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Tri-City Times

50

LAPEER

ST. CLAIR

MACOMB

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

142nd Volume - Issue No. 3

www.tricitytimes-online.com

Less than 24 hours after a Capac man robbed the Capac BP gas station
last week, the suspect turned himself in to police.

Armed robber
turns himself in

Police say substance abuse problem


prompted crime at BP station in Capac
By Maria Brown

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

ST. CLAIR COUNTY A substance abuse problem allegedly led


Robert Lee Johnson Jr. to walk into the
Capac BP gas station last week with a
gun and pilfer the stores cash registers.
The 30-year-old Capac man told
investigators he was broke when he
decided to rob the Capac Road business
on Wednesday night, Jan. 13.
Johnson was arraigned on Friday
morning on two counts of armed robbery
and two counts of assault with a dangerous weapon. His bond was set at $250,000.
Previously, police identified the suspect
as an Imlay City resident but his current
address is in Capac. An Almont Ave.
address in Imlay City is noted on his
court record.
Detective Steve Surman with the St.

Clair County Sheriffs


Department said they
dont believe theres a
connection between the
Capac robbery and others in the area. On
January 7 a man robbed
the Tri-County Bank
branch in Yale and one
day later the Oxford
Robert
Johnson Jr. Bank branch in Dryden
was hit.
Surman notes that Johnson and the
Yale bank robber are quite different in
their appearances and builds. They
believe Johnson was looking to quickly
get some cash and the gas station was a
convenient target.
Surman said the investigation into the
Yale robbery is still ongoing.

Investigators hope
co-workers at
Rubber Enterprises
can shed light
By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

LAPEERCOUNTY
Police are hoping employees at the
Rubber Enterprises plant in Imlay
City will shed light on a homicide
that occurred over the weekend.
21-year-old North
Branch resident
Andrew Hall, has
been arrested for
his alleged
involvement in the
death of Miguel
Harvey, 23, of Port
Huron.
Lapeer County
Sheriffs Dept.
Andrew
investigators
Hall
report that the two
men were friends and co-workers
at Rubber Enterprises, which is
located on Reek Road in Imlay
City.
As the investigation unfolded,
Hall was taken into custody on
Saturday, Jan. 16, at his home. He
is currently lodged in the Lapeer
County Jail.
On Sunday, Jan. 17, Lapeer
County Prosecutor Tim Turkelson
formally charged Hall with firstdegree pre-meditated murder, tampering with evidence and fourthdegree arson.
Hall was arraigned in 71-A
District Court by Lapeer County
Magistrate Greg Wise, with bond

Robber page 14-A

Homicide page 14-A

Richards is Citizen of Year


Surprised schools superintendent among those awarded at Chamber Dinner-Dance
Tri-City Times Editor

IMLAY CITY It was


an evening of speechless
people and outstanding
speeches. Of family, friends,
food and music. Of seeing
and being seen, and of recognizing and recognition.
The 2016 Imlay City
Chamber of Commerce
Dinner-Dance drew about
150 of the citys finest to the
Knights of Columbus Hall on
Saturday evening.
The annual event is held
to publicly recognize the
people and organizations that
make Imlay City a standout
when it comes to community-building and caring for
one another.
In a heartfelt speech by
Imlay City School Board
President Sharon Muir, the
once top-secret recipient of
the 2015 Citizen of the Year
award became evident, and
no one was more surprised
than Dr. Gary Richards,
superintendent of Imlay City
and Dryden schools.
Excellence does not
occur by mere happenstance, Muir told the crowd.
It requires determination,
intentionality, sacrifice, dedication, and vision. Above all,

demic opportunities. Middle


College, the begindergarten
program, the year-round
schooling option and the
expansion of virtual learning
are all programs that were
implemented under Richards
watch.
Imlay City High School
was twice a bronze medal
winner as One of Americas
Best High Schools named by
U.S. News and World
Report. Richards was also
instrumental in developing
the Blue Water Area
Conference, which includes
athletics and fine arts.
A few years ago,
Richards took on the role of
dual superintendent, and now
serves at the helm of the
Dryden School District as
well.
Imlay City School Board President Sharon Muir
Richards was active in
presents Citizen of the Year award to schools
the Imlay City Rotary Club,
superintendent Dr. Gary Richards.
and was president from
achieving excellence requires Students in 1996. From there 2011-13. He sat on the Board
of Directors of the Four
leadership. Imlay City
he worked his way through
Schools is a district of excel- the ranks, becoming principal County Community
Foundation, serving as its
lence because of the extraor- and eventually
chairperson for two years.
dinary leadership of our
Superintendent, a role he
Hes also been active in the
superintendent of schools
assumed in 2007.
and the 2015 Chamber of
Along with overseeing a Imlay City Chamber of
Commerce and was honored
Commerce Citizen of the
staff of 243 and an annual
as a Thumb Friend of
Year, Dr. Gary Richards.
budget of $23,000,000,
Youth. Richards is also on
Richards was hired into
Richards initiated a number
the Imlay City School district of programs that offered paras the high school Dean of
Honored page 14-A
ents and students more acaPhoto by Tom Wearing

By Catherine Minolli

Photo provided

Photo by Maria Brown

Tips sought
in homicide

Members of MiGrove tree climbing club


show off their skills.

New club
aims high
MiGrove tree climbing
group has big passion
for arboriculture skills
By Nicholas Pugliese

Tri-City Times Contributing Writer

TRI-CITY AREA For people growing up in


a rural area, climbing trees as a young person is
often a rite of passage. Time goes by, and people
age, and the lure of climbing into a tree simply
because its there starts to subside.
MiGrove, a new tree-climbing club in the TriCity area, aims to challenge that notion. The goal of
MiGrove is to rekindle that love of trees and climbing that many have as kids, and the inspiration is
catching on.
The group was founded in Spring of 2015 as a
recreational tree-climbing club based out of midMichigan. Cofounder Joe Drinkhorn, or Joey Tree
as hes known in the community, created the group
as a forum for like-minded people who share an
interest in arboriculture and nature to meet and discuss.
Our aim is to bring people who enjoy tree
climbing together in a non industry setting, to
increase awareness of arboriculture, and bring new
people into the hobby and industry, says
Drinkhorn.
Arboriculture is defined as the cultivation, management, and study of wooded plants, like shrubs
and trees, but beyond the scientific aspects of the
word, there is a culture of appreciation that accompanies the technical definition. MiGrove aims to
share with the community that appreciation for the
trees in the area, and possibly a little of the science
as well. Drinkhorn says, I think recreational tree
climbing can bring people who are like minded
together. People who enjoy trees are going to want
to see more healthy trees in their communities and
want to promote the propagation of more trees for
future climbs. Trees clean our air and provide an
aesthetic value to our landscape. Both are big positives.
There are few restrictions participants need to
adhere to, though common sense and respect for
nature are paramount with MiGrove.
MiGrove has very few rules. Dont damage the
specimens, be respectful, no drugs or alcohol, wear
and use the appropriate safety gear like helmets,
Climbing page 14-A

Puzzle pieces

Making magic

Imlay City graduate pens


inspirational childrens book
...see page 3-A

Master illusionist Ron Aldrich


pays visit to Imlay Salon,

...see page 4-A

Page 2-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 20, 2016

Your Local Agent Vehicle overturns into


creek, driver perishes

- for -

Auto
or
Home

By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

Insurance

GASS-BECKER INSURANCE
ALMONT

CAPAC

METAMORA

ST. CLAIR COUNTY


A motorist died Thursday
morning, Jan. 14, when his
vehicle skidded off a snowy
roadway and landed in a
creek off Meskill Rd., east of
Bauman Rd. in Columbus
Township.
Michigan State Police
Lapeer Post Trooper Chris
Rinna identified the victim as
Daniel Steven Witherow, 60,
of Columbus Township.
Rinna reported that State

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Police responded to the scene


at around 8 a.m. and found
Witherows overturned vehicle partially submerged in the
creek in about 4-5 feet of
water.
He noted that the deceased
victim was secured in the
drivers seat and still wearing
his seat belt.
Rinna said an initial
investigation indicates that
Witherow lost control on the
hard packed snow covered
road and ran off the roadway,
overturning in the creek.
He added that the incident remains under investigation.
Michigan State Police
troopers were assisted at the
scene by Richmond/Lenox
Fire and EMS.

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Wednesday, January 20 & Thursday, January, 21, 3:30 & 6:45pm
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AFTER 6PM
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Tri-City Times
Published weekly by Delores Z. Heim. Office:
594 N. Almont Ave. P.O. Box 278, Imlay City,
MI 48444. USPS No. 014440. Additional entry
application pending.
Subscriptions: $30 per year Lapeer & St.
Clair Counties; Out of Counties $32 per year,
Senior Citizens $27 per year In-County. Outof-State mailing $40 per year. Outside USA $60
per year. Single Copies 50.
Periodicals paid at Imlay City.
Postmaster please send address changes to
P.O. Box 278, Imlay City, MI 48444.

DAYS
ONLY!

Page 3-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 20, 2016

Imlay City grad pens childrens book

Amalia Aguinaga weaves faith-filled message into tale for tots


By Catherine Minolli

had spoke, Amalia says. I puzzle from as far


It remains a big part of
was at Sunday services and back as she can
her life today.
right in the middle of him remember.
My faith has always
DRYDEN Amalia preaching his message, I took
been a very, very important
Aguinaga always had a out a notepad and started
part in my personal life,
fondness for words that writing. The book was
she says. Its just something
rhymed. Even as a little girl, done two days
that is so near and dear to
she loved the sound of poems later.
my heart that I
try to
and the feelings they The
turn around and spread
invokedthe musical way
book
the word when I can,
they helped tell a story.
revolves
and in different ways
But it wasnt until she had around a little
when I can.
kids that she felt pulled to try girl
named

God Pieces
her hand at writing. It was as Molly.
Shes
Me Together is
if she was being called, and about 7 years old
one of those ways.
deep within the 34-year-old when she comes
After feeling
Imlay City graduate knew across a puzzle.
called to write
she had to heed the message. As the story
the
book,
Amalia, a member of the unfolds, its essence
A m a l i a
Class of 1999, just finished becomes clear.
researched
her first childrens book, The message is
ways to get
which will be available in that life is like a puzzle,
it
pubthe coming weeks in both were all like a puzzle. You
lished. Though
print and e-editions.
may drop a piece now
she found a publisher,
Its called God Pieces and then, but you never lose
which
required a huge leap
ned of faith, she decided to
n
Me Together, and was the love of Jesus Christ.
e
p
inspired by her deep faith That
message
is
go the self-publishing
ook naga.
b
f gui
and trust in God.
important to Amalia because
route.
o
er
aA
I was actually inspired her faith has always been a
Self-publishing is not as
CovAmali
by a message the pastor big piece of her own
hard as people think, she
y
b
says. The hardest part is
getting it marketed and on the
shelves out there.
As for the illustrations,
well, Amalia says that was
also seemingly from the
divine. She immediately
thought of Almont resident
Lindsey Chandler, someone
she met on a mission trip
several years ago.
After the mission I just
stayed in touch with her,
Amalia says. I knew she
was an artist. As our friendship grew, I offered
her a chance to do the illustrations if she wanted to
take it, and she gladly did.
Lindsey is currently
wrapping up her undergrad
degree in Early Childhood
Education. Amalia says art
and kids are her passion
Also integral to the
The Aguinaga family, Gus, Landen, Amalia and Crishten with their pet dog.
process has been digital
Photo provided

Auction items sought for


2016 Blueberry Auction
Blueberry Committee to meet Jan. 26 at city hall
By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

IMLAYCITY The
Imlay City Area Chamber of
Commerces
Blueberry
Auction is the primary fundraising effort benefitting the
annual Blueberry Festival.
Given the importance of
the auction to the success of
annual summer festival,
Blueberry Auction Committee
members are busy making
preparations for this years
event.
The 2016 Blueberry
Auction will take place
Saturday, March 12, starting
at 5 p.m. at Castle Creek Golf
Course in Lum.
Brian Rowley of Rowley's
Auction Service from Attica

will be the auctioneer for the


event.
Chamber Director Ann
Hintz reports that the
Blueberry Auction Committee
is currently seeking donations
of auction items to be bid on
during the event.
The Blueberry Auction
Committee meets next on
Tuesday, Jan. 26, starting at 6
p.m. in the Chamber office at
the Imlay City Hall.
Hintz invites all interested parties to attend and share
their suggestions and ideas
for the auction.
More volunteers are also
being sought to serve on the
committee and assist on the
evening of the auction.
Last years Blueberry
Auction at Castle Creek

raised more than $17,000 to


help pay for entertainment,
childrens games and activities, and myriad other costs
and expenses associated with
hosting the annual summer
event.
The 2016 Blueberry
Festival is scheduled to take
place July 22-23 in downtown Imlay City.
We
have
already
received auction items from
businesses and individuals,
Hintz reported this week. If
you need us to pick up your
donated items, please call us
at 810-724-1361.
The Imlay City Area
Chamber of Commerce office
is located inside the Imlay
City Hall on Main Street,
south of Third Street.

Volunteers needed for


2016 Heritage Fest
Planning meeting set for Jan. 27 at village offices
By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

ALMONT After a
years sabbatical in deference
to
the
2015 Almont
Homecoming event, this
years Heritage Festival
organizers find themselves
back at the drawing board.
The 2016 Heritage
Festival will take place on
June 24-25, and event organizers are already seeking
input and ideas from interested community members.
Organizers will host their
first planning meeting on
Wednesday, Jan. 27, starting
at 6 p.m. at the Almont
Municipal Building on

Howland Road.
Almont
Downtown
Development
Authority
(DDA) Director Nancy Boxey
encourages anyone wishing
to participate in any way to
attend the upcoming meeting.
Dont be afraid, said
Boxey, were not going to
volunteer you to run the show,
but we would like you to help
us spread the word.
Please invite your families, friends and anyone else
you feel would be willing to
help out and join in the fun.
Boxey said a core group
of volunteers is anxious to get
the planning process under
way.
Were excited about the

opportunity to plan another


event that showcases all that
the Almont community has to
offer, said Boxey. We are
going to need the help of
some reliable volunteers.
The ability to host these
events is directly tied to having enough hands to help,
she said.
Thus, Boxey is anticipating a roomful of raised hands
from those ready, willing and
able to volunteer for this
years summer festival.
For questions, further
information, to volunteer,
make a donation, or to pick
up the entire tab for this years
event, please call the Almont
DDA office at 810-798-8125.

Photo provided

Tri-City Times Editor

Amalia Aguinaga and her husband Gus, both


graduates of Imlay City High School.
editor/publisher
Brad
Johnson, Amalia says.
Hes very proud of what
weve
been
able
to
accomplish and I am so
grateful for his hard work
and expertise, she says.
Amalia says the entire
experience of piecing her
book together has deepened
her faithin both herself
and in God.
What I personally
learned is that when you
truly set your mind to
something and believe in
yourself,
good
things
happen, she says. Personally
I have struggled with not
believing in my self in
the past and I would usually
quit while I was ahead
instead of pushing out of
my comfort zone and persevering.
Trusting herselfand the
processwas another big
lesson for Amalia.
When you put the
project in Gods hands, to
bring the right people to
the table to do the job, when
He is at the core of it,
amazing and indescribable
things happen.
To learn more about

Illustrator
Lindsey
Chandler of Almont
God Pieces Me Together,
visit
www.facebook.com/
godpiecesmetogether
or
search Amalia Aguinaga on
Facebook.
Amalia and her husband
Gus, a 1998 graduate of Imlay
City High School, have two
sons, Landen, 11, and
Crishten, 8.

Subscribe
Today!
Tri-City
Times

(810) 724-2615 or
www.tricitytimes-online.com

Page 4-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 20, 2016

Making magic
Master illusionist Ron Aldrich
wows crowd at Imlay salon
By Catherine Minolli

Aldrich created the illusion, an awe-inspiring spectacle, through his decades of


IMLAY CITY You
experience as a magician. A
could say master magician
retired advertising executive
Ron Aldrichs opening act
with the Detroit News,
was a splash at last
Aldrichs interest in magic
Wednesdays meeting of the appeared many years before
Imlay Conversation Salon at he entered the corporate
the Mulefoot Gastropub.
world.
Aldrich transfixed the
My Welch grandmother
crowd when he demonstrated was a tea leaf reader and I
how to transform money into would watch as she dumped
gold. With a little fire, a little the tea leaves out for her cliwater, and Aldrichs swift
ents, many of whom were
hands, live goldfish suddenly wealthy and of means, he
appeared out of nowhere,
says.
swimming in little circles in The leaves would make
a wine glass.
little pictures of things on the

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Magician Ron Aldrich drew a big crowd to the January meeting of the Imlay Conversation Salon.
table, and she would interpret
those pictures into what the
future held.
Those observations led
Aldrich to conclude that
reality is the ultimate illusion, a belief he proclaims
to this day and is reiterated
on his business cards.
Aldrich was also influenced by his parents, both of
whom were creative and
musically gifted. As a boy, he
frequently watched card
tricks performed by his dads
jazz musician friends after
gigs during late nights in the
kitchen of his Detroit home.
At school, Aldrich found
himself with books about
voodoo and magic stretched

across his lap. Hed steal furtive glances while the teachers droned on about history
and politics.
I was always drawn to
these types of things, good or
bad, Aldrich says. I was
interested in different mystical practices more than I was
interested in learning about
Congress or the Senate.
As a teen, he began practicing illusions and magic
tricks in earnestfirst for his
love of the craft, and second
to attract girls. He succeeded
at both.
Eventually, he felt he had
to join the business world to
carve out a living in a more
conventional way. He found

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Ron Aldrich (center) enlists the help of Ron


Stallings and Sue Walters for his entertaining illusion that makes spongy spheres appear out of
nowhere.

success as an advertising
executive with the Detroit
News, back when the Motor
City newspapers were in
their heyday and could do
no wrong.
After taking an early
buyout when things at the
Detroit dailies started to go
south, Aldrich was able to
practice his craft full time at
Dougs Body Shop in
Ferndale. The upscale restaurant which featured retro
vehicles carved in half and
made into booths was a popular nightspot in metro
Detroit. Hired for a trial run,
Aldrichs ability to wow the
evening crowds earned him a
12-year gig at the eatery.
His mastery as a magician led him into the business
arena, and he soon found
himself traveling the world
as an entertainer hired by big
corporations for their gatherings and events.
It also led him to his
bride, Ruth Hughes Library
Director Tracy Aldrich, while
he was performing at a
Monroe County library event
16 years ago.
Aldrich says all of his
successes have been based
on one thing: knowing who
he is as a human being
before attempting to know
anything else.
I became a person
before I became a magician,

Photo by Catherine Minolli

LOCATED IN IMLAY CITY

Photo by Catherine Minolli

Tri-City Times Editor

Magician Ron Aldrich


makes his way around
the room.
he says. Being a person first
allowed me to be a magician.
It is the key to success.
Aldrich takes his beliefs
about person-hood a step
farther and offers the following advice.
Be kind to yourself so
that you can be kind to others, he says.
The Imlay Conversation
Salon meets on the second
Wednesday of each month
and is open to all interested
persons. For more
information visit
www.imlay-conversationsalon.com.

Page 5-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 20, 2016

Board awards bid for


old school, property
By Tom Wearing

process, Novak was required


to submit a $5,000 deposit on
the 1928-vintage building and
ALMONT The Almont its approximate 14.85-acre
Board of Education agreed grounds.
Monday to sell the former The next step is for our
elementary school and attorney to draw up a purgrounds at 401 Church Street chase agreement which will
to a local businessman.
be reviewed by Mr. Novaks
Schools Supt. Joe Candela attorney, said Candela.
said the board voted 6-1 to Were probably looking at a
accept a bid of $135,599 from 60-day time period to comJim Novak, owner of Novak plete the transaction.
Supply & Equipment. Board The sale brings to fruition
member Jill ONeil cast the the school districts efforts to
lone dissenting vote.
relieve itself of the financial
Candela said Novaks bid responsibilities associated
was the highest of three offers with
maintaining
the
submitted to the board by 7,600-square-foot building
Fridays (Jan. 15) deadline.
and property.
The other bidders were: That building has served
Cliffs
Summit, LLC., the Almont community very
$130,000; and Almont resi- well over the years, Candela
dent George Tencza, who bid noted. Up until 1988, that
$117,500.
school housed all of our stu As part of the bidding dents (grades K-12).
Tri-City Times Staff Writer

The boards job was to


get the most money it could,
Candela continued, all of
which will come back to the
district and be used to benefit
students.
We dont know exactly
what Mr. Novak has in mind
for the building and property,
but we hope it can continue to
be used by the community in
some capacity.
The former school originally sat on a 28-acre parcel
of property.
The school district recently sold a 12.82-acre section of
the property north of the old
school to Almont Township
for $49,680.
That property will continue to be used for baseball
fields and parking for
Almonts youth sports programs.
More than a year ago, the

Photo by Tom Wearing

Jim Novaks highest bid of $135,599 accepted by board

Jim Novak of Novak Supply & Equipment had the winning bid for the historic
Almont school building and surrounding property.
district had proposed a
building exchange with
the Almont Village and
Township
governmental
agencies.
As part of the proposed
building swap, the school district would have moved its
administration offices into the
existing municipal offices on
Howland Road.

In exchange, the Village


and Township, building
department and Almont
Police Department would
have moved into the old
school.
After spending $14,400
on a feasibility study to determine the costs and logistics
associated with such a transaction, the school board opted

to abandon the idea in favor


of selling the building and
grounds.

The proposed reuse
plan would have cost
Almont
Village
and
Township residents about
$7.7 million over 20 years
to renovate and maintain the
building and property for
future use.

nomic growth and revitalization in the area, and a team of


representatives from all walks
of life around the area met
regularly to brainstorm for
ideas and fine-tune plans.
The Imlay City area was
among just 50 communities
from across the country to
advance to the quarterfinal
stage in the contest, and was
awarded $50,000 to create its

revitalization plan.
The ABC Committee,
which consists of city officials, business owners and
other volunteers, will continue to meet on a quarterly
basis. In the interim, plans for
arts and culture projects such
as the Detroit Institute of Arts
Inside/Out program are in
the works, as is a community
garden planned for this spring.

Imlay area out of ABC contest


Revitalization Plan in place to move forward at slower pace
By Catherine Minolli
Tri-City Times Editor

IMLAY CITY The


Imlay City area was not
among those chosen to
advance in the Americas Best
Communities
nationwide
contest co-sponsored by
Frontier Communications,
DISH Network, The Weather
Channel and Co-Bank.
Imlay area ABC Team
member Dana Walker says
that while the news is disappointing, it wont deter the
team from pressing ahead
with revitalization and
improvement plans.
...The experience up to

this point has been amazing


and so beneficial, Walker
says. Imlay City, Imlay
Township
and
Attica
Township are now at the same
table discussing our futures
and are ready to work together on projects.
Those projects include
moving forward with the
Revitalization Plan which
was created via grant funds
received for making the quarterfinalist cut in the ABC contest, which Walker notes was
a source of pride for the entire
community.
Projects in the plan
include a Farmers Market
building, community garden,

and improvements to M-53.


We will continue to
move our communities into
the future. Our economic
development and community
placemaking strategies will
continue, Walker says.
Speaking for the DDA
(Downtown Development
Authority) and City offices,
we have not lost steam but
rather are more determined
than ever to accomplish our
goals and see projects to their
completion.
Frontier Communications
General Manager Sarah
Norat-Phillips echoes those
sentiments.
While disappointing that

Imlay City will not advance


in the ABC competition, this
entire process has been a
wonderful way for the community and its leadership to
get together, to dream, to
research and to plan its
future, she says. This was a
rare opportunity that the city
took complete advantage of,
advancing in front of hundreds of other cities to the
quarterfinals! As the local
Frontier representative I am
proud to have been part of the
process.
Imlay City teamed up
with Imlay and Attica townships to qualify for the ABC
contest. Officials from all
three municipalities collaborated on ways to spur eco-

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Page 6-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 20, 2016

By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

Photo provided

IMLAYCITY City
commissioners are moving
forward with a $185,000
project to modify the citys
water delivery meter pits on
Lierman and Weyer roads.
When
completed,
possibly by the end of 2017,
the physical upgrades will
improve the citys ability to
regulate when and how much
water is being used by
residents and industries.
The
upgrades
are
mandated under the terms of
Imlay Citys new 30-year
water service contract with
Detroit Water and Sewerage
(DWSD).
The specific project will
include:
Modifying the existing
PRV (pressure reducing
valve) site just north of
Lierman Road to include a
new vault, meter and
re-piping the existing water

Above-ground view of one of the citys meter pits


to be upgraded to meet DWSDstandards.
main connections to allow for
bypassing of the meter and
PRV if necessary.
Removing the existing
abandoned PRV
vault and

re-piping the water main to


bypass the Weyer Road site.
On Tuesday, Jan. 5, the
city commission voted
unanimously to hire Rowe

Professional Services to
conduct design and construction engineering services for
the project at a total cost of
about $32,000.
City Manager Tom Youatt
said the water control system
upgrades are essential to
ensuring the quantity and
quality of water for city
residents and businesses
over the long term.
Youatt explained that the
improvements to the citys
meter pit and new flow
reduction valves will help
the city measure water
usage more accurately, thus
ensuring the best possible
rates.
Withdraws from GLCUA
In a related matter,
the city recently submitted a
letter to the Greater
Lapeer County Utilities
Authority (GLCUA), notifying the local water authority
of the citys decision to
withdraw, effective June 30,
2016.
Because the City of Imlay
City has entered into an individual contract with DWSD,
Detroit Water transferred its
assets to GLCUA on Jan. 1,
2016. As a result, DWSD will
no longer recognize previous
agreements with GLCUA.

