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Zachary Vincent

HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Portfolio Narrative
Zachary Vincent
12/06/15

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative
Economic/1A
Standards
SSUSH1 The student will describe European settlement in North America during the 17th
century.
a. Explain Virginias development, including the Virginia Company, tobacco cultivation,
b. Explain the development of the mid-Atlantic colonies, including the Dutch settlement of
New Amsterdam and subsequent English takeover, and the settlement of Pennsylvania.
(55-59)
c. Explain the reasons for French settlement of Quebec. (41)
d. Analyze the impact of location and place on colonial settlement, transportation, and
economic development; include the southern, middle and New England colonies.
SSUSH2 The student will trace the ways that the economy
a.
Explain the development of mercantilism and the trans-Atlantic trade. (75-76)
b. Describe the Middle Passage, growth of the African population and African-American
culture.
Narrative:
As the new world started to increase its presence in the world economy, with the Virginia
Company using its cash crop, tobacco, to sustain itself and provide Britain with financial
means. To raise these crops plantation owners would start using cheap laborers like indentured
servants to farm their land. Overseeing the Joint-Stock Companies, such as the Virginia
Company were given special privileges as long as they supported their country, which increased
the notion of mercantilism. European countries increasingly marked their presence here by
establishing colonies such as New Amsterdam by the Dutch. European countries wanted an
increased national presence in the colonies, which produced thousands of colonists here in the
colonies. The colonies became more economically independent from Britain, who at the time
controlled the thirteen colonies during the period of salutary neglect. The colonists wanted more
land to farm then they had at the current time, but there was a major French and Indian presence
west of the Appalachian Mountains. After the French-Indian war Britain signed the
Proclamation of 1763 that forbade colonists from expanding past the Appalachian Mountains. In
the process of winning war Britain spent a lot of their resources and the colonists were looked at
the colonies to supply compensation with an abundance of taxes on goods.
Terms:
Navigation Acts
Cash Crop
Stamp Act
Virginia Company
New Amsterdam
Indentured Servant
Northwest Passage
Joint Stock Company
Boston Tea Party
Mercantilism
Proclamation of 1763
Triangular Slave Trade
Intolerable Acts

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative
Social/1A
Standards
SSUSH1 The student will describe European settlement in North America during the 17th
century.
e. Describe the settlement of New England including religious reasons and religious
tensions that led to colonies such as Rhode Island, the half-way covenant, Salem Witch
Trials, and the loss of Massachusetts charter.
SSUSH2 The student will trace the ways that the society of British North America
developed.
c. Identify Benjamin Franklin as a symbol of social mobility and individualism. (78,124)
d. Explain the significance of the Great Awakening
SSUSH3 The student will explain the primary causes of the American Revolution.
a.
Explain colonial response to such British actions as the Proclamation of 1763, the
Stamp Act, and the Intolerable Acts as seen in Sons and Daughters of Liberty and
Committees of Correspondence.
Narrative:
At the end of the 17th century victims of religious persecution flocked to the New World in seek
of religious freedom for themselves. Religious groups such as Puritans, Pilgrims, and Quakers
set up colonies based on their religious customs. Both the Pilgrims and Puritans had strict gender
roles. These colonies prospered for a period, but due strict daily routine, many people strayed
from their religion, this inspired the creation of the Half-Way Covenant, which focused on
regaining members from future generations. The Salem Witch Trials, in which innocent women
were killed because they were suspected of witchcraft, can be looked at as evidence for why
religion and government should be separated.
Terms:
Great Awakening
Half-way Covenant
Puritans

Quakers
Pilgrims/Separatist
Salem Witch Trials

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative
Political/1A
Standards
SSUSH1 The student will describe European settlement in North America during the 17th
century.
Explain Virginias development, including relationships with Native Americans such as
Powhatan, development of the House of Burgesses and Bacons Rebellion.
Describe the settlement of New England including the establishment of town meetings
and development of a legislature
SSUSH3 The student will explain the primary causes of the American Revolution.
Explain how the end of Anglo-French imperial competition as seen in the French and
Indian War and the 1763 Treaty of Paris laid the groundwork for the American Revolution.
Explain the importance of Thomas Paines Common Sense to the movement for
independence.
Narrative:
During early colonization, the colonies were self- governed colonies under the rule of Britain.
With the establishment of the Mayflower Compact and the House of Burgesses you can see the
beginnings of a democracy. The problem of these self- governed colonies was that there was
really no defense or efficient way of handling problems so when Bacons Rebellion happened
there wasnt really a solution to the problem. With the mixture of Proprietary Colonies and
Royal Colonies there was always a mix of interests. After the French-Indian War there was an
end to Salutary Neglect and all of the colonies were under the control by royal governors to
enforce taxes set upon by the King to pay for the damage of the war. Benjamin Franklins
Albany Plan of the Union was published to convince the colonists to come together to fend off
the taxes forced upon them. In response to the sugar act angered colonists set the Boston Tea
Party on the way to Revolution.
Terms:
Bacons Rebellion
House of Burgesses
King Phillips War
Mayflower Compact
Powhatan
Proprietary Colony
Royal Colony
Salutary Neglect
First Continental Congress
French and Indian War

Treaty of Paris 1763


Proclamation of 1763
Intolerable Acts
Pontiacs Rebellion
Albany Plan of the Union
Committees of Correspondence
Common Sense
Quartering Acts
Townshend Act
Boston Tea Party

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Political/1B
Standards
SSUSH3 The student will explain the primary causes of the American Revolution
a. Explain the importance of Thomas Paines Common Sense to the movement for
independence.(111)
b. Explain the reason for and significance of the French alliance and foreign assistance and
the roles of Benjamin Franklin and the Marquis de Lafayette. (120)
c. Analyze George Washington as a military leader, including the creation of a professional
military and the life of a common soldier, crossing the Delaware River, and Valley Forge.
(109, 118)
d. Explain Yorktown, the role of Lord Cornwallis and the Treaty of Paris, 1783. (124-125)
SSUSH5 The student will explain specific events and key ideas that brought about the
adoption and implementation of the United States Constitution.
a. Explain how weaknesses in the Articles of Confederation and Daniel Shays Rebellion
led to a call for a stronger central government. (140-141)
b. Evaluate the major arguments of the anti-Federalists and Federalists during the debate on
ratification of (151-152, 143) the Constitution as put forth in The Federalists Papers
concerning form of government, factions, checks and balances, and the power of the
executive, including the roles of Alexander Hamilton and James Madison.
c. Explain the key features of the Constitution, specifically the Great Compromise,
separation of powers, limited government, and the issue of slavery. (146-148)
d. Analyze how the Bill of Rights serves as a protector of individual and states rights. (153)
Explain the importance of the Presidencies of George Washington and John Adams; include the
Whiskey Rebellion, non-intervention in Europe, and the development of political parties
(Alexander Hamilton) (192)
STANDARD 6: Analyze the nature of territorial and population growth, and its impact in
the early decades of the new nation.
a. Explain the Northwest Ordinances importance in the westward migration of Americans,
on slavery, public education, and the addition of new states. (p. 137)
b. Describe Jeffersons diplomacy in obtaining the Louisiana Purchase from France and the
territorys exploration by Lewis and Clark. (p. 208-209)
c. Explain major reasons for the War of 1812 and the wars significance on the development
of a national identity. (p. 214-219)
Narrative:
In 1775, the first shots of the American Revolution were fired at Concord. The colonists were
tired of the taxes implanted on them by the British government such as the Stamp Act and the
Intolerable Acts. These acts were among the numerous reasons for the revolution, and under
George Washingtons leadership the Continental Army was preparing for the British army

