Anda di halaman 1dari 114

1

INTRODUCTION

First and foremost Id like to thank you for buying the Bujinkan Fudo Shin
Ninjutsu Densho of Budo Taijutsu. Its taken a long time to put all of this
together, and now Ive completed it I can finally share it with all in the world
that are interested. I have purposely designed this book with the beginner in
mind, but it can also be used for the likes of intermediate or advanced students
in the art of Bujinkan Budo Taijutsu.
For those of you that are of an intermediate or advanced level in the art youll
find the syllabus to be full of techniques from the Tenchijin Ryaku No Maki
(the principles of heaven, earth, and man). This is basically to give you the
reader more of a compact training guide to study. From the unarmed combat
of the nine Ryuha to the weapons and strategic stealth tactics of the Shinobi
warrior!
There are ten levels in the Bujinkan Fudo Shin Ninjutsu Densho of Budo
Taijutsu and these are from 10th kyu to 1st kyu and they are full of information.
There is also a Bunkai (application) section that is included with each of the kyu
levels. The Bunkai itself has been simplified for the complete beginner, but! As
written above, the intermediate to advanced student can also benefit from the
contents of this Densho.

I have not included the Shodan (1st degree black belt) level since I believe that
to gain such a belt, one should seek out a qualified Bujinkan instructor.
Remember?! This book is just a guide for those that wish to know about the
Bujinkan system, and although it is the syllabus for the Bujinkan Fudo Shin
Ninjutsu Dojo, it will have similarities to other schools.
Once again! Seek out a qualified Bujinkan instructor if you wish to continue in
budo Taijutsu, its a lifetime of knowledge!

THE JOURNEY BEGINS

Welcome to your journey of self discovery. A journey where the knowledge of


life begins no matter what age you are!
The Bujinkan system of Budo Taijutsu is a combination of nine Ryuha (schools),
three of which are of the art known as Ninjutsu.
Togakure Ryu Ninpo Taijutsu
Gyokushin Ryu Ninpo
Kumo Gakure Ryu Ninpo
You then have the remaining six that complete the Bujinkan system, as written
below:
Kukishinden Ryu Happo Bikenjutsu
Shinden Fudo Ryu Dakentaijutsu
Takagi Yoshin Ryu Jutaijutsu
Gyokko Ryu Kosshijutsu
Gikan Ryu Koppojutsu
Koto Ryu Koppojutsu

THE BIRTH OF THE BUJINKAN


The Bujinkan system is the creation of Soke (Grandmaster) Masaaki Hatsumi
(formally Yoshiaki Hatsumi born 2nd December 1931).
In his childhood Hatsumi was fascinated in the martial arts, so much so, that he
studied a myriad of fighting styles under the tuition of numerous teachers.
It was in 1957, after so many years within the martial circle that Yoshiaki
Hatsumi decided he wanted more in the line of real martial arts. Not the
watered down modern equivalent. Yoshiaki heard of a master named
Toshitsugu Takamatsu, also known as Moko No Tora, the Mongolian
Tiger. Yoshiaki was told of his life teaching martial arts in a not so safe chaotic
China for twelve years as a young man. It was after so many stories of
Takamatsus life, that Hatsumi decided he wanted in, so he travelled half a day
to the old city of Kashihara to meet this man he heard so much about.
Takamatsu was the last of the worlds combat ninja, who trained from
childhood in the ancient art of the ninja warrior! It is still unknown even today
about some of his secret exploits.
Hatsumi finally met with Takamatsu and with this, they both agreed to a match
with each other. Although a man in his 70s, Takamatsu was quick to throw
Hatsumi around like a small child and show the young man what he was up
against.
After the match Takamatsu decided that Hatsumi was worth teaching, and so
he did! Hatsumi trained with Takamatsu every weekend during which time he
would learn the art of Ninpo Taijutsu. Over time Hatsumi became well versed
in ninjutsu.
After fifteen years of arduous training with Takamatsu, Hatsumi was finally
given the title of Soke. This meant that he was now the 34th Grandmaster of
Togakure Ryu Ninpo Taijutsu, just one of the schools of Ninjutsu dating back
at least 900 years. As time moved on, Hatsumi would eventually achieve Soke
of another eight traditions, all of which are listed above.
The 33rd Soke Toshitsugu Takamatsu died on the 2nd of April 1972. And at the
wish of Takamatsu, Yoshiaki Hatsumi changed his name to the now known
Masaaki Hatsumi (
). He then founded the Bujinkan Dojo (Divine
Warrior School) in honour of his teacher.
Gathering together a small group of dedicated Japanese and foreign students,
Hatsumi then went on to instruct them all in the teachings of his master.
The breakthrough was in 1982 when Masaaki Hatsumi travelled to America to
do a series of seminars on the arts he knew. From there the art of Budo
Taijutsu reached out to the world, and has done ever since.

WHAT TO EXPECT IN THE BUJINKAN

What to expect in the Bujinkan?! Well, to begin with Budo Taijutsu is not a
sports martial art! All of the nine Ryuha were formed in times when violence
was prevalent in ancient Japan, and a lot of the techniques that are taught in
the Bujinkan system are designed to maim, cripple, or even kill the enemy.
The Bujinkan is family orientated and although the training in some cases can
be physically demanding the atmosphere in general is of a good one. We tend
to only teach students from thirteen years and above, but, there are those we
will accept of a slightly lower age if reasons suggest otherwise.
The Bujinkan does not practice kata to gain grades like other martial arts. Each
grade is tested on the techniques you are taught and perform. The belt system
is also different in Budo Taijutsu, 10th kyu is white for the beginner, but from 9th
kyu through to 1st kyu youll remain a green belt until you achieve your Shodan
(1st degree black belt). One other difference is that even at a Kyu grade youll
be taught how to use weapons such as the Roku Bo (six foot staff), Hanbo (a
three foot staff), Tessen (Fan), Jutte (Japanese Truncheon), Katana (Japanese
sword), etc! The list goes on.
The Bujinkan system also teaches the Shinobi strategy of stealth and much more
of their clandestine activities. All in all the Bujinkan system of Budo Taijutsu is a
complete package of martial skills.

Bujinkan Fudo Shin Ninjutsu Dojo No Budo Taijutsu

THE SYLLABUS

DOJO ETIQUETTE
The Japanese are a very respectful nation with a lot of tradition. Therefore
when it comes to training in any of the Japanese martial arts, we should learn
from example and remain courteous of their history.
The Rules
1. Students should bow when entering the dojo and prior to entering the
matted area.
2. Students should greet each other with a bow followed by the word
Onegaishimasu when beginning training, and Domo Arigato when
completing practice, or changing partners.
3. Students with questions are directed to ask the instructor. If a beginning
student and intermediate/advanced student are working together, the
senior of the two should not give unsolicited direction until the junior
student has tried the techniques a few times. Advanced students are directed
to give silent advice of the problem before requesting any help.
4. Only do the techniques shown. No alternatives are to be done unless
instructed to do so.
5. Do not handle the training weapons of others unless you are give
permission.
6. A beginning student should give or receive No resistance to techniques.
Advanced students may give slight resistance (meaning only move when
moved properly) when training with each other, when explicitly permitted
to do so. Advanced students may use greater resistance when given
permission by the instructor.
7. If you cannot see a technique when it is demonstrated, move to a position
where you can. Be careful not to invade the space of those demonstrating
the technique.
8. Remember to respect others possessions, and they will respect yours.
9. Never forget that you are part of a long tradition and there is a reason for
everything you are shown.
Other Rules
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

Always call your teacher Sensei.


Always show up to train on time.
Always pay at the end of the training session.
Always show up with the proper training attire.
If you are not teaching, you should be training.
When asked to show a technique, do so with proper skill.
Always mimic the instructors movement.
Do not talk when training. Concentrate on the techniques at hand.
Do not ask the instructor to show you a technique, watch and learn.

And finally!
10. Always clean up after yourself, and remember to pay for the instruction.
Opening a Class
1. The Sensei kneels in seiza at the head of the class facing the dojo altar.
2. Students kneel behind Sensei in respect of order of rank from left to right.
3. The Sensei places his hands together (as in prayer) above his head, students
do the same.
4. Sensei speaks the words Shikin Hara-mitsu Dai-ko-myo followed by the
students. Sensei then claps twice and bows placing thumbs and forefingers
together on the floor to form a triangle. Students follow.
5. Sensei then raises hands above head again, claps once and bows the same
way. Students follow.
6. Sensei then turns to the students and bows to them, the senior student then
says Sensei Ni-Rei.
7. Everyone bows and say O-ne-gai-shi-ma-su.
8. Everyone stands ready to warm up.

Shikin Hara-mitsu Dai-ko-myo


Shikin Hara-mitsu Dai-ko-myo has many translations and cannot be translated
directly into English. One interpretation is, A moment of true interaction
between mind and spirit may lead to enlightenment. basically you are
welcoming your higher self (that reacts without thinking, Mushin: No Mind), to
aid you in training and to give you better understanding.

The Syllabus
From 10th Kyu - 1st Kyu

JU KYU
(10 Grade Student White Belt)
th

TAIHENJUTSU = BODY MOVEMENT


Taihenjutsu (body movement/body way) consists of your general Kaiten,
Ukemi, Tobi, etc. It really is the basis to all martial arts and is considered a must
in daily practice.
JUNAN TAISO = BODY CODITIONING
Junan Taiso (body conditioning). There are many forms of Junan Taiso in
many styles of the martial arts. Body conditioning means to stretch and
strengthen and in Budo Taijutsu we have a set number to work with as often as
one can. We tend to do this at the beginning of a lesson and again at the end.
Here is a list written below on how Junan Taiso is used in the Bujinkan Fudo
Shin Ninjutsu Dojo.
Junan Taisho: A method of conditioning the whole body. Best done daily in
the morning, on a regular basis, at the dojo or training hall, and at the
beginning of class.
Starting with the neck work slowly and rotate the head in a clockwise fashion,
then anti clockwise. Next stretch the head back and then forward tucking the
chin in as you do so. Lastly, bend the head side to side and try touching your
shoulders with your ears without straining.
The second exercise is with the shoulders. Rotate them forward slowly for a
count of thirty, stop and rest for a short time the reverse the movement by
rotating them backward for a count of thirty again. Next swing the arms in a
circular motion both forward and backwards, again for a count of thirty. As
you do this try brushing your ears as you swing. Swing your arms side to side
smoothly for a count of thirty, and rest. Lastly stretch your arms across the
body, supporting them at the elbow when doing so.
The third exercise is for the chest. Standing erect with arms and hands in gasho.
Fling your arms out to the sides stretching your pectorals as you do so finishing
with your arms outstretched as though you were about to dive.

Repeat in a relaxed method for a count of thirty, then rest.


Exercise four, the hips. Swing your arms across your body as like a pendulum
twisting at the hips as you do so. Again, do this for a count of thirty, and relax.
Next, place your hands on your hips and rotate side to side, but as you reach
stretching point bend in the direction of the twist, for instance, twisting left,
bend left and vice versa.
Exercise five, the knees. Placing hands on the knee caps push back to stretch
then release forward with a slight bend in the knees. Perform this movement
for a count of thirty. Next, still with your hands placed upon you knee caps.
Rotate in a clockwise fashion, then anti clockwise. Repeat for a count of thirty
again.
Exercise six, the wrists. Clasping one hand with the other, bend the hand palms
inward until you feel a stretch, then release. Bend the hand backwards and
stretch the fingers as you do this. Repeat these two movements for a count of
thirty. Next, wrist twists, twisting first in a clockwise fashion then anti
clockwise, once again for a count of thirty.