Photo provided

City moving ahead with water control upgrades

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weather allows, work continues on the Karegnondi
Water Authority (KWA) pipeline project.
About three-and-a-half
miles remains on the portion
of the project along Clear
Lake Road in Goodland
Township,
says
Kevin
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County Drain office. That
work is being completed by
L. DAgostini and Sons Inc.
The Zito project near
M-24 will be completed later Pipeline, ready for installation, lines the north side
this year, Sylvester said.
of Clear Lake Road last week.
Restoration work on portions of the project in Lapeer County was given permission deliver water from Lake
County also continues. Ryan to use bond monies to expe- Huron to the city of Flint and
Doyle of the Lapeer County dite restoration work.
other Genesee County comRoad Commission confirms Doyle said the two agen- munities.
that contractors have made cies are still at odds over In recent weeks, national
good progress on cutting other issues including winter attention has been drawn to
ditches and replacing cross maintenance efforts, safety Flint and its ongoing water
tubes.
and keeping roads open.
issues. State officials are now
They are now about Restoration is being under fire for allegedly knowwhere we want them to be, done as construction moves ing, but not immediately disDoyle said.
along the roadway, however closing, information about a
In October the road com- there are parts of restoration potential connection between
mission filed a temporary such as placing permanent serious health issues and
restraining order against con- seeding, which will have to treated municipal water from
tractors who continued to lay wait until we have warmer the Flint River. Chemicals
pipeline without a permit. weather in the spring, used to treat the water resultThe road commission said Sylvester said.
ed in elevated lead levels and
they would not issue addi- The overall project is the city saw an outbreak of
tional permits until a certain still on schedule, however the the number of Legionnaires
amount of restoration work timeline will depend on disease when river water was
was complete on past por- weather conditions seen the used from April 2014 to
tions of the project. The rest of the winter months.
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The city has since
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water line and will utilize that
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system wont solve the current water quality issues since
the citys aging water transmission pipes were damaged
by corrosive river water.

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Page 7-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 20, 2016

DDA providing grants


for architectural fees
By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

IMLAYCITY

Downtown business and


property owners may now
apply for additional grant
money to cover the cost of
architectural fees associated
with facade upgrades.
Currently, the Imlay City
Downtown
Development
Authority (DDA) considers
grant requests of up to 50% of
eligible costs for some facade
improvements, not to exceed
$5,000.
Maximum grant allowances are $2,500 per fiscal
year with the exception of an
Architectural Services grant.
Last Monday, Jan. 11, the
DDA Board agreed to expand
the facade grant program to
allow a 50% reimbursement

of up to $1,000 for architectural services. Participants


would be eligible to receive
up to $500 for renderings of
proposed
changes
or
upgrades.
DDADirector
Dana
Walker said such grant money
can be awarded to facilitate
improvements that add value
the the building, are appropriate to the buildings existing
architecture, and are compatible with Imlay Citys downtown mainstreet setting.
The architectural grants
go hand-in-hand with the
facade grants we already
offer, said Walker. The purpose of the architectural grant
is to assist property owners
who may not have a clear picture of what potential the outside of the building has.
It will also help those

who may wish to restore the


outside of a building to its
original appearance, she
said.
Criteria for grant funds
The DDADirector must
approve the qualifications of
requested architectural firm
before a grant application is
accepted or design work may
begin.
Design work must be
appropriate to the buildings
architecture and be compatible with other downtown
buildings.
Only one architectural
services grant will be allowed
per property address. Changes
in ownership, scope of design
work or architectural firm
will not be considered as
reasons for the DDA to grant
additional
architectural
services funding.

Businesses within the Imlay City DDA district will now be eligible for artist
renderings of possible upgrades.
Upon design work
completion the DDA will
receive copies of all work
tendered by an approved
architectural firm.
It is the responsibility
of the architectural firm
and/or property owner to
ensure that the design
meets any state, local or
city ordinances and codes.
Quotes must include
the architectural firms busi-

Informational meetings near


for Habitat project participants
Call going out for a future Habitat
homeowner on Jan. 30 & Feb. 11
By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

LAPEERCOUNTY
If home ownership has
always seemed like an impossible dream, you may wish to
turn to Habitat for Humanity
of Lapeer County.
Habitat has scheduled
two upcoming meetings (Jan.
30 and Feb. 11) for interested

parties living and/or working


in Lapeer County to learn
about the application process
for becoming a homeowner.
Habitat Director Cheryl
Holland said the newest project home is located in the
Metamora/Hadley area and
will involve the complete
rehabilitation
of
a
1920s-vintage home.
She said two meetings are

being scheduled to enable


more potential applicants to
attend, though interested
parties need only attend one
of the meetings.
First meeting is Jan. 30
The
first
Partner
Orientation meeting is
scheduled for Saturday,
Jan. 30 at 1633 N. Lapeer
Rd., starting at 11 a.m.
A second meeting will
take place on Thursday,
Feb. 11 at 6 p.m. at the
Hadley Township Hall, 4293
Pratt Road in Hadley.

Holland pointed out that


attendees will not need to
bring paperwork to the
first meeting.
This is a real opportunity
for people to own their
own
home,
said
Holland. However, they
must apply now to see if they
qualify for a home through
Habitat for Humanity.
Further questions may be
directed to Lapeer County
Habitat for Humanity Director
Cheryl
Holland
at
810-664-7111.

ness
name,
address,
phone number and website
(if applicable).
Upon completion of
work,
all
invoices
pertaining to the project must
be paid in full and, along
with all receipts, be presented
before funding will be
available.
Design renderings must be
completed
within
six
months of approval or the

Photo by Tom Wearing

Facade program expands to include drawings

applicant
will
be
required to resubmit the
application
with
no
guarantee
of
funding.
Any downtown business
owners
interested
in
receiving grant assistance to
help pay for architectural
fees, is encouraged to
call Imlay City DDA
Director Dana Walker at
810-724-2135.

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Page 8-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 20, 2016

Our Opinion

Reduction in crime
a welcome trend

sk anyone what they appreciate about living in Lapeer County and youll likely
hear the words quiet and safe. The latest
report from the Sheriffs Department proves
that statistic-wise Lapeer County is becoming
increasingly safer due to fewer crimes as
recorded in 2014a trend thats been seen
since at least 2007.
Considering the countys demography and
geography, were likely on par with other
mostly rural communities when it comes to
crime but take a quick look at our neighbors
and the situation could be different.
To the west is Genesee County and Flint. In
2011, the county seat was number one in the
nation for violent crime although those numbers have begun to drop considerably.
Our neighbors to the east, St. Clair County,
have been plagued with a methamphetamine
epidemic. In 2015, the Drug Task Force rooted
out 30 of these operations and have already
notched one in the new year.
To the south are the population dense
Detroit suburbs with their typical big city
issues.
Of course we arent completely immune to
these influences and have our own homegrown
crime too. Were only three weeks into 2016
and have recorded one alleged homicide. Drug
users are still dying from overdoses and crooks
sometimes take advantage of our quiet countryside to break into homes but the law
enforcement community has worked hard on
these fronts. Fortunately, the number of overdose deaths dropped by half from 2013 to
2014.
Some of the credit should go to residents
too. According to the 2014 Sheriff report, they
and other departments saw a sharp rise in the
number of citizen calls fielded. A vigilant population is needed to spot suspicious people and
help the addicted or abused get assistance. If
you see something, say something is a phrase
commonly used in our countrys war on terrorism but it certainly has implications at the local
level too.
It is encouraging that the two things that
most people appreciate about Lapeer County
living quiet and safe remain, for the most
part, true. We trust that police and residents
can continue to work together in 2016 and
keep our communities safe and secure.

Guest Columnist

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Opinion Page
Letters to the Editor

Excited about Imlay Citys future


The news that the Imlay
community would not be
advancing in the Americas
Best Communities contest hit
me hard. After all, the Imlay
ABC Team had been meeting
faithfully every week for 15
months and had created,
through countless hours of
work, a Revitalization Plan
and contest application that
were solid. Everyone on the
Team truly believed we would
be advancing on to the Finalist
round where eight communities will be awarded $100,000.
So hearing the words,
Im sorry but you didnt
advance, hurt. Someone
asked me if I cried when I
heard the news and I must
admit, I did. I was down and
depressed over the finality of
it all. After working on the
project for over a year, I, like
the rest of the Team, really
wanted to go to the next level
and deliver something special

to the Imlay community.


Turns out, we did.
I have been reminded
over the last few days why
Imlay City is one of Americas
Best. Countless people, both
business-owners and community members, have come up
to me to say that they are
excited about Imlays future
and look forward to the positive changes ahead. This
shouldnt surprise me because
the community support during the contest process has
been truly amazing.
The community has also
reminded me that the whole
contest experience has had
nothing but positive results.
After all, the City and Attica
Township
and
Imlay
Township came together to
create a Revitalization Plan
that in the words of Attica
Township Supervisor Al
Ochadleus, has laid the
groundwork for our future.

fter about 17 costume


changes I find myself
sitting at one of the premier
tables at the K of C Hall, the
site of the Imlay City
Chamber of Commerce
Dinner-Dance on Saturday.
No slouch in the wardrobe department, the 17 costume changes are required
because Im not quite as
comfortable as I used to be
in some of the old standbys.
At the
last minute I come
up with a
familiar
mix of
leggings
and a
dress,
motorcycle-type

boots and
a velvet,

silk-lined
overcoat,
accented with a snazzy, vintage-looking beaded purse
that was given to me by my
aunt Zizi Teresa. The velvet
overcoat was my godmothersAsunta Comare Suzy
Frascatomade in the 1940s
especially for her. I am comfortable and comforted having these things with me,
symbols of my ancestors and
where Icome from.
At the table is my col-

league, Tom Tommy-boy


Wearing, and Bob and
Sharon Muir. Stu Cameron,
curriculum director of Imlay
City Schools, is there, too,
and were all excited for the
surprise thats to come.
Sharon is Imlay City
School Board President, and
shes about to present the
2015 Citizen of the Year
Award to Dr. Gary Richards,
who has little to no clue.
Weve all known each
other for a number of years
now, so the conversation is
easy and the friendly banter
fun. Stu quizzes Tom if hes
gotten behind the kit lately,
referring Tommy-boys alterego life as a drummer
extraordinaire, and it gives
ol Tommy-boy a chance to
open up about his time away
from playing gigs due to a
medical situation that left
him sidelined for a while.
Anyone who knows Tom
knows hes a multi-layered
fellow. He was in a band that
produced a hit record. He
was in the Navy during
Vietnam. He booked entertainment for big wigs and
played at governors parties
and Detroit Auto Show gigs.
He wrote a song and performed it acapella when the
Moving Wall came to Imlay
City in 98, and of course has
written thousands of stories

This document will not just


sit on the shelf but rather, be a
reference for future projects
that aim to develop our region
both economically and culturally.
Speaking of crying, I shed
a few tears during the Chamber
of Commerce Dinner-Dance
last Saturday nightbut they
were good tears. I was overwhelmed by the devotion to
Imlay City the three award
recipients displayed and their
gratitude for recognition they
didnt believe they deserved.
Dr. Gary Richards, Citizen
of the Year, Rodney
Sanderson-Smith,
Merit
Award Recipient and Pastor
Tim Wright representing
Heritage Church, Organization
of the Year, all had a similar
message during their acceptance speech. Each mentioned
how they were humbled by
such an honor. The three
gentlemen never mentioned

the word I but rather,


acknowledged and thanked
the people they work with and
serve. In fact, the hall was
filled with people who care
deeply for our community.
People who everyday make a
difference to our Imlay world
and serve because it is the
right thing to do.
For me, the Dinner-Dance
was a perfect way to end a
very memorable week. It was
a week filled with emotional
lows but incredible highs. A
week that reminded me how
truly special Imlay City is.
On behalf of the Imlay
ABC Team, I look forward to
our future and want to thank
you for making our community Americas Best!
Sincerely,
Dana Walker
ABC Team member
& Downtown Development
Authority Director
Imlay City

The power of diplomacy


Diplomacy
works!
Saturdays breaking news of
the release of five Americans
held in Iran for seven Iranians
held in the US must be seen as
the result of the power of
diplomacy.
The news coming out
Saturday morning seems to
indicate that the prisoner swap
was worked out in separate
highly classified negotiations
that ran parallel to the nuclear
discussions.
Saturday also marked the
beginning of sanctions relief
that were part of the Iranian
nuclear dealhammered out
during 14 months of intense
negotiations
in
Vienna
between six Western powers
and Iran. The International
Atomic Energy Agency
(IAEA) has certified that the
number of centrifuges has
been drastically reduced,

radioactive material used in


nuclear weapons has been
exported, the core has been
removed from its heavy water
reactor, and concrete has been
poured into it.
These were all steps that
had to occur for Iran to have
complied with all the requirements of the agreement.
Therefore, the $100 billion of
Iranian funds that had been
frozen by the allies has been
released. This money came
from Iranian oil sales that have
been piling up in Western
banks around the world. It was
their money that the west was
holding. The money is needed
to rebuild their economy
which has been shattered due
to the sanctions.
One expert has said the
bulk of this money may not
even make it back to Iran, but
probably would be converted

to other currencies and used in


business deals in Europe and
Japan and China.
Keep in mind that the sole
purpose of the Iranian nuclear
deal was to keep them from
developing a nuclear weapon!
The West should celebrate
this victory cautiously while
continuing to press Iran, by
sanctions if necessary, to modify their engagement in other
destructive actions such as the
launch of ballistic missiles and
the negative involvement in
Syria and other Middle East
activities. That region of the
world would become more
stable if this were to be accomplished.
One
last
comment:
enforcement of the terms of
this nuclear deal was never to
be based on trust, but on
inspection by the IAEA.
A second last comment:

this deal has been criticized by


those who say the US should
never negotiate with an enemy.
But the second George Bush
administration successfully
negotiated a nuclear deal with
Lybian president Gaddafi, a
sworn enemy of Israel, the US
negotiated with the USSR for
prisoner swaps a number of
times, and George W. Bush
negotiated with North Korea
and Iran even after declaring
them part of the axis of evil.
Iran dismantled a program
they had spent billions on and
this entire disarmament was
accomplished without a bombing campaign, without a single
shot being fired, and with no
loss of life.
The world is a little safer
today.
Cordially,
Don Davenport
Imlay City

Doctors abandon Hippocratic Oath


December 7, 1941, a
Day That Will Live in
Infamy, Japanese armed
forces led surprise attack at
Pearl Harbor Hawaii killing
3,000 sailors and soldiers.
On January 22, 1973 an
attack was made on the
unborn children of this nation
not by a foreign power but by
the United States Supreme
Court when it declared abor-

tion on demand the law of the


land. Since then 57 million
plus unborn babies have died
on the altar of choice.
Attempts have been made to
stop the killing, but only stopping it only around the edges.
With the Court making
this decision on right to privacy issues how can the killing of your own child be a
privacy issue? Doctors who

Clairvoyant moment at dinner dance


A

www.tricitytimes-online.com

as a community newspaperman. Tommy-boy is rarely at


a shortage for words, and his
years as an entertainer have
honed his wit, which is
sometimes most funny to
him.
Of all the things Tommyboy is though, I didnt know
clairvoyant was on the list.
It happens when Imlay City
Mayor Walt Bargen is wrapping up his introduction of
the 2015 Organization of the
Year award winner, Heritage
Church. Almost as if on cue,
right when Heritage Pastor
Tim Wright approaches the
podium to accept the award,
I hear the resounding, familiar chimes of Tommy-boys
cell phone ringing.
Ive always loved the
ringtone hes chosen, but up
until this moment had no
clue that the bold ding-dong,
ding-dong of the church bells
ringing may have been
divinely inspired. Im forced
to suppress a giggle, and it
takes all my might to not
turn around and jab him with
my elbow for an inappropriate moment of levity. I can
feel Tommy-boys frantic
motions as surreptitiously
reaches to silence the bells. I
dont know if anyone else
has noticed, but for me the
typical Tommy-boy
moment is priceless.

And just when I think he


cant top that, he does.
Were talking about the
excellent, heartfelt speech
Sharon gave while introducing Gary as Citizen of the
Year. Sharon is blushing at
the accolades that are
making their way around the
table, all in high praise for
her obvious wordsmithing
abilities and the effort she
put into perfecting the
speech.
Yeah, when I woke up I
thought it was great, Tom
says.
For a moment everyone
at the table is deadpan. You
could hear a pin drop. Im
getting that elbow ready to
jam into Tommy-boys ribs
when the entire table
explodes with laughterTom
stammering about his warped
sense of humor as frantically
as he had been reaching to
silence his cell phone earlier.
He doesnt have to worry,
though, like me, the people
at the table have known Tom
for years, and are familiar
with his uncanny ability to
light up a crowdor sound
the bells, so to speak.
And as usual, he did
both, in an award-winning
fashion, at the dinner-dance
on Saturday.
Email Catherine at
cminolli@pageone-inc.com.

make lots of money from


abortion must have checked
out of the human race and
abandoned the Hippocratic
Oath that said Do no harm.
Even continuing this war on
the weakest ones, liberal
Democrat politicians stonewall any reduction in the
slaughter of the unborn. They
seem to glory in their ability
to join with Planned
Parenthood and so called
womens rights groups to
keep abortion legal by blocking efforts to limit abortions. I
wonder how they claim they

are for human rights when


they deny rights to the unborn.
Maybe you should ask
yourself where you stand on
the issue. Dont say I dont
have a position on abortion,
Thats a cop out. Do you
stand on firm moral ground
with a solid moral compass to
oppose abortion? Or have you
sold away any remnant of
humanity in allowing this terrorism to the unborn?
Lastly pray to end abortion.
David Naeyaert
Allenton

Valentines Day
dinner dance
The band Second &
Stone will be part of this
years magical entertainment
at the second annual
Valentines Day Dinner
Dance at Castle Creek in
Lum. They are known in the
area as one of the best bands
for a mixture of classic rock,
blues and old country rock
and roll. Dinnertime entertainment will include a fantastic Frank Sinatra tribute by
Gary Dixon, a local singing
icon and owner of Cavellis in
Lapeer. There will be more
music, more dancing and
more fun, as we enjoy this
fundraising event for the
Attica Days Festival 2017.
There will be a Chinese
Auction, a small live auction,

and a 50/50 raffle to support


the Attica Food Ministries.
Also included in your ticket
price of $25 per person is a
delicious dinner prepared by
the Country Smokehouse.
Cash bar on site.
Save the date: Saturday,
February 13, 2016 at Castle
Creek Golf Club, 5191 Lum
Rd., Lum, MI. 48412.
For more information, to
make a donation, or to get
tickets please call 586-4845067 or 586-822-9413.
Tickets also available at
Attica Township Hall on
Peppermill Road, daily from
9 a.m. to noon.
Sincerely,
Attica Days Festival 2017
Committee

Dinner-Dance success
The Annual Imlay City
Chamber of Commerce
Dinner-Dance, 2016, was a
great success, with approximately 150 people attending
the event at the Knights of
Columbus Hall on Saturday.
I want to thank the following sponsors of the

Chamber Dinner-Dance:
Centerpiece sponsors:
R.A. Duthler Land Surveyors,
Kapala Heating and Air
Conditioning, Noffert Dental,
Great Clips, King & King
PCAs, Jets Pizza, Village
Letters page 11-A

Page 9-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 20, 2016

Long-serving veteran will be greatly missed

An act of
kindness
returned

Editors note: The following guest


column was submitted by Ronald J.
Kazmierczak, a retired Navy veteran
and Post Historian for the VFW Post
2492 in Imlay City.

he phone rang yesterday


morning, saved me from
the antagonist in my novel.
Ive been watching his every
move this week, listening to
his mind, feeling for a shred
of goodness in his heart.
Writing. Rewriting. Evil
people are difficult to understand, distressing to characterize. Sometimes too close
to home.
So I was glad for the distraction,
Honest Living . . . hoped the
caller was a
friend like
Sue. She
makes me
laugh; forget the
world has
always

been a dan gerous


place. But I
dont have
a friend named Beverly, the
name with an unknown
number. Hello, this is Iris.
I'm calling because I
have a job to do for a good
friend, she said in a timorous tone.
How may I help?
Are you a lavender
farmer?
Yes.
My friend's two-yearold granddaughter has
Beverly wavered.
Leukemia.
My stomach sickened at
the flashback of my thirdborn baby in Beaumonts
intensive care, cries in the
night from terminally ill
children. Diseases. Invisible
enemies.
Beverly apologized and
composed herself.
The baby loves the
scent of lavender. My friend
has been looking for something soft with lavender to
comfort her.
Thankfully, I found two
yellow cotton chicks in the
bottom of the glass jar that
holds what was left of lavender sachets from my farms
gift shop.
The chicks are the size
of a toddler's hand, I said.
Perfect. Ill take them,
thank you.
I addressed a manila
envelope to Beverly, sealed
the two lavender chicks
inside before we said goodbye, and went back to work.
After wrestling several
hours with my storys bad
guy, Id had enough and left
the house for a stroll to clear
my mind. Dear Reader, you
know a person with eyes to
see cant resist the residue of
a winter sunset. Theres
healing in the evaporation of
those orange ribbons in the
frigid sky. Have mercy, God,
I prayed. We are broken,
needy people.
This morning I woke
with Beverly on my mind,
relieved I hadnt mailed the
chicks, and went straight to
the sachet jar. Glory be! I
found three of my favorite
lacy sachets in good shape.
One for Beverly, her friend,
and the babys mother.
In the broad scope of
human suffering, such a gesture seems futile, even ridiculous. Yet, my baby sister
mailed me a card after my
firstborn passed that simply
said I love you, Im sorry
three times. The spirit of
those words carried me until
the next act of kindness
extended another bridge to
hope and healing, the courage to trust God again.
From childhood, Ive
anchored my faith in
Romans 8:28: And we
know that all things work
together for good to them
that love God, to them called
according to his purpose.
This Scripture seemed like a
cruel joke nineteen years ago
when we buried our daughter. Death, our abiding opponent, mocked God in my
sorrow.
I believe we walk this
earth for a purpose, one tested and proven. Be not afraid.
This is our Fathers world.
And He loves us.
Email Iris at
irisleeun@gmail.com.

John A. Herrera
(1935-2016)

oses are red, violets are blue, our


soft spoken friendJohn A.
Herrerawe are going to miss you.
John Herrera was 80 years young
and belonged to the Veterans of
Foreign Wars of the United States for
37 years. John would have been 81
this May, and he would have celebrated his 38th year with the VFW in
November, 2016. He passed away on
January 14.
John Herrera was more than a
United States Marine, he was holding

the job of Chaplain for the longest


time at the VFW Post 2492, 20-plus
years and still going strong.
John Herrera was more than a veteran, he was, and still is, a friend to
many veterans. He would come to
visit veterans that were in the hospital,
senior living centers, at their homes,
and in many other places that veterans
who could not attend functions at the
post were staying.
As part of the message in one of
the documents in the VFW package, it
states: The Eternal God, in his infinite wisdom, has called to his presence our beloved Comrade John A.
Herrera. It was John A. Herreras time
to go to see the Lord of Lords, King
of Kings... and so forth.

John was always ready with a


joke, a good, firm handshake, and
ready to travel as part of his job as
post Chaplain. John A. Herrera, one
last thing before I end this message:
You are going to get a BZ (Bravo
Zulu) for an outstanding job, and
well done, too. The person who
takes on the job of post Chaplain is
going to have some pretty big shoes to
fill, and a lot of traveling to do as
well.
With that, I say these last,
famous words of all, keep the sun
in your face, the wind at your
back, and a nice calm sea ride
on. Were going to miss you John
A. Herrera. Goodbye,
old friend.

He would come to visit veterans that were in the hospital, senior living
centers, at their homes, and in many other places that veterans
who could not attend functions at the post were staying.