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Thomas Paines pamphlet Common Sense inspired colonists to declare and fight for
independence. The colonists were fighting the British Empire, who was well trained and
tremendous on the battlefield, and the colonists needed tremendous support to fight the redcoats.
The support also came from the French, after the Battle of Saratoga in which the colonists
defeated the British. The French supporting the colonists was a big turning point in the war, and
after the victory at Yorktown, the colonists had successfully defeated the British. Along with the
freedom that came with being independent, came the struggle of building a government. There
was a lot of disagreement with how the government should be structured and with the Articles of
Confederation, becoming our first official constitution, the arguments continued. Under the
Articles of Confederation most of the power was given to the states while the central government
was left with minimal control over the government.
Terms:

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Shays Rebellion

First Continental Congress

Federalist

Militia

Anti-Federalist

Second Continental Congress

Checks and balances

Natural Rights

Great Compromise

Virginia Plan

Separation of powers

New Jersey Plan

Bill of Rights

Popular sovereignty

Limited Government

Electoral college

Cabinet

Whiskey Rebellion

Valley Forge

Precedent

Saratoga/Yorktown

Loose Construction

Treaty of Paris 1783

Strict Construction

Constitutional Convention

XYZ Affair

Three Fifths Compromise

Alien and Sedition Acts

Democratic Republican Party

Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions

Federalists Party

Impressment

Stamp Act

War Hawks

Intolerable Acts

War of 1812

Sons of Liberty

Judicial review

Committees of Correspondence

Marbury V Madison

Common Sense

Mercenaries

Bicameral Congress

Manumission

Anti Federalists

Unicameral legislature

Boston Massacre

Ratification

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Loyalist

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Economic/1B
Standards
Narrative:
After the American Revolution, the United States banks were run by the states, because there
was no federal government financial institution under the Articles of Confederation. Also under
the Articles of Confederation the government could not collect taxes and each state had different
trade rules. Since there was no federal bank, there was also no federal currency, which meant
there were different exchange rates going from state to state. After the adoption of the
Constitution, federal governments role in economy expanded and Alexander Hamilton instituted
the nations first financial system. The First National Bank established a national currency and
gave handouts to businesses. The U.S. government put a tariff on British goods to help the
American economy by stimulating economic growth in businesses. This tariff hurt the south, as
they were still dependent on British goods since they primarily produced cash crops such as
tobacco and cotton. Hamiltons ideal of a strong capitalistic economy still holds true to United
States economy today.
Terms:
Federalists

Anti-Federalist

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Land Ordinance 1785

Northwest Ordinance 1787

Stamp Act

Tariff

Lewis and Clark Expedition

Social/1B
Standards
SSUSH3 The student will explain the primary causes of the American Revolution
e. Explain the importance of Thomas Paines Common Sense to the movement for
independence.(111)
f. Explain the key features of the Constitution, specifically the issue of slavery. (146-148)
g. Analyze how the Bill of Rights serves as a protector of individual rights.
STANDARD 6: Analyze the nature of territorial and population growth, and its impact in
the early decades of the new nation.
a. Explain the Northwest Ordinances importance in the westward migration of Americans,
on slavery, public education.
b. Explain the War of 1812 and the wars significance on the development of a national
identity. (p. 214-219)
Narrative:

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

After the American Revolution, Americans did not wrong a strong central government and for
the government to develop king-like powers. So when it was time to adopt a Constitution, we
ratified the Articles of Confederation, which had no central government to develop the kinglike powers that Americans feared. After the failure of the Articles of Confederation, the United
States ratified a new constitution which involved more government but also helped protect
slavery, with the addition of the Fugitive Slave act, which mandated that runaway slaves be
returned back to their masters plantation and the Three-Fifths compromise which made each
slave Three-Fifths of a person when it came to counting population. However, the Northwest
Ordinance was passed which banned slavery in areas granted statehood in the land provided.
Also under the Northwest Ordinance, for every 16th plot of land sold, that money was set aside
for public education, which set a precedent for higher education in the Midwest.
Terms:
Stamp Act

Sons of Liberty

Common Sense

Popular sovereignty

Three Fifths Compromise

Intolerable Acts

Whiskey Rebellion

Loyalist

Political/2A
Standards

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

STANDARD 6: Analyze the nature of territorial and population growth, and its impact in
the early decades of the new nation.
a. Describe the reasons for and importance of the Monroe Doctrine. (p. 246)
SSUSH8 The student will explain the relationship between growing north-south divisions
and westward expansion.
a. Explain the Missouri Compromise and the issue of slavery in western states and territories.
(p. 242- 246, 233 238)
b. Describe the Nullification Crisis and the emergence of states rights ideology; include the
role of John C. Calhoun and development of sectionalism. (p. 255 259)
c. Describe the war with Mexico and the Wilmot Proviso.(p. 305 315)
d. Explain how the Compromise of 1850 arose out of territorial expansion and population
growth. (p. 324 329)
Narrative:
In response to the French and the Spanish trying to reclaim its lost territory in Latin America,
President James Monroe issued the Monroe Doctrine in 1823, which was a written document
that declared that the western hemisphere would not be furthered colonized by European Powers.
Even though the United States of America did not have the military force to enforce the
Doctrine, it showed Americas desire for more power. In 1824, Andrew Jackson was elected
president, which began the Age of Jackson. Even though he did not have a clear platform to run
by, he was elected because he was a war hero from Tennessee. Quickly, he developed king-like
powers, believing in the Spoils system, where he would give jobs to his supporters and not to
qualified individuals. Also, he passed the Indian Removal Act, where he forcibly removed
Southeastern Native Americans to the west, known as the Trail of Tears. His Tariff of
Abominations invoked tariffs on imported goods, which the south relied on. South Carolina led
by John C. Calhoun threatened to secede if the tariff wasnt nullified, thus leading to the
Nullification Crisis. Jackson threatened to use federal troops to shut down the treat of
nullification. Jackson nullified the tariff and South Carolina did not secede.
Terms:

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Adams-Onis Treaty

Mexican American War

Monroe Doctrine

Wilmot Provisio

Spoils System

American system

Indian Removal Act

Whig

Trail of Tears

Freedman

Jacksonian Democracy (Age of Jackson)

Lone Star Republic

Compromise of 1850

Alamo

Missouri Compromise

Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo

Nat Turners Rebellion

Tariff of Abominations

Nullification Crisis

Secede

Sectionalism

Fugitive Slave Act


Marbury v. Madison

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Economic/2A
Standards
STANDARD 6: Analyze the nature of territorial and population growth, and its impact in
the early decades of the new nation.
b. Describe the construction of the Erie Canal, the rise of New York City, and the development
of the nations infrastructure. (p. 228-230)
STANDARD 7: Explain the process of economic growth, its regional and national impact
in the first half of the 19th century, and the different responses to it.
c. Explain the impact of the Industrial Revolution as seen in Eli Whitneys invention of the
cotton gin and his development of interchangeable parts for muskets. (p. 231-232, 236)
Narrative:
During the early 19th century, the United States went through an industrial revolution, which
was mainly centered on improvements to the agrarian society, as well as transportation. The
adaption of the steam engine on boats made transporting goods north and south on the
Mississippi River easier. The current was rough, and without a steam engine, shipping products
from farms in the south to factories in the north could take weeks. The creation of the Erie
Canal allowed for boats to travel from the Hudson River to Great Lakes. The creation of the Erie
Canal also reduced shipping costs and allowed for mass shipping of products. One of the main
products shipped on the Mississippi was cotton, but picking cotton was extensive work. So Eli
Whitney invented the cotton gin, which made work easier for the slaves and increased the
production of cotton. However, the increasing amount of production led to a higher demand for
slaves.

Terms:

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Turnpike

Cotton gin

National Road

American system

Erie Canal

Santa Fe trail

Industrial Revolution

Mountain Men

Interchangeable Parts

Oregon Trail

Lowell girl

California Gold Rush

Tariff of 1816

Forty-niners

Labor union

Tariff of Abominations
Gadsden Purchase

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Social/2A
Standards
a. Describe reform movements, specifically temperance, abolitionism, and public school. (p.
277, 278-280, 275)
b. Explain womens efforts to gain the suffrage, including Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the
Seneca Falls convention. (p. 286, 289, 290)
c. Explain Jacksonian Democracy, expanding the suffrage, the rise of popular political culture,
and the development of American nationalism.
SSUSH8 The student will explain the relationship between growing north-south
divisions and westward expansion.
a. Explain how slavery became a significant issue in American politics; include the slave
rebellion of Nat Turner and the Rise of Abolitionism (William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick
Douglass, and the Grimke sisters)( p. 278 285)
b. Explain the Missouri Compromise and the issue of slavery in western states and territories.
(p. 242- 246, 233 238)
Narrative:
Slavery was a hot topic prior to the Civil War. There was an Abolitionist Movement that was
gaining momentum, and it was a national debate to determine if slavery was constitutional.
Slavery was upheld after the passing of the Fugitive Slave Act that mandated all escaped slaves
were to be returned to their master. There also were other social movements, including the
Womens Movement, Suffrage Movement and the Temperance Movement. The Womens
Movement was the push to obtain suffrage for women. At the Seneca Falls Convention, they
wrote the Declaration of Sentiments, which helped gain support for the Suffrage Movement.
There was also a large movement of people westward. They heard reports of gold out west and
rode their wagons across the Santa Fe and Oregon Trail. These people were called Forty-niners,
as in 1849, and helped establish California as a state. As part of the Temperance Movement,
people pushed for the restriction or prohibition of alcohol.

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Terms:

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Nationalism

Revivalist

Transcendentalist

Mormon

Second Great Awakening

Utopian community

Temperance Movement

Freedman

Abolitionist Movement

Womens movement

Suffrage

Santa Fe trail

Seneca Falls Convention

Mountain Men

Manifest Destiny

Oregon Trail

Public School Reform

Hudson River School

Nat Turners Rebellion

Secede

Nullification Crisis

Fugitive Slave Act

Sectionalism

Declaration of Sentiments

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Political/2B
Standards
STANDARD 9: Identify key events, issues and individuals relating to the causes, course,
and consequences of the Civil War.
a. Explain the Kansas-Nebraska Act (334-336), the failure of popular sovereignty, Dred Scott
case (341), and John Browns Raid (344-345).
b. Describe President Lincolns efforts to preserve the Union as seen in his second inaugural
address and the Gettysburg speech and in his use of emergency powers, such as his decision
to suspend habeas corpus. (384-385)
c. Describe the role of Ulysses Grant (364), Robert E. Lee (361), Stonewall Jackson, William
T. Sherman (386), and Jefferson Davis (376).
d. Explain the importance of Fort Sumter (353), Antietam (368), Vicksburg (380-381),
Gettysburg (382-384), and the Battle for Atlanta (386-387).
e. Describe the significance of the Emancipation Proclamation. (368-369, 372)
f. Explain the importance of the growing economic disparity between the North and the South
through an examination of population, functioning railroads, and industrial output. (360-361)
STANDARD 10: Identify legal, political, and social dimensions of Reconstruction
a. Compare and contrast Presidential Reconstruction with Radical Republican Reconstruction.
(402-409)
b. Explain the impeachment of Andrew Johnson in relationship to Reconstruction. (407-408)
Analyze how the presidential election of 1876 and the subsequent Compromise of 1877
marked the end of Reconstruction.
Narrative:
During the late 1800s, the tensions between the north and the south were raging. Multiple
territories became de facto battlegrounds for the political rivalry between the north and the south,
such as the Nebraska territory. Congress passed the Kansas-Nebraska Act that led pro- and antislavery Americans to move to the region to participate in the popular sovereignty clause. This
led to violent actions by both sides, known as Bleeding Kansas. The southern states believed in
states rights, in which individual states rather than the federal government held rights. This
would mean slavery would remain legal in southern states. However, South Carolina declared
secession from the Union and attacked Fort Sumter. Other southern states joined South Carolina
in their fight to secede from the union. Sparking the Civil War, which lasted four years and lead

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

to the abolishment of slavery and the beginning of the Reconstruction period. Abraham had a
plan for the reconstruction of the South, in which he planned not to punish the south and instead
immediately allow them to rejoin the Union. However, he was assassinated and the Radical
Republicans created a stricter plan for the south, which was implemented until the election of
Rutherford B. Hayes in the 1876 Presidential Election.