Exercise seven, the ankles. Whilst sitting on the floor with legs outstretched try
bending your feet towards you as though pointing your toes towards your
face. Then bend your feet away toes pointing forward. Next, bend both feet
outwards as far as you can, then reverse position and bend both feet inwards,
toes point at each other. Lastly, rotate both feet in a clockwise fashion, and
then reverse anti clockwise. As with all the other exercises repeat the above for
a count of thirty.

10

KYUHO TAI SABAKI TO TSUKI


(9 BODY ANGLES WITH PUNCH)
Tai Sabaki is probably one of the most important techniques a beginner should
know in any martial art. It teaches the student how to naturally move away
from punches, kicks, even weapons. Its also a great defence for counter
movements putting your opponent off balance.
A good way to practice Tai Sabaki is by breaking it down into stages.
Example:
Stage one: Punches
Stage two: kicks
Stage three: Punches and kicks
Stage four: Grabs
Stage five: Weapons
Stage six: Etc, etc.
Here is a diagram (below) showing just eight of the angles one can move in the
direction of. Id suggest that for the absolute beginner, stepping forward should
be avoided until your movements become natural and your confidence grows
to a stage where you do not flinch. Start slowly and as your confidence builds
you will eventually counter and move naturally with added speed, and
accuracy!

Diagram No.1
1. Straight Forward. 2. Forward Right 45. 3. Forward Left 45.
4. Sidestep Right. 5. Sidestep Left. 6. Backwards Right 45.
7. Backwards Left 45. 8. Straight Back. 9. Drop Down.

11

Stage One: Avoiding the Punch


Uke (attacker) stands in Hidari Ichimonji. Tori (defender) stands in Shizen. For
the Kamae look to the 8th Kyu section of this book.

Uke first measures up the strike against Tori by stepping through with Fudo
Ken. The idea is to strike at a target behind Toris head as shown in the
diagram below. The same applies to any part of the striking area, always aim
for a target beyond the initial connection.

Example:

Diagram No.2

Stage one: Part (a)


1. Uke strikes Tori with Jodan Fudo Ken.
2. Tori shifts in any one of seven directions (do not move straight forward or
drop down), to avoid Ukes oncoming strike.
Stage one: Part (b)
1. Uke strikes Tori with Jodan Fudo Ken.
2. Tori shifts in any one of seven directions whilst using Uke Nayashi (soft
Blocking), palming Ukes strike away as you do so.
Stage one: Part (c)
1. Uke strikes Tori with Jodan Fudo Ken.
2. Tori shifts in any one of the seven directions whilst using Uke Nagaeshi
(striking block), then retaliates with a strike of his/her own with the
following: Fudo Ken, Boshi Ken, Omote Shuto, Ura Shuto.

12

Dakentaijutsu (striking techniques) can be found in the 8th Kyu section of this
book.
Stage one: Part (d)
Youll now be introduced to Tobi (leaping), remember this? To leap is not to
jump! Leaping involves a simple shift of the feet where you glide from one
position to another. Lifting the feet approximately one to two inches off the
ground is sufficient enough to move away fast and silently. Jumping can result
in a loud thud, which if using stealth can also result in you being caught out.
Uke stands in Hidari Ichimonji, Tori in any one of the kamae below
Shizen
Jumonji Kihon
Doko Ichimonji
1. Uke strikes Tori with Jodan Fudo Ken.
2. Tori shifts in any one of the seven directions whilst using Uke Nagashi.
3. Tori then retaliates with a Fudo Ken, Boshi Ken, Omote Shuto, or Ura
Shuto.
4. Uke blocks with Uke Nayashi or Nagashi, then strikes back with a Fudo
Ken, Omote Shuto, or Ura Shuto.
5. Tori uses Tobi in any one of the seven directions.

SHIHO TENCHI TOBI


(LEAPING TECHNIQUES)
Initially the term shi means four, but there are many different directions one
can leap as seen in diagram No.1.
1. Ten Tobi (Leaping Up)
2. Hidari Tobi (Leaping Left) this also includes leaping left 45 front and back.
3. Migi Tobi (Leaping Right) this also includes leaping right 45 front and back.
4. Chi Tobi (Leaping Down)
5. Ushiro Tobi (Leaping Back)
The word Ten (Heaven), leaping up. This is a jump that is used in general with
a frontal attack, to leap into the attacker. Chi Tobi (leaping down), is as it says.
Attack is full frontal, so you drop and strike the most vulnerable points such as
the groin or legs. Its also used in Kaiten (rolls).

13

Stage one: Part (e)


This is where Kaiten (rolls) are introduced. Again, just like in Tai Sabaki there
are many angles one can roll to avoid attack. Here is a list of some rolls youll
be using in this exercise.
These are taken from the 9th Kyu section in this book.
KAITEN (ROLLS)
Katate Zenpo Kaiten (One Hand Forward Roll, Left + Right)
Ni Te Yoko Kaiten (Side Roll with Both Hands)
Katate Yoko Kaiten (Side Roll with One Hand)
Ni Te Ushiro Kaiten (2 handed Back Roll)
Katate Ushiro Kaiten (1 Handed Back Roll)
Mute Ushiro Kaiten (No handed Back Roll)
In this exercise use a combination of all youve been working on in stage one,
parts a through d placing Kaiten at the end.
Example:
Part (a): At the end of Ukes attack, Tori avoids by moving into a Katate Yoko
Kaiten (side roll with one hand) either to the left or right.
Part (b): After the Uke Nayashi, Tori shifts back into a Mute Ushiro Kaiten (no
handed back roll). Finishing in Hidari or Migi Ichimonji, or Jumonji Kumite.
Part (c): At the end of your retaliation roll away and escape by using any of
the above Kaiten.
Part (d): Once Tori has used Tobi to avoid Ukes attack, use Kaiten to avoid
any further confrontation and escape.
In the advanced stages of Tai Sabaki, Tori will eventually use metsubushi
(blinding techniques) to avoid any further confrontation. Metsubushi comes in
many forms; Powders, liquids, solids, explosives etc. and two of the forms
youll be using during training will be that of Shuriken (throwing blades) and
talcum powder (for safety reasons of course).
Other forms of metsubushi will be the likes of anything you have to hand at
the time.

14

UKE
(BLOCKING TECHNIQUES)
Soke Masaaki Hatsumi has said on many occasions that Budo Taijutsu is the
martial art of distance. A lot of the techniques are very deceptive this also
includes the blocks?!

1. Uke Nagashi (Striking Block / Parrying)


2. Jodan Uke (Upper Block)
3. Chudan Uke (Middle Block)
4. Gedan Uke (Lower Block)
5. Gedan Burai (Lower Sweeping Block)

Diagram No.3
Uke Nagashi (Striking Block / Parrying)
In diagram No.3 Uke Nagashi (striking block), use the first two knuckles of the
fist to strike the attackers vital points of the arms or legs.
Overleaf in diagrams 4 and 5 I have pinpointed the areas of the arm one can
strike using Uke Nagashi. These points are also open to other strikes such as
Shuto, Boshi Ken, Fudo Ken, Shikan Ken, and Koppo Ken.
I dont really need to explain the striking points of the legs, as in practice youll
soon find where Uke Nagashi or any other strike for that matter will have full
effect on the attacker.

15

Diagram No.4
(Striking points of the inner arm)

Diagram No.5
(Striking points of the outer arm)

16

KU KYU
(9th Grade Student Green Belt)

TAIHENJUTSU=BODY MOVEMENT
JUNAN TAISO = BODY CONDITIONING

KAITEN (ROLLS)
Kaiten is a valuable asset in martial arts, especially in Budo Taijutsu. Its primary
function is to avoid danger, from a full on confrontation, weapons, stray cars,
or a raging bull if that be the case. Below is a list of Kaiten one can use in the
eight directions of Tai Sabaki.
MAE KAITEN (FORWARD ROLLS)
YOKO KAITEN (SIDE ROLLS)
USHIRO KAITEN (BACK ROLLS)
MAE KAITEN (FORWARD ROLLS)
Ni Te Zenpo Kaiten (Two Hand Forward Roll)
Katate Zenpo Kaiten (One Hand Forward Roll, Left + Right)
Mute Zenpo Kaiten (No Hands Forward Roll)
Hicho Kaiten (Flying Handsprings)
Kuten Ni Te Zenpo (Air Turn-Two Handed to the Front)
Katate Kuten Zenpo (Air Turn- 1 Hand to the Front)
Oten Ni Te (Side Turn-Two Handed Cartwheel)
Katate Oten (Side Turn-One Handed Cartwheel)
Kaiten (Leaping Roll)
17

Shizen (natural Rolling)

YOKO KAITEN (SIDE ROLLS)


Ni Te Yoko Kaiten (Side Roll with Both Hands)
Katate Yoko Kaiten (Side Roll with One Hand)
Mute Yoko Kaiten (Side Roll with No Hands)
A.

Hikho Kaiten B.

Oten C.

Kaiten D.

Shizen

USHIRO KAITEN (BACK ROLLS)


Ni Te Ushiro Kaiten (2 handed Back Roll)
Katate Ushiro Kaiten (1 Handed Back Roll)
Mute Ushiro Kaiten (No handed Back Roll)

UKEMI (GROUND HITTING TECHNIQUES)


Weve all tripped or slipped over at some point in our lives. This is where
Ukemi comes in to play. When we fall, our natural instinct is to put our arms
out to protect ourselves. Unfortunately we sometimes end up hurting more
due to the lack of knowledge we have on how to fall properly.
Below is a list of techniques one can use on how to correctly land as you fall
over, or at worst, been pushed or thrown. In the later circumstances Ive also
added in kicks to follow up on confrontation such as being pushed over.
1. Zenpo Ukemi Kaiten To Keri
(Forward Roll and Slap with Kick).
2. Yoko (Side Drop with Kick).
3. Ushiro (Back Drop with Kick)
4. Zenpo Ukemi To Keri
(Front Drop, Landing On Both Forearms, Kick Back)

18

KAMAE NO KATA (STANCES)


Fudoza (Relaxed Sitting)
Shizen No Kamae (Natural Stance)
Hira Ichimonji No Kamae (Inviting Stance)
Ichimonji No Kamae (First Receiving Stance)
Doko No Kamae (Angry Tiger Stance)
Hicho No Kamae (Flying Bird Stance)
Hoko No Kamae (Arrow/Bear Stance)
Jumonji No Kamae (Crossed Arm Stance)

Below is the Kamae No Kata, a combination of stances one can practice.


Each kamae is a transitional position performed in general between a
technique.

On the next page is the full list of Kamae youll be using throughout 10th kyu to
1st kyu syllabus. There are more, but they come at the later stage as you reach
Shodan and beyond.
19

HACHI KYU
(8th Grade Student Green Belt 1 White Star)
KAMAE NO KATA
Shizen No Kamae
Ichimonji No Kamae
Doko No Kamae
Hicho No Kamae
Kosei No Kamae
Jumonji Kihon (Crossed Arms Receiving Stance)
Jumonji Kumite (Crossed Arms Attacking Stance)
Ihen Hidari (Uncommon Stance Left)
Ihen Migi (Uncommon Stance Right)
Hira No Kamae (Inviting Stance)
Hira Ichimonji No Kamae
Hoko No Kamae
Kongo Gassho No Kamae (Formal Salute)
SUWARI GATA (FLOOR FORMS)
Seiza (Formal Kneeling)
Fudoza (Relaxed Sitting, Crossed Legs)
Practice these Kamae often as they are an integral part of your Tai Sabaki and
Budo Taijutsu, which also includes the Suwari Gata.
Within Budo Taijutsu, Suwari Gata has many techniques! Seiza and Fudoza are
not the only floor forms youll be learning. There are more?!
The Kamae No Kata is taken from the Hachi Kyu section of this book.
Next come the Dakentaijutsu (striking techniques). There are many striking
methods involved in Budo Taijutsu, and the list that follows on the next page
will cover these in greater detail. There are sixteen Dakentaijutsu in the syllabus
all starting from Hachi Kyu section of this book.
Sixteen striking techniques dont sound much, but its what you do with them
that make all the difference. One of the most important aspects of striking in
Budo Taijutsu is that one does not just use muscle power in a strike. You
actually put your bodyweight behind it as well. This increases the power of a
strike adding to its effectiveness in combat.

