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Item 1: Active Play and Games

Item:
An outline for a game that would be suitable for early primary students. This game
must incorporate ability and inclusion concerns.
Evidence:

(Australian Sports Commission, 2008).


Description:
An active replicated game for lower primary aged students where they are required to
duplicate the movements of a kangaroo, similar to the classic British Bulldogs. Students are
requested to either skip or hop, centred on the movements of a kangaroo jumping.
Explanation:
This active play and game is a variation of The Yulunga, a traditional indigenous
game, which was established to offer all Australians with more appreciation of indigenous
culture by celebrating the games that Indigenous Australians have been playing across the
country for hundreds of years (Australian Sports Commission, 2008).
This resource allows children to participate in Health and Physical Education through
collaboration and team work, in a fun and healthy way. This resource allows children to use
imaginative play and caters for all ability and inclusion concerns. This game enables

involvement by all children, but keeping in mind that no one child is obligated to participate
beyond their level of skills (Swinburne Online, 2015). This is why there are game play and
basic rules as well as many variations of this activity. Modifications can be made to
incorporate ability and inclusion for all. Some modifications that could be implemented are
for example, the playing area could be more or less, being adjusted to the ability of the
children. The children jump or hop like kangaroos, keeping their legs together, if some
students find this difficult they could step and hop or gallop step.
This game is associated with replication play, offering openings for children to try out
roles in society and experience activities from the perspective of different cultures (Briggs &
Hansen, 2012). This resource is also linked within the Australian Curriculums, crosscurriculum priorities of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures.
Teaching strategies implemented here are to be a positive and enthusiastic role model.
Smith and Cestro (1998), state that you should lead by example, by displaying yourself as
living the active lifestyle you teach about and that no motivation is stronger to want to
participate in and enjoy your physical education lesson.
Whilst I was on my professional practicum experience, I always participated in active
play with the students. I always encouraged the students and invited all to participate. For
example during lunch time play, the children liked to have a kick of the football, I was
thrilled when they asked if I wanted to join in.
Analysis:
Benefits of this resource are that active play and games are an important part of
childhood development, supporting the establishment of both physical and social skills
(Swinburne Online, 2015). This resource also incorporates many general capabilities in the
Australian Curriculum for example critical and creative thinking and personal and social
capability as well as the cross curriculum priority of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

Histories and Cultures (ACARA, 2014). Another benefit of this resource is it can be
combined with more learning of the cross curriculum priorities such as the word kangaroo
appears to have originated from a word (gangarru) in the language of the Gouguyimithirr
people in the (Wahalumbaal) Endeavour River area of North Queensland (Australian Sports
Commission, 2008).
A Limitation to this resource could be the problem solving component. This game
activity will enhance students ability on how to outwit the opposition (Doherty & Brennan,
2012), but only if the students have the adequate problem solving skills.
The content of the resource is based on the content descriptor of the learning area in
the Australian Curriculum as Health and physical education / Foundation / Movement and
Physical Activity / Learning through movement (ACPMP014) and (ACPMP012), (Australian
Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority [ACARA], 2014), Health and physical
education / Foundation / Movement and Physical Activity / Moving our body (ACPMP009)
and Health and physical education / Foundation / Movement and Physical Activity /
Understanding movement (ACPMP011), (ACARA, 2014).
Item 2: Challenge and Adventure Activities
Item:
An outline of a physical activity for middle primary students which requires
cooperation and problem solving.
Evidence:

(TES Australia, 2013).