Football futility: Is it in the names?

ts January again, National


Football League playoff
time. Twelve teams made the
playoffs to compete for this
years Super Bowl trophy.
Its the 50th Super Bowl.
Can you guess which team
will not be thereagain? For
the 50th year? Hint: Its the
only NFL team in Michigan.
Yes, readers, cant slip
anything past you, can I? It
is, indeed, the Detroit Liedowns,
formerly
the
Pontiac
Pussycats.
They prefer to be
called by
their official name,
the Detroit Rick Liblong
Lions, but
Lions roar,
not purr and meow.
This franchise has had 13
losing seasons out of the last
16. They even set an NFL
record in 2008 losing all 16
games of the regular season,
after being the only NFL
team to go 4-0 in the pre-season that year.
The last time the Detroit
Football Club won an NFL
title was more than 58 years
ago in 1957! That was eight
years before they even started having Super Bowls! Ike
was President. Soapy
Williams was Governor. The
Almont Raiders finished a
perfect 8-0 that year.
The Lions finished a
respectable 8-4 during the
regular season and then beat
the San Francisco 49ers and
Cleveland Browns in the post
season to win the championship. I had just turned 10

All the Liblong day..

years old.
During the fabulous fifties, the Lions won three
NFL championships. Of
course, there were only 12
teams then, not 32, so the
odds were better. But still
The futility has spanned
generations of players and
fans alike. Why? There are
as many theories about why
as there are fans. Some say
its the Fords, owners of the
team. I wont argue with that.
Some say its the Curse
of Bobby Layne. When the
Lions traded him in 58 he
said they would not win a
title for 50 years. But the
curse should have ended
eight years ago. Some say
its the coach. But theyve
had 17 of them since 1957.
Lousy players? Theyve had
at least five Heisman Trophy
winners and fifteen Hall of
Famers since 57.
Quarterbacks? Thirty-nine of
them since the last title.
Theyve even had three different stadiums. Two of those
were indoors so there should
be no weather excuse.
Over the years I have
seen the Lions find many
creative ways to lose, often
near the end of the game
snatching defeat from the
jaws of victory. There have
been countless dumb penalties, interceptions, sacks,
missed field goals, dropped
passes and allowing too
many punt and kickoff
returns for touchdowns.
A few weeks ago, you
will recall, they lost AFTER
THE GAME WAS OVER! A
win was in the bag against
the rival Green Bay Packers
as time ran out. The scoreboard read 0:00 time left as I,

thought the quarterback


wasnt down enough so he
grabbed his face mask.
Thatll show em.
But the guy in the striped
zebra shirt saw it, too. The
game cannot end on a defensive penalty. So, give the
Pack 15 more yards for the
penalty and one more play. I
mean, what are the odds that
the Packers will score on one
play? Turns out that the odds
were 100%. A Hail Mary
pass lofted into end zone,
cleanly caught by a guy
wearing green and gold with
five guys BEHIND him in
Honolulu Blue and Silver
watching.
My theory of the futility
Cloyce Box
over the years was the players names. In the glory days,
we had guys with cool,
unusual first names like
Harley, John Henry, Tobin,
Yale, Darris, Dorne, Doak,
Cloyce, Jug, Torgy and
Hopalong. How could you
lose with names like that? I
loved hearing those names
called out by the Ol
Announcer, Van Patrick.
Thats the only thing I could
think of for the long draught,
the names. But wait, this
years team had some guys
with cool, unusual first
names, too. Names like Isa,
Ameer, Ziggy, Crezdon,
Quandre, Haloti, Caraun,
Khyri and Tahir.
So I guess the names
Doak Walker
arent the problem after all.
and thousands of other fans, Someone else will have
breathed a sigh of relief. And to figure out the riddle of the
then what did our wondering Lions. They just hired a new
eyes behold? A yellow hanGeneral Manager, not that
kie (flag) on the field and it
they havent tried that before
wasnt accidentally dropped either. Maybe this one knows
by the ref as he left the field. a little about football.
Seems like one of our guys
Theyre keeping the same

The Curse of Bobby


Layne?

Dorne Dibble

Ziggy Ansah
coach, however.
I know the sun will still
shine, children will still
laugh and play, the universe
will unfold as it should. But,
again, its wait til next
year. Im running out of
next years! Cmon, Lions,
win one for Bobby Layne
and me, while I can enjoy it.
Dont make me resign my
fanship.
Email Rick at
rick.liblong@cox.net.

Perspective shifts, and other things too


F

unny how perspective on age and


aging changes as we get older.
My daughter recently made a comment that made me realize how we
gauge aging on different levels at
certain times in our lives. She said,
Wow, look at you, all sporty and
stuff. I was wearing Adidas workout
pants and a trendy sport jacket. My
first thought was, being pretty fresh
off the treadmill, Thats what happens when you get old.
Old?! she questions, giggles
then adds, You are not that old,
Mom.
Well I feel old. I HAVE to work
out or Im going to totally lose hold
of my health. I am in those years

where metabolism begins dipping,


where its a necessity to add exercise
to my daily routine
and watch eating
and drinking habits.
What surprises
me is that my
13-year-old does
not think I am old
enough yet to be in

the old catego


ry from her perspective anyway.
Recently, a
woman who appeared to be in her
60s gasped when she heard I had an

almost 19-year-old son. What? No


way do you have a child that old.
You look like you are about 30!
(Shes my new best friend.)
Thirty? Okay well, her perspective is about as good as mine when
guessing the age of someone considerably younger. For example, the
doctors and nurses these days are
looking younger and younger. I
recently saw a young man who is a
doctor that looked to me like he was
maybe 20. He very well could have
been 25 with a medical degree,
maybe hes a tad older but to me he
looked way too young to be diagnosing any kind of ailment this old lady
has

So considering some things that


we need to be wary of as we age,
like metabolism, gaining weight,
blood pressure issues and such, I said
to my husband, I am too young to
have to worry about these things!
As usual, he puts me in my
place with a raised eyebrow and
a, Yeah, you kinda are, response.
Yes, he keeps me grounded. God
bless him.
And after hearing that I will be
40-something next week, an
esteemed colleague pointed out eloquently, Youre halfway home!
Indeed. Time waits for no one.
Email Paula at
paulaparisot@gmail.com.

erning of the people who live under


the umbrella of its protection.
That is a lot of words. As I dig
in to read, I discover that, while the
preamble is only 51 words, even that
part acts to lay out a plan to bring
solidarity; and to prevent our country
from becoming a dictatorship.
Whatever our political stripes, we
can be very thankful that our countrys founders saw fit to put checks
and balances into the format for living here.
Id be the last to say that I have
expertise in interpreting, or even
reading, this document and any
amendments which have been adopted. What I will do, though, is just
print the preamble, exactly the way I

found it, for us all to appreciate


together:
We the People
of the United
States, in Order to
form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure
domestic
Tranquility, provide for the common defence , promote the general

Welfare, and
secure the

Blessings of
Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain
and establish this Constitution for

the United States of America.


I settle in to try to read it, recognizing within about ten minutes that I
am in over my head, I see quickly
how there can be shades of interpretationhow people of different persuasions can butt heads. The beauty
is, that the people who drew up the
document, foresaw this, and built in
checks and balances. Divisions of
government.
That can give us comfort.
None of us will probably get
exactly what we envision. But
together our system of government
is still something to be valued,
and to thank God for.
Email Willene at
willenetanis@aol.com.

The beauty of checks and balances

nough political rhetoric is


bouncing around in my head
that Im probably not going to be
sleeping any time soonenough
shades of interpretation, splitting of
semantics to make me want to reread through the constitution for
myself.
More than half a dozen people,
narrowed down already from more
than a dozen, stand ready and willing. Ready for what? Thats a fair
question. The answer is not as simple
as it may sound. The short version is:
to take an oath to assume a mantle of
leadership in upholding that constitution. All of them are passionate about
our country and the parameters the
constitution draws around the gov-

Page 10-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 20, 2016

By Tom Wearing

Tri-City Times Staff Writer

LAPEERCOUNTY
The Lapeer County Sheriffs
Dept. is warning of an individual who is contacting residents by telephone and impersonating a Lapeer County
Sheriffs deputy.
According to a Sheriffs
Dept. fraudulent activity
report dated Friday, Jan. 15,
the impersonator advises
there is a valid arrest warrant
out for the call recipient and
attempts to collect bond
money.
The Sheriffs report indicates that during the past
week, neighboring counties
have experienced the same
fraudulent activity.

The report identifies the


callers phone number as
beginning with an 810 area
code, followed by the first
three numbers, 247.
It is believed the calls
originate from an out-of-state
location, possibly in the
south.
When returning the call, a
recording of a male voice
with a southern accent states:
you have reached the Lapeer
County Sheriffs office. If
this is an emergency, please
hang up and call 911, thus
giving the scam call greater
legitimacy.
Lapeer County Sheriff
Ron
Kalanquin
and
Undersheriff Robert Rapson
urge residents to not send

any money through pre-paid


debit cards or any other
means.
They note that the
Sheriffs Department does
not collect bond payments
with pre-paid debit cards.
Such payments must be made
in person.
If anyone is contacted by
someone claiming to be law
enforcement regarding an
arrest warrant, immediately
contact the nearest local
police authority.
That authority can confirm the existence of a legitimate warrant and bond.
For questions or more
information, contact the
Lapeer County Sheriffs
Dept. at 810-664-1801.

NEW BUSINESS . . .

Visiting Angels

Photo by Tom Wearing

Sheriffs department warns of scam calls

Obituaries

~ George J. Boychuck, 86 ~

George J. Boychuck, 86,


New Florence, Pa, formerly
of Dilltown, Pa went to be
with the Lord January 15,
2016 at home surrounded by
his family.
Born March 16, 1929 in
Dilltown the son of the late
Charles and Anna Boychuck.
Also preceded in death
by son George Boychuck,
Jr.; brothers Walter, Steve,
Charles, James and Alex
Boychuck; sisters Mary
Burdumy and Helen
Boychuck.
Survived by wife Evelyn
(Penrose) Boychuck; chil-

dren Barbara Green, John


Boychuck and Mark

Boychuck all of Michigan;


Georgina Stoldt, Iowa;
Debra Balistreri, Wisconsin;
Timothy Cesefske and
Deidra Brenna, both of
Michigan; Michelle Kosker,
Ligonier; Debra Silvis, New
Florence; Marilyn
Stinchcomb, Florida; Harry
Condron, Georgia; Lisa
DeWitt, New Florence;
Angie Manning, Iowa;
Melony Billetdeaux,
Davidsville; David Condron,
Johnstown; Terri Craft, New
Florence; Amy Baum,
Latrobe. 35 Grandchildren
and numerous Great-

~ Jean Case Dewey, 83 ~


Grandchildren.
George enjoyed farming,
bowling, dancing, singing
and golfing.
He was the former vice
president of Champion
Home Builders Co. and the
owner of Lapeer Fire
Extinguisher Sales and
Service.
Services and burial
where in Pennsylvania.
Funeral arrangements
were made by Stuart Funeral
Home of New Florence, PA.
Online condolences may
be left at www.thestuartfuneralhomes.com

~ John Herrera, 80 ~
John Herrera, age 80, of
Imlay City, Michigan
passed away after a short illness Thursday, January 14,
2016 at Stonegate Health
Campus in Lapeer,
Michigan.
John was born on May
27, 1935 in Grand Saline,
Texas. A son of Francisco
and Isabel Herrera. John
grew up in Brown City and
graduated from Imlay City
High School in the Class of
1954.
John joined the U.S.
Marine Corp and served his
country for 22+ years during
the Vietnam War. When John
retired from USMC he had
attained the rank of Master
Gunnery Sergeant.
He was married to Irma

Nieves on September 25,


1960 in San Juan, Puerto
Rico. John went to work at
GM Truck and Coach in
Pontiac and retired after 17
years. John studied at the
University of Michigan for a
degree in Social work and
went back to work as a substitute teacher in the Imlay
City area.
He was a Life Member
of the Imlay City V.F.W.
and was a past Chaplin. He
was a member of the
Crossroads Baptist Church
in Imlay City. John has participated with the Good
Samaritan Missionary Group
on missions to Mexico,
Honduras, Dominican
Republic and more.
Surviving are: his wife:

Community Calendar

Wednesday, January 20th

Lapeer Area Citizens Against


Domestic Assault meets 1:00 p.m. to
3:00 p.m. in the Lapeer Court House for
personal protection order clinic. For info
810-246-0632.
Lapeer Amputee Support Team will
meet at 3:30 p.m. at Trinity United
Methodist Church, 1310 N. Main Street,
Lapeer.

Friday, January 22nd

Imlay City Senior Center Texas Hold


Em 12:30 p.m. For info 810-724-6030.
Al-Anon Meeting 10:00 a.m. at Family
of Christ Lutheran Church, Imlay City.

Tuesday, January 26th

Imlay City Senior Center Euchre


Tournament 1:00 p.m. For information
call 810-724-6030.
Community Soup Kitchen is open
4:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. at Zion United
Methodist Church.
Alcoholics for Christ meets 7:00 p.m.
at Full Potential Ministry, 170 Weston
Street, Imlay City.

Wednesday, January 27th

Lapeer Area Citizens Against


Domestic Assault meets 1:00 p.m. to
3:00 p.m. in the Lapeer Court House for
personal protection order clinic. For info
810-246-0632.

Friday, January 29th

Imlay City Senior Center Texas Hold


Em 12:30 p.m. For info 810-724-6030.
Al-Anon Meeting 10:00 a.m. at Family
of Christ Lutheran Church, Imlay City.

Monday, February 1st

Almont/Dryden Lioness Branch Club


meets 7:00 p.m. at the Lions Hall, 222
Water Street in Almont.

Tuesday, February 2nd

Imlay City Senior Center Euchre


Tournament 1:00 p.m. For information
call 810-724-6030.
Community Soup Kitchen is open
4:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. at Zion United
Methodist Church.
Alcoholics for Christ meets 7:00 p.m.
at Full Potential Ministry, 170 Weston
Street, Imlay City.

How to use our Community Calendar

The Tri-City Times Community Calendar is a weekly schedule


of events for churches, clubs, local meetings, and civic
organizations. If you have an item for the Community
Calendar call our office at 810-724-2615. Deadline for all
calendar items is noon Monday prior to publication date.

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JANUARY 27TH 3:00-5:00P.M.

FREE EVENT WITH SOUP & SALAD BAR - RSVP (810) 724-6300 BY JANUARY 23RD

www.SanctuaryatMapleVista.org

Irma Herrera of Imlay City;


children: John A. (Raynl)
Herrera of Jeffersonville,
Indiana, Janet A. (Brenda
Dominguez) Herrera of San
Antonio, Texas, Jane A.
Herrera of Attica, and Joseph
(Amy) Herrera of Imlay
City; sisters: Marcie Chacon
of Fort Lauderdale, Florida,
Frances Villalobos of
Detroit, and Pamela (Robert)

Slingerland of Imlay City.


John is also survived by
grandchildren: Skylar, Joey,
Mia, Ashley, Melissa; and
great-grandchildren:
Madeline, Gabriel, Sadie,
Ariana, Zoey, Quinton, and
Destiny.
Funeral service was held
11:00 a.m. Tuesday,
January 19, 2016 at
Crossroads Baptist Church,
in Imlay City, MI. The
Reverend Kenneth Renard,
pastor of Crossroads Baptist
Church officiated. Burial
followed in Imlay Township
Cemetery, Imlay City.
There was a Final
Veterans Salute at 7:15 p.m.
Monday evening.
Funeral arrangements
were made by Muir Brothers
Funeral Home, Imlay City.
Please be sure to sign
our online register book at
muirbrothersfh.com

~ Jean Myers, 74 ~
Jean Myers, age 74, of
Attica, Michigan passed
away after a short illness
Thursday, January 14, 2016
at McLaren Lapeer Region
Hospital.
Jean Yvonne Cummings
was born February 27, 1941
in Cadillac, Michigan. She
was the daughter of Evon
Elton and Wilhelmina A.
Cummings. She grew up in
the Order of the Eastern Star
Villas in Adrian, Michigan
during the 1950s and graduated from Adrian High
School.
She married her first
husband Claude Abbott in
May, 1958. He passed away
in 1964. Jean married Lester
"Les" Myers on May 27,
1967 in Troy, Michigan.
They have lived in Attica
since 1967. Les died on
March 15, 2011.
She had been employed
by the Norm Robbins and
Pat Cronin State Farm
Insurance Agencys in
Lapeer. Jean retired after 25
years as office manager.
Surviving are: her
daughter: Mindy (Mark)
Rogers of Attica; sons: Mark
(Karen) Abbott of St. Louis,
MI, Timothy Abbott of
Imlay City, and Wade (Sallie
Wise) Myers of Attica; a sister: Laura (Gary) Winckler

Operations Manager Richard


Kray and Marketing Director
Kimberly Whitley are ready to
help residents meet their needs
through Visiting Angels, 245 N.
Cedar Street, Imlay City. Visiting
Angels offers non-medical, private duty home care. Services
include bathing, dressing and
grooming assistance, assistance with walking, medication
reminders, errands, shopping,
light housekeeping, meal prep,
friendly companionship and
respite care for families on a
flexible, hourly basis. For more
information call 810-721-7388 or
visit www.visitingangels.com/
imlaycity.

of Woodstock, Georgia.
She is also survived by
19 grandchildren:
Kimberlee, Nathan,
Sheloshah, Kalah, Kezia,
Jedidah, Emalee, Eleazor,
Ezekiel, Lydia, Gina,
Chrystal, Alex, Sondra, Lisa,
Chelle, Maggie, Ryan, Kyle,
Cassandra, Matt, Sadie,
George, Abbie; and by 17
great-grandchildren; and a
great-grand dog: Cooter.
Jean is preceded in death
by her first husband Claude
Abbott, her second husband
Les Myers, and a brother:
Wayne Cummings.
Funeral service was held
10:00 a.m. Monday, January
18, 2016 at St. Pauls
Lutheran Church 200 N.
Cedar Street, Imlay City, MI.
Reverend Alan Casillas, pastor of St. Pauls Lutheran
Church officiated. Burial followed in the Arcadia
Township Cemetery, Lum,
Michigan.
Those planning an
expression of sympathy may
wish to consider memorials
to St. Pauls Scholarship
Fund.
Funeral arrangements
made by Muir Brothers
Funeral Home of Imlay City.
Please be sure to sign
our online register book at
muirbrothersfh.com

Jean "Case" Dewey, age


83, of Attica, passed away
Monday, January 11, 2016 at
Lapeer County Medical Care
Facility (Suncrest) in Lapeer.
Jean Elizabeth Ludwig
was born on February 6,
1932. She was the daughter
of Robert and Helen
Ludwig. She grew up in
Detroit and Memphis,
Michigan. Jean attended
school in Memphis. She has
been in the Attica community since 1962.
She married Gerald W.
Dewey on February 25,
1978 in Port Huron,
Michigan. Jean traveled all
over the country including
Arizona, Texas, and Florida.
She was a homemaker. Jean
cooked at the Imlay City
Elementary School. She also
was a school bus driver for
the Imlay City Community
Schools. She enjoyed knitting and belonged to a knitting club in Harrietta,
Michigan. She also enjoyed
crocheting mittens and
scarves.
Jean is survived by her
daughter: Barbara (John)
O'Neal of Imlay City; sons:
Bill (Theresa) Case of Imlay
City, Jerry Case of
Mooresville, IN, David
(Debra) Case of Lapeer, and
Bryan (Kelly) Case of

Lapeer; eight grandchildren;


eight great-grandchildren;
sisters: Phyllis Pulley of
Tennessee and Pauline
Dishinger of Florida.
She is preceded in death
by her husband: Gerald
Dewey and brother: Robert
Ludwig.
A funeral service was
held 11:00 a.m. Friday,
January 15, 2016 at Muir
Brothers Funeral Home of
Imlay City. Michelle Lamb
officiated. Burial followed at
Imlay Township Cemetery.
Funeral arrangements
made by Muir Brothers
Funeral Home of Imlay City.
Please be sure to sign
our online register book at
muirbrothersfh.com

~ Cheryl A. Liptak, 69 ~
Cheryl A. Liptak, age
69, of Almont, passed away
January 17, 2016. She was
born March 22, 1946 in
Canada, daughter of the late
William and Mary Sweet.
She is survived by her
beloved husband, Jan; her
loving daughters: Elizabeth
(Kyle) Bowman and Katie
(Darin) Schick; and her
adoring grandchildren:
Andrew, Erik, Tate, Easten,

Jenna and Ashlyn.


A funeral Mass will
be celebrated in the near
future at St. John the
Evangelist Catholic
Church, 872 Capac Road,
Allenton, MI.
Funeral arrangements
will be made by Phillips
Funeral Home of South
Lyon. For more information
visit www.phillipsfuneral.
com.

~ Sally Sue Rapley, 73 ~


Sally Sue Rapley, 73, of
Capac, died Monday,
January 11, 2016, at
Allegiance Hospice Home,
Jackson, MI.
She was born January
31, 1942, in Port Huron. The
daughter of the late Herbert
and Lois (Merritt) Siegel.
Sally graduated
Michigan State University
with a Bachelors of
Education degree and from
MaryGrove College with a
Masters degree. She taught
for the Head Start program
in Lansing and public
schools in Charleston, S.C.
and then for the Capac
Middle School before retiring in 2004.
Surviving are two sons
Patrick (Lois) Rapley of Yale
and Paul Siegel (Ken Dane)
of Jackson; two grandchildren, Stephanie and
Samantha, great-granddaughter, Girette and sister,
Janet Palmateer of Capac.
Funeral services were
held 11:00 a.m. Friday,

January 14, 2016 at Kaatz


Funeral Directors in Capac.
Pastor Sarah Flatt of St.
Johns Lutheran Church,
Capac, officiated.
Memorials are suggested
to Allegiance Hospice
Home.
Funeral arrangements
were made by Kaatz Funeral
Directors in Capac.
For information and
Guest Book visit kaatzfunerals.com

To share one of these obituaries with a friend or a loved-one


VISIT US ONLINE AT:

www.tricitytimes-online.com

By Catherine Minolli
Tri-City Times Editor

ALMONT Things just


keep getting better for singer/
songwriter Bob Marshall.
A 1973 graduate of
Almont
High
School,
Marshall has carved out a living as a rock-n-roll cowboy,
playing at gigs as near as
Almonts 2015 homecoming
and as far away as
Albuquerque, New Mexico
and Liberty Hill, Texas.
With his new CD Horses
That Run Far Away,
Marshalls love of cowboy
music sung straight from the
heart has earned accolades on
the national scene, including
a shot at Western Male
Vocalist of the Year.
Nominees for the award,
presented by the Academy of
Western Artists (AWA), are
selected by Western music
DJs from the U.S. and around
the world. Marshall is one of

five in the running for this


years award, which will be
presented at the 20th Annual
Academy of Western Artists
Awards Show scheduled for
March 12 at the historic Fort
Worth Stockyards in Fort
Worth, Texas.
Marshall appeared on the
radar screens of Western
music DJs with the January
2015 release of Horses That
Run Far Away, says Lori
Tesch, artist manager of
Diamond M Music.
Horses that Run is currently playing on more than
200 radio stations in some 20
countries.
The album has received
tremendous critical acclaim,
Tesch says in a press release.
The CD, which is a compilation of Marshalls original
material, finished third nationally in the Grammy Amplifier
Awards sponsored by Hyundai,
and has remained number two
on the national Western Music

Roy remains at helm


of county commission
LAPEER Goodland
Townships Gary Roy will
continue to serve as chairman
of the county commission.
Members voted unanimously
at their January 7 meeting to
keep Roy in the top spot. Hes
been chairman of the board
since 2011.
Commissioners
also
opted to keep Cheryl Clark as
vice chairperson.
As part of their regular
new years business, Roy
handed
out
committee
assignments and commissioners adopted rules of
procedure
and
their
2016 meeting schedule. The
commission meets every
Thursday morning at 9 a.m.
in the county building in

Lapeer.
In other commission business:
A public hearing for the
countys 2016-2020 Parks
and Recreation Plan draft will
be held tomorrow, January
21, as part of the commissions meeting. Residents
wishing to weigh in on the
document have their chance
beginning at 9:15 a.m. that
day. A copy of the draft plan
can be viewed on the countys
website at www.lapeercountyweb.org.
Written comments can
also be submitted through
February 4, one week prior to
the anticipated adoption date.
Opinions can be directed to
Lapeer
County
Administration, 255 Clay
Street, Suite 301, Lapeer, MI
48446.

IMLAYCITY While
snowfall has been light thus
far this winter, we may well
find ourselves buried in a
foot or so of the fluffy white
stuff at any time.
In the event of a heavy
snowfall,
Imlay
City
DPW
workers will need
some help from residents in
keeping the citys streets and
sidewalks safe and accessible to residents and motorists.
To ensure the public
safety, DPWSupt. Ed Priehs
urges residents to not plow,
shovel or blow snow back
into city streets.
When snow is left in
piles on the street or curb, it
becomes dangerous for
motorists and for snow plow
drivers, said Priehs. It
freezes and can cause dam-

age to your vehicle or to the


citys equipment the next
time the street is plowed.
Priehs added that doing
so is not allowed by citys
Obstructions
Prohibited
Ordinance, which applies to
all public streets, alleys and
sidewalks.
The citys policy for
snow removal on sidewalks
includes the following:
Snow must be removed
within 48 hours of a snow
event.
A notice will be published in the newspaper each
year to notify property owners of the policy and fines
associated with such violations.
A form letter will be
sent to absentee property
owners to inform them of
any new policies.