20

DAKENTAIJUTSU = STRIKING TECHNIQUES


JUROKU KEN (SIXTEEN FISTS)
Ken (Fist)
Ki kaku Ken (Demon Horn Strike)
Shuki Ken (Elbow Strike)
Fudo Ken (Immovable Fist)
Kiten Ken (Knife-hand Strike) More Commonly Known as Shuto
Shi Shin Ken (Finger Needle Strike)
Shitan Ken (Finger Tip Strike)
Shako Ken (Claw Strike)
Shito Ken (Finger Sword) Better Known as Boshi Ken
Shikan Ken (Extended Knuckle Fist)
Koppo Ken (Bone Principle Fist)
Happo Ken (8 Leaves Fist)
Sokuyaku Ken (Dancing Foot Fist)
Sokki Ken (Wake Up Leg Fist). The Knee
Sokugyaku Ken (Toe Fist). Tip of the Toes
Tai Ken (Body Fist)
Shizen Ken (Natural Fist)
Above is the Juroku Ken a big part of the Budo Taijutsu arsenal of techniques.
Use these strikes correctly and they become extremely effective.
There are other techniques within the syllabus of the Bujinkan Fudo Shin
Ninjutsu Dojo that are not strictly part of the Bujinkan system, but Ive added
them all the same.
These are as follow:
TSUKI = STRIKES
Tetsui Ken (Hammer Fist)
Ura Ken (Back Fist)
KERI (KICKS)
Mae Keri (Front Kick, Ball of Foot)
Zenpo Keri (Front Kick, Flat of Foot)
Kagato Keri (Heel of the Foot)
Hidari
Migi
21

DAKENTAIJUTSU EXPLAINED
Ki kaku Ken (Demon Horn Strike)
The Ki Kaku Ken is easy to explain, as its just a head butt.

Diagram No.6
(Points of the head used to strike with)
Diagram No.6 shows the points of the head that one can use to strike with.
The point on the forehead is very effective when used against Ukes chest, as a
solid blow with the head can knock Uke over.
The point on the top of the head can be used at close quarters to strike up
under Ukes chin.
If you become entangled in a bear hug from the front, the side of the head can
be used to strike Ukes face, as using the forehead might result in you gaining
an extra set of lower teeth.
The back of the head is generally used in conjunction with a bear hug from
behind. Used quickly and without a great deal of force Tori can strike the nose
or jaw of Uke and with outstretching your arms to the sides drop your
bodyweight to escape.
Shuki Ken (Elbow Strike)

Diagram No.7
(Point of the elbow used to strike with)
22

The Shuki Ken (Elbow Strike) is a short range weapon, excellent for close
quarter fighting. The range of motion is variable considering the position you
find yourself in during a confrontation! Vertically, horizontally, diagonal and
reverse, these are the movements of the elbow strike.
As its a large bone and close to the shoulder, you can expect the strike to be a
powerful one at best.
Fudo Ken (Immovable Fist)

Diagram No.8
(Fudo Ken)
Unlike some martial arts where you corkscrew a strike Fudo Ken remains in the
same position as shown in diagram No.8.
The techniques in the Fudo Ken strike is not to use it like a boxer would
(shoulder strength alone), but with the weight of your body in movement.
Fudo Ken can be used in long and short ranged movements.

Kiten Ken (Knife-hand Strike) More Commonly Known as Shuto

Diagram No.9
(Kiten Ken or Shuto)
(The Knife-hand Strike)

23

The Kiten Ken or Shuto is an excellent weapon to use in close quarter combat;
it can also be very powerful at a long range. There are numerous ways to use
the Shuto and its not just the straight down typical James Bond (Roger Moore)
Judo Chop! The movements for Shuto are simple and effective, ura and omote
(inside and out). Targets for striking would be the neck, ribs, joints and muscles
of Uke.

Shi Shin Ken (Finger Needle Strike)

Diagram No.10
(Shi Shin Ken)
The Shi Shin Ken is ideal for stabbing in the eyes, striking nerve points in the
face, fish hooking and much more given the right situation in close combat.
Shitan Ken (Finger Tip Strike)

Diagram No.11
(Shitan Ken)
The Shitan Ken is again ideal for striking nerve points, but also good for Renishi
(skin grabbing) techniques especially around the neck or ears. Its also excellent
for striking and grabbing the ribs.
Shako Ken (Claw Strike)

24

Diagram No.12
(Shako Ken)
The Shako Ken is a weapon with a ferocious bite. The Kunoichi (female ninja)
used a similar techniques but with additional claws made with leather and
metal (sometimes bamboo), that slipped on the ends of the fingers and thumbs.

Diagram No.13
(Neko)
The Shako Ken is excellent for attacking targets like the face and eyes by raking,
and even more effective if you were to wear Shuko (hand claws), more
commonly known as tiger claws.
Shito Ken (Finger Sword) Better Known as Boshi Ken

Diagram No.14
(Boshi Ken)
The Boshi Ken is a piercing weapon that strikes at the nerve points of Ukes
body. Very effective towards the soft parts such as the inside of the upper arm
(see Diagram No.4), the armpit, the rib area (Butsumetsu), the bladder area,
the inner thighs and the neck. The techniques used for Boshi Ken are swinging
25

Movements and sharp thrusts. Tightly press the thumb upon the closed fist as a
loose thumb will easily become dislocated or broken.
Shikan Ken (Extended Knuckle Fist)

Diagram No.15
(Shikan Ken)
The Shikan Ken is a weapon great for striking areas like the throat or ribs.
Turned so the palm faces down the Shikan Ken can easily slip through and
strike its target. When striking the ribs, its best to strike them at a downward
angle as the ribcage can take a great deal of force straight on.
Koppo Ken (Bone Principle Fist)

Diagram No.16
(Koppo Ken)
The Koppo Ken is excellent for striking areas such as the temples, cheekbones,
sides of the neck, up under the chin, sides of the ribcage, swift strike to the
groin, the ears, etc. in training its a good idea to practice shifting between
Boshi Ken and Koppo Ken whilst hitting a strike pad.

26

Happo Ken (8 Leaves Fist)

Diagram No.17
(Happo Ken)
The Happo Ken is basically a slap, a very effective slap. Targets for this are
simply the face, nose and ears. A well placed slap with your bodyweight
behind it can knock even the biggest of guys over, especially if you strike the
ears using one or both hands.

Sokuyaku Ken (Dancing Foot Fist)

Diagram No.18
(Soku Yaku Ken)
The Soku Yaku Ken is the whole base of the foot. Its sole purpose (excuse the
pun), is to stomp or crush the attacker with as much force as possible. Unlike
the Mae Geri (front kick) where the ball of the foot is snapped out, the Knee is
raised up high and trust forward to effectively break the target. The Soku Yaku
Ken is also highly effective against the legs of the attacker.

27

Sokki Ken (Wake Up Leg Fist). The Knee

Diagram No.19
(Sokki Ken)
The Sokki Ken is an excellent weapon in close quarter combat. With the large
knuckle of the knee cap and the strength of the legs a blow from Sokki Ken can
cripple. Target areas, groin, inner and outer parts of the upper thighs, stomach,
ribs (especially the floating ribs), chest and head. All these areas can be
extremely hurtful from a blow with Sokki Ken.

Sokugyaku Ken (Toe Fist). Tip of the Toes

Diagram No.20
(Sokugyaku Ken)
28

The Sokugyaku Ken is excellent for striking nerve points of the soft areas of
Ukes body. The groin, the ribs, the inner thighs, the armpits and even the
throat.
Tai Ken (Body Fist)
The Tai Ken technique is basically barging into someone with the shoulder
using your bodyweight behind it. Its certainly effective when used against the
attackers chest. A well placed blow will wind Uke, or possibly knock them
down.

Shizen Ken (Natural Fist)


The Shizen Ken is using all your body, including your teeth and nails. Become
animalistic, fight with everything you have, jump on the attacker and maul
them.

Tetsui Ken (Hammer Fist)

Diagram No.21
(Tetsui Ken)
The Tetsui Ken is hammer action strikes used in techniques like the sentry kill
(smashing a guard on the top of the head). Its also very good for striking the
sides of the head or collar bones. Its very versatile and can be used in many
different ways.

Ura Ken (Back Fist)

29

Diagram No.22
(Ura Ken)
The Ura Ken is a back fist technique. Its a whipping strike that can cause a
concussion if used against the temple of Uke horizontally. Vertically, it can be
used against the bridge of Ukes Nose or against the point between the upper
lip and base of the nose (the philtrum); this would knock out the front upper
teeth.

Mae Keri (Front Kick, Ball of Foot)


The Mae Keri (or Geri) is a snapping front kick with the toes bent back so you
strike with the ball of the foot.
Zenpo Keri (Front Kick, Flat of Foot)
The Zenpo Keri is a pushing/thrusting kick similar to that of the Soku Yaku Ken.
Kagato Keri (Heel of the Foot)
The Kagato Keri is one of variation. It can be used in many different ways
whether it is an axe kick or striking the outsides of the calf muscle. Its
movement is as far as your imagination.
Ushiro Keri (Back Kick)
The Ushiro Keri is a snapping back kick, or it can be a Mawashi Ushiro Keri
(Spinning Back Kick), whipping it around.
Yoko Keri (Side Kick)
The Yoko Keri is a thrust kick using the knife edge (outer edge) of the foot.
Turn side on to Uke, raise the knee to the front, and thrust sideways.
30

SANSHIN NO KATA (Kata/Form of the Three Hearts)


Chi No Kata

(Earth Form)

1. The defender is in shizen (natural stance) facing the attacker.


2. The attacker steps forward with a right hook or lunge punch, and the
defender responds by slipping back and to the right into left Ichimonji (first
receiving stance) while executing a left uke nagashi.
3. The defender counter attacks by stepping forward with the right foot and
executes a right upward swinging Shitan Ken (fingertip drive) to the solar
plexus.
Sui No Kata

(Water Form)

1. The defender is in Shizen facing the attacker.


2. The attacker steps forward with a right hook or lunge punch, and the
defender responds by slipping back and to the right into a left Ichimonji
while executing a left uke nagashi.
3. The defender counter attacks by stepping forward with a right foot and
executes a right Omote Shuto (knife hand edge) strike to the left side of the
attackers throat.
Ka No Kata

(Fire Form)

1. The defender is in Shizen facing the attacker.


2. The attacker steps forward with a right hook or lunge punch, and the
defender responds by slipping back and to the right into a left Ichimonji
while executing a left uke nagashi.
3. The defender counter attacks by stepping forward with the right foot and
executes a right Ura Shuto (knife hand edge) to the right side of attackers
neck.

