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Curriculum

Based Assessment

Student Name: Eleanor Wyant
Beginning Date: 9/14/15
1. GATHER DATA
Component
Directions

Student Grade: 3-4


Ending Date:
Possible Resources

Outcomes/Comments

Teacher Interview
9/14

Select a student who needs help with


computation and discuss specific
areas of strengths and weaknesses.

Teacher Interview
Protocol
K371 CBA Project

Observation
9/21-9/28

Observe Target Student during math


instruction or math seatwork to
analyze how he/she approaches
computation.

K371 CBA Project

I am working in a 3rd-4th grade resource room at Van Buren


Elementary, Nashville IN. The student I have selected is a fourth grade
male who was referred to me by the resource room teacher for being
behind in basic computation. The teacher stated that they believe the
student is behind because they missed a significant amount of school
the previous year and because math is completed at the end of the day
when his ADHD medication is worn off to a degree. The teacher said
that the student has greatest difficulty with place value and
subtraction with regrouping (4 digit). The teacher said the students
strongest math area is addition, however still needs to use his fingers
to compute. Furthermore, she stated his automatic computation skills
are below average compared to other students and that the student
generally needs extra time. However, the student has shown
improvement this year. The teacher has noticed common patterns of
error having to due with basic computation and regrouping. The
student also has trouble solving word problems because he is a low
level reader. He has difficulty identifying the needed operation in the
word problem and needs step-by-step assistance. The teacher stated
that the student understands the underlying concepts of operations
(including multiplication and division), however not regrouping.

The student currently has an LD and OHI IEP. The special education
teacher suspects he also has dysgraphia because he writes his letters
and numbers the wrong direction.
9/21 I observed my student working in a small group in the back of the
general education classroom on a review assessment math packet. I
observed the student for thirty minutes working on the single digit by
single digit multiplication problem section. The student was able to

correctly solve the problems but needed to create repeated addition


images to solve each problem. The student showed strong
understanding of multiplication concepts, but didnt have strategies for
addition or multiplication to make the process more fluent. The
student showed a great deal of frustration sustaining attention to
complete the section of the test. The student took many breaks and
wanted to tell me about his weekend. At one point he laid his head on
the table because he didnt want to do the work anymore.

9/28 I observed my student working individually in the resource room
on a subtraction worksheet with 4 digit by 4 digit problems with
regrouping. The student had a hard time focusing in the room despite
the fact that it was silent. He asked to go to the bathroom and for
breaks multiple times during the 45-minute period we were together.
The student completed 8 of 10 problems in this period but did not get
a single problem correct. The student needed to draw tallies to aid is
subtraction of 1-digit minus 1-digit numbers in the problem. The
student consistently used tallies to solve even if the student only
needed to subtract 1. Furthermore, the student showed a
misunderstanding of regrouping. The student borrowed from the
current number he was supposed to be subtracting from and gave that
one to the number to the right instead of vise versa. He basically
flipped the correct order of the regrouping process. The student also
wrote many of his numbers the wrong direction. This is a common
issue. The special education teacher suspects he says Dysgraphia.

9/28 I also interviewed the student today regarding his perceptions of
math and his math abilities. The student reported that math is a little
hard for him, especially getting down the basic facts. He said his
biggest struggles are regrouping and division problems. However, the
student said that he hasnt noticed any pattern in the types of mistakes
he makes when solving these types of problems. The student said his
strongest areas of math include addition and subtraction without
regrouping and multiplication. The student reported that he enjoys
word problems, especially creating his own. The student gave me a few
examples of addition and subtraction word problems. The student said
he doesnt get anxious about math and thinks he is improving. He

Work Samples

Collect samples of student work for


analysis.

If work samples are not


available, create
worksheets to collect
samples of students
work.

prefers to work in Ms. Duncans (Resource Room) instead of the


general education classroom because it is quieter and he can focus
better.


Base Ten Worksheet
4 digit by 4 digit subtraction with regrouping worksheet
(See Attached)

2. ASSESS STUDENT NEEDS


Error Analysis
Score and analyze student work.
Summary/Conclusion Using all data gathered on student,
determine the focus of your
intervention.

Error Analysis Worksheet


K371 CBA Project
Background Data Analysis
Worksheet

(See Attached)
Background Data Analysis Worksheet (See attached)

The most evident pattern of need communicated by my teacher and
observed by myself is subtraction with regrouping. The student does
not demonstrate understanding of the regrouping process; this could
be linked to a misunderstanding of place value, which was also
mentioned as an area of weakness by my host teacher.
The student demonstrates this misunderstanding by borrowing from
the current number he is supposed to be subtracting from and gives
that one to the number to the right instead of vise versa (borrowing a
ten from the number to the right). The student basically flips the
correct order of the standard algorithm regrouping process. The fact
that the student borrows a ten from the ones place demonstrates a
misunderstanding of the role of place value in the regrouping process.
When the student is required to regroup he makes basic computation
errors, when the problem does not require regrouping the student
generally does not make computation errors.

3. CREATE INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN


Select strategies
Find one or two evidence based
strategies to use as you instruct your

What Works
Clearinghouse

Strategy: CRA (Concrete-Representational-Abstract) for Subtraction


with Regrouping

Lesson planning

student.