By Maria Brown

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

DPW asks residents for


help after heavy snows

Bob Marshall
Charts for six months. Horses
that Run remains in the top
twenty of the Most Played
Western Albums to this day.
The Academy of Western
Artists is an organization dedicated to the continued support
and advancement of the
Cowboy/Western
lifestyle
through the fine arts, traditional western arts, poetry and
music.
Bob Marshall is the son of
Jo Marshall of Almont.
Bob is a second generation cowboy, who was

inspired by his father, a professional cowboy.


He was 10-years-old
when he started playing the
guitar. His mother would
drive him over an hour each
way to lessons where he
learned blues licks of greats
such as Muddy Waters and
B.B. King.
His tastes turned to the
folk sounds of Crosby, Stills,
and Nash and James Taylor
and Jim Croce as he grew up
in the 70s.
Eventually, he found his
niche with cowboy music
that he writes and plays
straight from the heart.
The truth of Bobs words
can be felt in the pit of your
stomach, says popular
Western music reviewer Rick
Huff. They can be smelled
like a coming rain on the
wind. They can be heard as
easily as the scream of a red
tail hawk on the wing. Every
sense is triggered in an audience, because Bobs presentation is as genuine as youd
expect from a man used to
working with Gods creatures
and land.

Photo provided

Almont grad up for Western music award

Page 11-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 20, 2016

Families first
Louis Parsh, trustee of the Knights of Columbus
Council 4556 of Imlay City, hands award to
Family of the Month recipient, Paul Lafontaine.
The Family of the Month Award goes to a family
whose contributions to the church, council and
community are above and beyond the norm and
whose daily family life promotes the development and nurturing of the Catholic family. Parsh
says the award is the council's way of saying,
Thank you for your efforts! adding that the family being recognized is chosen from nominations from fellow Knights within the Council.

Letters Continued:
from page 1-A
Barn Carpets & Rugs, Taco
Bell, Sandy & Karl Iloncai,
Lapeer County Bank & Trust,
B Naturals Wellness & Spa,
Compass Home & Health
Care of Michigan, CSB
Bank, Homer Concrete
Products, Kellys Pet Salon,
Liebler Insurance Agency,
Rowe Professional Services,
Doug Halabicky State Farm

Insurance, Security Credit


Union, Dennis CollisonSpicer Group, Talmer Bank
& Trust, Tianas Dollar N
Deals, Tri-City Times, Tri
County Bank & Todds Glass,
Mirrors & More.
The sponsors of the
entertainment for the evening
were: Muir Brothers Funeral
Home, Stitchin at the Barn,
Dr.
Clif
Clendenan
Chiropractic and Mette

Financial Group.
A special thanks to:
Kempfs Imlay City Florist,
Tianas Dollar N Deals and
The Print Shop.

Members
of
the
Chambers
Promotions
Committee are to be thanked
for their long hours of planning and execution of the
beautiful 2016 Chamber
Dinner-Dance.
The 2016 Chamber

Dinner-Dance was a huge


success because of all the
generosity of the businesses,
individuals and volunteers
who made it possible to have
such a great event. Thank
you to everyone.
Sincerely,
Ann Hintz
Executive Director
Imlay City Area Chamber
of Commerce
Imlay City

If you cant pass the check you dont get a gun


Im a strong believer in
the 2nd Amendment of the
Constitution: The right to
bear arms. If you buy a gun
from a dealer, in a store or at
a gun show, its a law that a
background check is required.
If you cant pass the background check you dont get
the gun. Case closed. Its
already been proven that even
with the new Executive
Order restrictions none of
these terrible mass shootings
would have been avoided. If
youre a criminal you
probably didnt buy your
guns legally in the first
place. So, this is my question.
If the purpose of more
gun control is to stop these

mass shootings, then how


do more restrictions on the
people that legally sell and
legally buy guns solve the
problem? It doesnt.
Maybe there is another
reason for these additional
restrictions. This administration would like nothing
better than to make our country more like the European
countries where you cannot
own a gun. Yet even there it
doesnt stop the mass
shootings. Look at Paris,
France, which has one of
the strictest forms of gun
control in the world. If the
real reason for these changes
is to be more like them,
what better way to take guns

away from you and me than


to put enough restrictions into
law that makes no one qualified?
The new Executive Order
requires more stringent
reporting from our doctors on
mental health and drug use.
What if your doctor will be
required to report any medication a person is taking for
depression, anxiety or medications that may cause these
side effects? Does this constitute mental illness? What
additional data does the fine
print on this order say? If this
person wants to buy a gun and
his name is added to the list
during the FBI background
check he or she would not

qualify for a gun.


Lets go one step further,
what if they determine that
because you are on the list
there should not be any guns
in your household? Are all the
guns in your home confiscated, even if the owners have
no mental health issues? I
think less people will seek
help from their doctors if it
means putting them on the
list.
I hope more people get
involved and realize the
action of this President maybe
more about confiscating guns
than trying to prevent these
mass shootings.
Tim Lintz
Lapeer

Capac varsity soccer has a long list of thank yous


The Capac High School
Varsity Boys and Girls Soccer
teams would like to thank the
Four County Community
Foundation, and Darcy Flynn,
who created the Capac
Adolescents
Preventing
Abuse and Crime Fund to
benefit the youth of Capac.
This financial support has
benefited our high school
soccer program since 2006

and we are truly grateful for


all these years.
It takes many volunteers
each season to make soccer
happen. Thank you to
Dan Ransom for coaching
both the boys and girls this
past year. Your dedication
was very much appreciated.
Others that have given
their time include Mary
Ransom, Eric Ransom,

Barry
Geliske,
Anna
Dalessandro,
Jordan
Robinson, Chad Anderson,
Linda
Anderson,
and
Roger Smith. Thank you to
each one of you!
Also, we would like to
recognize all the volunteers
from AYSO Region 1296 that
take care of our fields and
bathrooms. They are some of
the best in the area.

Last, but not least, we


thank all the families and
friends that come out to our
games and cheer us on,
and drive our athletes.
We look forward to the
upcoming girls season this
spring!
Sincerely,
Angie Sawicki
Capac High School Varsity
Boys and Girls Soccer

If youre like most couples, you and your spouse


probably stood at the altar,
hearts and minds giddy with
expectation of the journey
ahead. But, somewhere along
the line, the romantic Street
Car Named Desire got
derailed
by
the
big
Locomotive Named Reality.
Is there any hope to get on
track? Yes!
At Gateway Assembly we
know that strong marriages
create strong families and in

order to stay on track we need


Gods Word to guide our
steps! We also need time to
just focus on our marriage.
We have invited Jay and
Laura Laffoon, marriage
edu-tainers and hosts of the
comedy-infused Ultimate
Date Night event, to help
couples learn how to create
and regularly celebrate a
thriving marriage while
exploring the realities that
everyday life brings to the
relationship. Their humorous

and entertaining transparency


offers couples permission
to discover and bring
laughter into their marriage
as they enjoy a connecting
experience
with
one
another.
Please join us at Gateway
Assembly, 2796 S. Van Dyke
Rd., Imlay City, MI, 48444,
for a two-day marriage conference on Friday, February
19, at 7 p.m. and Saturday,
February 20 beginning at 9
a.m. Tickets can be purchased

online at gwafamily.com or at
Gateway Assembly for $40 if
purchased by January 31, and
$50 if purchased February 1,
or after.
For more information,
please call Gateway Assembly
at 810.724.8110.
Cant wait to see you
there!
Pastor Jeff & Tammy
Krist
Lead Pastor
Gateway Assembly
Imlay City

Genealogy workshop at Goodland library Gateway Assembly hosts marriage edu-tainers

GOOLDAND TWP.
The Goodland Township
Library will again host
Katherine Willson, vice president of the Michigan
Genealogical Council, on
Saturday, January 23 from 11
a.m.-1 p.m.
Willson will be discussing
how to start your research and
how to do it without breaking
the bank, says library Director
Catherine Yezak in a press
release.

Visitors are asked to
bring all family history available. Visitors may also
bring their own electronic
devices, though the library
has a few on hand for partici-

pants to use. Refreshments


and other materials will be provided.
This event is free, but
donations are always welcome.
Reservations can be made
online at goodlandtownshiplibrary.org, or you can call 810721-2110.
Yezak notes that this event
is in a different format from
last years workshop. It is
geared primarily for adults, but
everyone is welcome. Due to
limited space, reservations are
required.
The Goodland Township
Library is located 2370 N. Van
Dyke, adjacent to the Goodland
Twp. Hall.

Hand crafters wanted

GOODLAND TWP. The Goodland Township


Library is looking for anyone who enjoys doing hand
crafts, such as knitting, crocheting, scrapbooking, drawing/painting, wood carving, cross stitch, etc. Novice to
experienced crafters are welcome to join in on Monday,
January 25, from 6-7 p.m. The event is free and open to
the public. The group welcomes young and old to learn a
new skill, practice an old one, and to share in some lively
conversations. We may not do all crafts, but we all practice some of them. Everyone is welcome to attend. The
Goodland Twp. Library is located at 2370 N. Van Dyke,
adjacent to the township hall.

Three candidates to be at upcoming forum


Thank you for to the 82nd
District State House candidates for accepting the invitation from the Lapeer County
Tea Party to speak at our
forum on Tuesday, February 2
at 7 p.m. at the Mayfield
Township Hall, 1900 North
Saginaw St.
It is our privilege and
honor to have the Republican
candidate Mr. Gary Howell,
the Democratic candidate Ms.

Margaret Guerrero Deluca


and the Libertarian candidate
Ms. Tracy Spilker at the
event. We are excited to hear
the candidates tell us about
their plans to make Lapeer
County a better place to live
and raise a family. The
Honorable Judge Nick
Holowka will be the moderator and he will be asking
questions from our audience.
The Lapeer County Tea Party

is a nonpartisan group. We
hold these forums for voters
to hear directly from the candidates and give them an
opportunity to ask questions.
Our goal is to encourage
everyone to gather as much
information as they can, to
make informed decisions
before they go to the polls.
This is also an opportunity for
you, the candidate, to tell people your plans on how you

will serve the citizens of


Lapeer County, if elected.
On behalf of the Lapeer
County Tea Party we want to
thank the candidates for their
participation and the opportunity to share your platforms
with us.
Sincerely,
Tim Lintz
Director Lapeer County
Tea Party
Lapeer

Page 12-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 20, 2016

Town Talk
Free meals for people in
need are offered at the
North Branch Senior Center
on Monday and Thursday
evenings from 5:30-7 p.m.
Call 810-441-0322 for more
information.

For Senior Citizens

Museums

will be served the 4th


Tuesday of every month.
Call 395-4518 for details.
Pickleball at the Imlay City
Senior Center is no longer a
drop in class. If you are
interested in participating,
please call the center at 810724-6030. Stay fit & active
with this fun racquet sport
Dinner and an evening of that is simple, free and easy
card playing with friends, to play.
50/50 raffle and prizes of
high and low for each table
every third Monday at the
Washington Senior Center
from 4-8 p.m. Call the cen- St. Pauls Lutheran Church
ter for further details 586- Food for Families kitchen
752-6543. The center is is open to the public for
located at 57880 Van Dyke, free, hot meals every
Washington Township, MI Monday and Wednesday
48094.
from 4-5:30 p.m.
Swing Dance Lessons are This Heart Loves Food
being offered at the Port Pantry is open the first
Huron Senior Center, 600 Saturday of each month
Grand Avenue in Port from 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. at
Huron, every Tuesday from Gateway Assembly Church,
7:30-9 p.m. and the first and 2796 S. Van Dyke Rd., Imlay
third Thursday of the month City.
from 7:30-9 p.m. with Dryden Area Food For
instructors Lyle Malaski & Families free dinner is
Kristina Morton. Call 810- served on the second
984-5061 for more informa- Tuesday of each month
tion.
from 4:30-6:00 p.m. at St.
Council
on
Aging Cornelius Church, 3834
Membership is open to indi- Mill Street (north of the
viduals 18 and older. The light in Dryden). No proof
Capac Senior Center is of income is required. Come
open 8:30-4:30 weekdays. and enjoy a home cooked
We offer a variety of activi- meal with us.
ties such as fitness and craft The Attica United Methodist
classes, a book review Church will be holding a
group, cards and bus trips! free community meal on the
Yoga, Zumba Gold, Stability second and fourth Tuesday
Ball, Chair Exercise, and a of each month from 4:30 to
Walking
Club
meet
p.m. For more inforMonday-Friday.
Enjoy 6:30
mation
please
call
cards? We offer Euchre 810-724-0690
or
visit
every Monday at 1 p.m. and www.atticaumc.org
6 p.m. The following card
games are played every The Attica Food Bank at
week beginning at 1 p.m.: the Attica United Methodist
Texas Cards Tuesday, Lucky Church, 27 Elk Lake Rd., is
Cards
Thursday
and open from 2-4 p.m. the secPinochle Friday. Call Lori ond and fourth Monday of
at 395-7889 for more infor- each month. Proof of residency and need required.
mation.
Almont and Dryden area The Capac Community
senior citizens meet the sec- Food Pantry, 114 S. Main
each
ond Tuesday of the month at Street, is open
12 p.m. at the Almont Lions Wednesday from 1-3 p.m.
Hall, 222 Water St., for a Please call LOVE, INC. at
potluck and program. Call 810-245-2414 in advance to
798-8210 for more informa- ensure your food voucher
will be received before you
tion.
in to shop. Any quesAdults 55 and over are stop
tions,
please call Sherrie
invited to the Berlin Twp. Cramton
at 810-395-1905.
Senior Center to play cards
from noon-3 p.m. the first The Capac Kitchen serves
Wednesday of every month. free meals every Tuesday
Bring a sack lunch, coffee from 4:30-6 p.m. at Zion
provided. Potluck luncheons United Methodist Church.

Free Meals, Food

The Capac Historical


Society is now open to visitors daily from 1-3 p.m. and
1-4 p.m. on Sundays. Call
810-395-2859 for more
information.
The Imlay City Historical
Museum is closed for the
months
of
January,
February and March.
Volunteers are busy developing new displays, cleaning and preparing for an
April opening. Workers are
usually at the museum on
Wednesday mornings if
questions or requests.

Youth Events

Ready, Set, Go! Workshop.


This is a FREE workshop
for 3-5 year olds & parents/
caregivers! Enjoy fun projects that will develop your
childs skills and prepare
them for school! Children
also enjoy a snack, story
time, and a free book! Call
the Family Literacy Center
today to reserve your seat at
810-664-2737 and for more
information on dates and
times.
The Family Literacy Center
offers free playgroups, usually running for six weeks.
For children six years old
and their parent/caregiver.
Many locations and times.
Call the Center for more
information, 810-664-2737.
Attica Methodist has a free
Christian Play Group on
Mondays from 10-11:30
a.m. on school days, featuring preschool Bible stories,
a snack, interactive songs,
crafts, and games. Parents
are required to be with their
children during the group.
Space is limited. For details/
reservations call Pam
Holihan at 810-724-6941.

Support Groups
FOR WIDOWED MEN &
WOMEN. LUNCH/CARDS
/FRIENDSHIP.
Third
Tuesday of Every Month.
Come and meet with other

widowed people for lunch,


cards, games and meet new
friends. Join us every 3rd
Tuesday of each month
from 11:45 am - 4:00 pm at
Cavis Pioneer Restaurant,
5600 Lapeer Rd. in Kimball
Twp. 48074 (located approx.
15 Miles S.W. of Port Huron.
No RSVP necessary. For
more information call
Joanne K. at 810-324-2304.
This activity is sponsored by
Widwoed Friends, a peer
support group www.widowedfriends.org.
Lapeer County Families
Against Narcotics group
meets the second Tuesday of
the month at Faith Christian
Fellowship, 69 W. Nepessing
St. in Lapeer. Call 810-6670119 for more information
or email faithchrist09@aol.
com.
TOPS 620 Lapeer weightloss group meets Tuesday
nights at the Hunters Creek
Mobile Home Park Club
House, 725 DeMille Rd. in
Lapeer. Weigh-in from
6-6:30 p.m., meeting from
6:30-7:30 p.m. For more
information, call 810-6647579.
For those that have experienced the death of a loved
one, a support group is
available facilitated by a
trained United Hospice
Service (UHS) bereavement
volunteer. Marlette Regional
Hospital, located at 2770
Main Street in Marlette,
hosts this support group the
first Friday of each month
at 10 a.m. in the
Administration Conference
Room. For more information, call 800-635-7490 or
visit www.marletteregionalhospital.org

Fundraisers
SPAGHETTI DINNER

3-1

Editors note: Due to space


constraints announcements
will be posted one week in
advance of the event. Notices
must be received in writing
by noon Monday prior to the
publication date.

Saturday, January 23rd 5pm - 7pm


Adults $8.00 - Chlidren 5-10 $4.00
Live Auction begins at 6:00
St. Pauls Lutheran Church

200 N Cedar St., Imlay City 810-724-1200


Proceeds to Benefit - Relay for Life & Multiple Sclerosis Foundation

Womans Life Chapter 855


Presents.Chili Cook-Off
Compete for bragging rights
for the Best Chili in Town!
Bring your best chili in a
crock pot or electric roaster.
No entrance fee! To PreRegister, please call (810)

392-5136 or email lynnsuniverse@yahoo.com. Deadline


to register is Monday,
January 25, 2016. PRIZES
WILL BE AWARDED!
Proceeds will benefit the
Memphis Schools Back
Pack Program. (At risk children receive backpacks of
nutritious foods to supplement meals.) Saturday,
January 30, 2016 Tasting
from 5pm 7pm. Attendees
are the Judges! (Admission
fee includes tasting of all
chili!) COME OUT, BRING
THE FAMILY AND HAVE
SOME FUN! Womans Life
Insurance Society
will
match the first $500 raised!
Imlay City Christian School
is selling raffle tickets for a
Build Your Own Bundle
from the Almonts Country
SmokeHouse. 2 prizes will
be awarded on April 11th.
1st prize is a $300 gift certificate and 2nd prize is a
$200 gift certificate, both to
the SmokeHouse. For more
details or to purchase tickets, call the school at 810724-5695.
9 pin no tap bowling fundraiser at the Almont
Hideaway Lanes. All proceeds benefit the education
of the students at the Imlay
City Christian School. The
event will be held on
January 23rd from 11 to 3.
There will be a euchre tournament and chili cook-off as
well. Contact the school to
find out how you can join in
on the fun. 810-724-5695.
The Imlay City Christian
School is holding a fundraiser for TAFFY (Tuition
Assistance Fundraising For
Youth). Come join us for
euchre the second Saturday
of each month at 7 p.m. at
the Imlay City Christian
School, 7197 E. Imlay City
Rd. in Imlay City. For more
information on everything
going on at the school, call
810-724-5695.

Other
The Lapeer Art Association
exhibit Lets Celebrate
will continue in Gallery 194,
Lapeer, thru Feb. 6. Hours
are noon to 6pm, Tuesday
thru Saturday. 810-6673632, http://www.lapeerart.
org/.
Zumba Gold - What are you
doing for you today?? Why

AREA UNITED
METHODIST
CHURCHES
Attica
U.M.C.

27 Elk Lake Road, Attica, MI

(810) 724-0690

Sunday Worship: 10 a.m


Attica Food Bank: Serving those
in need in Attica Twp, 2-4 pm,
2nd and 4th Monday
Rev. Ron Rouse
www.atticaumc.org
15

Capac Zion
U.M.C.
14952 Imlay City Rd., Capac

St. Pauls
Lutheran Church

Capac First
U.M.C.

Church School - 10:00 am - All Ages


Worship Service - 10:30 am
Sunday School: 9:15 am
Junior Church During Worship Service
Several Bible Studies During the Week
Office Hours:
Tuesday-Thursday 8:30 am - 12:00 noon
Nursery Provided
15

Imlay City
U.M.C.

Corner of 4th St. & Almont Ave.


(Across from the Library)
www.imlayumc.org
9:15 a.m. Sunday School
10:30 a.m. Worship
Nursery Available
Jr. Church for K-5th grade
Rev. Marcel Allen Lamb
15

810-724-1200
Worship 8:30 & 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
15

810-796-2371

Sunday Worship Services - 10:00 a.m.


www.stjohnsdryden.org
stjohnschurchdryden@gmail.com

15

810-796-3341

Weekday Masses

810-724-1135

15

586.336.4673

Sunday Masses

Sat. 5 pm
Sun. 8 am, 10 am
12 pm - Spanish
Reconciliation 1/2 hr. before each Mass &4pm Sat.
15

Father Paul Ward

15

Imlay City
Church of Christ

670 N. Van Dyke


Imlay City, MI 48444
Sunday Service
Bible Study (all ages) 10:00am
Morning Worship 11:00am
1st Sunday of the
Month Evening Service 2:30pm
Wednesday Bible Classes (all ages) 7:00pm

810-395-2409

810-724-3306

15

C O M E W O R S H I P W I T H U S ! 15

Almont
First Baptist Church

859 N. Van Dyke Road


Imlay City, Michigan 48444
Sunday 2:30 pm
Tuesday 7:00 pm
Friday Youth 7:00 pm
15

881 Van Dyke - 810-798-8888


Sunday Bible Classes: 9:45 am
Worship Services
10:30 am & 6:00 pm
Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 pm
fbc@airadvantage.net
Live Webcasting Sunday worship services
over Sermonaudio.com/fbcalmont 15
Proclaiming the Sovereign Grace of God

"Experience Revival"
Pastor James Brandt
www.jamesbrandt.org
www.revivalchristian.tv
www.facebook.com/revivalpreacher
15
248-622-4759

Sunday Mornings
10:30 am

COME & MAKE A


DIFFERENCE WITH US! 15

810-417-0265 cbcimlay.org
Sunday School 9:30 am
Morning Service 10:45 am
Evening Service 6:00 pm
Wednesday Service 7:00 pm

15

Light of Christ
Community
Church

7191 Imlay City Road


Imlay City
Educational Hour - 9:15 am
Worship Time - 10:30 am

1 Mile South of I-69 Overpass

Phone 810-724-2620

GATEWAY
ASSEMBLY

15

Phone: 810-724-6999

15

ST. JOHNS LUTHERAN CHURCH


(ELCA) 109 E. Kempf Court Capac, MI

(810) 395-7557

Phone: 810-724-8110
Pastor Jeffrey S. Krist

2720 Winslow Road


Imlay City, MI 48444

Sunday Worship 10:30 am


Wednesday Prayer & Praise 7:30 pm

Supervised child care during all services

Adult & Children's Sunday School 9:00 a.m.


Children's Church during service.

PASTOR KEN RENARD

6835 Weyer Road Imlay City, MI48444

Family of
Christ
Lutheran Church Missouri Synod

2796 S. Van Dyke Road - Imlay City


Morning Worship - 8:55 a.m. & 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service - 5:00 p.m.
Wednesday Family Night - 6:45 p.m.

74903 McKay Rd., Romeo

M-T-Thurs-Fri 8 am Wed. 10 am
First Sat. 8 am

905 Holmes Rd. - Allenton, MI


Corner of Almont Road

firstapostolichome.com

Come Grow With Us!

700 Maple Vista, Imlay City

West Berlin
U.M.C.

Worship Service - 11:00 a.m.


Rev. Curtis Clarke

Imlay City
C.R.C.

810-724-4315

15

Sacred Heart
Catholic Church

Pastor Patricia Hoppenworth


Sunday School - 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service - 11:00 a.m.
EVERYONE WELCOME!

email: nlcc@newlifechristian.net
www.newlifechristian.net
Pastors Tim & Terri Martin
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
(ISOM) Bible School Tues. Nights 6 p.m.
Wednesday Family Night 7 p.m.
Embracing every generation, serving God,
reaching others, fulfilling destiny. 15

395 N. Cedar (M-53)


www.imlaycitycrc.org
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Sunday School 11:15 a.m.
Youth Ministry
MOPS Program
Community Mens & Womens
Bible Studies

Dryden
U.M.C.

St. Johns
Episcopal Church
The Rev. Susan Rich

Pastor Alan Casillas

206 W. Mill, Capac, MI


Senior Pastor:Rev. Lisa Clark
Worship Service 9:00 a.m.
Jr. Church 9:30 a.m.
Office Hours: TuesdayThursday 8:30 a.m. - 12 noon
Everyone Welcome
810-395-2112
15

15

4074 South Mill Street


Dryden, MI 48428

810-724-2702

200 North Cedar (M-53)


Imlay City, MI

810-724-1747

Pastor: Laurie Koivula


Sunday School - 9:00 a.m.
Worship - 10:00 a.m.

Attica, I-69 West of Lake Pleasant Exit on Newark

(ELCA)

2008 N. Van Dyke Rd.


Imlay City, MI 48444

5394 Main Street - Dryden

Church 810-395-2112

Senior Pastor:Rev. Lisa Clark

810-724-0687

West Goodland
U.M.C.

15

Monday - Friday: 9:00 am - 2:00 pm

Sunday 10:00 a.m.


The Imlay City American
Sunday School
Legion Post 135 meets the
9:00 a.m. September thru May
Staffed Nursery During Worship 15 second and last Wednesdays

Club News

Christ Evangelical First Congregational Church


Lutheran Church
United Church of Christ
1970 S. Almont Ave., Imlay City
at corner of Newark Rd.