Fu No Kata

(Wind Form)

1. The defender is in Shizen facing the attacker.


2. The attacker steps forward with a right hook or lunge punch, and the
defender responds by slipping back into Ichimonji while executing a left uke
nagashi.
3. The defender counter attacks by stepping forward with the right foot and
execute a right swinging Boshi Ken (thumb Drive) to the attackers ribs or
side of the groin area.
31

Ku No Kata

(Void Form)

1. The defender is in Shizen facing the attacker.


2. The attacker moves forward with a right front kick, and the defender
responds by slipping back and to the right into left Ichimonji while
executing a low uke nagashi.
3. The defender counter attacks by first executing a right hand faze to attackers
face followed by a Soku Yaku (Heel Shove Kick) to the attackers
midsection.
The Sanshin No Kata (above) is part of the fundamental basics within Budo
Taijutsu. It origins come from the Gyokko Ryu (Jewelled Tiger School), one of
the oldest Ryuhas and still as practical today as it was back then.
Another basic set of movements is the Kihon Happo Gata (Eight Fundamental
Basic Ways). Both the Sanshin No Kata and Kihon Happo Gata should be
practiced daily, these will give you a better understanding on the mechanics of
Budo Taijutsu and also aid in bettering your Tai Sabaki.
KIHON HAPPO GATA
(Eight Fundamental Basic Ways)
KOSSHI KIHON SANPO (Three Fundamental Ways)
Ichimonji No Kata
1. Both Tori and Uke stand in Gyokko Ichimonji.
2. Uke steps forward striking with a right Jodan Fudo Ken.
3. Tori steps back and to the right 45 degrees blocking with a left Uke
Nagashi raising his right hand ready for Omote Shuto.
4. Tori shift his bodyweight straight forward with his right foot and
strikes Ukes neck on the left side with a right Omote Shuto.
Hicho No Kata
1. Both Tori and Uke stand in Gyokko Ichimonji.
2. Uke steps forward striking with a right Chudan Shikan Ken.
3. Tori shifts back into Hicho No Kamae and block with Chudan Uke
Nagashi. With his left leg, Tori kicks Ukes right armpit and raises his
right hand over his left shoulder ready to strike with Ura Shuto
4. Tori steps straight forward with his right foot and strikes Ukes neck
on the right side with a right Ura Shuto.
32

Jumonji No Kata
1.
2.
3.
4.

Tori stands in Jumonji, Uke in Gyokko Ichimonji.


Uke strikes with a right Jodan Fudo Ken.
Tori shifts back with his right foot whilst blocking with a left Uke Nagashi
Tori then shifts his weight forward on his left leg and strikes Ukes Kimon or
Butsumetsu with a left Boshi Ken.
5. Uke shifts forward on his left foot and strikes left Jodan Fudo Ken.
6. Tori shifts back and to the left and blocks with a right Jodan Uke Nagashi.
7. Tori then shifts his weight forward on his right leg and strikes Ukes Kimon
or Butsumetsu with a right Boshi Ken.
Omote Gyaku Dori

1. Uke grabs Toris left lapel with his right hand.


2. Tori steps back with his right foot putting Uke off balance and places his left
hand (with thumb pressing into the back of Ukes right hand and fingers
rapped over Ukes wrist and thumb pad). Tori then grabs with his right
hand also, and pulls Ukes hand away.
3. Tori then steps in with his right foot and turns anti clockwise with his left
foot facing his rear. Tori then twists Ukes wrist outwardly in Omote
fashion and takes Uke to the ground.
Omote Gyaku No Tsuki
1. Follow steps 1. And 2. From Omote Gyaku Dori
2. Uke strikes with a left Jodan Fudo Ken.
3. Tori shifts back and to the left with his left foot and blocks with a Migi
(right) Jodan Uke Nagashi knocking Ukes left arm away.
4. Follow step 3 of Omote Gyaku Dori.
Ura Gyaku Dori
1. Uke grabs Toris left lapel with his right hand.
2. Tori shifts back and to the left with his left foot and swings his right hand
over Ukes right hand (with the thumb pressing into the back of Ukes right
hand and fingers wrapped around Ukes wrist and palm).
3. Tori now steps back with his right foot and breaks Ukes hold by twisting
his wrist inwardly in Ura fashion, then places his left hand on Ukes upper
arm and pushes slightly to aid in Ukes downward motion.
4. Once Uke is down, kneel and maintain a wristlock.

33

Muso Dori
1. Whilst Tori relaxes in Hira/Shizen Uke grabs Toris left sleeve at the upper
arm.
2. Tori steps slightly back with his right foot then forward left putting Uke off
balance. At the same time as Uke is still holding on, Tori raises his left arm
up and under Ukes now bent arm placing his left hand on Ukes left
shoulder.
3. Tori now shifts his right foot slightly clockwise whilst pulling uke into him,
he places his right hand on Ukes shoulder for extra pressure and throws
Uke to the ground.
Musha Dori
1. Whilst Tori relaxes in Hira/Shizen Uke grabs Toris left sleeve at the upper
arm.
2. Tori steps slightly back with his right foot then forward left putting Uke off
balance. At the same time as Uke is still holding on, Tori raises his left arm
up and over Ukes now outstretched arm. Tori rolls his left arm under Ukes
right arm and bends it up as he clasps both hands together for leverage.
3. Tori now shifts his right foot slightly clockwise whilst pulling uke off balance
and sweeps Ukes right supporting leg from under him dropping him to the
floor as you go down to restrain him further.
Part of

SHICHI KYU (7th Grade Student- Green Belt 2 White Stars)


JUTAIJUTSU (Grappling Techniques)
Te Ho Doki (Wrist/Hand Escapes)

1. Uke grabs toris left wrist with both hands.


2. Tori shifts back dropping his bodyweight low and pulling Uke off balance.
3. Tori then shifts forward raising his left arm up towards his chest bending at
the elbow.
4. Now Tori turn slightly clockwise with right foot bring his left arm closer to
his body and presses his left forearm against Ukes right arm.
5. Tori now turns swiftly lowering his bodyweight and breaks Ukes grip.
Tai Ho Doki (Body Escapes)
1. Uke grabs Tori from behind bear hug style.
2. Tori responds by thrusting his hips back first causing uke to slump forward
slightly followed by a thrusting head butt to Ukes face.
3. Tori drops his bodyweight at the same time as lifting his arms out to the
sides, thus breaking Ukes hold, Tori then uses Kaiten to escape.
34

Heiko Jutsu (Balancing Techniques)


This is where youll learn to improve your balancing skills. We will start with
the use of a scaffold pole supported at both ends at least a foot off the ground.
To start, stand on the pole with both feet slightly angled out to allow the soft
part of the soles of your feet rest upon the surface. placing one foot in front of
the other start to walk from one end of the pole to the other. It helps to
outstretch both arms for the added balance when you first begin.
Stage two in Heiko Jutsu is to raise the scaffold pole to at least two feet off the
ground. As you perfect the balancing skill pick up the pace and once you feel
ready why not raise one end of the scaffold pole to three feet.
For a full explanation of Heiko Jutsu and ways to improve your balance, youll
find what your looking for in the Glossary of Techniques in the back of this
book
Kumite (Fighting)
Kihon Kumite Jutsu (Basic Fighting Techniques)
In this part from the Shichi Kyu section of this book, youll now put together all
you have learnt so far and show different variations of each technique, if and
when you can!
KUKISHINDEN RYU (Stick Fighting School)
Hanbo Kamae No Kata (Stances with Half Staff)

Katate Yaburi, Otonashi, Munen Muso


Diagram No.23

35

Diagram No.23 shows three Kamae. These are known as katate Yaburi No
Kamae, Munen Muso No Kamae and Otonashi No Kamae, or better known
as the Sanshin No Kamae.

Kamae
Katate Yaburi No Kamae (Breaking the Form)
Munen Muso No Kamae (Be without Thought and Concept)
Otonashi No Kamae (Wait and See)
Rei (Bowing)
Shizen Rei
Hold the Hanbo on the right hand side of the body, pass to the left hand, and
raise both hands. Hold the arms out stretched, at shoulder height, and bow.
Return to shizen.
Seiza Rei
From the right hand pass the Hanbo to the left hand. Drop to the left knee,
and place the Hanbo at the side of the body, drop to Seiza. Left and right hand
on the ground, and bow. Return to Seiza.
Jinchu Rei
Hanbo in the right hand, drop to the left knee, left hand on the floor in Fudo
Ken. Slightly bend the elbow. Hold the Hanbo along the length of the arm,
and bow. Return to Otonashi No Kamae.
Ritsu Rei
Stand in Munen Muso No Kamae. To Katate Yaburi No Kamae, and bow.
For full details on the Hanbo look in the Glossary of Techniques in the back of
this book.

36

ROKU KYU
(6 Grade Student Green Belt 3 White Stars)
th

Shinobi Aruku (Stealth Walking)


The art of stealth isnt just to hide away in concealment, around a corner, or
behind a rock. Stealth also includes the art of being able to move silently from
one position to another, Shinobi Aruku, or Aruki. There are a number of ways
this can be performed and this means to practice then on a regular basis if you
wish to be silent!

METHODS OF TRAINING ROPPO HOKO JUTSU, THE SIX WAYS OF


WALKING.
1. Walk on ice, run around, and practice Taihenjutsu wearing Geta (clogs).
This serves to give your body stability and balance, and teaches you to walk
silently.
2. Spend a few hours every day, walking with quick, small steps. Walking with
smaller steps lessens the strain on your heart. This also trains you for
walking, as if you were on a cushion of air, not letting your centre of
gravity rest on either leg.
3. Yoko Aruki; walking with your body sideways on. This type of movement
is a part of the Taijutsu in Koto Ryu, Koppo Jutsu.
4. Sokushin Sokusho-ho: adapt to a changed situation by practicing method 1,
2, and 3 above whilst running.
5. Learn the four movements above by watching famous dancers and football
players. Takamatsu taught Hatsumi that Shinobi No Mono should always
keep their feet warm. Hatsumi also mentioned that Takamatsu Toshitsugu
always used to wear Tabi even in the summer! There is also a saying,You
can tell someones art, by there feet.
6. There is an art called Henso Hoko Jutsu (disguised walking): one example
would be walking with a stagger as if drunk. Another name for this is Yugei
Hoko Jutsu (the entertainers walk).
The methods written above will definitely improve your Heiko Jutsu, along
with
, Shoten No Jutsu (art of ascending to heaven) practised with
the scaffold pole.

37

Dakentaijutsu (Striking Techniques)

Ura Tekubi (Back Of Wrist Strike)

Diagram No.24
(Ura Tekubi)
The Ura Tekubi is excellent for many different techniques; its even accepted as
a block in some styles of martial arts?!
As the wrist is a large area with thick bones, its ideal for striking with,
especially when the knuckles of the hand are broken. Swiping across from left
or right and striking up are the main attacks of the wrist.
Sanshin Ken (Three Finger Cone)
Remember the Boy Scout salute? Well, thats primarily the position your
striking hand should be in except the three protruding finger are then pulled
together and bent over the supporting thumb and small finger. Personally I
prefer the Shishin Ken, where the tips of the fingers are pulled together, bent
over and supported by the thumb. This creates a beak to strike with.
Shuken (Heel of Hand and Claw Strike)
Shuken, using the heel of the hand Taisho, along with the Shako, one would
first strike the face pushing it back, and then claw down. This is especially good
if you were to use Neko or Shuko.
Ashiken/Toki (Instep)
Ashiken or Toki, the instep is a great weapon for striking such areas as the
groin, inner thighs, or the calves.

38

Keri No Suwari Kata (Kicking from Floor Forms)


Suwari Gata, Fudoza, and Seiza are the positions youll be using for this part of
the syllabus.
You maybe seen as defenceless whilst sitting, but this is a big mistake on the
part of the attacker. You are fully capable of being able to defend yourself with
blocks and strikes, but what the attacker wont expect is for you to suddenly
strike out with a kick as you spring into action.
Ive purposely left out any diagrams or photos for this part, as Id like for you
to experience this first hand either at one of my classes, or another qualified
Bujinkan instructor class.
KUMITE (Fighting)
(Basic Fighting Techniques)
Here again is where you prove as to what you have learnt in the time youve
studied this syllabus up to the Roku Kyu section of this book.
Your Tai Sabaki should have improved somewhat by now and variations of the
techniques should be a priority.
KUKISHINDEN RYU (Stick Fighting School)
Hanbo Kamae No Kata (Stances with Half Staff)
Now youll begin to learn actual techniques in set forms of the Hanbo.
Here are the basics of Hanbo jutsu.