Interventioncentral.org
Cooperating teacher
IU supervisor
K352 Resources

Establish a plan to work with your


student

Cooperating teacher
IU supervisor

Source: http://www.ernweb.com/educational-research-
articles/teaching-subtraction-with-regrouping-borrowingusing-a-
concrete-representational-abstract-sequence/ & Huron Intermediate
School District

Rational: I want to use CRA evidenced based strategy with my student
because it builds off of his previous knowledge. The student shows an
understanding of the subtraction process when using manipulatives. I
want to start here with my student and then use his knowledge of
visually subtracting to connect to the process to regrouping in the
standard algorithm. The CRA method is built on students conceptually
understanding subtraction first, and then introducing the algorithm
using the students visual knowledge of the concept.

Standard: 4.C.1: Add and subtract multi-digit whole numbers fluently
using a standard algorithmic approach.
I will work for 30 minutes once a week for 5 weeks with the student
following the below lesson plan schedule: (Lesson plans attached)

10/19- Subtracting 4-digit numbers with base ten blocks (Regrouping)
10/26- Subtracting 4-digit numbers using pictures (Regrouping)
11/2- Teach the Standard Algorithm connecting regrouping with base
ten blocks/images
11/9- Create Standard Algorithm steps for student to reference and
practice algorithm with 4-digit subtraction with regrouping
11/16- Review and practice algorithm with 4 digit subtraction with
regrouping

4. MONITOR PROGRESS
Establish baseline
Create and administer to your target
student three single skill probes
aligned with your instructional plan

K371 CBA Project

10/12 My 3 probes consisted of nine 4-digit by 4-digit subtraction


problems. Due to the students age and complexity of the computation
the student was given six minutes per probe. The student completed
one problem on the first probe, three on the second, and two on the
third.

10/16 The median score for correct digit scoring on my students
probes is 3. I used this information to establish my goal and baseline. I

Create Graph

Week 1

Week 2

Use the BIG formula to establish a


K371 CBA Project
goal. Plot the baseline and goal. Draw
an aimline. Label graph.
Provide evidence-based instruction.
Administer probes, update data
chart, and analyze progress.
Provide evidence-based instruction.
Administer probes, update data
chart, and analyze progress.

Week 3

Provide evidence-based instruction.


Administer probes, update data
chart, and analyze progress.

Week 4

Provide evidence-based instruction.


Administer probes, update data
chart, and analyze progress.

K371 CBA Project


Hosp & Hosp Ch. 7
Intervention Central

did this by adding my students median score to the weekly increase


(for 5 weeks of intervention). I found the increase by multiplying the 5
weeks of intervention by the 1.15 the ambitious weekly growth rate for
a 4th grader (Hosp. pg. 109). I used the ambitious instead of the realistic
growth rate because I need my student to be in the 50-75% norm
range (Hosp. pg. 111) for a fourth grader by the end of the fall. Since
my student scored very low on the probes I need to provide an
ambitious intervention that gets his performance back to that 50-75%
range. Therefore, the rounded goal I got for my student is 9 correct
digits by week 5.

See attached graph and above steps.

10/12 Did not start instruction this week because student was unable
to complete probes within given math class time
10/19- Subtracting 4-digit numbers with base ten blocks (Regrouping)

Students median score stayed the same as original probes. This is
because the method focused on today was about conceptually
understanding subtraction and not focused on fluency. I suspect
students score to start moving up next week when I begin to build in
quicker strategies such as drawing the regrouping process.

10/26- Subtracting 4-digit numbers using pictures (Regrouping) &
began connecting to the standard algorithm

Student finished 3 total problems on the probes (1 per probe) and got
an entire answer correct on each probe. This led him to move up
slightly to an average of 4 correct digits. Student is showing
improvement by using pictures and the standard algorithm to increase
his fluency.

11/2- Teach the Standard Algorithm connecting regrouping with base
ten blocks/images

Week 5

Provide evidence-based instruction.


Administer probes, update data
chart, and analyze progress.

Week 6

Provide evidence-based instruction.


Administer probes, update data
chart, and analyze progress.

Student was able to use his general knowledge of the standard


algorithm and drawn pictures to improve his probe score. The student
got an average of 5 correct digits on the probes. The student is
showing improvement.

11/9- Create Standard Algorithm steps for student to reference and
practice algorithm with 4-digit subtraction with regrouping

Student furthered solidified his knowledge of the standard algorithm
steps. However, the student had only slight improvement with an
average correct digit score of 5.3. I believe this is because he became
distracted during the probes by a noisy group working close by and
noisy outside transitions. The student has ADHD and therefore is
distracted easily. Next week I will make sure we are in a quieter
environment and will further review the standard algorithm steps.
11/16- Review and practice algorithm with 4 digit subtraction with
regrouping

This week we reviewed the students errors on previously completed 4
digit subtraction problems with regrouping. We used our standard
algorithm and regrouping steps to check our work. Through this
process we were able to catch the students common error borrowing
from the wrong place value. The student was able to use the steps on
his probes. The student greatly improved from the previous week
earning an average of 8.6 correct digits on the probes. This is just
slightly below our 9 digit ambitious CBA goal. The intervention proved
successful.