Terms:
Kansas-Nebraska Act

Andrew Johnsons Impeachment

States Rights

Compromise of 1877

Secession

Lincolns Second Inaugural Address 1865

Emancipation Proclamation 1863

Bleeding Kansas

Thirteenth Amendment

Underground railroad

Fourteenth Amendment

Harpers Ferry

Fifteenth Amendment

Know Nothings

Impeach

Anaconda Plan

Gettysburg Address

Civil Rights Act of 1866

Sectionalism

Blockade

Habeas Corpus

Republican Party

Presidential Reconstruction

Copperhead

Radical Republican

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Economic/2B
Standards
g. Explain the importance of the growing economic disparity between the North and the South
through an examination of population, functioning railroads, and industrial output. (360-361)
Narrative:
In the years leading up to the Civil War, the norths economy, which was built mostly on
industry, was prospering. However, the south, whose economy was solely focused on agriculture,
flourished for a few but unfortunately was unreliable for the majority. In the north, there was an
influx of immigrants, which helped the population grow steadily. There also were thousands of
miles of track in the north that helped transport resources and people. A third of the population in
the south were slaves, and they were there to produce products and crops, such as tobacco and
cotton. After the Civil War in which slavery was abolished, the southern plantation owners turned
to sharecropping and tenant farming to help maintain plantations.

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Terms:

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Sharecropper
Tenant Farming

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Social/2B
Standards
STANDARD 9: Identify key events, issues and individuals relating to the causes, course,
and consequences of the Civil War.
a. Describe the significance of the Emancipation Proclamation. (368-369, 372)
b. Explain efforts to redistribute land in the South among the former slaves and
provide advanced education such as Morehouse College, and the Freedmens
Bureau. (415-416, 414)
c. Describe the significance of the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments. (391, 407, 409)
d. Explain Black Codes (405), the Ku Klux Klan (416-418), and other forms of
resistance to racial equality during Reconstruction. (422)
Narrative:
Before the civil war there was an abolition movement in the United States. Even though the war
wasnt started over slavery, it quickly turned into the war against slavery after Lincolns
Emancipation Proclamation. The Proclamation freed all slaves living in confederate states, and
was handed out or read to slaves by Union soldiers. After the war, the newly freed slaves were
given citizenship and the right to vote, but some southerners were upset about giving blacks this
right. They banned to together to form the Ku Klux Klan (KKK), which became one of the
most feared organizations by African-Americans. The KKK helped enforce black codes, which
kept blacks from using their newly granted rights. There was an effort to help the freed slaves to
adopt to society. This government-funded organization was called the Freedmans Bureau, and
they reunited families who were torn apart by slavery and also negotiated labor contracts
between blacks and their white landowners.
Terms:

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Popular Sovereignty
Dred Scott v. Sanford
Carpetbagger
Scalawag
Morehouse College
Black Codes
Ku Klux Klan
Emancipation Proclamation 1863

Political/3A
Standards

STANDARD 14: Explain Americas evolving relationship with the world at the turn of the
twentieth century.
a. Explain the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 and anti-Asian immigration sentiment on the
west coast. (523-524)
b.
c. Describe the rise of Jim Crow, Plessy v. Ferguson, and the emergence of the NAACP. (520522, 528, 565-567)
d. Explain Ida Tarbells role as a muckraker. (551)
e. Describe the significance of progressive reforms such as the initiative, the recall, and (554555) referendum direct election of senators; reform of labor laws; and efforts to improve
living conditions for the poor in cities. (578)

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

f. Describe the conservation movement and the development of national parks and forests;
include the role of Theodore Roosevelt
Narrative:
After the Reconstruction era, in which blacks were pushed into society, southerners drew up laws
in placed them into their governments, and they were meant to separate blacks from whites in
public areas such as, restaurants, buses, and restrooms. These laws were called Jim Crow Laws,
and were an evolution of the black codes. Southerners also kept blacks from voting by using poll
taxes and literacy tests to determine who voted. The Native Americans also were discriminated
against during this time period. The U.S government wanted the Native Americans to assimilate
into society rather than exclude themselves from society. This was a period Prohibition with the
passage of the 18th amendment. However, the 18th amendment also led to an increase in crime
with bootleggers. Women were given the right the vote with the passage of the 19th amendment.
Another change in voting is that there was direct voting of the senators in the direct primary.
Terms:
Nativism

Poll Tax

Assimilate

literacy test

Jim Crow Laws

Populist Party

Progressivism

Homestead Act

Direct primary

Grandfather clause

18TH Amendment

Square Deal

19th Amendment

Progressive Party

Dawes Act

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Economic/3A
Standards
STANDARD 11: Describe the growth of big business and technological innovations after
Reconstruction.
a. Explain the impact of the railroads on other industries, such as steel, and on the organization
of big business. (440-441)
b. Describe the impact of the railroads in the development of the West, including the
transcontinental railroad, and the use of Chinese labor. (507-508, 511-512)
c. Identify John D. Rockefeller and the Standard Oil Company and the rise of trusts and
monopolies. (444-446)
d. Describe the inventions of Thomas Edison, including the electric light bulb, motion pictures,
and the phonograph, and their impact on American life. (438-439)

STANDARD 12: Analyze important consequences of American industrial growth.


a. Describe Ellis Island (466-470), the change in immigrants origins to southern and eastern
Europe (464-465), and the impact of this change on urban America. (472-474)
b.

Identify the American Federation of Labor and Samuel Gompers. (454)

c. Describe the 1894 Pullman strike as an example of industrial unrest. (455-456, 457)
Narrative:
The United States experienced an industrial revolution after the Reconstruction era. Millions of
immigrants entered the United States, and many of them worked in factories, even though
working in the factories meant low wages and poor working conditions. Unions were created to
improve conditions and wages by collectively bargaining, but the corporations were much more
powerful. One of the best examples of the power the corporations had over their workers was the
Pullman strike. It was a laissez faire type of economy, in which the government had little or no
restrictions on the economy. This led to companies building monopolies through vertical and
horizontal integration. There were a lot of innovations, such as the Bessemer process, which

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

made steel easier to create and more durable, as well as led to the creation of more skyscrapers
and better railroads. Mass production also helped companies grow because they could rapidly
produce tons of products. One of the most famous innovations of all time is Thomas Edisons
light bulb, which was one of thousands of patents at Menlo Park.
Terms:
Monopoly