Naname Ushiro Omote Waki Uchi Hidari Migi


(Moving Diagonally Back outside Ukes Attack and Striking the Side)
Tori in Katate Yaburi No Kamae. Uke in Hidari Ichimonji.
1. Uke strikes with a right Jodan Fudo Ken.
2. Tori shifts back and to the left, loosens the grip of his right on the Hanbo,
and strikes Uke under the right arm and across the right pectoral muscle
with the tip of the Hanbo.
The same applies to the opposite side; except Tori loosens his grip on the left
hand to strike Ukes left pectoral muscle.
39

Naname Mae Ura Waki Uchi


(Moving Diagonally Inside His Attack and Strike the Side)
Tori in Katate Yaburi No Kamae. Uke in Migi Ichimonji.
1. Uke strikes with a left Jodan Fudo Ken.
2. Tori shifts back and to the left, loosen the grip of his right on the Hanbo,
and strikes Uke under the left arm into the ribs on his left side with the tip
of the Hanbo.
The same applies to the opposite side, except Tori loosens his grip on the left
hand to strike Ukes ribs.

Naname Mae Omote Waki Uchi


(Moving Diagonally Forward Outside His Attack and Striking the Side)
Tori in Katate Yaburi No Kamae. Uke in Hidari Ichimonji.
1. Uke strikes with a right Jodan Fudo Ken.
2. Tori shifts forward and to the left, loosens the grip of his right on the
Hanbo, and strikes Uke under the right arm and across the right pectoral
muscle with the tip of the Hanbo.
The same applies to the opposite side, except Tori loosens his grip on the left
hand to strike Ukes ribs.

Mawashi Kote Uchi Omote


(Rotate the Stick and Strike the Wrist, Outside His Attack)
Tori in Katate Yaburi No Kamae. Uke in Hidari Ichimonji.
1. Uke strikes with a right Chudan Fudo Ken.
2. Tori shifts back and to the left, loosen the grip of his right hand on the
Hanbo, and arches the strike to hit Uke on the top of his right wrist with
the tip of the Hanbo.
The same applies to the opposite side, except Tori loosens his grip on the left
hand to strike Ukes wrist.

40

Mawashi Kote Uchi Ura


(Rotate the Stick and Strike the Wrist, Inside His Attack)
Tori in Katate Yaburi No Kamae. Uke in Migi Ichimonji.
1. Uke strike with a left Chudan Fudo Ken.
2. Tori shifts back and to the left, loosens the grip of his right hand on the
Hanbo, and arches the strike to hit Uke on the top of his wrist with the tip
of the Hanbo.
The same applies to the opposite side, except Tori Loosens his grip on the left
hand to strike Ukes wrist.

Kote Uchi Omote


(Strike the Wrist, Outside His Attack)
Tori in Katate Yaburi No Kamae. Uke in Hidari Ichimonji.
1. Uke strikes with a right Jodan Fudo Ken.
2. Tori shifts to his left with his left foot, then steps back with his right foot to
the rear left side, Tori loosens the grip of his left hand on the Hanbo and
strikes down on Ukes wrist.
The same applies to the opposite side, except Tori loosens his grip on his right
hand to strike Ukes wrist.

Kote Uchi Ura


(Strike the Wrist, Inside His Attack)
Tori in Katate Yaburi No Kamae. Uke in Migi Ichimonji.
1. Uke strikes with a left Jodan Fudo Ken.
2. Tori shifts straight back with his right foot, and pivots on his left. He loosens
the grip on his left hand and strikes the inside of Ukes wrist with the tip of
the Hanbo.
The same applies to the opposite side, except Tori loosens his grip on his right
hand to strike the inside of Ukes wrist.

41

Kata Te Tsuki
(One Hand Thrust)
Tori in Katate Yaburi No Kamae. Uke in Migi Ichimonji.
1. Uke strikes with a left Jodan Fudo Ken.
2. Tori shifts forward left with his left foot, and steps back slightly with his
right foot. Tori releases his right hand grip, and thrusts the tip of the Hanbo
into the chin or solar plexus.
The same applies to the opposite side, except Tori releases his left hand grip
and thrusts with the Hanbo.

Tessen (Iron Fan)

Photo No.1.
The Tessen was primarily a defensive weapon used by the Samurai. There are
two types of iron fan? The first being that of an actual fan constructed with
material intertwined between iron rods, the second, and a solid iron rod made
to look like a fan.
In this the Roku Kyu section of this book, well examine the areas of the body
that one would strike with the Tessen.

Just for your own interest. The Tessen was generally used in conjunction with
the Jutte (iron truncheon), a defensive weapon that would have been used by
the police of feudal Japan. Youll learn more about the Jutte in the Yon Kyu
section of this book.

42

A chart demonstrating the strike areas of the Tessen/Jutte/Kunai

Diagram No.25
As you can see from the chart above, the Tessen can be a very versatile
weapon striking at the bone points, and nerve points of the body. The Tessen
can also be used for locks, holds and chokes, and in a similar fashion so can the
Jutte or Kunai.

Tessen Jutsu
By now your Tai Sabaki should be well and truly up to a standard of the
intermediate level and using the Tessen will involve a lot of movement on
your part.
In most cases the Tessen was used against armed opponents, such as a
swordsman, samurai or otherwise! Because of this youll be learning three
simple yet effective techniques as listed below.
Kocho (Small Butterfly)
Shuko Kudaki (Breaking the Back of the Hand)
Kasumi Jime (Tying Up the Fog)
43

Kocho (Small Butterfly)


Tori stands in Migi Seigan No Kamae
1. Uke draws his sword to cut Tori with Do Giri (across from sheath to the
right).
2. Tori shifts forward left and moves his right foot clockwise to his left rear,
grabs Ukes right wrist with his left hand.
3. Tori then uses the Tessen in his right hand to strike the back of Ukes right
hand.
4. Tori then shifts behind Uke and uses his left hand to grip Ukes left jakkin
(weak muscle), located between the biceps and triceps inside the upper
arm.
5. Tori then drives the rear end of the Tessen into Ukes chest, take him to the
ground and restrains him.
Shuko Kudaki (Break the Back Of the Hand)
Tori stands in Migi Seigan No Kamae
1. Uke strikes Chudan Tsuki with his sword.
2. Tori avoids by stepping to his left and strikes down on Ukes sword (or
Ukes right hand) with the Tessen.
3. Tori then strikes Ukes right Kasumi (temple) with the Tessen, steps in to
Ukes right side and applies hard pressure to Ukes left Kasumi to restrain
him.
Kasumi Jime (Tying the Fog)
Tori stands in Migi Gedan No Kamae
1. Uke strikes with Chudan Tsuki with his sword, from Seigan No Kamae.
2. Tori shifts to his left side and hits the side of Ukes sword blade upwards
with his Tessen from underneath.
3. Tori then shifts in close behind Uke, places the rear end of the Tessen
against Ukes left Kasumi and applies hard pressure with the aid of his left
hand.
It has been said, if one becomes very skilful in Tessen jutsu even a pencil
Can easily be utilised to restrain an attacker.
There you have it! Three basic techniques on Tessen Jutsu. In the more
advanced stages, youll learn locks, holds and chokes.
44

GO KYU
(5 Grade Student Green Belt 4 White Stars)
th

Shinobi Iri (Silent Movement)


In the back of this book there is a large section covering Shinobi Iri. It will take
you through the tactics and techniques taught to you through the Bujinkan
system of Budo Taijutsu.
DAKENTAIJUTSU (Striking Techniques)
Once again weve reached a point where more bodily weapons are added to
the syllabus. Below are a few new striking methods you will learn to use in the
Bujinkan Fudo Shin Ninjutsu Dojo.
Ichiken (One Knuckle Strike)
The Ichiken is a one knuckle strike excellent for hitting nerve points on the
body of Uke. The weapon here is the second knuckle of the middle finger,
folded into a fist form and then extended.

Diagram No.26
(Ichiken)

Niken (Two Knuckle Strike)


The Niken, a two knuckle strike fist. Yet another excellent weapon for getting
into those hard to hit places on the human body. The weapon at hand is the
second knuckles of both the index and middle fingers, folded into a fist form
and then extending the two fingers with support from the thumb.

45

Diagram No.27
(Niken)
Fumi Keri (Stomp Kick)
The Fumi Keri. A stomp! When youve knocked your attacker to the floor and
you want him to stay down, the target areas would be, the jaw, back of the
thighs (under the buttocks), the floating ribs, knees, ankles, and neck.
Yoko Tobi Keri (Side Leaping Kick)
The Yoko Tobi Keri. A jumping side kick! Either in the form of a Soku Yaku
Ken, or with the outer knife edge of the foot. For the later, a strike to the knees
or floating ribs whilst in flight would knock your attacker for a six.

JUTAIJUTSU (Grappling Techniques)


Here are three more additional techniques to study in the Jutaijutsu section of
The Bujinkan Fudo Shin Ninjutsu Dojo.
Hon Gyaku (Straight Arm Lock)
Tori in Shizen. Uke in Hidari Ichimonji.
1. Uke steps in and grabs Toris right lapel with his right hand.
2. Tori shifts back and to the left whilst bringing his right hand over the top of
Ukes right hand.
3. Tori grips Ukes right hand with thumb pressed into the back and fingers
rapped around Ukes little finger.
4. Tori twists Ukes right hand inwards, shifts forward and places his left hand
on top and in the crutch of Ukes elbow and bends it.
5. As Tori twists Ukes right hand inward, he applies pressure down on Ukes
elbow and drops him to the floor.

46

For both the Ura and Omote Gyaku of the Jutaijutsu section of the Go Kyu,
refer back to page 32 0f this book.
Ura Gyaku (Wrist Lock Going In)
Omote Gyaku (Wrist Lock Going Out)
HOKO JUTSU (Walking Techniques)
(Emphasizing Leg Movement)
A refresher course on learning how to walk properly with speed and silence.
KUKISHINDEN RYU (Stick Fighting School)
Hanbo Kamae No Kata (Stances with Half Staff)
Jodan No Kamae
Chudan No Kamae
Gedan No Kamae
Ichimonji No Kamae
Seigan No Kamae
Ten Chi Jin No Kamae
The above Kamae for the Hanbo are exact replicas of the Bo Roku (six foot
staff) Kamae.
Hanbo Jutsu (Half Staff Techniques)
Tori in Katate Yaburi No Kamae. Uke attacks with a Shoto (short sword)
.
Katate Uchi (Single Strike)
1. Uke with Shoto in the right hand steps forward with the left leg and grabs
Toris right lapel with his left hand.
2. Uke then steps forward with his right leg and executes a right Chudan Tsuki
with the Shoto.
3. Tori responds by stepping back with his left leg and immediately strikes up
with the right tip of the Hanbo under Ukes left elbow releasing Ukes grab.
The above is to be done all in one move.