275 Bancroft - Imlay City


(Corner of 5th Street)

810-814-4056

810-724-6207

Sunday School 9:00 a.m.


Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m.
Thursday Worship 7:00 p.m.

Pastor

Ralph O. Stuebs
Cell-(567) 674-0438

Come to the WELS

St. Nicholas
Catholic Church
4331 Capac Road
Capac, MI 48014

810-395-7572

www.stnicholascapac.com

15

Sunday School &Morning Adult Group 9:30 a.m.


Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Rev. Dr. Renee C. Jackson
No matter who you are or where you are
on lifes journey, you are welcome here!15

Holy Redeemer
Lutheran Church
4538 Dryden Rd. Dryden, MI

810-796-3951
www.lutheransonline.com/holyred

8:00 am - BIBLE CLASS


Weekday Masses:
9:30 am - WORSHIP
Wednesday & Friday 8:30 a.m. 11:00 am - SUNDAY SCHOOL & BIBLE CLASS
Weekend Masses:
ALL WELCOME!!!
Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
Pastor Steven Helms
Rev. Mike Gawlowski, Pastor 15
Christian Preschool Available
15

not give Zumba Gold a try.


Classes are every Wednesday
at the Imlay City Senior
Center at 12:30. The class is
45 minutes of fun! Classes
are taught by certified
instructor Vicki Mueller. No
need to make reservations.
Wear comfortable clothing
and be prepared to feel better.
Euchre Nights at Avoca
Community Hall, 5396
Kilgore Road in Avoca are
held on the third Saturday
of the month until May. A
light meal is included. Cash
prizes and door prizes will
be given, and a grand prize
to the player with highest
monthly scores at the end of
the season. Registration
begins at 6:30 p.m. and play
begins at 7 p.m.
The Flea Market held each
Sunday at the Lapeer
Center
Building,
425
County Center Rd. in
Lapeer, will be open from 8
a.m.-3 p.m. Up to 50 booths
inside and outside sell a
huge variety of items. This
long running event is sponsored by the Lapeer Center
Building, and there is no
admission charge. For info
on space rentals, contact
Logan at 810-347-7915. See
w w w. L a p e e r C e n t e r.
com<https://lapcntynt2.lapeercounty.org/owa/www.
LapeerCenter.com
for
building rental info. For
general information on the
Flea Market or food service
by Peacock Alley Catering
call 810-664-2109 or email
lapeercenter@charter.net.
Christian Music Club concert series for the public is
held the last Friday of each
month, from 7-10 p.m.
Three modern Christian
bands,
different each
month. Free admission, free
snacks. Socialize and listen
to music in a friendly, uplifting atmosphere. See CMC:
Christian Music Club on
Facebook or call Judy at
810-444-1497 for updates
and info. Our new location
is at the Lapeer Center
Building, 425 County
Center St. in Lapeer.
Free tutor training for people who would like to help
others in our community
improve English skills.
Volunteer basis. Please call
for orientation before training at 810-664-2737.
Free hearing and vision
screens for children of preschool age are available at
the Lapeer County Health
Department. To schedule an
appointment for these free
services please call 810-6670448 or 810-245-5549.
Widowed Friends invites all
widowed to join us for
breakfast and friendship in
a safe setting every 2nd and
4th Monday of the month at
9 a.m. at Seros, 925 Gratiot
in Marysville. For more
information about our
group, call Julie at 810-3880868.
Volunteer for the Habitat
for Humanity of Lapeer
County at the office.
Interested parties can call
810-664-7111 and speak to
Carolyn, Cheryl or Pete at
810-660-7823.
Capac Pharmacy is teaming
with Support Million Hearts
by offering in-pharmacy
blood pressure screenings,
136 North Main St. in
Capac, Tuesdays, 9 a.m.- 6
p.m. Everyone is invited to
come to Capac Pharmacy
and have their blood pressure read for free.

201 E. St. Clair, Almont, MI


810-798-8855
Sr. Pastor: Keith Langley

Sunday Worship Service at 10:15 a.m.


Nursery available and Jr. Church
for ages 3 thru 5th grade
Jr./Sr. High Youth Group ~ Sundays 6-8pm
Kidz 4 Christ ~ Wednesdays 6-7:30pm
Pre-School - 5th grade
15

St. John The


Evangelist
Catholic Church
872 Capac Rd.
Allenton, MI 48002

810-395-7074

www.stjohnsallenton.com

Weekday Masses:
Thursday & Friday 8:30 a.m.
Weekend Masses:
Saturday - 6:00 p.m.
Sunday - 9:00 a.m.
Rev. Mike Gawlowski, Pastor 15

of the month at 7:30 p.m.


The post is located at 212 E.
Third Street. Contact them
at 724-1450 or americanlegionpost135@frontier.com.
The Evening Star Quilt
Guild meets the last
Wednesday of each month
at the Davison Senior
Center, 10135 Lapeer Rd. in
Davison. Meetings start at
6:30 p.m. and doors open at
6:00 p.m. For more information, call Lisa, 810-3587294.
TOPS 888 (Take Off Pounds
Sensibly) meets Wednesdays
at the 25 Pine Ridge Dr. in
Lapeer. Weigh-in at 8:30
a.m., 9:30 a.m. meeting.
Call Linda at 810-245-3955
or Phyllis 810-395-7035 for
more information.

Page 13-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 20, 2016

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Golf Bowling Sportsbar


Banquet & Entertainment Center
4855 Capac Rd.
Capac, MI 48014

810-395-4653

Book Your Fundraisers & Parties with Us!

Tri-County Bank

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5 8 6 S . C E DA R S T R E E T I M L AY C I T Y

Page 14-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 20, 2016

Photo by Tom Wearing

Robber: Capac man turns himself in

Dr. Gary Richards (back, center) celebrates with family members (L/R) Eric
Sobocinski, daughter Jennifer, wife JoAnne, daughter Julie, sister and brother-in-law Gayle and Don Nelson and (front) parents Glenna and Robert
Richards at the Imlay City Chamber Dinner-Dance on Jan. 16.

Honored: Chamber bestows awards

another criminal off the


streets.
According to a press
release from the St. Clair
County Sheriffs Office,
Johnson allegedly entered the
Capac Road store around
7:30 p.m. wearing a green
hoodie type sweatshirt and a
skull face mask. Once he
received the money, he fled
the scene in a black mini-van,
going northbound on Capac
Road.
Capac Police responded
to the scene along with sheriff deputies and detectives.
Johnsons van was eventually
discovered abandoned on
westbound I-69 by Lapeer
County Sheriff deputies.
Investigators
eventually
determined the vehicle had
run out of gas. The registered
owner was contacted and she
told police her boyfriend had
the vehicle, leading to
Johnsons identification.
Several addresses were
checked in Lapeer and Imlay
City, where contact was made
with relatives of the suspect,

however he was not at any of


the addresses checked, officials said in the release.
When an Imlay City
Police Department sergeant
was able to make contact
with the suspect by phone,
Johnson stated he would turn
himself in after taking care of
some errands first. The next
morning, Johnson showed up
at the Lapeer County Sheriffs
Department and he was transported to the St. Clair County
Intervention and Detention
Center.
Johnson is due to appear
in court again on January 26
for a probable cause conference.
Anyone with information
regarding the Yale robbery is
asked to contact the St. Clair
County Sheriff at 810-9858115.
Tips
regarding
the
Dryden robbery can be forwarded to the Dryden
Township Police at 810-7962271 or the Lapeer County
Sheriffs Office Tip line at
810-245-1374.

Homicide: Can co-workers shed light?

Photo by Tom Wearing

from page 1-A

Pastor Rodney Sanderson-Smith accepts 2015


Merit Award from Imlay City Chamber President
Ron Gray at the Jan. 16 dinner-dance.

being set at $1 million.


Police say their preliminary investigation revealed
that the two men were
employed on the second
shift at the Imlay City
factory.
The crime unfolded at
1:38 a.m. on Saturday, Jan.
16, when Lapeer County
Sheriff deputies responded to
a report of a car fire/explosion on Kings Mill Road,

near Cedar Lake Road in


Arcadia Township.
Also responding to the
scene were Arcadia
Township firefighters.
Det./Sgt. Jason Parks
said that once the fire was
extinguished, Harveys body
was discovered inside his
Ford Taurus, after which it
was determined a homicide
had been committed.
The homicide remains
under investigation by the
Lapeer County Sheriffs

Office.
Parks said he is hoping
that co-workers of the two
men will be able to offer
valuable information pertinent to the investigation.
Anyone with information
is asked to contact Det./Sgt.
Jason Parks or Sgt. Chad
Polmanteer at 810-245-1381;
or call the Lapeer County
Sheriffs anonymous tip line
at 810-245-1374.
Catherine Minolli contributed to this story.

Climbing: New club aims for the sky


from page 1-A
harnesses, and ropes,
Drinkhorn says.
The goal of the group is
fun, recreation, and learning,
and members of the group
hold this in high regard.
The group started small,
and the first meetings comprised only a handful of participants.
Our first meeting happened in April 2015 with 20
or so people and was a great
success and our last meeting
in December 2015 had
approximately 35 people
come, Drinkhorn says.
Pastor Tim Wright of Heritage Church accepts
The group has shown
Organization of the Year award from Mayor Walt
growth over its existence and
Bargen.
Drinkhorn hopes that growth
can continue.
wife and Ihave become
wish for bad weather (during We dont have a list of
addicted to Small Town
the concerts/movies) so they members so much as we
USA. The people there are
can sit in the nice seats at the have return attendance, he
MiGrove is a new tree climbing club formed to
the bread and butter of the
church, Bargen chuckled.
says. We operate in this
gather like-minded members in the Tri-City area.
country. Rons words will
Bargen mentioned
manner so that we dont disremain with me the rest of
Heritages own community- courage new people from
[The activities] depend
The groups growth has
my life.
wide eventsthe Winter
coming.
on the location really,
also curried the interest of
Blast and Hunters Haven
There is no typical
Drinkhorn says. Sometimes local businesses and organiboth of which draw people
structure of a MiGrove meet- ziplines are popular, or
zations, and as a result
from around the area. The
ing, as the location and
building rigging for big
theyve received donated
group hosted a Rake and
activities change based on
swings. When enough people items like ropes, and expoRun in the fall to assist with participation, season, and
show up, anything you can
sure with The Arboricultural
leaf cleanup for those who
local interest.
do in a tree happens. Its a
Society of Michigan.
needed help.
Every meet you will see really energetic and exciting People interested in par Like Richards, Pastor
lots of climbing, limb-walkatmosphere to find yourself
ticipating in MiGroves next
Tim Wright, who accepted
ing, swinging, and speedy
in.
meetup or those who would
the award on behalf of
descents. Each meet has its
As the group has grown, like to offer their land as a
Heritage Church, said he
own theme in a way. There
its reach in the local commu- possible meeting location
was speechless.
is never a set were going to nity has grown as well, and
can contact the group
This is very humbling
do this this time attitude,
theyve begun attracting
through its Facebook page at
and I am at a loss for
Drinkhorn says.
interested climbers from all
facebook.com/migrove or
words, he said. We came
After a location for the
over the region, into Ohio
simply by searching
in here like the new kids on meet is confirmed, whether
and Canada.
MiGrove on Facebook.
the block...and said we want it is public land or private
We have had people
Drinkhorn says,
to be part of the community land provided for the groups come from Guelph, Ontario
Everyone is welcome to
to bless and serve, he said. use by its owner, the activiand Columbus, Ohio,
come. We would be happy to
We have an amazing
ties are determined.
Drinkhorn says.
talk to anyone interested.
team of selfless people, but
its not about us. Its about
Organization of
the love of God and the love
the Year
of others. We are here to
Imlay City Mayor Walt
serve and thankful to be let
Bargen introduced Heritage
in.
Church as the 2015
Wright said Heritage is
Organization of the Year
eager to continue working in
recipient.
the Imlay City community
Bargen noted the
and hopes to continue to
churchs volunteer efforts in
make a difference in area
helping with the Blueberry
residents lives.
Festival through both spon Exciting things are
sorships and site cleanup, the coming up, he said. We
Eastern Michigan State Fair, are excited and thrilled for
Woods-N-Water News
2016, to continue to partner
Outdoor Weekend, Relay for here to make a difference.
Life, and offering an alterna- Write alluded to the
tive location for the
contributions of fellow
Downtown Development
Pastor Randy Hall, who
Authoritys Summer Concert was unable to attend due
and Movies in the Park
to being hospitalizedbut
Tree climbing enthusiasts gather to do their thing during meeting of MiGrove
series.
on the mendfrom a heart
club in the late fall.
Some people actually
condition.

Photo provided

Photo by Tom Wearing

"It's easy to be
loving and
connecting in
a loving and
connecting
community."

--Rodney
Sanderson Smith
Lapeer Commuity
Church

Photo provided

from page 1-A


the Americas Best
Communities committee.
It is remarkable the
time and energy that Gary
Richards spends creating
positive relationships to help
people get organized and
succeed, said Sharon Muir.
It is something that he has
emphasized and modeled,
and that will be part of his
legacy at Imlay City
Schools.
Richards said the recognition rendered him speechless.
It means a lot, I am so
emotional, he said with
tears welling in his eyes.
The tears turned to
laughter when Richards went
on to say he thought the
Chamber made a mistake by
naming him Citizen of the
Year.
I thought you had to be
really old to win this award.
I mean last years recipient
was (former Fire Chief) Kip
Reaves, and Im much
younger than Kip, Richards
grinned.
He expressed gratitude to
the Chamber, his wife
JoAnne, family, friends and
colleagues for their support,
inspiration and encouragement over the years, and was
moved to tears by the presence of his daughters Julie
who traveled from Las
Vegas, Nevada for the dinner-dance, and Jennifer, who
came with her fiance in tow.
Richards acknowledged his
parents, Glenna and Robert
Richards, who were there to
celebrate as well.
I am humbled and honored by this, he said.
Merit Award
The 2015 Merit Award
winner was also humbled
and honored by the recognition.
Rodney Sanderson-Smith
of Zone Productions and
Lapeer Community Church
was introduced by Chamber
Board President Ron Gray.
In an emotional speech,
Gray detailed all the ways
Sanderson-Smith has made
an impact on his own life,
and the lives of young people around the area.
With Zone Productions
he wanted to make sure
young people had somewhere to go, where they
could be safe and have fun,
he said.
Along with his duties at
Lapeer Community Church,
Sanderson-Smith became a
Level II firefighter with the
Lapeer department while
working on a masters
degree. He and his wife
became U.S. citizens in
2015.
Gray said SandersonSmith makes families a priority, noting that he transformed his own family and
helped them through a trying
ordeal when their youngest
son was suffering through
complications after he was
born.
The first words he
(Sanderson-Smith) spoke to
me changed the way I saw
the world, Gray said.
Sanderson-Smith
expressed gratitude for the
recognition, adding that he
found it effortless to be of
service in the Imlay City
community.
Its easy to be loving
and connecting in a loving
and connecting community,
he said. After 17 years, my

from page 1-A


Were trying to run
down leads and are talking
with the FBI, he noted.
Dryden Police say theres
no new developments in their
investigation either.

Police credit cooperation


between several agencies in
both St. Clair and Lapeer
counties for Johnsons quick
apprehension last week.
I am very pleased with
the outcome of this investigation, said Capac Chief
Heather Fantin.
The cooperation shown
between our department and
the Sheriffs Office helped
lead to a quick resolution to
the incident.
St. Clair County Sheriff
Tim Donnellon said, This
shows what happens when
law enforcement is able to
work together collectively.
Members of the Capac Police
Department, Imlay City
Police Department, Lapeer
County Sheriffs Office and
our Office helped to take

Page 15-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 20, 2016

Extension brainstorms for future


Lapeer, St. Clair leaders meet for Focus Group session
ATTICA With the
new year, comes a new focus
for Michigan State University
Extension. Earlier this month,
community stakeholders from
Lapeer and St. Clair counties
took part in an Identification
Focus Group session held at
the Lapeer County Ed Tech
Center. On January 5, elected
officials, business owners,
county employees and residents put their heads together
to identify needs in the community and talk about ways
that MSU resources can help.
Helping facilitate those
discussions were Extension
staff Joe Bixler, Christine
Venema,
Jeannine
Schweihofer, Kathy George,
Phil Kaatz and Carol Bublitz.
Bixler,
District
10

Extension coordinator, said


Extension leaders want to
ensure theyre using their
resources in the most efficient
manner for the benefit of
Michigan residents.
Its important for us to
make sure were extending
research from the university
down to the local level, he
noted.
Concurrently,
MSU
Extension and the AgBio
Research program is conducting a state-wide Survey to
Sharpen Our Focus asking
the public to help them shape
future programs and projects.
Bixler said theyve received
approximately 5,000 survey
responses so far.
After reviewing the many
programs and services offered
through Extension, participants and staff dived into discussions about current needs

in the community, successful


programs that could be
expanded or new areas that
deserved exploration. After
creating extensive lists in
small groups, the entire
assembly worked on combining their ideas to identify priorities. Bixler said theyll be
aggregating the data collected
at this event with ideas generated at focus groups elsewhere in District 10 which
includes our neighbors to the
north-Tuscola, Sanilac and
Huron counties.
Topics ranged from early
childhood education to alternative energy but some of the
strongest themes to come out
of the January 5 event were:
Agricultural literacy:
Farmers want to help consumers understand the whole
farm to fork concept and
they have an eager audience.
People want to know
where their food is coming
from, Bixler said.
Financial literacy/home
ownership: Community lead-

Photo by Maria Brown

By Maria Brown

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

MSU Extension District 10 Coordinator Joe Bixler leads discussions during


a Focus Group session earlier this month at the Lapeer County Ed Tech
Center.
ers say residents need assis- choices.
resources: Those who interact
tance when it comes to buy- Marketing and promo- and work with minorities,
ing and keeping a home and tion of current MSU Extension including the local migrant
can benefit from learning programs:
Bixler
said population say more tools for
basic budgeting skills. Bixler Extension staff is always those who dont speak English
said this topic originated from looking at different ways to or have limited English profithe housing crisis some five- reach constituents although ciency are needed.
plus years ago but, although that has become complicated Bixler encourages Trithe economy has improved, is as more Extension resources City area residents to log on
still relevant.
have moved online while and complete the Sharpen
Nutrition education: This some residents still struggle Our Focus survey which can
topic includes things like food to secure adequate Internet be found at msue.msu.edu/
preparation, food preserva- services.
focus. All information coltion and making healthy Cultural
diversity lected is anonymous.

New Year,
New Wheels

Bob Riehl

General Manager

Chris Byrnes

Photo by Maria Brown

New Car Manager

Tim Wilcox

Commercial Truck
Manager

Lapeer County 4-H Program Coordinator Kathy


George works with Lapeer and St. Clair County
stakeholders to identify educational needs.

Lionel Guerra

Commercial Vehicle
Sales

Stk# L-15B030

2015 Dodge Charger SE RWD


EMPLOYEE SALE PRICE $19,852
FRIENDS & FAMILY $20,870

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Photo by Maria Brown

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2015 Jeep Grand


Cherokee Laredo 4x4

Reward offered in
vandalism incident

FRIENDS & FAMILY START-UPS DUE $28986/MO. $1,999 DOWN $20229/MO.

By Maria Brown

Tri-City Times Assistant Editor

CAPAC A cash
reward is being offered for
information related to a vandalism incident that occurred
in the village in September.
Several vehicles, parked
behind a business at 108 S.
Main Street, were extensively damaged on Sept. 15

around 2:45 a.m. Three people were captured on surveillance camera but have ye to
be identified.
The business owner is
offering $1,000 for information that leads to the arrest
and conviction of those
responsible.
Contact Capac Police at
810-395-4351.

Police and fire briefs . . .


Editors note: The follow- vit after learning that someing is a compilation of activ- one opened multiple bank
ity and reports from area accounts in his name.
police and fire departments.

Identity thieves
open accounts
GOODLAND TWP.
A deputy responded to a residence in the 2300 block of
Blacks Corners Road on
January 12 where a resident
completed an ID theft affida-

Lock out reported

ATTICA TWP. Police


responded to a home in
the 800 block of Force
Road on January 12 after a
resident accidentally locked
their vehicle with a small
child inside. A wrecker company was able to unlock the
door.

Even small ads draw BIG attention in the


TRI-CITY TIMES

724-2615

MSRP $34,990 Stk# L-15W247

Sales

Rob Piccirilli
Sales

Sale Price
$
29,931

Field Crops educator Phil Kaatz, former State Rep.


Kevin Daley, Lapeer City Commissioner Catherine
Bostick and County Commissioner Ian Kempf discuss community needs.

Dave Wilson

Scott Feehan
Sales

Shannon Lane
Sales

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MSRP $33,965 Stk# L-16M042

John Barton
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Sale Price
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2016 Jeep
Patriot Latitude 4x4
MSRP $27,435 Stk# L-16Y012

Ty Schmidt
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Pictures may not reflect actual vehicle. Chrysler Employee and Friends/Family public prices stated. Sale Price includes all available factory incentives, does NOT include special offers (TDM) from the factory that are available to a select group of qualified people and does NOT include military rebate. Sale and lease payments include
loyalty & pull ahead factory incentives. Not everyone qualifies. Payments are based on the sale price, A+ or Tier 1 credit rating. Buy payments and sale prices are plus tax, title, plate, and destination. * Zero down lease payments are plus tax, title, plate, destination, and requires security deposit waiver and must qualify for S/A
Tier 1 credit. Lease payments are based on 10,000 miles per year for 24, 36, 39 mos. Lease term. Prior purchases/leases excluded, must take delivery out of stock by 1/31/16, see sales associate for details. Advertised specials in this ad are good for at least 48 hours after the printed date unless stated differently in the ad, but
could go longer. Call or come into our Lapeer location. Availability is limited.

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Jacob Podgorski

Business Development
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Rachel Walls

Business Development
Specialist

Page 16-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 20, 2016

Rural Lifestyles

Backyard flocks prone to


ectoparasite infestations
ers also note that there is no
risk to humans who eat
eggs or the meat of infested
chickens.
The researchers surveyed
100 adult hens in 20 different
backyards
in
southern
California and searched the
birds and their coops for
ectoparasites. They found a
much greater diversity of
ectoparasites on the backyard
chickens than has been found
in commercial flocks.
Ectoparasites were found
on 80 percent of the flocks
surveyed, and lice were the
most common and abundant.
Six different species of louse
were found on the chickens,
and some individual chickens
had hundreds of lice.
Sticktight fleas were found in
only 20 percent of flocks, but
infestations could be quite
severe. The northern fowl
mite was the most common
mite, but the scaly leg
mite and the chicken red

mite were also found.


Commercial
poultry
flocks suffer from a few of
the same ectoparasites. But
most commercial birds
presently are housed in
suspended cages that give
them little or no contact with
the ground or substrate that
immature stages of parasites
such as fleas and some mites
need to develop. In addition,
these cages provide fewer
crevices that might harbor
ticks or bed bugs when they
arent feeding on birds.
Finally, birds in commercial
flocks are generally all the
same age and breed
which may affect the suite of
parasites that they host.
The results of this study
suggest that some of the perks
of being a backyard chicken,
such as comfortable coops
and access to the outdoors,
also increase the birds
availability to ectoparasites.
According
to
Murillo,

many of the chicken


owners that participated in this study were
surprised to learn that
their chickens had
ectoparasites,
and
almost none of the
owners were practicing parasite prevention.
With that in mind,
she recommends backA hen shows signs of sticktight flea injury. Researchers
yard chicken owners
say that fleas and other ectoparasites are more prevalent
focus on preventing
in backyard flocks than commercial operations.
ectoparasite infestations because control
people or equipment).
products are limited.
The research comes at a time
Chicken owners should If a chicken owner decides when several states, including
practice biosecurity, which to use insecticides, she California, have banned or
includes excluding wild birds said to make sure to read and limited the use of isolated
and other animals from com- follow the label. The label is battery cages in favor of
ing into contact with the law, and helps prevent enriched cages or cage-free
the flock, limiting the addi- unsafe insecticide exposure. operations. The European
tion of new birds to the flock, If products not meant for Union has also banned
temporarily
quarantining use on laying hens are battery cages. And a bill
birds that are brought into used, chicken owners risk that would have banned those
the flock and limiting outsider exposure to insecticides when cages
in
the
United
visitation (many of these consuming the eggs or States was introduced in
parasites can hitchhike on meat from the birds. Congress but failed to pass.

Photo provided

TRI-CITY AREA
Researchers at the University
of California, Riverside
have found backyard chickens are more likely to be
infested by ectoparasites
than poultry raised on commercial farms. Ectoparasites
are things like fleas, lice and
mites that live on the exterior
of an organism.
The researchersAmy C.
Murillo, a graduate student
and Bradley A. Mullens, a
professor of entomology
believe that these more open,
cage-free or free-range type
habitats increase the risk of
acquisition and transmission
of ectoparasites. Their work
was recently published
online in the Journal of
Medical Entomology.
Such infestations increase
stress on the chickens and
may cause economic damage
such as decreased egg production and feed conver
sion efficiency. The research-

Elm seed bug present in Michigan

Vegetable meeting slated


for February 25

DRYDEN Local vegetable growers are invited to


attend a Thumb Vegetable Meeting, hosted by Michigan
State University Extension, on February 25 at Lenny
Millers Restaurant to learn more about last season and
plan for next year.
Participants will get to meet four of MSUs vegetable
production research specialists focusing on vegetable diseases, weeds, cover cropping and insect pests. In addition,
Phil Tocco will give a review of the final Food Safety
Modernization Act ruling that rolls out this year. A variety
of bulletins will be available for purchase on site.
The agenda runs from 9 a.m.-1 p.m., features 2 RUP
credits and a buffet lunch. Attendees must pre-register for
$20. The agenda and registration options can be found at
events.anr.msu.edu or call 989.758.2500.