Description:
A physical activity scavenger hunt for middle primary aged students which requires
cooperation and problem solving skills.
Explanation:
Children will be provided with a map outlining the details of their hunt. Their boat has
been shipwrecked and they must in teams look at the map and gather all the sporting
equipment that is required being five skipping ropes, four balls of any type and three gym
mats.
Each team needs to set out the scavenged sporting equipment. Each island represents
a different side of the sporting oval. As an alternative and weather not permitting, this could
be conducted in the gymnasium also.
As a team the students must develop a plan of action and all of the team must cross to
the other side of the island using only the equipment they have scavenged for, taking into
consideration factors like will all the team members go over at once or take it in turns?. Once
the students have reached the other side of the island they need to collect the treasure chest,
then they need to make their way back across the other side to their shipwrecked boat.
This resource is providing a challenge for the students, for example working in teams
and problem solving, e.g. orienteering, which takes advantage of developing social and
cognitive skills (Swinburne Online, 2015).
The teaching strategy that would be applied here would be convergent discovery,
which encourages more independent problem solving. In this scenario the resource is
designed for a stimulus to formerly unfamiliar questions, in which the students answer the
problem, through reasoning, inquiring and logic thought. Through this progression the
students will be involved in a sense of adventure and discovery and stimulate rational,
consecutive problem solving skills (Meldrum and Peters, 2012).

In my past experience back in primary school, we conducted a similar scavenger hunt,


which forced our team to cooperate with one another, listening to each others strategies and
ideas, it also gave students who werent necessarily friends to open up and share ideas to
problem solve their way through the hunt. It also gave the students an opportunity to select a
team captain who they believe would be a good leader in the given scenario. It taught me how
to solve problems within a team and how to overcome challenges for a successful outcome
(Doherty and Brennan, 2012).
Analysis:
A benefit of this resource is its a challenge and adventure activity which is utilised
within problem solving and can be easily adapted for higher and lower abilities. Benefits of
this resource are also to stimulate, to inspire and to influence every student to be active, and
the opportunity to stand up and be heard, with their opinions and strategies. More so for the
students that are less likely to do so in a formal classroom environment.
Limitations to this resource could be that not all students orienteering skills are
developed, which would only hinder the more quieter students as opposed to the more
adventurous and outspoken students. This is where the grouping or teaming of members and
team captains would play a crucial role.
The content of the resource is based on the content descriptor of the learning area in
the Australian Curriculum as Health and physical education Years 3 and 4 / Movement and
Physical Activity / Learning through movement (ACPMP049) (Australian Curriculum,
Assessment and Reporting Authority [ACARA], 2014), Years 3 and 4 / Movement and
Physical Activity / Moving our body (ACPMP043) and (ACPMP045), Years 3 and 4 /
Personal, Social and Community Health / Being healthy, safe and active (ACPPS033)
(ACARA, 2014).
Item 3: Group Games and Sports

Item:
An outline for a lesson for upper primary students based on an organised sport. This
lesson must incorporate both ICT and ability and inclusion concerns.
Evidence:

(Kaiser, 2015).
Description:
A sports timer which is a unique application available from the
iTunes store. It is a photo finish Information and communications technology (ICT) that uses
the same practices as the fully programmed timing equipment used at the Olympics. This
resource is for upper primary aged students to utilise throughout Athletics.
Explanation:
This resource application will be utilised through Athletics during the term. It works
by starting the timer and pointing the camera towards the finish line. The application creates
an image where you can scroll to get the time for each individual competitor. SprintTimer
also includes a motion activated Video Finish for longer races and a Start Sender for
wirelessly controlling SprintTimer from another device (Kaiser, 2015).
SprintTimer is used by coaches, teachers and athletes all over the world for practice
and competition in, for example, track & field, cycling, skiing, speed skating, car racing,

rowing, kayaking, horses or greyhound racing. This unique application has various benefits
and a preferred benefit over a physical stop watch for example it has a one person can time all
participants feature, higher accuracy, easier to determine order, the images and the results can
be saved, can be operated hands free and the timer can be started manually with a sound or
remotely from another device (Kaiser, 2015).
By incorporating Information and communication technology in athletics, it provides
opportunities for greater involvement by students. It can be utilised as a support within the
lesson or as a tool for coaching, which in this resource it has been effectively integrated into
health and physical education. It could also help students to evaluate their individual and
peer performances and develop their skills. This is a creative way when approaching teaching
and learning in physical education, as its purpose is to improve the students learning, building
on what they have accomplished prior, but in a more meaningful, creative and powerful way
(Williams, 2011).
OfSTED (2009b), claims that Information communication technology has a positive
impact on the wellbeing and personal development of students, as well as contributing
significantly towards their ability to work both independently and cooperatively. This
resource would be very beneficial in ensuring all ability and inclusions concerns are met. For
example it can be valuable using information communication technology when catering for
students who have English as an additional language to aid their construction of sentences, as
well as supporting inclusive learning for students with learning difficulties and or disabilities,
because of the useful, simple and visual aspect of the resource (Williams, 2011).
This resource allows for the students to be competitive against themselves and
concentrating on the pleasure and partaking factor, utilising a resource that is engaging and
intriguing, ensuring that all student are able to be involved and not feel vulnerable or
degraded by their lack of skills in athletics. The resource is primarily to inspire individual