47

Katate Uchi Henka (Single Strike Variation)


1. Uke with Shoto in the right hand steps forward with the left leg and grabs
Toris right lapel with his left hand.
2. Uke then steps forward with his right leg and executes a right Chudan Tsuki
with the Shoto.
3. Tori responds by stepping forward and to the right with his right leg, the
left foot comes across and behind the right foot.
4. Tori then strikes up under Ukes right arm just behind the elbow with the
left tip of the Hanbo.
Tsuki Otoshi (Strike and Drop)
1. Uke with Shoto in his right hand steps forward with his left leg and grabs
Toris right lapel with his left hand
2. Uke then steps forward with his right leg and executes a right Chudan Tsuki
with the Shoto.
3. Tori responds by stepping back with the left leg, and strikes up under Ukes
left elbow with the right tip of the Hanbo releasing the grab form Uke (all
in one movement).
4. Tori then strikes Jodan Tsuki with the right end of the Hanbo at Ukes chin
(move the body forward when striking the chin).
Tsuki Otoshi Henka (Strike and Drop Variation)
1. The start is the same as in Katate Uchi.
2. After the strike, Tori releases the left hand, and turn the Hanbo over to the
right.
3. Catching again with the left hand, Tori strikes again with the tip of the
Hanbo into Ukes throat. Tori moves forward for the Tsuki strike.
Uchi Waza (Hitting Technique)
1. As Uke steps in to strike right Chudan Tsuki with the Shoto.
2. Tori steps back and to the left 45, and then strikes down onto Ukes right
wrist with the right tip of the Hanbo.
3. Tori then steps forward and strike Uke on the Migi Kasumi (right temple)
with the left tip of the Hanbo. Tori moves forward for the Tsuki strike
Uchi Waza Henka (Hitting Technique Variation)
As above, but to the left side of Ukes Kasumi, and then strike to Hidari Koe
whilst stepping forward with the left leg.
48

Tessen Jutsu (Iron Fan Techniques)


Follow the three techniques youve already been taught, and for each one
create two variations.
In a similar effect, the Kunai (a trowel or digging implement), can be used
instead of the Tessen.
Tanto Kihon Jutsu (Basic Knife Techniques)
Tanto No Kamae

Photo No.2
Shote No Kamae (Beginning 8 Position)
Seigan No Kamae (Correct Eye Position)
Techi No Kamae (Heaven and Hell Position)
Hidariwaki No Kamae (Left Side Position)
Taira No Kamae (Flat Position) (Blade Horizontal to Ground)
Written above are the first five Tanto Kamae, there are fourteen in total. The
techniques for each Kamae will follow in the Ichi Kyu section of this book.
Shuriken Kihon Jutsu (Basic Throwing Star Techniques)

Photo No.3
The Shuriken. A weapon portrayed as the ninjas ultimate killing tool! Films,
Books, and magazines, have especially made this the case ever since the mid
49

80s ninja boom that hit the western world with a storm!
One famous clip in the film Revenge of the Ninja. Showed a rogue Koga (or
Koka as its properly pronounced) ninja kill a mafia boss with a shuriken in
the head, from at least a hundred feet away. Impossible?! Id say so!
The mid 80s ninja boom also brought out the hidden pseudo Ninja
Masters, and their so called Secrets of the Ninja, where the simple Shuriken
now became named as the Ninja Star of Death or The Lethal Ninja Star.
Books were written by these same pseudo ninja masters on the killing power
of the Shuriken.
The reality of the shuriken, especially the Senban of the Togakure Ryu (most
commonly used amongst Bujinkan practitioners), was its use in distracting the
Attacker, as in throwing it towards the enemy to aid in your escape.
It is true however that some Shuriken had poisonous tips; poison taken from
the Fugu (a Japanese puffer fish). Its Hundreds of times more powerful than
Cyanide and just a trace of this poison can kill a fully grown man in minutes
with the poor soul dieing in excruciating Pain.
This in its self probably brought about the myth of the Shurikens killing power
and created fear in the hearts of the Samurai and ordinary village folk.

Photo No.4
Pictured here is a ninja, in the Doko No Kamae style stance in readiness to
throw a shuriken.
(IMPORTANT NOTE): One thing Id like to point out here is that the
Shuriken isnt just for throwing. Held correctly in the hand, its edges can be
used to stab, gouge, rip, and slice your attacker in close quarter fighting.
50

Shuriken No Kamae
Hira No Kamae
Doko No Kamae
Jumonji No Kamae

Nage Waza (Throwing Techniques)


Sei Jo Uchi (Side of Head)
Yoko Uchi (From Stomach Throw)
Gyaku Uchi (From the Hip Throw)
Here are some basic Kata forms for you to study with the Shuriken
Chi No Kata
Tori in Seigan No Kamae. Uke in Hidari Ichimonji.
1. Tori is in Seigan no Kamae with sword drawn.
2. Tori lets go of the sword with the right hand, he then thrusts the sword into
Ukes face and at the same time draws a Senban Shuriken from the inside of
his gi.
3. Tori then performs Chi No Kata, releasing shuriken as though striking with
Shitan Ken. As the right hand swings forward the left hand draws the sword
to the left and behind. After the shuriken is released, Tori then re grips the
sword with the right hand and cuts Gyaku Kesa Giri (Bottom Left-Top
Right). Diagram No.28

Diagram No.28

51

Sui No Kata
Tori in Seigan No Kamae. Uke in Hidari Ichimonji.
1. Tori is in Seigan no Kamae with sword drawn.
2. Tori Lets go with the right hand, he then thrusts the sword into Ukes face
and at the same time draws a Senban Shuriken from the inside of his gi.
3. Tori then performs Sui No Kata. As right hand extends to strike Ura Shuto
ken, he then releases the Shuriken. As the right hand throws, the left hand
moves the sword out to the left. After the Shuriken is thrown Toris right
hand then re grips the sword and cuts with Kesa Giri (Top Right-Bottom
Left). Diagram No.28
Ka No Kata
Tori in Seigan No Kamae. Uke in Hidari Ichimonji.
1. Tori is in Seigan no Kamae with sword drawn.
2. Tori lets go with the right hand, he then thrusts the sword into Ukes face
and at the same time draws a Senban Shuriken from the inside of his gi.
3. Tori then performs Ka no Kata. He releases the Shuriken instead of striking
with Omote Shuto Ken. As shuriken is thrown, his left hand moves the
sword to the left side of his head.
4. After shuriken is thrown, Toris right hand re grips the sword and cuts Kesa
Giri (Top Right-Bottom Left). Diagram No.28
Fu No Kata
Tori in Seigan No Kamae. Uke in Hidari Ichimonji.
1. Tori is in Seigan no Kamae with sword drawn.
2. Tori lets go with the right hand, he then thrusts the sword into Ukes face
and at the same time draws a Senban Shuriken from the inside of his gi. Tori
then performs Fu no Kata. And as the shuriken is being thrown straight
forward, the point of the sword is lowered to the floor.
3. After the throw the sword is re gripped and thrust at Ukes Solar Plexus.
Ku No Kata
Tori in Doko Ichimonji No Kamae. Uke in Hidari Ichimonji.
1. Tori is in Doko Ichimonji no Kamae, with Senban or Bo Shuriken in both
hands.
2. Tori throws multiple Shuriken with his right hand (in any of the above
methods), while stepping forward with the right foot. Then throws the
Shuriken in his left hand (in any of the above methods) while stepping with
the left foot.
3. Tori then escapes using any Kaiten technique.
52

These techniques are a lot of fun to do. Don't get too hung up on making the
Shuriken stick into the target. If uke flinches or tries to block the shuriken, then
that's the opening youre looking for to cut him down.
(NOTE OF INTEREST): Why not use Metsubushi (blinding powder), either in
conjunction with the Shuriken, or as an alternative. And why not try to expand
on the above techniques. Remember! The techniques written down here are a
guide to further your education within Budo Taijutsu. After all, it is a grown
art!

KusariFundo Kihon Jutsu (Basic Weight and Chain Techniques)

Photo No.5
The length of a Kusari Chain can be anything from 12 to 48 inches with
numerous types of heavy weights attached to each end. In training we tend to
use flexible ropes knotted at the ends, a real Kusari Fundo/Manrikikusari can
be used, but only by a well instructed person with a great deal of skill.
Here is an example of the training Kusari Fundo (Photo No.6).

Photo No.6
Because of the flexibility of the chain, the Kusari Fundo is used through its own
Momentum, hence, vertically, diagonally, and horizontally. One method is to
throw the Kusari Fundo at the opponents face whilst holding the other
weighted end (excellent distraction tactics, plus if it hits, it hurts)! Other
53

advantages with the Kusari Fundo are the catch, throw, and choke techniques.
Listed below are eight basic weight and chain techniques thatll help you get
into the swing of things (excuse the pun).
Ago Kusari (Hitting the Chin)
1. Tori stands in Migi Ichimonji holding both weights in each hand and the
chain extended along the right outstretched arm.
2. As tori shifts forward on the left foot, he drops his right arm down to his
right side and behind. The left arm follows and lies across the front of toris
body.
3. With the chain still extended, tori releases the weight in his right hand, and
swings the left arm up and out in front of him, hence, the weight and chain
will whip out and up striking Uke under the chin.
Hachi Mawaru Kusari (Figure Of Eight)
1. Tori stands in Hira/Shizen No Kamae with the Kusari in his right hand and
hanging down beside his right leg.
2. Tori shift back and to the left (Migi Ichimonji), at the same time he whips
the Kusari up and across, thus beginning to form a figure eight out in front
of him.
One excellent way of training with the Kusari Fundo is to move around as your
swinging the weighted chain.
Hidari Yoko Man Kusari (Hitting the Head)
1. Tori stands in Jumonji with the Kusari held between both hands.
2. Tori steps forward and with the leading arm, strikes out and swings the
Kusari towards Ukes head.
Do Kusari (Hitting from the Side)
1. Tori stands in Hira/Shizen with the Kusari in his right hand.
2. Tori steps back, swings his right arm back, releases one end of the Kusari.
He then steps forward and swings the Kusari widely out to the front across
his body.

54

O Kusari (The Big Swing)


This is virtually the same as Do Kusari, except you swing the Kusari from side to
side.
Nage Kusari (Throwing the Chain)
Not much needs to be said about this technique, other than the best way to
throw the Kusari is to swing it first so momentum builds up. Practice with a
pole and see if you can wrap the Kusari around it. Train as though you were
using a bolas.
Tsuki Kusari (Thrusting the Chain)
1. Tori stands in Hidari Ichimonji with the Kusari Held in his right hand (Photo
No.7)
2. Uke attacks with a right Jodan Fudo Ken.
3. Tori shifts back and to the right, blocking with a left Uke Nagaeshi.
4. Tori shifts forward and strikes out with his right hand releasing one end of
the Kusari so it hits Uke in the face.

Photo No.7
Yoko Men Kasumi Kusari (Hitting Both Temples)
1. Tori stands in Jumonji, left arm leading.
2. Uke strikes with a right Jodan Fudo Ken
3. Tori shifts back and blocks with a left Uke Nagaeshi using the butt of the
Kusari weight.
4. Tori immediately shifts forward with his right leg and strikes Ukes temples
with both ends of the Kusari.
Henka (Variation) Toris leading arm is his right. Uke strikes right Jodan Fudo
Ken. Tori steps to his left blocking with the Butt of the Kusari. Tori steps in
behind Uke and strikes both temples from behind. Tori brings his right hand
over in front of
55

Ukes face wrapping the chain around his neck. Tori crosses his hands
tightening the chain, steps back, and throws Uke to the ground.

YON KYU
(4 Grade Student Green Belt 1 Gold Star)
th

JUTAIJUTSU (Grappling Techniques)


Omote Oni Kudaki (Outside Figure 4)
Both Tori and Uke in Hira/Shizen.
1. Uke steps in grabbing both of Toris lapels.
2. Tori shifts back on his left leg putting Uke off balance. Tori then places his
left hand up under Ukes left hand, shift forward with his left leg, and slides
his right hand up under ukes now bent right elbow.
3. Tori now clasps both of his hands together. He now raises his right arm and
brings his right leg around (clockwise).
4. Tori now raises his right arm further and pushes with his left to break Ukes
left hand grip and drops him to the floor.
Henka Ichi (Variation One)
Follow steps 1 and 2. Once Uke is off balance strike him with Boshi Ken to
Butsumetsu, and continues with the remaining steps.
Henka Ni (Variation Two)
1. Uke grabs Toris right lapel with his left hand.
2. Uke then strikes Jodan Fudo Ken with his right, Tori shifts back and to the
right whilst blocking with Uke Nayashi to his right wrist.
3. Tori now shifts forward and slides his right arm up and under Ukes Right
elbow bending it in the process.
4. Follow steps 3 and 4.
Ura Oni Kudaki (Inside Figure 4)
Both Tori and Uke are in Hira/Shizen.