ACROSS MICHIGAN
The Elm seed bug (ESB)
has made its way into
Michigan. Last month the
Michigan Department of
Agriculture
and
Rural
Development
(MDARD)
confirmed it has been discovered in Oakland County. The
elm seed bug (Arocatus melanocephalus (Fabricius)) is a
small, non-native homeinvading pest native to southcentral Europe. It uses its
needle-like mouthparts to
penetrate seeds and extract
their nutrients. It feeds primarily on elm, but it has been
reported from other tree spe-

Washington Family Medicine


Washington Family Medicine

Washington Family Medicine

cies. In 2012, it was detected


in Idaho, the first record of
this insect in North America.
Three specimens were
collected from a residence in
Birmingham and tentatively
identified as ESB by Michigan
State Universitys Diagnostic
Services Laboratory and was
confirmed by the U.S.
Department of Agriculture on
December 2.
Elm seed bug is considered a minor pest of elm and
other trees. It can, however,
be a significant household
nuisance because it enters
buildings in large numbers to
seek refuge from winter
weather. When the insect is
crushed, its scent glands produce a foul odor. Elm seed
bug joins a suite of similar
non-native household insect
pests present in Michigan,
including Asian lady beetle,
brown marmorated stink bug,

and western conifer seed bug.


Major outbreaks of this insect
have occurred in parts of
Europe in recent years, resulting in massive invasions of
homes and other buildings.
ESB may have arrived in the
U.S. as a hitchhiker in the
baggage of international travelers arriving from heavily
infested areas. The source of
Michigans ESB is unknown.
It could have arrived from
Europe, Idaho, or another
location where ESB occurs
but has not been identified.
Elm seed bug is not a significant plant pest, it is not a
threat to human health, and it
does not cause structural
damage to homes. For these
reasons MDARD will not be
monitoring its spread in
Michigan or managing infestations. Homeowners who are
concerned about ESB or other
home-invading insects are

Photo by Emilie Bess,


USDA
APHIS
PPQ,
Bugwood.org
encouraged to protect their
homes against intrusion by
sealing around baseboards,
window and door openings,

Growers to vote on wheat


referendum renewal
Dr. David Calton, M.D.
University of Michigan

Graduate
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ACROSS MICHIGAN
Just two days remain
for Michigan wheat producers to vote on whether to
continue the Michigan Wheat
Program in a referendum
conducted by the Michigan
Department of Agriculture
and Rural Development
(MDARD). All ballots must
be received in the MDARD
Lansing office or postmarked
no later than January 22,
2016.
Ballots were mailed to
wheat producers on Thursday,
January 7, 2016. Eligible producers with questions, or
those not receiving a ballot,
should contact MDARD tollfree at 800-292-3939 or by
sending an email to merrilld@michigan.gov.
The Michigan Wheat
Program was designed to promote the profitable production, marketing, and utilization of wheat on behalf of
Michigan producers. Eligible
producers are those who have
produced any market wheat

in quantity beyond that persons own family use, and


who have a value at first
point-of-sale of more than
$800 in any one growing season within the last three years.

For the program to be


adopted, more than 50 percent of the votes cast, representing more than 50 percent
of the total bushels voted,
must approve the proposal.

Weather
almanac
Lapeer station
Minimum temp.
5.6 on Monday, 18th
Maximum temp.
44.5 on Friday, 15th
Rainfall
.66 inches

For the week of


January 12-18
Emmett station
Minimum temp.
803 on Monday, 18th
Maximum temp.
43.8 on Friday, 15th
Rainfall
.48 inches

Weather data courtesy of Enviro-weather,


www.enviroweather.msu.edu

your Farm Bureau Insurance agent


is your one-stop professional, dedicated
to serving all of your insurance needs.
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Page 17-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 20, 2016

Almont youth to host


Feb. 6 Polar Palooza
Winter celebration slated for noon-3 p.m.
from noon-3 p.m. at the old
elementary school and
grounds at 401 Church Street.
The event will include
open ice skating, snowman
building, games, a warming
fire, music, crafts, face painting, D.J. Wayne Sutherby,
and food and beverage concessions.
Those who cannot handle
the cold will find conditions
more suitable inside the
school, where YOMSmembers will host various indoor
activities, including a family-

Photo by Wendy Lange

Photo provided

Photo provided

friendly movie in the schools


cafeteria.
Tri-City Times Staff Writer
This years seasonably
appropriate movie will be Ice
ALMONT Most of us
Age, the 2002 Academy
have been enjoying the unseaAward nominated animated
sonably balmy temperatures,
film, featuring the voices of
but organizers of Almonts
Ray Romano, Denis Leary
2016 Polar Palooza are
and John Leguizamo.
hoping for more frigid condi While most of the activitions for their upcoming
ties will take place inside and
event.
outside the former elementary
Presented again by
school and grounds, sledding Almont YOMSmembers, Maddy Gray, Olivia Bussone, Heidi Theisen, Kara
Almonts Youth on Main
(pending sufficient snowfall) Feys and Isabelle Bourque met Friday to coordinate plans for this years Polar
Street (YOMS)organization,
will again be available at Palooza winter festival to take place from noon-3 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 6.
the 3rd annual winter celebraAlmont Community Park.
tion returns Saturday, Feb. 6
History of YOMS
Almonts Youth on Main
Street group was formed
about four years ago as a way
to develop leadership and
encourage public service
among young people in the
Almont community.
Almont
Downtown
Development
Authority
(DDA)Director
Nancy
Boxey said she believes
YOMSmay be the only group
of its kind in the state.
These kids are our future
civic leaders, said Boxey.
They are responsible for
organizing these events and
seeing them through to their Last year, many Polar Palooza participants sought
the warm comforts available inside the old elefruition.
As a result, they learn mentary, including games, crafts, sports and food.
about the challenges of leadership and giving back to sustained itself during its rel- Business sponsorship
their community, she contin- atively brief existence, Boxey In addition to the Almont
ued. This program is stu- wants to expand the groups DDA, sponsors of this years
dent-driven. They make the numbers through recruitment Polar Palooza include:
decisions and are responsible efforts.
Vi n c k i e r
Foods/
for following through on We intend to reach out to ACEHardware, CSBBank
those decisions.
our local Scout and church and Spring Dynamics.
This years Dryden Snowcoming Court includes: (front row) Wolfgang
Boxey said YOMSis groups to increase participa- For more information, to
Packard, Morgan Cox, Alex Curatolo, Katie Schenkel and Jeremy Trieloff;
comprised of a broad cross- tion, said Boxey. We have make a donation or to volun(back row) Jake Fuerst, Madison Keliin and Jake House. The Cardinals
section of local youth, all of an outstanding core of young teer, contact the Almont
varsity basketball team hosts Kinde North Huron on Friday (Jan. 22) evewhom put personal time and people right now, but we want DDAoffice at 810-798-8125
ning. The 2016 Snowcoming Dance takes place Saturday, Jan. 23.
effort into their projects.
to build and grow the pro- or visit the DDAwebsite at:
While the program has gram in the future.
www.almontdda.com.

By Tom Wearing

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Page 18-A-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 20, 2016

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Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Sports

www.tricitytimes-online.com

Imlay City
rolls past
Algonac

Schirmer, Reiff and


Hart in double digits
By Kevin Kissane

IMLAY CITY Imlay City


turned back host Algonac, 83-52, in a
Blue Water Area Conference varsity
boys basketball battle last Friday
night.
With the decision, Imlay City
moves to 7-2 and 2-1.
In Fridays battle, Imlay City
opened up a 24-10 advantage after one
quarter was over with.
The middle two quarters saw
Imlay City generate 34 total points,
while holding Algonac to 28. That
made it 58-38, Imlay City, with 24
minutes gone.
Imlay City then outscored Algonac
25-14 the rest of the way, finishing off
an 83-52 win.
Griffin Schirmer topped Imlay
Citys scoring attack with 15 points.
He was backed by Seth Reiff and
David Hart (12 points apiece), Curtis
Homer (eight), Mike Nadrowski and
Jose Castro (seven each), Mitchell
Allen and Hunter Galbraith (six
apiece), Noah Galbraith (four) along
with Travis Gould and Jared Stryker
(three).

Photo by Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

Noah Burgess, of Capac, looks to score under pressure from several Cros-Lex foes in Fridays BWAC encounter.

Capac holds off Cros-Lex, 52-48

Chiefs hit free throws in final seconds to seal win to hold off BWAC foe
By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

CAPAC Noah Burgess hit a


pair of pressure-packed free throws
with 2.5 seconds remaining, helping host Capac close out a 52-48
win against Cros-Lex in a Blue
Water Area Conference varsity
boys basketball game last Friday

night.
With the decision, Capac now
stands at 5-4 and 2-1.
In Fridays game, Capac spotted Cros-Lex a 12-11 edge after
one quarter was done.
The next eight-minute stretch
saw Capac hit for 16 points and
Cros-Lex manage 14. That made it
27-26, Capac, at the halftime

break.
When the action resumed,
Capac padded its cushion some.
Aided by a 14-10 third quarter
edge, the Chiefs grabbed a
41-36 advantage with 24 minutes
gone.
Cros-Lex then outscored
Capac 12-11 the rest of the way,
leaving the floor with a 52-48 win

to their credit.
Andrew Sams paced Capac
with 15 points. The Chiefs also had
Noah Burgess (nine), Louis
Aguinaga (eight), Brent Boers (a
pair of trifectas), Jeff Opificius
(five), Trevor Boers (a triple) plus
Jacob Parski and Jared Roosen
(three each) contribute points to
their cause.

Dryden rolls past Mayville, 56-41


By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

Spartans
nab first
in Durand
Pawlaczyk, Mullins
win weight classes
By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

IMLAY CITY The Imlay City


wrestling team registered a first-place
finish last Saturday at the Durand
Invitational.
Imlay Citys winning total that day
was 132 points. Ionia (123 points),
Midland (113), North Branch (102),
Perry (101), Fenton (88), Mayville
(68), Milan (67), Durand (65), Burton
Bentley (40), Burton Bendle (36),
Flint Powers (26), Bath (20),
International Academy of Flint (14)
and Vassar (11) held down spots two
through 15.
Eric Pawlaczyk and Hunter
Mullins led Imlay City with firsts.
Pawlaczyk reached the title bout at
103 pounds where he notched a 9-0
win against Ionias Cole Cudney and
Mullins advanced to the 130-pound
championship clash where he obtained
a 6-0 victory over Midlands Jacob
Gomola.
Pat Pauli gave Imlay City a second. Pauli made it to the title bout at
189 pounds where he dropped a 3-0
verdict to Ionias Trevor Piggott.
Zac Hellebuyck and Jaykob Shaw
contributed Imlay Citys thirds.
Spartans page 4-B

DRYDEN Dryden
registered a 56-41 triumph
against visiting Mayville in a
North Central Thumb
League varsity boys basketball confrontation last
Saturday night.
With the outcome,
Dryden improves to 4-2 and
2-1.
In Saturdays confrontation, Dryden jumped out to a
14-7 advantage after one
quarter was done.
Quarter number two
would see Dryden outscore
Mayville by an identical
14-7 count. That staked
Dryden to a 28-14 cushion at
the halftime break.

John DelCampo, of Dryden, looks to distribute the basketball to an


open teammate in Saturdays confrontation versus Mayville.

Capac grapplers first at Notre Dame Prep


By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

Photo provided

Imlay Citys Hunter Mullins (L)


competes in a recent match.

When
the
action
resumed, Dryden widened
the gap some more. Bolstered
by a 13-12 third quarter
edge, the Cardinals went up
41-26 with 24 minutes gone.
Dryden and Mayville
then hit for 15 points
apiece the rest of the way,
leaving the former with a
56-41 win to celebrate at
nights end.
Justin Knox (13, including three trifectas), Max
Kage (11) and Sean Riley
(10) led Dryden with double
figure point totals. The
remaining Cardinal points
went to John DelCampo
(nine), Bailey Knuth (five),
Evan Pocius (a triple), Trey
Raab (three) and Mike Kirts
(two).

Photo by Kevin Kissane

Cardinals Knox, Kage and Riley combine for 34 in NCTL home victory

The Capac wrestling team poses for a photo after winning the Notre Dame Prep
Tournament last Saturday. Capac went 5-0 en route to the title.

CAPAC The Capac wrestling team


went 5-0 en route to a number one showing
last Saturday at the Notre Dame Prep
Tournament.
Capac got their successful five-match
stint underway with a 60-23 win against U of
D Jesuit. That was followed by a 61-18 victory over Clarkstons B team; a 57-24 triumph
against Sterling Heights; a 52-17 win over
Dearborn; and a 61-18 victory against Notre
Dame Prep.
Dylan Wojie (103), Ian Detroyer (140),
Paul Livermore (152) and Jason Tyson (160)
led Capac with 5-0 marks that day.
Justin Lee (112), Anthony Trudo (125),
Thomas Wheeler (130), Carter Smith (145),
Danny Navarro (171), Josh Skarsvog (189)
and Aaron Podgorski (215) furnished the next
best Capac showings, putting together 4-1
records in their respective weight classes.
Gerrardo Navarro was the other Capac
grappler who posted a winning mark that day.
Navarro finished 3-2 at 285 pounds.
With the results, Capac now stands at
17-10 overall.

Page 2-B-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 20, 2016

Sports News

Boys Basketball

Zauner named as
Drydens new AD
online.
We are very excited to
welcome Dave to our team,
Dryden Principal Mary
Finnigan commented. He
received his Bachelors
Degree from the University
of Detroit Mercy in Secondary
Education and his Masters of
Athletic Administration from
Wayne State University, she
noted.
Dave is a great guy. He
is
personable,
student
centered, compassionate,
dedicated, has a strong sense
of community and possesses
a great deal of integrity. He
brings 20-plus years of
teaching and coaching experience to Dryden. He understands the role that athletics
play in the school and community and is dedicated to
preparing our student athletes
for success both on and off
the field.

By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

Photo by Kevin Kissane

DRYDEN Following
several weeks of speculation
as to who would fill the
position of Drydens Athletic
Director, David Zauner has
been named to the post.
He takes over the spot
from
interim
athletic
directors Mark Newell and
Beth Highley, who stepped in
to handle the assignment after
Al Margrif resigned to pursue
other career opportunities a
few months ago.
Zauner had previously
coached at East Detroit,
where he enjoyed a 15-year
run as varsity boys
basketball coach. He also
coached softball, football and
baseball in his time there.
At Dryden, Zauner plans
to teach as well. There he
has three classes scheduled,
including a seventh hour
resource time. Zauner will
also teach a pair of courses

Strong fourth lifts


Dryden to a victory

Max Kage, of Dryden, brings the ball up the floor


during a NCTL matchup last week.

DRYDEN Dryden
handed Memphis a 57-42
setback in a North Central
Thumb League varsity
boys basketball
game
Monday night.
With the result, Dryden
improves to 5-2 and 3-1.
In Mondays game,
Dryden grabbed an 8-7
edge after one quarter was
done.
The middle two quarters
would see Dryden produce
27
total
points
and

Memphis manage 26. That


staked Dryden to a 35-33
cushion with 24 minutes
gone.
Dryden then outscored
Memphis 22-9 the rest of
the way, putting the finishing
touches on a 57-42 win.
Max Kage (16 points),
Justin Knox (15) and John
DelCampo (14) led Dryden
with double figure outputs.
They were backed by Sean
Riley (four points), Eric
Johnson, Evan Pocius and
Bailey Knuth (two each)
along with Jake Hagemeister
and Mike Kirts (one apiece).

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Bowling & Euchre


Fundraiser

Imlay City guard Jose Castro looks over his offensive options during a game this season.

Imlay City downs Flint Northwestern


By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

IMLAY CITY Imlay


City handed host Flint
Northwestern a 66-51 setback
in a non-conference varsity
boys basketball clash last
Wednesday night.
With the decision, Imlay
City improves to 6-2 overall.

In Wednesdays clash,
Imlay City spotted Flint
Northwestern Academy a
20-13 advantage after one
quarter was history.
The next eight-minute
stretch saw Imlay City amass
19
points
and
Flint
Northwestern manage 12,
making it a 32-32 ballgame at
the halftime break.

When the action resumed,


Imlay City struck with a 17-4
third quarter edge. That staked
them to a 49-36 advantage
with 24 minutes gone.
Imlay City then outscored
Flint Northwestern 17-15 the
rest of the way, finishing off a
66-51 victory.
Griffin Schirmer paced
Imlay City with a 20-point

performance. The Spartans


also had Seth Reiff (13
points), Hunter Galbraith and
David Hart (nine each), Mike
Nadrowski (seven), Curtis
Homer and Mitch Allen (three
each) plus Jose Castro (two)
connect.
Troy Brown led Flint
Northwestern. He finished
with 15 points.

Capac posts convincing road win


By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

CAPAC Trevor Boers


collected 20 points and Noah
Burgess supplied 18 to help
Capac post a 74-44 road win
against Memphis in a nonleague varsity boys basketball encounter on Tuesday,
January 12.
With the decision, Capac
evens their mark at 4-4 overall.
In Tuesdays encounter,
Capac bolted out to a 24-11
advantage after one quarter
was complete.
Quarter number two
would see Capac add 14
points to their total, while
holding Memphis to eight.

That staked Capac to a


38-19 cushion at the halftime
break.
When the action resumed,
Capac continued to pull away.
Aided by a 14-12 third quarter edge, the team went up
52-31 with 24 minutes into
the record books.
Capac then outscored
Memphis 22-13 the rest of the
way, putting the finishing
touches on a 74-44 win.
Louis Aguinaga (eight
including a field goal of the
trifecta variety) generated the
next highest Capac point
total. He was backed by Brent
Boers (seven points), Nathan
Lietz (six) plus Jeff Opificius,
Andrew Sams and Jacob Andrew Sams, of Capac, surveys his offensive
options during a game with Memphis last week.
Parski (five each).

Photo by Kevin Kissane

Monday Night Trio


1st Place: KCInsurance
Mens High Game
Chad Wolak, 280
Mens High Series
John Hollenbeck, 779
Team High Series
AC/DC Electric, 2048
Tuesday Mens Charter
1st Place: State Farm Insurance
Mens High Game
Travis Lowe, 269
Mens High Series
Travis Lowe, 747
Team High Series
TLN, 2982
Hollys Angels
1st Place: Tri-County Bank
Mens High Game
Barb Jurn, 210
Mens High Series
Terri Ritter, 560
Team High Series
Country Girls, 2363
Thursday Night League
1st Place: Silver Bullets

Mens High Game


Nick Cox, 256
Mens High Series
Nick, Cox, 750
Womens High Game Stephanie Schaefer, 195
Womens High Series
Sue Ward, 540
Team High Series
Silver Bullets, 2082
Friday Night Mixed
1st Place: Future-In-Laws
Mens High Game
Mike Smith, 215
Mens High Series
Mike Edgerton, 556
Womens High Game
Barb Jurn, 204
Womens High Series
Cathy Strunk, 546
Team High Series
Future In-Laws, 2118
Beginniners Luck
1st Place: Still Fishing/Professional Amatures
Mens High Game Shawn McCormick, 279
Mens High Series Shawn McCormick, 690
Womens High Game
Misty Fisher, 181
Womens High Series
Misty Fisher, 505
Team High Series
Still Fishing, 1966

Richmond outpoints Almont, 64-44


By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

ALMONT

The
Almont varsity boys basketball team now stands at 3-4
overall, including a 1-2 Blue
water Area Conference standing, following its 64-44 road
loss to Richmond last Friday
night.
For Richmond, Matthew
Skoryanc proved the toughest
player to stop. Skoryanc netted 15 points.
Zach Revoldt (16 points,
including a trifecta) and Drew
Revoldt (11) were Almonts
top offensive weapons. Tom
Lulgjuraj (six points), Dante
Dudek (five, featuring a trey)
plus Nick Terry, Nathan
Miller and Eric Conn (two
each) supported their perfor- Eric Conn, of Almont, drives to the hoop during a Blue Water Area Conference
mances.
clash this season.

Photo by Kevin Kissane

Holly Meadows

Page 3-B-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 20, 2016

Athlete of the Week

Photo by Kevin Kissane

Girls Basketball

Sophomore Andrew
Sams collected 15 points to
lead Capac to a 52-48
BWAC varsity basketball
win against Cros-Lex last
Friday.
For his effort, Sams
claims our Boys Athlete
of the Week honor.

Be sure to pick up your t-shirt at the Tri-City Times office.


CITIZENS
FRANKENMUTH
PIONEER CINCINNATI
TRAVELERS
SELECTIVE
THE HARTFORD

Shelby Husovsky, of Capac, concentrates on the hoop as a Cros-Lex foe defends in Fridays game.

Cros-Lex posts road victory at Capac


By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

Cros-Lex amass 13 points


and Capac manage two. That
left Cros-Lex holding a 22-4
advantage at the halftime
break.
When play resumed,
Cros-Lex picked up where
it left off. Thanks to a 10-4
third quarter edge, the

Photo by Kevin Kissane

CAPAC Capac fell by


a 42-17 count to visiting
Cros-Lex in a Blue Water
Area Conference varsity
girls basketball contest last
Friday night.

With the outcome, Capac


slips to 4-5 overall and 1-2 as
far as BWAC clashes are
concerned.
In Fridays contest,
Cros-Lex grabbed a 9-2
edge after one quarter was
done.
Quarter number two saw

Megan Jamison, of Capac, draws some attention from several Cros-Lex


defenders during the teams BWAC basketball game at home last Friday
night.

Imlay leaves Algonac with win


By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

IMLAYCITY Ashton
Combs netted 36 points,
including two field goals of
the three-point variety, and
Abby Schefka supplied 11 to
lead Imlay City past host
Algonac, 65-37, in a Blue
Water Area Conference
varsity girls basketball
meeting last Friday night.
With the outcome, Imlay
City raises its mark to 6-3
overall and 4-0 when they
square off versus BWAC

rivals.
In Fridays meeting,
Imlay City took an 18-6
advantage after one quarter
was done and widened the
gap to 30-16 at halftime.
When the action resumed,
Imlay City struck with a 21-5
third quarter edge. That left
them holding a 51-21 cushion
with 24 minutes gone.
Algonac then outscored
Imlay City 16-14 the rest
of the way, only to drop
a 65-37 outcome when the
final second ticked off the
clock.

Kendall
Sommer
provided the next highest
point total for the victorious
Imlay City side, contributing
five. Ella Merlo and Cassie
Malhado (four points each),
Melissa Rahn (a triple) plus
Madalinn Thibodeau (two)
were the other Spartans that
connected.
Combs (13) and Schefka
(12) furnished Imlay Citys
top rebounding outputs.
Malhado and Sommer added
nine and five rebounds,
respectively, to the Spartans
cause.

Pioneers went ahead 32-8


with 24 minutes elapsed.
Cros-Lex then outscored
Capac 10-9 the rest of the
way, leaving the floor with a
42-17 victory.
Rachel
Soper
led
Cros-Lex with a 12-point performance.
Alexys Anderson and
Megan
Jamison
paced
Capac with four points apiece.
The Chiefs also had
Dyman Huss (three points)
plus Kristen Payne, Alexis
Wesch
and
Emma
Shellenbarger (two each)
reach the scoring column.

Dryden senior
McKenna Rudd netted
15 points in her teams
NCTL basketball win
over Mayville last week.
For her effort, Rudd
garners our Girls
Athlete of the Week
honor.

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Dryden picks up win over Mayville


By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

DRYDEN Dryden
earned a 38-22 win at visiting
Mayvilles expense in a North
Central
Thumb
League
varsity
girls
basketball matchup last
Friday.
With the verdict, Dryden
improves to 1-6 and 1-2.
In Fridays matchup,
Dryden charged out to a 15-6

advantage after one quarter


had ended.
The second quarter saw
Dryden accumulate eight
points,
while
holding
Mayville to four. That enabled
Dryden to go ahead 23-10 at
the halftime break.
When the action resumed,
Dryden continued to pull
away. Aided by a 10-2 third
quarter edge, the Cardinals
took a 33-12 lead with 24
minutes gone.

Mayville then outscored


Dryden 10-5 the rest of the
way, only to drop at 38-22
verdict at nights end.
McKenna Rudd led
Dryden with 15 points. She
was backed by Taylor
Wakerley (nine points), Mia
Sliman and Katie Schenkel
(four points each) plus Rachel
Vallad, Ally Sobek and Kelli
Schenkel (two apiece).
Dryden also received 11
rebounds courtesy of Rudd.