Horizontal Integration

Trust

vertical integration

Robber baron

Company town

Sweatshop

Collective bargaining

Initiative

Knights of Labor

Referendum

Mass transit

Recall

skyscrapers

American Federation of Labor

Gilded Age

entrepreneur

mass culture

laissez faire

New South

patent

protective tariff

Bessemer Process

suspension bridge

Mass production

time zones

corporation

Gospel of Wealth

cartel

Captains of Industry

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Social/3A
Standards
STANDARD 13: Identify major efforts to reform American society and politics in the
Progressive Era.
9. Explain Upton Sinclairs The Jungle and federal oversight of the meatpacking industry. (551556)
10. Identify Jane Addams and Hull House and describe the role of women in reform movements.
(552, 557-562)
11. Describe the rise of Jim Crow, Plessy v. Ferguson, and the emergence of the NAACP. (520522, 528, 565-567)
12. Explain Ida Tarbells role as a muckraker. (551)
Narrative:
The population of the United States was growing via immigration through Ellis Island and
Angel Island. America became a melting pot of different cultures, but most immigrants who
moved to the United States moved into pockets of towns called ghettos. Immigrants who moved
to the United States held jobs with low wages and were unskilled and would end up living in
company towns or tenement housing. However there were some organizations created to help
immigrants adapt to America. The Hull House was created by Jane Addams to help assimilate
immigrants into society by providing child care and shelter to recently arrived immigrants in
Chicago. African-Americans were being denied their basic rights as United States citizens with
the implantation of Jim Crow Laws. One of the main supports for the blacks was the NAACP,

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

who originally were trying to have anti-lynching mobs but soon turned into one of the most
prominent race relations organizations.
Terms:
Social Darwinism

Hull House

Nativism

Socialism

Urbanization

Knights of Labor

Tenement

Angel Island

Assimilate

Americanization

Jim Crow Laws

Populist Party

Muckraker

Melting pot

NAACP

Gilded Age

Ellis Island

mass culture

motion picture camera

New South

American Federation of Labor

Gospel of Wealth

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Political/3B
Standards
STANDARD 14: Explain Americas evolving relationship with the world at the turn of the
twentieth century.
b. Describe the Spanish-American War, the war in the Philippines, and the debate over
American expansionism. (592-598, 599-601, 598)
c. Explain U.S. involvement in Latin America, as reflected by the Roosevelt Corollary to the
Monroe Doctrine and the creation of the Panama Canal. (604-609)

STANDARD 15: Analyze the origins and impact of U.S. involvement in World War I.
a. Describe the movement from U.S. neutrality to engagement in World War I, with reference to
unrestricted submarine warfare. (624-625, 626)
b. Explain Wilsons Fourteen Points and the proposed League of Nations. (641-645)
Narrative:
After a long period of isolationism, the U.S. thrust itself into other countries problems with the
Spanish-American War and World War 1. The Spanish-American War was started primarily
because of yellow journalism on the horrors of the Spanish treatment of the Cubans and the
sinking of the USS Maine. The U.S did not lose many casualties but gained islands in the Pacific
and Atlantic widening the United States sphere of influence in the Treaty of Paris. The United
States adopted the Platt and Teller Amendment, which restricted them from negotiating with
other countries but it did not allow the United States to annex Cuba. After the war, Theodore
Roosevelt was elected as president, after gaining public support for his role in the Rough
Riders. Theodore as president enacted the Roosevelt Corollary, which was an addition to the
Monroe Doctrine and stated that the United States would use military force to keep European
countries out of Latin America. The corollary is part of his Big Stick Diplomacy and
essentially is deploying militarism to keep control of Latin America. The United States
desperately tried to stay out of World War I, but with the sinking of the Lusitania by German Uboats and the Zimmerman note, the United States had to intervene and joined the Allied
coalition. The Allies won shortly after the United States joined the war and President Wilson
presented his Fourteen Points to world peace, which included the League of Nations.
Terms:
Imperialism

Yellow press

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Jingoism

Moral Diplomacy

Boxer Rebellion

Roosevelt Corollary

Open Door Policy

Militarism

Big Stick Diplomacy

U-boat

Dollar Diplomacy

Reparations

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Economic/3B
Standards
Narrative:
In international affairs, under President William Taft the United States wielded their economic
superiority over less dominant countries. The United States were not imperialistic in the since of
an extractive economy, Americans were looking for new markets to sell their goods in. During
World War I or, the Great War, the United States had remained neutral but were secretly shipping
supplies to Britain. The United States had the Industrial threshold to go into an all out war
economy and after the sinking of the Lusitania by German u-boats, the United States increased
their industrial output to provide in the war. Germany was forced to pay reparations to other
European countries in response of World War I under the Treaty of Versailles. Germany could not
afford to pay these reparations, which left other European countries in their own depression as
well. The United States had loaned out money to the European Countries.

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Terms:

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Dollar Diplomacy
Reparations
Square Deal
Extractive economy

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Social/3B
Standards
A. Explain the domestic impact of World War I, as reflected by the origins of the Great
Migration, the Espionage Act, and socialist Eugene Debs. (634, 632)
B. Explain how rising communism and socialism in the United States led to the Red Scare and
immigrant restriction. (649-650)

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Narrative:
One of the main reasons for the United States to enter World War I was the sinking of the
Lusitania. This sinking brought the publics attention on what was happening in Europe.
Americans were morally behind joining the war, but this is an example of the beginning of the
publics opinion factoring into laws and cases, which is part of Moral Diplomacy. The United
States passed the selective services act, which implemented the draft. If you were selected in the
draft but the war was against your moral values, than you would file to be a conscientious
objector and serve in some other government role. During this time period their was a theory
called Social Darwinism, in which the strongest survive, but there was also the Captains of
Industry who gave back by building public facilities. After World War I Americans turned there
fears over to Russia which is known as the red scare.
Terms:
Yellow press

Social Darwinism

Open Door Policy

Urban League

Moral Diplomacy

Anti-Defamation League

Espionage Act
Great Migration
Red Scare

Lusitania
Conscientious objector
Sacco and Vanzetti

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Political/4A
Standards
Explain the social and political impact of widespread unemployment that resulted in
developments such as Hoovervilles. (710-712)
SSUSHS18: DESCRIBE FRANKLIN ROOSEVELTS NEW DEAL AS A RESPONSE TO THE
DEPRESSION AND COMPARE THE WAYS GOVERNMENTAL PROGRAMS AIDED
THOSE IN NEED.
a. Describe the creation of the Tennessee Valley Authority as a works program and as an effort
to control the environment. (736)
b. Explain the Wagner Act and the rise of industrial unionism. (744)
c. Explain the passage of the Social Security Act as a part of the second New Deal. (741, 738)
d. Identify Eleanor Roosevelt as a symbol of social progress and womens activism. (748-749)
e. Identify the political challenges to Roosevelts domestic and international leadership; include
the role of Huey Long, the court packing bill, and the Neutrality Act. (746, 739,
779)
Narrative:
After the stock market crashed on Black Tuesday. Herbert Hoover became a negative correlation
to poverty. FDR in his first 100 days in office as President of the United States passed 15 bills
that were the beginning of the government run programs under the New Deal. One of the laws
passed established the Tennessee Valley Authority who oversaw the electrification of the rural
south. FDRs approval rating was excellent, even though the economy was not improving.
Franklin Roosevelts court packing bill hurt his reputation, the bill was designed for the
Supreme Court to become pro-new deal and pass his laws he put on the table. The act was
considered unconstitutional and never was carried out into plan. One can say that the Great