56

1. Uke steps in and grabs Toris left lapel with his right hand.
2. Tori shifts back and to the left pulling Uke slightly off balance, and places
his left hand under Ukes right wrist.
3. Tori now shifts forward left with his left foot whilst grabbing Ukes right
wrist, and at the same he brings his right arm over the top of ukes right
arm bending it at the elbow.
4. Tori then folds his right hand under Ukes forearm and grabs his own left
wrist. Tori forcing Ukes right arm backwards, takes him to the floor.
Henka Ichi (Variation One)
Follow step 1. In step 2, Uke attempts a left Jodan Fudo Ken. Block him using
Uke Nagaeshi. As you shift forward in step 3, strike Uke with a right Ura Shuto
before placing your arm over the top. In step 4, once youve forced Ukes arm
backwards, sweep his right leg out from under him with your right heel into
the back of his ankle or calf muscle.
Ippon Seoinage (Shoulder Throw with Arm)
Both Tori and Uke in Hira/Shizen.
1. Uke grabs Tori by both lapels.
2. Tori shifts in with his right foot (between Ukes legs), then twists his body so
his back facing Uke.
3. At the same time as Tori twists in, Tori also brings his right hand up under
Ukes right arm and places his right hand on Ukes right shoulder.
4. At this point Toris right shoulder should be directly under Ukes right
triceps muscle.
5. Tori now lowers his body slightly and thrusts his hips back whilst pulling on
Ukes right arm. This throws Uke over Toris shoulder and onto the ground.
Morote Seoinage (Shoulder Throw with Arm and Cloth)
1. Uke grabs Toris gi with his right hand at the chest.
2. Tori responds by grabbing Ukes gi with his left hand at the chest and Ukes
sleeve on his right arm.
3. Tori steps in with his right foot (between Ukes legs), twisting so his back is
against Ukes
4. Tori then lower his body and thrusts his hips back whilst pulling on Ukes
Right sleeve and gi. This throws Uke over his right shoulder.

57

O-goshi (Major Hip Throw)

1. Uke steps in a grabs Toris gi by the chest.


2. Tori grabs Ukes right sleeve just above the elbow. He then steps in and
across with his right foot placing his right hip up against Ukes, at the same
time Tori wraps his left arm around Ukes waist on the left side.
3. Tori lowers his body and thrusts his hip back to throw Uke to the ground.
Henka Ichi (Variation One)
Follow steps 1 and two, but in the later part of step 2 Tori strikes Uke in his left
Butsumetsu with Boshi Ken, or Koppo Ken into Ukes left Kidney as Tori wraps
his left arm around Ukes waist.
Ashi Burai (Foot Sweep)
As it says, but sweeping Ukes legs from the outside in with the Foot. This takes
uke completely off balance dropping him to the ground.
KUKISHINDEN RYU (Stick Fighting School)
Hanbo Kihon Kumite (Basic Hanbo Fighting)
Nagare Dori (Flowing Drop)
Tori is in Katate Yaburi No Kamae.
1. Uke steps in with the Shoto striking with a right Jodan Tsuki. At the same
time, Tori steps forward right with his right foot and strikes up under Ukes
elbow with the left tip of the Hanbo.
2. Tori then lets go of the Hanbo with his left hand, grabs Ukes right wrist
with his left, and strikes Ukes Hip on the right side (Koshi Ori, Breaking The
Hip), with the Hanbo.
3. Tori lifts the Hanbo up jamming it between Ukes back and the upper part
of his arm.
4. Finally, Tori brings his left leg around anti clockwise whilst pushing the
Hanbo away, and the right hand of Uke towards him with his left hand
taking Uke to the ground.

Nagare Dori
Henka Ichi (Variation One)
Follow steps 1 and 2. In step 3, strike Ukes face with the right tip of the
58

Hanbo before you jam it between Ukes back and arm. In step 4 after taking

Uke to the ground, hold ukes right arm up and twist to Omote. Finally, place
the left tip of the Hanbo into Ukes Waki (armpit) and put pressure on that
point.
Kasumi Gake (Haze Trap)
Tori is in Katate Yaburi No Kamae.
1. Uke steps in with the Shoto striking with a right Jodan Tsuki. Tori steps
forward and to the left letting go of the Hanbo with his right hand.
2. Tori blocks Ukes right hand with his right, as he turns to face Uke, he then
slides the Hanbo forward strikes Uke with his left fist in Butsumetsu, turns
his left hand so the Hanbo is vertical and strikes Uke in the face.
3. Tori then twists Ukes wrist away from him and performs Tsuke Iri (inserting
the stick between the arm and the body),
4. Tori then moves his right leg to the rear (turning clockwise), taking uke to
the ground.
5. Finally, Tori kneels down and applies pressure to the Hanbo pinning Ukes
right arm to the ground.
Kasumi Gake
Henka Ichi (Variation One)
Follow step 1. In step 2, before you strike Butsumetsu, strike Ukes Omote Chu
Kansetsu (outside of Ukes knee joint). In step 5, Tori can also put pressure on
Ukes Yogasumi (a nerve point about an inch behind the lower part of the ears
and the base of the skull).
Tessen Jutsu (Iron Fan Techniques)
Its been mentioned before, but the Tessen can be used with some of the same
techniques likened to the Jutte or Kunai.
(IMPORTANT NOTE): For training purposes wooden equivalents of the above
mentioned are used, but if you can afford the real thing, thats more the better
for you to feel with.
Continuing with the techniques from page 43, the Tessen has a variety of ways
one can use it. In this section I am going to focus on Locks and Holds.
The following techniques are not strictly of the Tessen nature (more the
Yawara: A pressure point stick). But they are adapted for the likes of the
Tessen.
59

Take Ori (breaking The Bamboo)


1. Uke grabs Toris right wrist with his right hand.
2. Tori with Tessen in his right hand, flips the Tessen over Ukes right hand, at
the same time brings his left hand up and under his right hand and grabs the
end of the Tessen (this creates a Juji, cross grip trapping Ukes hand).
3. Tori then steps back and pulls Uke to the ground (breaking his wrist in the
process).
Ude Yojiru (Wrenching the Arm)
1. Uke steps in with his right foot and strikes with a right Chudan Tsuki.
2. Tori steps out to his left and catches Ukes wrist with his left hand, at the
same time fakes a strike, or strikes Uke in the right Kasumi with the Tessen.
3. Tori then steps in close trapping Ukes right forearm under his right armpit.
At the same time Tori brings the Tessen up under Ukes right arm and places
it just above Ukes elbow.
4. Tori then takes hold of the top end of the Tessen, slightly steps back with
the right foot and turn to his right pushing down on Ukes Right elbow
forcing him to the ground.
Tsure Dori (Arresting Hold)
1. Uke steps in with his right foot and strikes with a right Chudan Tsuki.
2. Tori steps out to his left and with the Tessen in his left hand held vertically
he strikes at Ukes arm just above the elbow.
3. As this happens, Tori brings his right arm up under Ukes right arm and
grabs the Tessen with his right hand (palm facing Tori). Tori also catches
Ukes right wrist in the crutch of his right elbow.
4. Tori now swings his right leg back and turns clockwise, at the same time
lifting his left hand up and twisting Ukes elbow back. Tori can hold Uke
this way.
Tsure Dori can be used with Uke pinned up against a wall, or car. If you can
take him to the floor, Tori can also hold him in the same way.
(IMPORTANT NOTE): If Tsure Dori is done swiftly enough and with power,
there is a possibility that Ukes elbow might become dislocated.
A variation of Tsure Dori follows step 4. Tori can bring his right leg back
further as he twists to the right and at the same time slightly shifting toris left
hand up can rest Ukes right arm onto Toris left shoulder. If Tori was to thrust
back with his hips Uke can then be thrown over his left shoulder.
60

Hiki Kudaru (Pulling Down)


1. Uke grabs Toris right sleeve with his left hand just below Toris Bicep.
2. Tori responds by bringing his right arm up twisting Ukes left hand, and
traps it. At the same Tori grabs Ukes left hand with his left and re-enforces
the hold.
3. Tori with Tessen in right hand, pushes the butt end into Ukes ulna nerve on
his left arm just below the elbow. Tori then steps back pulling uke to the
ground whilst maintaining pressure on Ukes left arm.
Kusari Fundo Jutsu (Weight and Chain Techniques)

Kaku Yoku Kiri (Capture Wings in the Mist)


Tori stands in Migi Jumonji. Uke in Hidari Gyokko Ichimonji.
1. Uke steps in with his right foot and attacks with a right Jodan Tsuki.
2. Tori shifts out to his left side and loops the Kusari chain around the inside of
Ukes right forearm (See Diagram No.29).
3. Once ukes right arm is pinned, Tori then shifts in and strikes Ukes right
Kasumi with the weight in his right hand, and strikes Ukes right Butsumetsu
with the weight in his left hand.
4. Tori then turns clockwise with his right foot grabbing Ukes right wrist, and
with his left hand places it on the back Ukes right arm to lock Ukes elbow.
Tori then throws Uke to the floor.

Diagram No.29
Kaku Yoku Kiri
Henka Ichi (Variation One)
Follow steps 1 - 3, then pin Ukes right arm at the shoulder against your own
shoulder, place your right hip against his right hip. Lower your weight, and
61

Throw Uke to the floor. Finally, swipe Uke in the face with the Kusari Fundo,
and escape.
Satsu On (Kill the Sound)
Tori stands in Migi Jumonji. Uke in Hidari Gyokko Ichimonji.
1. Uke steps in with his right foot and strikes with a right Jodan Tsuki.
2. Tori shifts out to his right side and blocks with his left hand using the butt of
the weight on the Kusari Fundo.
3. He them slightly shifts forward on his left foot and strikes Ukes left Koe or
Suzu with a right Sokugyaku Ken.
4. As Uke bends forward, Tori grabs Ukes hair with his left hand and strikes
Uke in the left Yu Kiri (the little bone about an inch behind the lower part
of the ear). Diagram No.30

Diagram No.30
The Kusari Fundo is a versatile weapon, the variation of techniques one can use
with the Kusari is virtually unlimited. Practice with this weapon regularly and
play with some of the techniques, or better still, incorporate it into some of the
Dakentaijutsu youve already learnt.
Jutte Jutsu (Truncheon Techniques)

Photo No.8
62

The Jutte (Truncheon) is in my list of favourite weapons. Its versatile and very
effective for strikes, locks, and chokes.
Jutte No Kamae (Truncheon Stances)
Shizen No Kamae (Natural Stance)
Same as Shizen in the Kamae No Kata, but with the Jutte held in the
right hand, and the tip pointing towards your toes on the right foot.
Hira Ichimonji No Kamae (Inviting Stance)
Same as Hira Ichimonji in the Kamae No Kata, but with the Jutte held in
the right hand at a diagonal position with the tip pointing up away from
the body.
Jumonji No Kamae (Crossed Arm Stance)
Same as Jumonji in the Kamae No Kata, but with the Jutte held in the
right hand (Migi Jumonji) with the tip of the Jutte at a diagonal position
pointing up away from the body.
Seigan No Kamae
Stand in Migi Seigan No Kamae with the right foot forward and left foot
back. Your right arm is extended with a slight bend in the right elbow,
the Jutte held in the right hand and the tip pointing towards Ukes eyes.
The left hand (palm in) is placed against the left hip.
Saka-te Seigan No Kamae
Virtually the same as Migi Seigan No Kamae, only the Jutte is now held
in reverse with the shaft resting against the right forearm pointing
towards the elbow.
Jodan No Kamae
Stand in Migi Jodan No Kamae with the right foot forward and left foot
back. Your right arm is extended high overhead with a slight bend in the
elbow and the Jutte held in the right hand with the tip pointing to the
left. The left hand rests on the left hip as in Seigan.