Almont falls on the road to Richmond


By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

ALMONT Almont
returned from Richmond with
a 41-26 loss in a Blue Water
Area Conference varsity
girls basketball meeting last
Friday night.
With the result, Almont
slips to 3-5 and 0-3.
In Fridays meeting,
Almont bolted out to a 10-5
advantage after one quarter

was done.
The next eight-minute
stretch, though, would belong
to Richmond. It was there
they
outscored
their
opposition 19-4, going up
24-14 at the halftime break.
When
the
action
resumed, Richmond remained
in command. Aided by an
11-4 third quarter edge,
the Blue Devils forged a
35-18
advantage
with
24 minutes into the record

books.
Almont then put together
an 8-6 fourth quarter rally,
only to drop a 41-26 verdict
at nights end.
Paige Walton led Almont
with
an
eight-point
performance. The remaining
Raider points went to
Lizzie
Rinke
(seven),
Meredith Rinke (four),
Rebecca Measel and Megan
Swank (three each) along
with Tyler Kautz (one).

810.724.0851

BOOK Our BANQUET HALL


Weddings, Meetings
Special Events
oF r Your
Or Private Parties

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Page 4-B-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 20, 2016

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

Photo by Kevin Kissane

TRI-CITY AREA
Imlay City registered a 57-18
triumph against Almont in a
Blue Water Area Conference
wrestling
battle
last
Wednesday.
Cros-Lex Middle School
is where the action unfolded.
Nic Morandi, Wesley

victory by void.
Julian Dervishi was the
other Imlay City grappler
who prevailed. He notched a
4-1 victory over Josh Phelps
at 152 pounds.
Jacob Battani and Robbie
Battani paced Almont with
triumphs by pin. The former
took 18 seconds to down
Garrett Shevnock at 145
pounds and the latter needed

Almonts Josh Phelps looks to escape the hold


of Imlay Citys Julian Dervishi in BWAC action.

The Almont wrestling team takes time out for a photo after claiming a second
at their own invite last Saturday.

Almont second at their own invite


By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

ALMONT

The
Almont wrestling team went
4-1, paving the way to a second-place finish at an invitational it hosted last Saturday,

Almont started things off


with a 50-24 win against St.
Clair Shores Lakeshore. That
was followed by a 46-30 victory over Lake Orion; a 42-39
triumph against Ferndale; a
53-30 win over Brown City;
and a 42-37 loss to Essexville

Garber.
Jacob Burchi (119),
Nathan Hunter (130), Jacob
Battani (145), Kyle Barr
(152) and Boyd Glenn (171)
led Almont that day. Each
went 5-0 in their respective
weight classes.

Capac halves BWAC clashes


By Kevin Kissane

Photo by Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

Almonts Nathan Hunter works for a pin against


a Cros-Lex foe in last weeks BWAC battle.
2:21 to down 160-pound
adversary Blake Porter.
Earlier that night, Imlay
City notched a 51-28 win
against Yale.
A group consisting of
Hampton, Scillian, Mullins,
Pauli and Shaw contributed
wins by pin to Imlay Citys

7-0 triumph against 130pound foe Wyatt Lambert and


the latter obtained a 9-8 win
over Joey Hayden at 145
pounds.
With the results, Imlay
City evens their BWAC mark
at 2-2. Almont watches their
league record drop to 1-3.

Photo by Kevin Kissane

Hampton, Noah Scillian,


Hunter
Mullins,
Jon
Louwsma, Adriel Rojas,
Brandyn Louwsma and
Jaykob Shaw led Imlay City
with wins by pin. Morandi
stopped Jack DeMara (fall
time not available) at 103
pounds; Hampton required 49
seconds to down 119-pound
foe Jacob Burchi; Scillian
upended Austin Cody (fall
time not available) at 125
pounds; Mullins downed
Colby Querciagrossa (fall
time not available) at 130
pounds; Louwsma needed
3:01 to defeat 135-pound
counterpart Nathan Hunter;
Rojas required 5:15 to turn
back Colton Kruse at 140
pounds; Brandyn Louwsma
needed 3:38 to best 171pound adversary Jordon
Phelps; and Shaw required
2:52 to beat Hunter Spies at
215 pounds.
Keegan Houghten (112)
provided Imlay City with a

cause. Hampton needed 1:11


to stop Nick Genaw at 112
pounds; Scillian required
1:17 to defeat 119-pound foe
Kolton Antilla; Mullins took
51 seconds to conquer Patrick
Hoppe at 130 pounds; Pauli
needed 47 seconds to best
189-pound
counterpart
Charles Moses; and Shaw
required 27 seconds to upend
Josh Simmons at 285 pounds.
Morandi (103), Dervishi
(145) and Plouse (215) gave
Imlay City victories by void.
Kulin was the other Imlay
City grappler who emerged
victorious, accomplishing the
feat with a 7-4 outcome versus Zach McIntyre at 125
pounds.
In the nights other dual,
Almont dropped a 62-12 verdict to Cros-Lex.
Burchi led Almont with a
win by pin. It took him 4:00
to stop Connor Woodruff at
119 pounds.
Hunter and Jacob Battani
were the other Almont grapplers who emerged victorious. The former registered a

Almont 140-pounder Colton Kruse looks to shake the hold of Imlay Citys
Adriel Rojas in their bout last Wednesday at Cros-Lex.

CAPAC Capac split a


pair of Blue Water Area
Conference dual wrestling
matches last Wednesday at
Richmond.
The team opened their
two-match stint with a 45-31
win against Armada.
Dylan Wojie, Anthony
Trudo, Paul Livermore,
Danny Navarro and Josh
Skarsvog led Capac with
victories by pin. Wojie took
2:20 to stop Justin Madill
at 103 pounds; Trudo required
3:45 to conquer 125-pound
foe
James
Laperriere;
Livermore
needed
53

seconds to down Brennan


Steibauer at 152 pounds;
Navarro took 3:31 to beat
171-pound
counterpart
Daniel Sage; and Skarsvog
required 1:38 to defeat
Antonio Annoni at 189
pounds.
Justin Lee (112) and
Aaron Podgorski (285)
provided Capac with triumphs by void.
Ian Detroyer was the
other Capac grappler who
prevailed. Detroyer picked up
a 6-5 win against Jonathon
Johnson at 140 pounds.
Capac also squared off
versus
Richmond
that
evening. That confrontation
drew to a close with

Richmond notching a 52-18


victory.
Trudo and Livermore
headlined for Capac. The former needed 2:28 to defeat
Cody Keller at 125 pounds
and the latter required 1:50 to
to upend 152-pound adversary David Kaltz.
Capac also received triumphs by decision courtesy
of Wojie and Navarro. Wojie
furnished a 9-5 win against
Harry McCloskey at 103
pounds and Navarro generated an 8-6 victory over 171pound rival Hunter Bergeron.
With the results, Capac
now stands at 12-10 overall
and 3-1 as far as BWAC
clashes are concerned.

Detroyer, Livermore win 100th


By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

CAPAC Capac senior


140-pounder Ian Detroyer
and senior 152-pounder
Paul Livermore claimed
their 100th career triumphs
this past week.
Detroyer was the first to
notch
that
milestone,
accomplishing the feat last
Wednesday
when
he
picked up a 6-5 victory over
Armadas Jonathan Johnson.
Richmond is where that
encounter was contested.
With
the
outcome,
Detroyer watched his career
mark improve to 100-75
overall.
Three
days
later,
Livermore would register his
100th win.
The milestone came in
his second clash of the
day
Saturday
at
the

Photo provided

By Kevin Kissane

Photo provided

Imlay defeats Almont, Yale

Capacs Paul Livermore (L) and Ian Detroyer (R)


notched their 100th win last week.
Notre
Dame
Prep
Invitational where it took
him 3:05 to conquer Clarkston
B team grappler Ian
Wilson.

Livermore would go on
from there to post a 5-0 record
that day.
He now owns a 103-55
career mark.

Scillian gets his


100th career win

Noah Scillian

IMLAY CITY Imlay


City senior 119-pounder
Noah Scillian notched his
100th career victory last
Saturday at a Blue Water
Area Conference dual last
Wednesday.
Cros-Lex is where the

action unfolded.
The milestone came in
Imlay Citys first match that
evening. It was there Scillian
required 1:17 to defeat Yales
Kolton Antilla.
He also pinned Almonts
Austin Cody in his other bout
that day.
With the results, Scillian
improved to 13-2 this season.

Call or send us with your


sports announcements...

810-724-2615

kkissane@pageone-inc.com

Photo provided

By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

The Imlay City wrestling team poses for a photo after wrapping up a top finish
Saturday at the Durand Invitational.

Spartans: win the Durand Invitational


from page 1-B

Hellebuyck closed out his


run in the 135-pound weight
class when he pinned
Milans Alex Jacques with
3:18 gone and Shaw
wrapped up 215-pound
action when he pinned
Milans Jesse Schmitt with

2:34 elapsed.
Wesley Hampton
provided Imlay City with
a two-way tie for a third.
He ended his run at
112 pounds with a 13-1
victory over Durands Walter
Will.
Kyle Kulin and Austin
Plouse added fourths to

Imlay Citys cause. Kulin


finished his run at 125
pounds with a 9-4 loss to
Perrys Tanner Orweller
and Plouse ended things
when he was pinned
with 5:50 gone by Burton
Bendle 285-pound weight
class counterpart Steven
Ganne.

Page 5-B-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 20, 2016

Sports In Brief

Photo provided

Competitive Cheer

The Capac Competitive Cheer team poses for a photo after winning their own invite last Saturday. They
are front Sidney Birkett, Camden Gaedcke, Reagan Wittstock, Hunter Smith, Ashley Andrus and
Catherine Helzer; and back Alaina Pawlowski, Morgan Woods, Shelbi McKeown, Karly Klug, Haydn
Hurley, Megan Woods, Nola Baba and coach Taylor Smith.

Capac Cheer team wins own invite


By Kevin Kissane

Tri-City Times Sports Editor

TRI-CITY AREA
The Capac Competitive
Cheer team earned a firstplace finish in the Division 4
portion
of
an
invitational it hosted last
Saturday.
Capacs winning total that
day was 724.42 points. It is
believed that their impressive

output marks the first


time in school history
that the team has topped the
700-point barrier.
Three other schools vied
for division honors that day.
Their ranks consisted of
Montrose (660.72 points),
Brown City (587.9) and
Sandusky (579.18).
Ashley Andrus, Shelbi
McKeown,
Catherine
Helzer, Reagan Wittstock,
Hunter Smith, Morgan

Woods, Karly Klug, Sidney


Birkett, Camden Gaedcke,
Alaina Pawlowski and
Haydn Hurley made Capacs
first-place showing possible.
In the Division 3
portion of the competition,
Yales
total of 692.56
points proved best. They
were followed by Imlay City
(670.28
points)
and
Almont (661.06).
Hollie Rager, Gina
Abbott, Makenna Schocke,

Katie Ferguson, Samantha


Giovannangeli,
Serena
Bara and Janet Felbarth
represented Imlay City.
Gabby Schlagel, Keegan
DeMara, Lexi Guerrero,
Brianna
Knee,
Jaclyn
Buerhle, Miranda Buehrle,
Hannah Long, Shianne
Calkins, Ashlynn Fistler,
Ritamarie McGowan, Jayme
Herin, Ashley Kroll, Sara
Ranucci and Ariana Maust
competed for Almont.

Stats and Standings


BOYS
BASKETBALL
STATLEADERS
SCORING


Z. Revoldt (A)
Schirmer (IC)
Reiff (IC)
DelCampo (D)
D. Revoldt (A)
Kage (D)
Burgess (C)
Nadrowski (IC)
Aguinaga (C)
Knox (D)
Sams (C)
B. Boers (C)
H. Galbraith (IC)

G
3
6
9
6
3
6
9
9
9
6
9
9
9

P
53
93
135
85
38
64
96
81
77
50
71
61
59

Avg.
17.7
15.5
15.0
14.2
12.7
10.7
10.7
9.0
8.6
8.3
7.9
6.8
6.6

REBOUNDING

Nadrowski (IC)
DelCampo (D)
Burgess (C)
H. Galbraith (IC)

G R Avg.
9 90 10.0
6 60 10.0
9 87 9.6
9 65 7.2

Schirmer (IC)

6 34 5.7

STEALS


DelCampo (D)
Sams (C)
Burgess (C)
Knuth (D)

ASSISTS


Reiff (IC)
DelCampo (D)
Sams (C)
Castro (IC)
Aguinaga (C)

G S Avg.
6 22 3.7
9 26 2.9
9 22 2.4
6 13 2.2
G
9
6
9
9
9

A Avg.
47 5.2
19 3.2
27 3.0
25 2.8
17 2.0

BOYS
BASKETBALL
TEAM STANDINGS
Blue Water Area Conference
Team
League
Overall
Imlay City
2-1
7-2
Almont 1-2 3-3
Capac 1-1 3-4
North Central Thumb League
Team
League
Overall
Dryden 2-1 4-2

GIRLS
BASKETBALL
STATLEADERS
SCORING


Combs (IC)
Jamison (C)
M. Rinke (A)
Zimmerman (A)
Huss (C)
Johnson (A)
L. Rinke (A)

G
8
8
5
5
8
5
5

P
174
74
43
43
59
28
28

Avg.
21.8
9.2
8.6
8.6
7.4
5.6
5.6

REBOUNDING

Combs (IC)
Schefka (IC)
M. Rinke (A)
Huss (C)

STEALS


M. Rinke (A)

G R Avg.
8 99 12.4
8 69 8.6
5 40 8.0
8 62 7.8
G S Avg.
5 30 6.0

Zimmerman (A)
Combs (IC)
C. Katkic (IC)
Measel (A)
Huss (C)
Johnson (A)
Jamison (C)

ASSISTS


C. Katkic (IC)
Combs (IC)
Zimmerman (A)
M. Rinke (A)

5
8
8
5
8
5
7

20
30
26
15
18
10
13

4.0
3.8
3.3
3.0
2.3
2.0
1.9

G
6
6
5
5

A Avg.
16 2.7
12 2.0
10 2.0
10 2.0

GIRLS
BASKETBALL
TEAM
STANDINGS
Blue Water Area Conference
Team
League
Overall
Imlay City
4-0
6-3
Capac 1-2 3-5
Almont 0-3 3-5
North Central Thumb League
Team
League
Overall
Dryden 1-3 1-6

WRESTLING
LEADERS
MOST WINS
Livermore (C)
Trudo (C)
J. Battani (A)
Detroyer (C)
Smith (C)

26
25
24
21
21

Wojie (C)
Hampton (IC)
Tyson (C)
Mullins (IC)
Glenn (A)
Pauli (IC)
Burchi (A)
Shaw (IC)
Hunter (A)
DeMara (A)
Lee (C)
Scillian (IC)
Webster (C)
Spies (A)
D. Navarro (C)
Pawlaczyk (IC)
Kulin (IC)
Barr (A)
R. Battani (A)
Podgorski (C)
Skarsvog (C)
Wheeler (C)
Plouse (IC)
Morandi (IC)
Bartlett (A)
B. Louwsma (IC)
J. Louwsma (IC)
Hellebuyck (IC)
D. Kruse (A)
Shevnock (IC)
Fritz (C)
G. Navarro (C)
Dervishi (IC)
Porter (IC)
Skarsvog (C)
Querciagrossa (A)
Jordon Phelps (A)
C. Kruse (A)
Cody (A)
Kline (IC)
Felder (IC)
Josh Phelps (A)
V. Rojas (C)
Houghten (IC)
Inwood (IC)
Pagano (A)
Arms (A)
Mardlin (C)

19
19
18
18
17
16
16
16
15
14
14
14
13
12
11
11
11
10
10
10
10
10
9
8
7
7
7
7
7
7
6
6
6
5
5
5
5
4
4
4
4
3
3
2
2
2
2
2

Canelo (C)
Powell (A)
Martini (A)
Lynch (IC)
Morse (IC)

MOST PINS

Livermore (C)
Trudo (C)
J. Battani (A)
Smith (C)
Shaw (IC)
Hampton (C)
Wojie (C)
Webster (C)
Glenn (A)
Detroyer (C)
D. Navarro (C)
Kulin (IC)
Mullins (IC)
Scillian (IC)
Pauli (IC)
Spies (A)
Hunter (A)
Barr (A)
R. Battani (A)
J. Louwsma (IC)
Tyson (C)
Wheeler (C)
Pawlaczyk (IC)
B. Louwsma (IC)
Lee (C)
Plouse (IC)
Podgorski (C)
D. Kruse (A)
Porter (IC)
Hellebuyck (IC)
Morandi (IC)
Fritz (C)
Dervishi (IC)
Jordon Phelps (A)
DeMara (A)
Burchi (A)
Skarsvog (C)
Kline (IC)
Shevnock (IC)
Felder (IC)
Bartlett (A)

2
1
1
1
1
20
18
16
15
13
12
11
10
10
10
10
9
9
8
8
7
7
7
7
6
6
6
6
5
5
5
5
4
4
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2

G. Navarro (C)
Querciagrossa (A)
Cody (A)
Mardlin (C)
Canelo (C)
Arms (A)
Martini (A)
Pagano (A)
Houghten (IC)
Lynch (IC)
Morse (IC)
Inwood (IC)
Quick Pins
Wojie (C)
J. Battani (A)
Trudo (C)
Hunter (A)
Trudo (C)
Detroyer (C)
Webster (C)
Bartlett (A)
Podgorski (C)
Smith (C)
Glenn (A)
C. Kruse (A)
Tyson (C)
G. Navarro (C)
Wheeler (C)
Livermore (C)
Fritz (C)
Livermore (C)
Glenn (A)
Trudo (C)
Webster (C)
Detroyer (C)
Webster (C)

2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
7 secs.
12 secs.
13 secs.
13 secs.
13 secs.
15 secs.
15 secs.
18 secs.
20 secs.
21 secs.
21 secs.
22 secs.
23 secs.
24 secs.
25 secs.
25 secs.
27 secs.
28 secs.
28 secs.
28 secs.
29 secs.
30 secs.
30 secs.

Wrestling Team
Standings
Team
League Overall
Capac 3-1 17-10
Almont 1-3 11-12
Imlay City
2-2
8-5

The following youth


sports, junior high, ninth
grade and junior varsity
recaps are provided to us by
area coaches. If your teams
results do not appear here
remind your coach to pass
along the information by
calling (810) 724-2615, or
e-mailing it to kkissane@
pageone-inc.com or send it
to us via fax at (810) 7248552.
Almont Junior Varsity
Boys Basketball
Almont vs. Richmond
January 14
Almont-36 Richmond-33
Game recap- Almont
slipped by Richmond, 36-33,
in a Blue Water Area
Conference junior varsity
boys basketball matchup last
Thursday.
Clay Schapman led
Almont with 10 points. He
was backed by Jordan
Bourdeau and Zach Filinger
(five points each) along with
Rafael Farias, Jared
Litchfield, Kevin Heim and
Garrett Rahula (four apiece).
Imlay City Ninth Grade
Boys Basketball
Imlay City vs. Algonac
January 14
Imlay City-55 Algonac-48
Game recap- Imlay City
downed Algonac, 55-48, in a
Blue Water Area Conference
ninth grade boys basketball
game last Thursday.
For Imlay City, Hunter
Abram (14 points) led the
way. He was backed by
Logan Wilson (12 points),
Zack Mostek and Lonnie
Wolford (seven each), Dillan
Sarka (five) plus Ty Evans,
Javier Arguelles, Wei Lin
and Quintin Zinger (two
apiece).
Imlay City Ninth Grade
Boys Basketball
Imlay City vs. Flint
Northwestern
January 13
Flint Northwestern-83
Imlay City-71

Game recap- Imlay City


fell by an 83-71 count to
Flint Northwestern in a nonleague ninth grade boys basketball battle last Wednesday.
Hunter Abram paced
Imlay City with 21 points.
He was given assistance in
the scoring department by
Lonnie Wolford (20 points),
Logan Wilson (eight),
Quintin Zinger and Manuel
Martinez (six each), Ty
Evans (four) along with
Dillan Sarka and Wei Lin
(two apiece).
Imlay City Ninth Grade
Girls Basketball
Imlay City vs. Marysville
January 8
Marysville-32
Imlay City-23
Game recap- Marysville
defeated Imlay City, 32-23,
in a non-league ninth grade
girls basketball contest on
Friday, January 8.
Kendall Whitsett paced
Imlay City with nine points.
The Spartans also received
points courtesy of Agnes
Krahn (five), Robin
LeFevere (four), Ashlyn
Vamvas (two) along with
Rebecca Sich, Emma Watti
and Leah Knezevich (one
each).
Imlay City Junior Varsity
Girls Basketball
Imlay City vs. Algonac
January 7
Imlay City-44 Algonac-6
Game recap- Imlay City
turned back Algonac, 44-6,
in a Blue Water Area
Conference junior varsity
girls basketball clash on
Thursday, January 7.
Mallory Wetzel paced
Imlay City with an 18-point
performance. The remaining
Spartan points went to Kayla
Louwsma (nine), Kaylee
Rucker and Haley Medrano
(four each), Erika
VanDerPloeg (three) plus
Claire Thibodeau, Ali Harper
and Alexis Diaz (two
apiece).

Sports Schedule
Girls Basketball
Tuesday, January 26
Wednesday, January 20
Almont at Dryden, 7 p.m.
Caseville at Dryden, 7:30
p.m.
Wrestling
Friday, January 22
Wednesday, January 20
Cros-Lex at Almont, 6 p.m.
Yale, Armada, Richmond at
Capac at Richmond, 6 p.m.
Almont, 5:30 p.m.
Imlay City at Armada, 6 p.m. Capac, Imlay City, Cros-Lex
Monday, January 25
at Algonac, 5:30 p.m.
Peck at Dryden, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, January 23
Tuesday, January 26
Almont at Lincoln Park
Almont at Imlay City, 7 p.m.
Tourney, 9 a.m.
Yale at Capac, 7 p.m.
Capac at Mt. Morris Invite, 9
a.m.
Imlay City at Flint Beecher
Boys Basketball
Invite, 9 a.m.
Wednesday, January 20
Dryden at Caseville, 7:30
Competitive Cheer
p.m.
Saturday, January 23
Friday, January 22
Capac at Breckenridge
Cros-Lex at Almont, 7:30
Invite, 10 a.m.
p.m
Imlay City at Howell Invite,
Capac at Richmond, 7:30
10 a.m.
p.m.
Tuesday, January 26
Imlay City at Armada, 7:30
Almont, Capac, Imlay City
p.m.
at BWAC Competition,
Kinde North Huron at
Almont, 6 p.m.
Dryden, 7:30 p.m.