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

depression did not end until the beginning of U.S. involvement in World War I, but Franklin
Roosevelt attempts at retooling the U.S. economy, and even beginning a Second New Deal,
which expanded on the original, increased his popularity with the American people.
Terms:
Dawes Plan
Scopes Trial
Quota system

New Deal
Fireside chat
TVA
Second New Deal

Scopes Trial

Social Security Act

Volstead Act

Court packing

Black Tuesday
Bonus Army

Black Cabinet
Wagner Act
Neutrality Act of 1939

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Economic/4A
Standards
STANDARD 16: Identify key developments in the aftermath of WWI.
B, Identify Henry Ford, mass production, and the automobile. (660-663)
SSUSHS17: ANALYZE THE CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF THE GREAT
DEPRESSION.
A. Describe the causes, including overproduction, under-consumption, and stock market
speculation that led to the stock market crash of 1929 and the Great Depression. (702-706)
B. Explain the impact of the drought in the creation of the Dust Bowl. (714-715)
C. Explain the social and political impact of widespread unemployment that resulted in
developments such as Hoovervilles. (710-712)
SSUSHS18: DESCRIBE FRANKLIN ROOSEVELTS NEW DEAL AS A RESPONSE TO THE
DEPRESSION AND COMPARE THE WAYS GOVERNMENTAL PROGRAMS AIDED
THOSE IN NEED.
D. Explain the Wagner Act and the rise of industrial unionism. (744)
E. Explain the passage of the Social Security Act as a part of the second New Deal. (741, 738)
Narrative:
In the early 20s the United States was experiencing economic growth on false pretenses. People
were buying manufactured goods on credit and not being able to pay off those debts. Also, there
were people who bought stocks on loaned money, buying on margin. So even though the Stock
Market Crash on Black Tuesday, was a surprise to most Americans, it shouldnt have been
because individuals were in so much debt, there was no possible way to pay it off. Setting off the
Great Depression, which affected almost all Americans, Franklin D. Roosevelt enacted the New
Deal, which ultimately set up the United States as a Welfare State. Also Franklin Roosevelt
supported labor unions because if they went on strike it would prove even more detrimental to
society, so he passed the Wagner Act, which allowed for labor unions to collectively bargain.
Roosevelts plan for economy was much more successful in gaining social support then his
predecessor Herbert Hoover, Hoover had initially encouraged volunteerism in which people help
people to get out of the Great Depression.
Terms:
Mass Production

Dawes Plan

Model T

Speculation

Bull market

Great Depression

Buying on margin

Bread line

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Black Tuesday

Second New Deal

Localism

Social Security Act

Trickle-down economics

Collective bargaining

Bonus Army

Wagner Act

New Deal

Welfare state

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Social/4A
Standards
STANDARD 16: Identify key developments in the aftermath of WWI.
B, Identify Henry Ford, mass production, and the automobile. (660-663)
C. Describe the impact of radio and the movies. (680-681)
D. Describe modern forms of cultural expression; include Louis Armstrong and the origins of
jazz, Langston Hughes and the Harlem Renaissance, Irving Berlin, and Tin Pan Alley. (690-663)
F. Identify Eleanor Roosevelt as a symbol of social progress and womens activism. (748-749)
Narrative:

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

After World War the Model T was more affordable as ever because of the increasing of wages,
but mostly in part to Mass Production. The Model T was among one of the many ideas that
created a national identity. Another innovation was the radio, which you could receive news
almost as it happened. Also, an important part of the radio was that it increased the popularity of
music. This era is known as the Jazz age, because of the dominance that Jazz held over
contemporary music. Music also helped in the integration of blacks into everyday society but
there was a whole new artistic expression movement that gained lots of support from the African
American community. This movement came to be known as the Harlem Renaissance and was
focused on celebrating black culture, rather than adopting white culture. Like other media forms,
movies such as, The Wizard of Oz and The Jazz Singer, captured the imagination of America.
Terms:
Model T

Jazz

Dawes Plan

Harlem Renaissance

Modernization

Speculation

Fundamentalism
Prohibition

Bread line
Dust Bowl
Okies

Bootlegger

Hoovervilles

Flapper

Black Cabinet

Lost Generation

The Wizard of Oz

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Political/4B
Standards
USHS19: IDENTIFY THE ORIGINS, MAJOR DEVELOPMENTS, AND THE
DOMESTIC IMPACT OF WORLD WAR II, ESPECIALLY THE GROWTH OF THE
FEDERAL GOVERNMENT.
a)
Explain A. Philip Randolphs proposed March on Washington, D.C., and President
Franklin D. Roosevelts response. (810)
b)
Explain the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and the internment of Japanese- Americans,
German-Americans, and Italian-Americans. (789, 813)
c)
Explain major events: include the lend-lease program, the Battle of Midway, D-Day, and
the fall of Berlin. (785, 807, 819, 823)
d)
Describe war mobilization, as indicated by rationing, wartime conversion, and the role of
women in war industries. (792, 814, 809)
e)
Describe Los Alamos and the scientific, economic, and military implications of
developing the Atomic Bomb
f)
Compare the geographic locations of the European Theater and the Pacific Theater and
the difficulties the U.S. faced in delivering weapons, food, and medical supplies to troops.
SSUSH20 The student will analyze the domestic and international impact of the Cold War
on the United States
1. Describe the creation of the Marshall Plan, U.S. commitment to Europe, the Truman
Doctrine, and the origins and implications of the containment policy. (850, 848)
2. Explain the impact of the new communist regime in China, the outbreak of the
Korean War, and how these events contributed to the rise of Senator Joseph
McCarthy. (854, 855-857, 873-875)
3. Explain the role of geography on the U.S. containment policy, the Korean War,
Narrative:

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative
World War II officially ended the Great Depression. The Germans were conquering all of Europe
and forcibly removing Jews from their homes using a quick war maneuver known as the
blitzkrieg they quickly swept across Europe establishing dominance from France to the Soviet
Union. As the war became more dangerous, the government focused was lifted off the economy
and more on how to protect Americas best interests. Our first act to help beckon the calls of war
was the Neutrality Act of 1939, which permitted the sales of arms, only if the ally came and got
the supplies from America. Not shortly afterwards we signed the Lend-Lease Act which allowed
us to give $50 billion dollars to the Allies in Europe. Our alliance with the Allies was not hidden
and we were blindsided by Japan at Pearl Harbor. The attacks on Pearl Harbor led us to plunge
into WW2. The US eventually helped win the war on the European front, but the Japanese were
not surrendering. Unbeknown to the world, the United states were developing the Manhattan
Project, which was a code name for our development of the atomic bomb. FDR had passed it
was now left to Truman on how to end the war. Ultimately he decided to use the bomb in
Hiroshima and Nagasaki and Japan agreed to an unconditional surrender. The ending of World
War II started a new age in politics in the US, because the Soviet Union and United States were
the only remaining superpowers.
Terms:
Neutrality Act of 1939