effort and performance, evolving the childrens sense of self-worth, accountability and being
trusted with the information communication technology equipment, and in this scenario the
schools iPads (Swinburne Online, 2015).
On my professional practicum experience, I observed how intrigued and interested the
students where when they got to utilise information communication technology whether it be
the computers, iPads or the interactive whiteboard. Their sense of pride and enjoyment
automatically heightened, especially in the children that where more disadvantaged, and
didnt have access to such information communication technology equipment at home.
Analysis:
Benefits of this resource are that within the Australian curriculum, information
communication technology is a general capability which must be engaged with across all
learning disciplines. This resource can be adapted and applied in many different contexts to
any of the group games and sports being taught throughout the year, not just this one domain
of athletics.
Limitations to this resource is that the school may not have access to iPads or this
application, in which case the resource couldnt be utilised to aid the learning and
development of athletics.
The content of the resource is based on the content descriptor of the learning area in
the Australian Curriculum as Health and physical education Years 5 and 6 / Movement and
Physical Activity / Moving our body (ACPMP061) and (ACPMP063) (Australian
Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority [ACARA], 2014), Years 5 and 6 /
Movement and Physical Activity / Understanding movement (ACPMP064) (ACARA, 2014).

References
Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority [ACARA]. Foundation
to year 10 curriculum: Retrieved from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/health-andphysical-education/curriculum/f-10?layout=1#cdcode=ACPPS022&level=1-2

Australian Sports Commission. (n.d.). Jumping Games. Retrieved December 21,


2015, from
http://www.ausport.gov.au/participating/resources/indigenous/individual_games/other_games
/kangaroo.pdf
Briggs, M., & Hansen, A. (2012). Play-based learning in the primary school. London:
SAGE.
Doherty, J., & Brennan, P. (2012). Physical Education and Development 3-11: A
Guide for Teachers. Hoboken: Taylor and Francis.
Kaiser, S. (n.d.). SprintTimer - Photo Finish. Retrieved December 29, 2015, from
https://itunes.apple.com/au/app/sprinttimer-photo-finish/id430807521?mt=8
Meldrum, K., & Peters, J. (2012). Learning To Teach Health and Physical Education.
Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson.
OfSTED, (2009b). The Importance of ICT: Information and Communication
Technology in Primary and Secondary Schools, 2005/2008. London: OfSTED.
Smith, T. and Cestaro, N.G (1998) Student-centred Physical Education. Champaign,
IL: Human Kinetics.
Swinburne Online. (n.d.). Module B: Topic 1: Active play and games. Retrieved
December 21, 2015, from https://ilearn.swin.edu.au/bbcswebdav/courses/2015-SO3EDU30014-210376/UnitLearningMaterials/module-b-topic-1.
Swinburne Online. (n.d.). Module B: Topic 2: Challenge and adventure activities.
Retrieved December 21, 2015, from https://ilearn.swin.edu.au/bbcswebdav/courses/2015SO3-EDU30014-210376/UnitLearningMaterials/module-b-topic-2.html
Swinburne Online. (n.d.). Module B: Topic 3: Group games and sports. Retrieved
December 23, 2015, from https://ilearn.swin.edu.au/bbcswebdav/courses/2015-SO3EDU30014-210376/UnitLearningMaterials/module-b-topic-3.html
TES Australia . (n.d.). Treasure Island. Retrieved December 21, 2015, from

http://www.tesaustralia.com/teaching-resource/Treasure-Island-6020070/
Williams, A. (2011). Primary PE unlocking the potential. Maidenhead, Berkshire,
England: Open University Press.