Page One Printing


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P.O. Box 278 594 N. Almont Ave. Imlay City, MI 48444

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Page 6-B-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 20 , 2016

REGULAR COMMISSION
MEETING
JANUARY 5, 2016
SYNOPSIS


Mayor Bargen called the meeting
to order at 7:00 p.m. Commissioners
present were Bargen, Rankin, Kempf,
Planck, and Tanis. Commissioners
Ramirez and Romine were absent. Also
present were City Manager Tom Youatt;
City Attorney Brian Garner; Utility
Biller/Deputy Clerk Anne McAvoy; four
members of the community and two
members of the media. The Commission
approved the agenda with the following
addition: 8.G. Amendment to Personnel

IMLAY TOWNSHIP
PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the Imlay Township Board of Trustees will hold
a public hearing on Wednesday, February 17, 2016 at 7:30 pm or as soon thereafter as the meeting agenda allows, at the Imlay Township Hall located at 682 N.
Fairgrounds Road, Imlay City, MI 48444. The purpose of the hearing is to solicit
comments on the 5 Year Parks/Recreation Plan. This is the final opportunity before adoption and submittal of the 5 Year Parks/Recreation Plan to the Michigan
Department of Natural Resources.
A complete copy of the 5 Year Parks/Recreation Plan draft is available for
review at that Imlay Township Offices during regular business hours of Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 9:00am 1:00pm. Written comments may be
addressed to the Imlay Township Clerk at the Township Hall address listed above.
The Imlay Township Board will provide necessary reasonable auxiliary aids
and services. Individuals with disabilities requiring such, should contact the Imlay Township board by writing or calling: Liz Makedonsky, Clerk 682 N. Fairgrounds Road, Imlay City (810)724-8835.
Elizabeth Makedonsky
Imlay Township Clerk
3-1

VILLAGE OF ALMONT
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
817 NORTH MAIN STREET
ALMONT, MICHIGAN 48003
(810) 798-8528
FAX (810) 798-3397

Please be notified that the Village Planning Commission of Almont


will hold a public hearing on Thursday, February 4, 2016 at 7:30
p.m., or as soon as possible thereafter as the matter may be heard, in
the Almont Municipal Building located at 817 N. Main St., Almont,
Michigan 48003 in order to consider an amendment to the Almont Village Zoning Ordinance to rezone certain property from Single Family
Residential (R-1) zoning district to the Central Business (C-1) zoning
district.
LEGAL DESCRIPTION:
01 55 400 000 00 VILLAGE OF ALMONT NORTHERN DIV OF
NEWBURGH LOT 8 BLK 7.
Parcel #041-507-008-00 (228 Johnson)
NOTICE: People with disabilities needing accommodations for
effective participation in the meeting should contact the Village Clerk/
Treasurer at (810) 798-8528 at least seven (7) working days in advance
of the meeting. An attempt will be made to make reasonable accommodations. A copy of the proposed text that would amend the ordinance
may be inspected at the Almont Village Offices located at 817 N.
Main; Almont, MI 48003 during regular business hours, being between
8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. on regular business days. Written comments
regarding this matter can also be received at the above listed address
until the day of its consideration by the Planning Commission.
Kimberly J. Keesler,
Village of Almont Clerk/Treasurer
3-1

VILLAGE OF ALMONT
NOTICE OF A PUBLIC HEARING
REGARDING A SPECIAL LAND
USE APPLICATION

Notice is hereby given that the Village Planning Commission of


Almont will hold a public hearing on Thursday, February 4, 2016 at
7:30 p.m., or as soon thereafter as the matter may be heard, in the
Almont Village Municipal Building located at 817 N. Main Street,
Almont, MI 48003.
The purpose of said public hearing will be to allow all persons
interested in the potential approval of a special land use application an
opportunity to be heard.
The special land use, if approved, would be granted in conformance
with Section 9.07 of the Almont Village Zoning Ordinance (and any
other similar provisions) and provide for open air businesses in a C-2
(general commercial) zoning district at the property (612 S. Main;
Almont, MI 48003) as described in the following description:
TAX DESCRIPTION:
10 74 700 000 00 SPLIT SECTION 28 T6N R12E VILLAGE OF
ALMONT COM AT A POINT ON THE EAST LINE OF SEC 28
IT BEING 1006.50 FEET NORTH FROM THE EAST 1/4 CORNER OF SAID SECTION 28, THENCE EXTENDING NORTH
86.40 FEET ALONG SAID EAST LINE OF SEC 28 THENCE W
140.00 FEET. THENCE NORTH 144 FEET THENCE W 104.42
FT, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEG 30 WEST 230.48 FT THENCE
EAST 250.45 FT. TOPOINT OF BEG ALSO SUBJECT TO
AN EASEMENT FOR RIGHT OF INGRESS AND EGRESS
IT BEINGDESCRIBED AS COM AT A POINT ON THE EAST
LINE OF SAID SEC 28, IT BEING 1006.50 FT. NORTH FROM
THE EAST 1/4 COR OF SAID SEC 28, THENCE EXTENDING NORTH 20 FT THENCE W 219.93 FT THENCE N 01 DEG
30 EAST 46.42 FT, THENCE E 218.71 FT THENCE 20 FEET
THENCE W 248.19 FT THENCE S 01 DEG 30 W 86.43 FT
THENCE EAST 250.45 FT TO POB. 0.846 ACRES.
Parcel #041-528-042-50 (612 S. Main)

Kimberly J. Keesler

Village of Almont Clerk/Treasurer
NOTICE: People with disabilities needing accommodations for effective participation in the meeting should contact the Village Clerk/
Treasurer at (810) 798-8528 at least seven (7) working days in advance
of the meeting. An attempt will be made to make reasonable accommodations. A copy of the special land use application may be inspected at
the Almont Village Offices located at 817 N. Main; Almont, MI 48003
during regular business hours, being between 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.
on regular business days. Written comments regarding this special land
use application can also be received at the above listed address until
the day of its consideration.
3-1

CITY OF
IMLAY CITY

PLANNING COMMISSION
MEETING
DECEMBER 22, 2015
SYNOPSIS


Chairman Germayne called the
regular meeting to order at 7:00 p.m.
Commissioners present were Germayne,
Bargen,
Davis,
and
Sadler.
Commissioners Lengemann and Schwab
were absent. Also present was Zoning
Administrator Jerry Edwards. The
Commission approved the agenda as
presented and approved the minutes of

IMLAY
TOWNSHIP

PARK/RECREATION PLAN
30-DAY REVIEW


The Township of Imlay is providing a draft version of the 5 Year Park/
Recreation Plan for public review for a
30-day period. The document is available for review at the Imlay Township
Office at 682 N. Fairgrounds Road,
Imlay City, MI 48444, during regular
business hours of Monday, Wednesday,
and Friday 9:00am1:00pm between the
dates of January 15, 2016 and February
17, 2016. Comments on the plan can be
provided at this location or by contacting Clerk Liz Makedonsky at clerk@
imlaytownship.org.
2-2

VILLAGE OF
DRYDEN

REGULAR MEETING
JANUARY 5, 2016
SYNOPSIS


President, Betcher called the meeting to order at 7:00 P.M.

Council
Members
Present:

LEGALS Page 7-B

NOTICE

IMLAY CITY EAGLES


AUXILIARY MEMBERS
Special nominations for Vice President is required. Due to health reasons.
Also we are looking for a Trustee. If you would like to be an officer now is the
time. Please come to the club and sign up. Special Election will be on 2/4/16
from 1p.m. till 7p.m. Dues for this year are $30.00 and remember WE ARE
PEOPLE HELPING PEOPLE.
For more information contact Betty at (810) 385-2357
3-3

Accounting &
Tax Preparation

Glass

MALEAR DEPAPE

TODD'S GLASS
MIRRORS & MORE

& ASSOCIATES

Formerly Select Accounting

Tax Bookkeeping Payroll

Frame & Frameless Shower Enclosures


Custom Mirrors Replacement Windows

395-2320
Enrolled Agent

124 N MAIN STREET CAPAC, MICHIGAN

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING


REZONING REQUEST
Notice is hereby given that there will be a Public Hearing at the meeting of
the Berlin Township Planning Commission on February 4, 2016. The meeting
will be held at the Berlin Township Offices, located at 740 Capac Road, Allenton, Michigan, 48002 beginning at 7:00 p.m.
The purpose of the Public Hearing is to consider comments, verbal or written, relating to a request for rezoning of approximately 11.39 acres of property
located at 745 Capac Road. The property is currently zoned B-2 (General
Business District). The applicant is requesting the property be rezoned to the
I-1(Light Industrial District). The property legal description and location are
described as:

Parcel #: 74-09-029-3002-900

Address: 745 Capac Road
Legal Description: BEG AT E 1/4 COR, TH S 0D 19M 2S E 328.32, TH
S 89D 22M 51S W 1327.62, TH N 0D 30M W 328.31, TH N 54.5, TH E
671, TH S 16, TH E 579.5, TH N 28, TH E 80, TH S 66.5 TO BEG SEC
29 T6N R13E 11.39 A
Copies of the application and any related documents are available for inspection at the Berlin Township Offices during regular business hours and will
be available at the time and place of the public hearing. All interested citizens
will be given an opportunity to comment on this application. Written comments
may be submitted up to the meeting time.
Karen Kloss,
Berlin Township Clerk
3-1

VILLAGE OF ALMONT
NOTICE OF A PUBLIC HEARING
REGARDING A SPECIAL LAND
USE APPLICATION

Notice is hereby given that the Village Planning Commission of Almont will hold a public hearing on Thursday, February 4, 2016 at 7:30
p.m., or as soon thereafter as the matter may be heard, in the Almont
Village Municipal Building located at 817 N. Main Street, Almont, MI
48003.
The purpose of said public hearing will be to allow all persons
interested in the potential approval of a special land use application an
opportunity to be heard.
The special land use, if approved, would be granted in conformance
with Section 9.07 of the Almont Village Zoning Ordinance (and any
other similar provisions) and provide for open air businesses in a C-2
(general commercial) zoning district at the property (528 S. Main &
606 S. Main; Almont, MI 48003) as described in the following description:
TAX DESCRIPTION:
01 74 800 000 00 SEC 28 T6N R12E VILLAGE OF ALMONT
COM 1092.9 FT N & 40 FT W OF E 1/4 POST SEC 28 & TH N
144 FT W 100 FT S 144 FT TH E TO BEG.
Parcel #041-528-043-00 (528 S. Main)

Kimberly J. Keesler
Village of Almont Clerk/Treasurer

NOTICE: People with disabilities needing accommodations for


effective participation in the meeting should contact the Village Clerk/
Treasurer at (810) 798-8528 at least seven (7) working days in advance
of the meeting. An attempt will be made to make reasonable accommodations. A copy of the special land use application may be inspected at
the Almont Village Offices located at 817 N. Main; Almont, MI 48003
during regular business hours, being between 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.
on regular business days. Written comments regarding this special land
use application can also be received at the above listed address until
the day of its consideration.

3-1

719 Van Dyke - Imlay City 810-724-2480


TODDSGLASS.COM

Home Repair
122 W. Washington, Downtown Romeo
Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm,
Saturday &
Evenings By Appt.

586-752-2682

www.romeoaccountants.com

R.E. BLANK
& ASSOCIATES

FIDUCIAL BUSINESS CENTERS


Accounting Income Tax

724-6431

Advertise your business here!


Call 810-724-2615
Outdoor
Equipment
Parts and Service
ON THE SPOT FINANCING!

370 North Cedar Street


Imlay City, 48444

Automotive
PARSCHS
AUTOMOTIVE

M bil

STIHL EXMARK HUSTLER


ARCTIC CAT MASSIMO

SERVICE & REPAIR


BRAKES
AIR CONDITIONING
MUFFLERS TUNE-UPS
STRUTS
COOLING SYSTEMS
EXHAUST SHOCKS
ELECTRICAL
COMPUTER ANALYSIS
TIRES
COMPUTER BALANCING
FUEL INJECTION SERVICE

SINCE 1975
Where the outdoor enthusiast shops!
7230 Webster Rd IMLAY

CITY

810-724-7230

2-cycle & 4-cycle Repair Tune-Up Specials in Effect


Pick Up & Delivery Available

810-724-6630

Mobil

314 CAPAC RD. - IMLAY CITY

TOWNSHIP OF
BERLIN

1-27-16

the Regular Meeting held Tuesday,


November 24, 2015. The Commission
moved that all notices and publications
for the Sign Ordinance Amendment
public hearing be made a part of the
record. Chairman Germayne opened the
public hearing at 7:03 p.m. Several comments were heard and much discussion
took place. Chairman Germayne closed
the public hearing at 7:29 p.m. The
Commission approved the Sign
Ordinance language with the changes as
discussed and recommended its adoption to the City Commission. The meeting was adjourned at 7:45 p.m. Complete
copies of the minutes are available in the
Clerk's office during regular business
hours or at www.imlaycity.org.
3-1

4-13-16


Meeting called to order by
Supervisor at 819 N. Main St., Almont,
MI. Members present were Supervisor
Bowman, Clerk Hoffner, Treasurer
Kudsin, and Trustees Moore, Stroup,
Streeter, and Groesbeck. The following
actions were taken: 1) approved consent
agenda as presented, 2) approved start
date for March BOR, 3) approved poverty tax exemptions, 4) approved tax
collection agreement with Imlay
schools, 5) accepted proposal for preparing and mailing assessment notices, 6)
approved road projects, 7) approved
putting up two new streetlights at township intersections. Meeting adjourned at
7:40 p.m. A complete copy of minutes

CITY OF
IMLAY CITY

Policy. The Commission approved the


Consent Agenda Items as presented,
including Regular Meeting minutes of
December 15, 2015, DDA Meeting minutes of December 14, 2015, and Payment
of Bills including Payroll of $99,373.04
and Accounts Payable and Trust &
Agency
of
$202,143.81.
The
Commission approved the proclamation
for retiring Police Chief John Stano;
approved the ROWE Professional
Services Company proposal for Design
and Construction Engineering Services
for Improvements to Water Systems
Controls in the amount of $32,000.00, as
presented; approved Resolution 2016-1
to approve the project application for a
2018 MDOT Rural Task Force 80/20
Grant, as presented; approved Resolution
2016-2 to address the collection of tax
payments or refunds under $3.00, as
presented; approved Resolution 2016-3
recognizing the Greg Prendergast
Memorial Foundation as a nonprofit
organization operating in the community for the purpose of obtaining charitable gaming licenses; and approved the
update to the Retirement Plan section of
the Personnel Policy, as presented. The
meeting was adjourned at 7:34 p.m.
Submitted by Nicole F. Frost, City
Clerk. Complete copies of the minutes
are available in the Clerk's office during
normal business hours or at www.imlaycity.org.
3-1

1-20-16

ALMONT TOWNSHIP
BOARD
REGULAR MEETING
SYNOPSIS
JANUARY 11, 2016

may be viewed on the township website


at almonttownship.org.
Paul Bowman-Supervisor
Carol Hoffner-Clerk
3-1

AKS
NOV

Builders

SUPPLY
&
EQUIPMEN
T

CHAINSAWS BLOWERS
STRING TRIMMERS

TRACTORS
MOWERS
Custom Building & Remodeling

Additions Kitchens Bath Farm House


Renovations Siding Roofing Windows

Family Owned Since 1973 Licensed & Insured


FREE
810-724-8060 - Imlay City
ESTIMATES
www.walters-enterprises.com

See these
ads on our
website . . .

2-10-16

ALMONT
TOWNSHIP

TFN

Legal Announcements

Business
Directory

tricitytimes-online.com

PUMPS
GENERATORS
MOWERS
SNOWBLOWERS
TILLERS

OUTDOOR POWER
EQUIPMENT

COMMERCIAL
MOWERS

Located Between Imlay City and Almont on M-53


Parts &e
Servic

3620 Van Dyke Almont, MI

810-798-8533 Financing
E-Z

Fax 810-798-3738

BUSINESS DIRECTORY RATES


3 MONTHS

6 MONTHS

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1 YEAR
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PUBLISHED EVERY WEEK,


ALSO ONLINE!
Call the Tri-City Times between the hours of
8 am and 5 pm, Monday thru Friday at
810-724-2615 or Fax us at 810-724-8552
or email us at tct@pageone-inc.com

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Email: tct@pageone-inc.com

www.tricitytimes-online.com
All letters, regardless of topic, should be signed and include day and evening phone numbers for verification. Names will be withheld upon
request. It is the policy of this newspaper not to accept letters related to upcoming elections within two weeks of the scheduled vote.

Basic Institute; Approved Four Month


Moratorium for
the Township of
Metamora regarding the following
Resolution Titled, "Establishing a
Moratorium of Gravel Mining
Application in Order to Consider New
Statutory Standards." The meeting was
adjourned at 7:40 p.m.

Complete copies of the minutes are
available in the clerk's office during
regular business hours or at www.villageofdryden.com
Holly A. Shroyer
Village Clerk/Deputy Treasurer
3-1

EMMETT TOWNSHIP
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
2016 MEETINGS
2nd WEDNESDAY of the Month

JANUARY 13, 2016


FEBRUARY 10, 2016
MARCH 09, 2016
BUDGET MEETING

REGULAR MEETING WILL FOLLOW

APRIL 13, 2016


MAY 11, 2016
JUNE 08, 2016
JULY 13, 2016
AUGUST 10, 2016
SEPTEMBER 14, 2016
OCTOBER 12, 2016
NOVEMBER 09, 2016
DECEMBER 14, 2016
JANUARY 11, 2017

Apartment For Rent

Real Estate

1995 LINCOLN CONTINENTAL,


88 K Miles, Leather & CD and
Telephone! Tires & Brakes are
very good! Starts and Rides
great! $2,800.00 (810) 7246067. A-3-8
...................................................
1989 LINCOLN TOWN CAR,
showroom condition, stored winters, a beautiful car! $4,200.00
or best offer. Call 810-660-7469.
A-1-CAT
...................................................

VFW HALL
BROWN CITY

CAPAC VILLAGE: 2 bedroom


upstairs apt. for 1 or 2 adults,
50+, spacious, lots of storage,
appliances and all utilities,
except AC included, carport, no
pets, security deposit required;
call 810-395-2226 and leave
message. APR-1-17
...................................................

HOME SALES, DIVISION,


JUST LAND SALES. We are
here to Help! Almont. Brown
City. Capac. Imlay City. Yale.
586-206-0118 RE-1-8
...................................................

Homes For Rent

MALE CARE-TAKER, experienced with gereatric patients,


health care provides first aid
CPR and A.E.D. Certified. References available 810-346-3560.
WW-2-2
...................................................

7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
3-1

EMMETT TOWNSHIP

Side bath, 154,000 original miles, 2nd owner,


never in salt, Oak framed day/night shades.
Screen door, Pod, Roof air, 350 hrs. on
6 KW Onan, 2 Zip Dee Awnings,
7 Alcoa Wheels, Stainless Steel Exhaust,
75 gal fuel capacity. Must see.

$10,000

OR BEST OFFER
Call Catherine at
810-724-2615

FS-44-TFN

PLANNING COMMISSION
2016 MEETINGS
3RD MONDAY of the Month

JANUARY 18, 2016



FEBRUARY 15, 2016
MARCH 21, 2016
APRIL 18, 2016
MAY 16, 2016
JUNE 20, 2016
JULY 18, 2016
AUGUST 15, 2016
SEPTEMBER 19, 2016
OCTOBER 17, 2016
NOVEMBER 21, 2016
DECEMBER 19, 2016
JANUARY 16, 2017

7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.

Pets
TRAIN YOUR DOG NOW!
Affordable In Home or Group
Classes at Pet Supplies Plus in
Lapeer. 8 weeks old & up welcome! Behavior help, obedience,
socialization & leadership. Visit
www.familydogmanners.com or
call 810-728-0904. PT-1-3
...................................................

3-1

EMMETT TOWNSHIP
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS
2016 MEETINGS
2nd Monday

IF NECESSARY SCHEDULE WILL BE:














JANUARY 11, 2016


FEBRUARY 8, 2016
MARCH 14, 2016
APRIL 11, 2016

MAY 09, 2016
JUNE 13, 2016
JULY 11, 2016
AUGUST 08, 2016
SEPTEMBER 12, 2016
OCTOBER 10, 2016
NOVEMBER 14, 2016
DECEMBER 12, 2016
JANUARY 09, 2017

7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.

810-346-3300
or 810-346-3548

VFW HALL
IMLAY CITY

FR-1-26

~Newly Remodeled~
Full & Half-day Rental
810-338-0163/810-724-6102

Apartment For Rent


GREAT NEIGHBORS AND
CLEAN ACCOMMODATIONS
AT OUR
50 + LIVING
APARTMENTS WITH ON SITE
MANAGERS,
ELEVATOR,
SECURE ENTRY, AND MOVE
IN SPECIALS ONLY $99
SECURITY DEPOSIT & 1ST
MONTH RENT FREE IMLAY
CITY. 810-721-0830 OR 810798-8091. APR-2-4
...................................................

COME HOME TO
HICKORY SQUARE
APARTMENTS
IMLAY CITY
1 Bedroom...........Starting at $560

SUNBEAM SNOWBLOWER: 3
hp, 20 inch, 2 cycle $50.00. Both
are ready to work! 810-7246067. FS-3-5
...................................................
MCCULLOCH CHAIN SAW:
Eager Beaver 2.0 CID, 16 bar,
ready to work, $45.00, 810-4172249. FS-1-5
...................................................

Security
Deposit*

3 Bedrooms.........Starting at $815

Call Us Today!

810-724-0266

Doctors of Optometry

Craig J. Watson, O.D Jeffrey D. Johnston, O.D.

518 S. Cedar Street, Imlay City

Fax: 724-6644

CAPAC
PHARMACY

BEER WINE LIQUOR LOTTO

Store Hours: Monday thru Saturday 9:00 am to 9:00 pm;


and Sunday 12:00 noon to 5:00 pm
Pharmacy Hours: Monday thru Friday 9:00 am to 6:00 pm;
Saturday 9:00 am - 2 pm; Closed Sunday

136 N. MAIN ST. 810-395-2336

SEEKING

experienced short
order cook and
pizza maker for
Louies Family
Restaurant.
560 North Main in
Capac. Appy within.
MOLDING MACHINE
OPERATOR
Afternoon Shift,
Starting Rate $10/hr, Production
and Annual Bonuses,
Medical Benefits,
Drug Screen/Physical Required.
Apply at:

Armada
Rubber Mfg. Co.

24586 Armada Ridge Rd, Armada


EOE

HW-2-5

www.mi-apartments.com

*Some conditions apply. E.H.O.

The Village of Capac will be accepting applications for a part-time DPW


employee.
REQUIREMENTS
The employee must be able to operate all small equipment necessary for the
Village of Capac. Be able to repair and maintain the development of streets, water, sewer, parks and other related operations of the Village of Capac. Must have
up to date CDL License and medical card.
Application and resume deadline 4:00 p.m. January 29, 2016, to Village of Capac, Attn: Public Works, PO Box 218, 131 N. Main St., Capac MI 48014. For
questions contact DPW Supervisor Greg Smith at (810) 395-4355.
HW 2-1

MACHINE BUILDERS
8204 Washington Blvd. Washington, MI 48094

F E AT U R E S :
24-Hour Maintenance
Available On-Site
Free Wifi
Pet Friendly
Gas Is Included
In Select Units

Washer/Dryer Hook-Ups
In Select Units

Laundry Facilities
In Select Buildings

724-EYES

*OFFICE/RETAIL SPACE WITH


OVER 1300 SQ FEET WITH
PRIVATE
ENTRANCE,
BATHROOM, AND STORAGE
AREA LAPEER 810-798-8091.
CR-2-4
...................................................
**OFFICE/RETAIL SPACE FOR
LEASE GREAT LOCATION
LAPEER 810-798-8091. CR-2-4
...................................................

Help Wanted

ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS

3-1

Lapeer County Vision Center

Commercial For Rent

Work Wanted

NOTICE
VILLAGE OF CAPAC

2 Bedrooms.........Starting at $610

Come See What


We Have To Offer!

$199

2 BEDROOM 2 BATH HOUSE


FOR RENT. Imlay City, just outside of town. Includes laundry
room with washer & dryer and all
appliances. $700.00 per month.
Call 810-721-1933 for appointment. HR-2-3
...................................................
NICE ONE BEDROOM HOME
INCLUDES FRIDGE, STOVE,
AND
WASHER/DRYER,
GARAGE & SHED ALMONT
810-798-8091. HR-2-4
...................................................

Subscribe Today!
810-724-2615

1, 2 & 3 BEDROOMS!

For Sale

As Low As

Professional
Directory

M O V I E R E N TA L S

Seating For 450


Air-Conditioning
Newly Remodeled
1/2 Day, Whole Day, Weekend
Wedding Reception Rentals
Bar Parking

HW-3-4

For Rent

1976 GMC Eleganza


26 ft. Motorhome

7:00 P.M.

810-724-2615

Autos

Campers/RVs

7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.

Tri-City Times Classifieds also


Online! Buy, Sell or Trade at
www.tricitytimes-online.com

Wheelchair Accessible

Live In The Heart of Southeastern


Michigans Most Beautiful
Golf Courses, Including Glacier Club,
The Orchards And Greystone.
Minutes Away From M-53, M-59,
Lakeside Mall And
Partridge Creek.

$500 OFF MOVE-IN IN JANUARY!


CALL TODAY

586.781.9804

Monday - Friday 9 am - 6 pm
*$199 security deposit based upon credit check

FR-3-1

eading
Together

Not only is the newspaper informative for you,


its a great learning tool for kids. Here are
some simple tips you can use to help improve
your childs reading skills at any age:
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Explain what youre reading and encourage a discussion.
Read the newspaper together as a family.
Let children choose what they want to read.
Encourage your children to read the newspaper on their own.
Give your family the knowledge they need. SUBSCRIBE TO:

Tri-City Times
P.O. Box 278 Imlay City, MI48444 (810) 724-2615

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HW-1-4

Betcher,
Jones,
Nash,
Quail,
Roszczewski, Franz

The Council Approved the Minutes
from the Regular Meeting on December
6, 2015; Approved the Agenda with one
addition under New Business, Metamora
Gravel Pit Resolution; Approved Bills
to Pay in the amount of $823.23 and the
Disbursements in the amount of
$46,197.23; Approved land split at 044011-044-00, 5313 Main Street; Approved
the Rural Task Force Grant Resolution;
Approved Water/Sewer Late Fee
Removal in the sum of $136.67;
Approved Clerk to Attend the 2016

FR-1-9

continued from 6-B

Classif ieds

FR-1-11

Legal
Announcements

Page 7-B-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 20, 2016

Page 8-B-TRI-CITY TIMES-JANUARY 20, 2016

Photos by Randy Jorgensen

Youth Club trains with a Champion...

Last Thursday Jimmy Kennedy was at Imlay City


offering instruction to a couple young wrestlers on
basic technique.

Members of the Imlay City Youth Wrestling Club along with members of the varsity team were
treated to a visit from Jimmy Kennedy. Kennedy is currently training with the Cliff Keen Wrestling
Club in Ann Arbor which helps top level athletes train for World and Olympic competitions.

Jimmy Kennedy a University of Illinois three-time All-American and former U.S. Open Champion,
came to Imlay City at the invitation of Coach Tony DAmbrosio (background) to help and inspire his
team.

Kennedy is training for the U.S. Olympic team


but finds time to make special guest appearances to local schools. He wrestles at 61 kg or
134 lbs.