Anschluss

Lend-lease Act

Blitzkrieg

Executive Order 8802

Unconditional surrender

Manhattan Project

Nuremberg Laws

Kamikaze

Genocide

Island hopping

Yalta Conference

Appeasement

United Nations

Holocaust

Geneva Convention

Los Alamos

Satellite State

Allied Powers

Cold War

Axis Powers

Iron Curtain

Internment of Japanese Americans

Containment

Atom Bomb

Warsaw Pact

Marshall Plan

38th Parallel

Truman Doctrine

Arms race

Totalitarianism

Brinkmanship

Anti-Semitic

Eisenhower Doctrine

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Economic/4B
Standards
Describe war mobilization, as indicated by rationing, war-time conversion, and the role of
women in war industries. (792, 814, 809)
e)
Describe Los Alamos and the scientific, economic, and military implications of
developing the Atomic Bomb
SSUSH21 The student will explain the impact of technological development and economic
growth on the United States, 1945-1975.
1. Describe the impact of competition with the USSR as evidenced by the launch of
Sputnik I and President Eisenhowers actions. (865, 895)
Narrative:
The United States of America were going through a Great Depression prior to World War II
erupting in Europe. England, which is one of our closest allies, was fighting in the war but
fighting the German army was depleting their supplies. So we adopted the Lend-Lease act,
which allowed for us to give weapons to other countries as long as they pay in cash and come
and ship the goods themselves. Other wartime economic strategies was rationing, which allowed
for us to send more supplies to the war front after we had joined the Allied forces. After the war
we implemented the Marshall Plan, which allowed for us to give money to European countries
to help protect those countries from being taken over by communism.
Terms:

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Lend-lease Act
Executive Order 8802
Rationing
Marshall Plan
Arms race
Brinkmanship

Social/4B
Standards
1. Explain the impact of the new communist regime in China, the outbreak of the
Korean War, and how these events contributed to the rise of Senator Joseph
McCarthy. (854, 855-857, 873-875)

SSUSH21 The student will explain the impact of technological development and economic
growth on the United States, 1945-1975.
2. Describe the impact of competition with the USSR as evidenced by the launch of
Sputnik I and President Eisenhowers actions. (865, 895)
Narrative:
Before World War II there was Anti Semitic feelings brewing in Germany. The Germans blamed
the Jews for their economic downfall, and then Germany started to collect Jews starting the

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

holocaust. On the domestic front, while the United States had stayed politically neutral the
influx of immigrants from all over Europe divided the publics opinion on which side to support.
After Pearl Harbor, almost all Americans were supporting the Allies and pressured FDR to join
the war. These were moral reasons for the United States to enter WWI. After World War II,
Americans entered a time of fear, known as the Red Scare. The Red Scare was the fear of
communists in the American government.
Terms:
Holocaust

Red Scare

Internment of Japanese Americans

Hollywood Ten

Anti-Semitic

McCarthyism

Tuskegee Airmen

Julius and Ethel Rosenberg

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Political/5A
Standards
SSUSH20 The student will analyze the domestic and international impact of the Cold War
on the United States
a. Describe the Cuban Revolution, the Bay of Pigs, and the Cuban missile crisis. (956-958)
b. Describe the Vietnam War, the Tet offensive and growing opposition to the war. (984-991,
995-996)
c. Explain the role of geography on the U.S. containment policy, the Korean War, the Bay of
Pigs, the Cuban missile crisis, and the Vietnam War.
SSUSH21 The student will explain the impact of technological development and economic
growth on the United States, 1945-1975.
a. Describe the impact television has had on American culture; include the presidential
debates (Kennedy/ Nixon, 1960) (897, 900, 953)
SSUSH22 The student will identify dimensions of the Civil Rights movement, 1945 1970.
a. Explain the importance of President Truman order to integrate the U.S. military and the
federal government.
SSUSH23 The student will describe and assess the impact of political developments between
1945 and 1970.
a. Describe the Warren Court and the expansion of individual rights as seen in the Miranda
decision. (972-973)
b. Explain Lyndon Johnsons Great Society, including the establishment of Medicare. (969971)
c. Describe the social and political turmoil of 1968, including the assassinations of Martin
Luther King, Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy, and the events surrounding the Democratic
National Convention. (996-999)
Narrative:
After World War II, there was a Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union. The
United States believed in the Domino Theory in which one country falls to communism then the
countries around it do and followed a policy of Containment for almost half a century. Directly

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

after World War II, the United States fought in the Korean War against Chinese-supported North
Korea to prevent South Korea from falling to communism. In 1960, John F. Kennedy was
running against Richard Nixon in the presidential campaign, and many people point to the 1960
Kennedy-Nixon Debate into why Kennedy won. It was the first televised debate and many
people saw that Nixon appeared nervous and that ultimately decided the presidency. In 1960, not
long after the election, JFK decided to go through with the Bay of Pigs invasion after pressure
from his closest advisors. There was also the Cuban Missile Crisis, because the United States
found Soviet missile launchers on Cuba. Almost a year after the Bay of Pigs invasion we sent
troops into Vietnam to help regain control of the government for the French. The Vietnam War
was the first war to be televised and after the Tet Offensive, Americans did not want to be in the
war anymore.
Terms:
Domino Theory

Civil Rights Act of 1964

Deferment

24th Amendment

Bay of Pigs

Democratic National Convention

Tet Offensive

Fair Deal

Vietnam War

Nuclear family

Cuban Missile Crisis

Television

1960 Kennedy Nixon Debate

Inner city

beatnik

Urban renewal

Medicare

Gulf of Tonkin Resolution

Conservative movement

Equal Right Amendment

Miranda v. Arizona

Hawks

Civil Rights Act of 1957

Doves

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Economic/5A
Standards
SSUSH20 The student will analyze the domestic and international impact of the Cold War
on the United States
SSUSH21 The student will explain the impact of technological development and economic
growth on the United States, 1945-1975.
a. Describe the baby boom and its impact as shown by Levittown and the Interstate
Highway Act. (883, 889, 890)
b. Analyze the impact television has had on American life; include the development of the
personal computer and the expanded use of air conditioning. (

Narrative:

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

After World War II, the United States had to decide if it were to continue its high military
production or if it were going to take cut backs to move on from the militaristic economy.
Truman ended the high wartime price control in 1947 but inflation increased dramatically and
unions were demanding higher wages, and did not receive them so, strikes spread across
America. The Taft-Hartley Act was enacted which limited the power of the labor unions by
mandating a cooling off period after a strike erupts and makes union leaders liable in lawsuits. As
transportation and communication became more efficient internationally there was a creation of
multiple multinational corporations who made globalization possible. The increase in
consumerism led to an increasing amount of franchise businesses where there was not just one
store but multiple stores owned by different people. An increasingly popular business was
McDonalds, because with the expansion of highways under the Interstate Highway Act, people
started to eat out a lot more than in the past.
Terms:
Interstate Highway Act

Franchise business

air conditioning

AFL-CIO

consumerism

Multinational corporations

Fair Deal

Taft-Hartley Act

Information industries

Medicaid

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Social/5A
Standards
SSUSH20 The student will analyze the domestic and international impact of the Cold War
on the United States
SSUSH21 The student will explain the impact of technological development and economic
growth on the United States, 1945-1975.
a. Describe the baby boom and its impact as shown by Levittown and the Interstate
Highway Act. (883, 889, 890)
b. Analyze the impact television has had on American life; include the development of the
personal computer and the expanded use of air conditioning. (
Narrative:
Even though the Cold War sparked a fear into the minds of Americans, people were experiencing
the Happy Days. The Untied States was going through a baby boom and were being influenced
by what they were watching on television on how to be socially accepted. Rock and roll ruled
over this area because it was new, exciting, and gave people a breath of fresh air. There also was
a greater expansion of civil rights under the Warren Court. African Americans were starting to
demand for their rights, if it was through peaceful protest, such as sit-ins or if it was more
militaristic style with the Black Panthers. The passage of the three Civil Rights Acts from 1957
to 1968 ended segregation and illegalized discrimination based on sex, race, religion, or
ethnicity. The Vietnam War, was not publicly accepted after the Tet Offensive, we anted our
troops back home and students at Kent State University protested the war. Which ended
violently, with the National Guard ordered in and opened fire on the students.
Terms:

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Baby Boom

Sit-in

Levittown

SNCC

air conditioning

Freedom ride

personal computer

Civil Rights Act of 1964

consumerism

24th Amendment

rock-and-roll

Black power

beatnik

Black Panthers

Warren Court

Fair Deal

Johnsons Great Society

Sunbelt

Medicare

Nuclear family

National Organization of Women

Television

United Farm Workers

Inner city

Silent Spring

Urban renewal

EPA

De jure segregation

Miranda v. Arizona

De Facto segregation

Civil Rights Act of 1957

Brown V Board of Education

Montgomery Bus Boycott

Letters from a Birmingham Jail

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

March on Washington

Roe v Wade

Counterculture

Medicaid

Generation gap

Students for a Democratic Society

Equal Right Amendment

Kent State University

Freedom summer

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Political/5B
Standards
SSUSH25 The student will describe changes in national politics since 1968.
1. Describe President Richard M. Nixons opening of China, his resignation due to the
Watergate scandal, changing attitudes toward government, and the Presidency of Gerald
Ford. (1009, 1010, 1049-1052, 1055-1057)

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

2. Explain the Carter administrations efforts in the Middle East including the Camp David
Accords, his response to the 1979 Iranian Revolution and Iranian hostage crisis. (10651067)
3. Describe domestic and international events of Ronald Reagans presidency, including
Reagonomics, the Iran-contra scandal, and the collapse of the Soviet Union. (1081-1083,
1087-1091)
4. Explain the relationship between Congress and President Bill Clinton, including the North
American Free Trade Agreement and his impeachment and acquittal. (1111-1112, 1115,
1113)
5. Analyze the 2000 presidential election and its outcome, emphasizing the role of the
Electoral College. (1119-1120)
6. Analyze the response of President George W. Bush to the attacks of September 11, 2001,
on the United States, the war against terrorism, and the subsequent American interventions
in Afghanistan and Iraq. (1122-1125)
Narrative:
In the United States we were dealing with the presidency of Nixon. Which was most scandalous
presidency of all time. He had tapped his office and had ordered the tapping of the Democratic
National Convention but attempted to cover-up his involvement. This scandal was known as
Watergate, and ended with the impeachment and eventual resignation of President Nixon. The
Cold war was coming to an end and the United States and the Soviet Union took appropriate
actions to start a period of friendship. They signed SALT I, which limited the amount of nuclear
missiles they could have in their arsenal. Also they signed SALT II, which set limitations and
guidelines for nuclear weapons. The treaty was never put into practice but both were considered
stepping stones in world peace. The Cold War officially ended after the Perestroika in the Soviet
Union. As that war ended the, United States relations began to unravel in the Middle East. When
Hussein invaded Kuwait, the United States sent troops to help protect their oil resources there.
After the turn of the century, Americans witnessed 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center, which
began the War on Terrorism and still continues today.
Terms:

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Silent majority

Perestroika

SALT I

Iran-Contra Affair

Southern strategy

Impeachment

Watergate

Bush v. Gore

25th Amendment

Taliban

Executive privilege

Weapons of Mass Destruction

Pardon

9/11

Conservative movement

Operation Enduring Freedom

Christian fundamentalist

Strategic Defense Initiative

Amnesty

Apartheid

Helsinki Accords

Operation Desert Storm

SALT II

Contract with America

Camp David Accords

EU

New Right

Al Qaeda

Moral Majority

Department of Homeland Security

Iranian Hostage Crisis

Patriot Act

Glasnost

No Child Left Behind

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Economic/5B
Standards
SSUSH25 The student will describe changes in national politics since 1968.
1. Describe President Richard M. Nixons opening of China, and the Presidency of Gerald
Ford. (1009, 1010, 1049-1052, 1055-1057)
2. Describe domestic and international events of Ronald Reagans presidency, including
Reagonomics.
3. Explain the relationship between Congress and President Bill Clinton, including the North
American Free Trade Agreement. (1111-1112, 1115, 1113)

Narrative:
After World War II, Ame
Terms:
Stagflation

NAFTA

OPEC

Savings and Loan Crisis

Supply-side economics

EU

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Social/5B
Standards
SSUSH25 The student will describe changes in national politics since 1968.
1. Explain the impact of Supreme Court decisions on ideas about civil liberties and civil
rights, including such decisions as Roe v. Wade (1973) and the Bakke decision on
affirmative action. (1026, 1083, 1062)
2. Analyze the response of President George W. Bush to the attacks of September 11, 2001,
on the United States.
Narrative:
After World War II, Ame
Terms:
Silent majority

Moral Majority

Affirmative action

AIDS

Christian fundamentalist

9/11

Zachary Vincent
HUSH/Fall 15
Mrs. Giresi
Portfolio Narrative

Apartheid

Department of Homeland Security

EU

Patriot Act

Al Qaeda

No Child Left Behind