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Names:

Probability in Games:
Rubric for Final Artifact
Level

Game
Design
Objectives:

Communicate effectively in a presentation

Evaluate the presentations of other students

Work as a team towards a common goal

Game is not original,


or is plagiarized.
Game does not
follow specifications
in launch letter.

Game contains
original ideas that
may need to be
expanded on. Some
specifications in the
launch letter may not
be met.

Game shows
originality and is
entertaining and
creative. Game
meets all
requirements.

Game does not


implement any
concepts of
probability covered in
class, or implements
them in an irrelevant
or hackneyed way

Game implements
concepts of
probability covered in
class in a somewhat
engaging way.

Game implements
concepts of
probability covered
in class in a creative
and engaging way.

Rule book is
completely
confusing, excludes
most important
details and general
information about the
game, grammar is
illegible. OR rule
book is missing
completely.

Rule book is
somewhat confusing,
may or may not
exclude important
details of the games
rules (number of
players, safety
concerns, age
recommendations,
etc). Grammar
mistakes are evident
but not ubiquitous.

Rule book is easy to


follow,
grammatically
correct, includes
visuals, and
explains all aspects
of the games rules.

Prototype is
completely missing
or is missing most

Prototype may be
missing some
required pieces.

Prototype has all


pieces required for
a game included.

TEKS:
English Language Arts and Reading
(24) Listening and Speaking/Listening
(25) Listening and Speaking/Speaking
(26) Listening and Speaking/Teamwork.

Implementation of probability
Objectives:

Calculate the probability of an event

Distinguish between permutation and combinations

Determine whether an event is independent or not

Calculate the probability of an event with replacement


and an event without replacement

Calculate the expected value of a random variable

Explain the concept of interdependent decision


making or game theory and identify it in everyday life

Use critical thinking skills to argue for an optimal


strategy

Apply independence in contextual problems to


calculate probability of a given event

Use probabilities to justify decisions about risk

Calculate expected value to analyze mathematical


fairness, risk, and payoff
TEKS:
Geometry
(1) Mathematical process standards. (A-G)
(13) Probability. (A-E)
Advanced Quantitative Reasoning
(4) Probabilistic and statistical reasoning. (E-F)
Discrete mathematics
(6) Game (or competition) theory. (A, C, E-F, H-J)
Statistics
(5) Probability and random variables. (A-D)

Rule book
Objectives:

Write a multi-step process

Write a set of instructions

Review and edit other students writing

Make edits of their own writing based on feedback


TEKS:
English Language Arts and Reading
(13) Writing/Writing Process. (A-E)

Prototype game
Objectives:

Names:

Communicate effectively in a presentation


Evaluate the presentations of other students
Work as a team towards a common goal

pieces. Pieces are


shoddily constructed.

Pieces may be
constructed poorly.

Pieces(or
representations
thereof) are
constructed well.

Concepts are not


explained clearly
and/or inaccurately,
and it is confusing
how they tie into the
game. It is clear that
the student does not
understand the
concepts behind the
game.

Concepts are
explained sufficiently,
with few mistakes.
Explanations may be
ambiguous or
irrelevant.

Concepts are
explained in depth
and correctly, and
ties the concepts to
how the game is
designed.

There are major


mistakes in the
calculations or no
calculations at all.
Many possible
events are missing.

There may be minor


mistakes in the
calculations of
probabilities, or some
may be missing.

Each possible event


is clear and
organized and the
probability of each
event is calculated
correctly. Takes into
account the
independence or
dependence of the
events.

No attempt at testing
their game design
was made.

May be missing
important details or
explanations.

Explains which type


of testing is used
and why. Explains
advantages and
disadvantages to
their chosen testing
method. Addresses

TEKS:
Geometry
(1) Mathematical process standards. (A-G)
English Language Arts and Reading
(24) Listening and Speaking/Listening
(25) Listening and Speaking/Speaking
(26) Listening and Speaking/Teamwork.

Probability
Background on the concepts the game is based on
Objectives:

Use critical thinking skills to argue for an optimal


strategy

Apply independence in contextual problems to


calculate probability of a given event

Use probabilities to justify decisions about risk

Calculate expected value to analyze mathematical


fairness, risk, and payoff

Communicate arguments using precise mathematical


language via oral communication or written
communication
TEKS:
Geometry
(1) Mathematical process standards. (A-G)
(13) Probability.

List of possible events and the probability of each


event
Objectives:

Use critical thinking skills to argue for an optimal


strategy

Apply independence in contextual problems to


calculate probability of a given event

Use probabilities to justify decisions about risk

Calculate expected value to analyze mathematical


fairness, risk, and payoff

Communicate arguments using precise mathematical


language via oral communication or written
communication
TEKS:
Geometry
(1) Mathematical process standards. (A-G)
(13) Probability. (A-E)
Advanced Quantitative Reasoning
(4) Probabilistic and statistical reasoning. (E-F)
Discrete mathematics
(6) Game (or competition) theory. (A, C, E-F, H-J)
Statistics
(5) Probability and random variables. (A-D)

Testing Design
Objectives:

Distinguish between observational studies, surveys,


and experiments

Design an experiment to test their game


TEKS:

Names:
Statistics
(2) Statistical process sampling and experimentation. (A-F)
(4) Categorical and quantitative data. (A-F)

Analysis of results and implementation of feedback


Objectives:

Analyze data by interpreting results


TEKS:
Statistics
(2) Statistical process sampling and experimentation. (A-F)
(4) Categorical and quantitative data. (A-F)

possible future
testing.
Insufficient analysis.
Did not implement
feedback to improve
their game design.

Does not include


important details
about analysis.
Graphical
representation is
insufficient or
missing. Sample size
may be
inappropriate.

Includes data,
sample size and
graphical
representation.
Interprets results
and feedback and
ties in finding to
further editing the
game. Used
appropriate sample
size or number of
trials.