63

Gedan No Kamae
Stand in Migi Gedan No Kamae with the right foot forward and the left
foot back. Your right arm is extended in a downward angle (Gedan),
with the Jutte held in the right hand and the tip pointing at Ukes
leading foot. Left hand on left hip as in Seigan.
Gedan No Kamae Henka (variation)
Stand in Hidari Gedan No Kamae with the left foot forward and the
right foot back. Your left arm is extended in a downward angle with the
left hand open and fingers pointing at Ukes leading foot. The Jutte held
in the right hand rests on the back of the right leg pointing to the
ground following the angle of the leg.
Za No Kamae
Za No Kamae, a seated posture with the left leg tucked under the
buttocks and the right leg folded in front, shin resting on the floor and
right foot relaxed in front of left knee. The Jutte is tucked into Toris
belt in readiness to be pulled out with the right hand.
What follows next are a few basic techniques in striking with the Jutte.
Ten To Uchi (Striking the Top of the Head)
Tori stands in Migi Seigan No Kamae. Uke in Hidari Gyokko Ichimonji.
1. Uke steps forward with his right foot and strikes with a right Jodan Tsuki.
2. Tori shifts back and to the right with his right foot, and blocks with a right
Uke Nagaeshi at the same time Tori raises his right arm with Jutte in hand
above his head in readiness.
3. Tori now shifts forward with his right foot and strikes Uke on the top of his
head with the Jutte.
Hidari Kubi Suji Uchi (Left Neck Muscle Strike)
Tori stands in Migi Jodan No Kamae. Uke in Hidari Gyokko Ichimonji.
1. Uke kicks with a right Chudan Zenpo Keri.
2. Tori shifts back and to the right with his right foot, blocking with a right
Uke Nagaeshi. At the same time as blocking Tori positions himself into
Doko No Kamae with the Jutte in his right hand.
3. Tori now shifts forward with his right foot and strikes Uke on the left side
64

of the neck in the style of Omote Shuto.


Migi Kubi Suji Uchi (Right Neck Muscle Strike)
Tori stands in Migi Jodan No Kamae. Uke in Migi Gyokko Ichimonji.
1. Uke steps in with his left foot and strikes with a left Jodan Tsuki.
2. Tori shifts back and to the left avoiding Ukes strike, and then strikes down
on Ukes left forearm with the Jutte.
3. Tori returns to Migi Jodan No Kamae.
4. Uke steps in once more with a right Zenpo Keri.
5. Tori shifts out to the right and delivers a right Toki Uchi (instep strike) to
Ukes right calf muscle putting Uke off balance, then Tori shifts in and strikes
Uke on the right side of the neck in the style of Ura Shuto.
Gedan Uchi (Lower Strike)
Tori stands in Gedan No Kamae Henka. Uke in Hidari Jumonji Kumite.
1. Uke kicks with a right Zenpo Keri.
2. Tori shifts back and to the left with his left foot, brings the Jutte over from
behind (in the form of an arch), and strike Uke on the outside of his right
shin bone.
3. Tori then shifts in with his left foot and follows up with a strike to the
outside of Ukes thigh then thrusts the Tsume (tip of the hook on the side of
the Jutte), into the top of Ukes thigh forcing him to the ground.
Chudan Tsuki Uchi (Middle Thrust Strike)
Tori stands in Gedan No Kamae Henka. Uke in Hidari Gyokko Ichimonji.
1. Uke steps in with his right foot and strikes with a right Jodan or Chudan
Tsuki.
2. Tori blocks with a left Uke Nagaeshi as he shifts back and to the right
3. Tori then shifts forward with his right foot and swings the Jutte (in the form
of the Chi No Kata) thrusting the tip into Ukes solar plexus.
Jodan Tsuki Uchi (Upper Thrust Strike)
Tori stands in Gedan No Kamae. Uke in Migi or Hidari Gyokko Ichimonji.
1. Uke steps in with his right or left foot and strikes with a right or left Jodan
or Chudan Tsuki.
2. Tori shuffles back and blocks either one of Ukes strikes with his Jutte on
65

The inside of Ukes wrists. Tori then follows through with a thrusting strike to
Ukes throat or chin.
In all of these postures and techniques, the most important aspect is to keep
eye contact with Uke. Do this in such a way that Uke feels uneasy. Do not
strain your stare as this will lead to contortion. Use Mushin (no mind), and
keep your stare blank showing no emotion. Stay steadfast and focused, do not
flinch.
Ken Jutsu (Sword Fighting)
Kihon Kata (Basic Forms)
Ken Jutsu No Kamae (Sword Fighting Stances)

Seigan No Kamae (Straight to the Eye)


The attitude of this stance is to focus on stabbing Uke in the face as a
distraction. The point of the blade (Kissaki) should be pointed in the direction
of Ukes eye. The expression on you face should be one of no emotion.
Chudan No Kamae (Centre)
In this Kamae the attitude is to stab Uke in the chest. The Kissaki should be
pointed at Ukes heart. The expression should again be one of no emotion.
Tenchi Hasso No Kamae (Heaven and Earth Connect)
In this Kamae the attitude is one of steadfast strength. Tenchis impression is
one of a solid stance to the attacker, but Tori is able to be flexible in
movement when blocking, thrusting or striking down at his opponent. The
expression of this Kamae is one of Mushin (no mind), showing no emotion.
Fudo No Kamae (Immoveable Stance)
In this Kamae the attitude is one of Immoveable spirit, a force to be reckoned
with. Fudo No Kamae enables Tori to strike at his opponent with the force of
his own bodyweight, and to move his feet with great speed in any direction.
The expression of the Kamae should be one anger (the element of fire).

66

Hiryu No Kamae (Flying Dragon Stance)


In this Kamae the attitude is one freedom, the elements of Air and Water both
play a part here since a Japanese dragon is master of both. With the freedom
of movement Tori not only moves his body and sword with elegant speed he
can also introduce the use of Tobi techniques as well. The expression of this
Kamae is one of Mushin. The importance of this Kamae is first defend, then
attack.
Chosui No Kamae (Clear Water Stance)
In this Kamae the attitude is one of swiftness. Move with the element of Water
in mind and the way it moves. Its adaptability towards other elements such as
Earth and Fire is one of first creating its path in the Earth (flowing defence),
then to extinguish the Fire (destroying its life force). The expression of this
Kamae should be one of gazing into the opponents eyes with the intent of
destroying him.
kasumigakure No Kamae (Hidden in the Mist Stance)
In this Kamae the attitude is one of mystery. The element in play here is Void,
the everything and nothing all in one. The position of the sword is paramount,
as it can deliver a small but extremely effective technique towards your
opponent if the Sun is behind him. The technique here is to use a metsubushi
(blinding) method by reflecting the Suns rays into Ukes eyes, thereby
temporarily blinding him for you to strike him down. Again, the expression
here is one of no emotion, especially as you move into position.
Muso No Kamae (Illusion in Thought Stance)
In this Kamae the attitude is one of total illusion. The Miyamoto Musashi
school of swordsmanship use this technique be it in a different position to
confuse their opponent as to the length of the blade Tori holds in his hands.
Striking from this position allows for horizontal and vertical movements. The
expression used here is one of calmness and no emotion.
Uranami No Kamae (Crashing Wave Stance)
In this Kamae the attitude is again one of swiftness. Given the position of the
sword which is somewhat hidden, it allows for swift movements in both
defence and attack in any direction. Footwork is important here! The
expression of the Kamae is one of Water reflecting loose emotion.
67

Roppo Kuji No Kamae. (Six ways to Infinite Stance)


In this Kamae the attitude is one of many ways. Given the position that Tori is
stood in, techniques can be executed in many different ways defensive and
offensive. In the traditional sense the Japanese looked at the six ways as being
Heaven, Earth, East, West, North and south! The expression of the Kamae is
one of Mushin.

Dato No Kamae (Striking stance)


In this Kamae the attitude is one of power and strength. The kamae may differ
from school to school, as in some they would brandish a Kodachi (short sword)
in their left hand whilst holding the Tachi (long sword) aloft within their right
hand. The element used in such a Kamae is that of Earth, be strong with power
and bodyweight behind each technique. The expression of this Kamae is one of
power and focus. Stare at your opponent with intent, exude the energy
overpowering strength towards him.

(3

RD

SAN KYU
Grade Student Green Belt 2 Gold Stars)

TAIHENJUTSU

Heiko Jutsu (Balancing Techniques)


As stated before in the 8th and 7th Kyu section of this book. A full explanation
will be given on Heiko Jutsu and further ways to improve your balance in the
Glossary of Techniques at the back of this book.
DAKENTAIJUTSU (Striking Techniques)
Tsuki (Upper Strikes)
Fudo Ken (Immovable Fist)
Ura Ken (Back Fist)
Shuto (Knife Edge Hand)
Boshi Ken (Thumb And Fore Finger)
68

Shuki Ken (Elbow Strike)


Tetsui Ken (Hammer Fist)
Shikan Ken (Extended Knuckle Strike)
Kikaku Ken ( Head Butt)
The Dakentaijutsu written above have already been covered in a previous
section of this book.
Keri (Lower Strikes)
Keri Kosshi Henka (Variation Of Instep Kick)
The Keri Kosshi Henka are ten variations of kicking with the instep of the foot.
1. Striking to the lower outside edge of Ukes left calve muscle with the instep
of the right foot.
2. Striking to the lower outside edge of Ukes right calve muscle with the
instep of the left foot.
3. Striking to the middle inside edge of Ukes left calve muscle with the instep
of the left foot.
4. Striking to the middle inside edge of Ukes right calve muscle with the instep
of the right foot.
5. Striking to the outside of Ukes left upper thigh with the instep of the right
foot.
6. Striking to the outside of Ukes right upper thigh with the instep of the left
foot.
7. Striking to the inside of Ukes right thigh (halfway between the groin and
the knee) with the instep of the right foot.
8. Striking to the inside of Ukes left thigh (halfway between the groin and the
knee) with the instep of the left foot.
9. Striking to the outside edge of Ukes left hip with the instep of the right
foot.
10. Striking to the outside edge of Ukes right hip with the instep of the left
foot.
When practicing these techniques try to mix them up a little.
Example: try techniques 1 and 8, or 4 and 10.
Work out a combination of your own and practice, practice, practice!
JUTAIJUTSU (Grappling Techniques)
Harai Goshi (Sweeping Hip)
Atemi Dori (Boshi To Throat, Slapping Back)
69

Taki Otoshi (Dragon Drop)


Shime Waza Kihon (Basic Choking Techniques)

Harai Goshi (Sweeping Hip)


1. Tori in Shizen or Hira
2. Uke steps in with the right foot and grabs Toris left lapel with his right
hand.
3. Tori responds by grabbing Ukes right sleeve under his triceps with his left
hand whilst cross stepping through with his right foot, twisting and placing
his right arm over Ukes shoulders
4. Tori then pushes his hips into Ukes pulling him forward and then sweeps
Ukes supporting right leg with his right leg throwing Uke to the floor.
Atemi Dori (Boshi To Throat, Slapping Back)
1. Tori stands in Shizen or Hira, Uke stands in Hidari Ichimonji.
2. Uke steps through with his right foot and strikes with a right Chudan Tsuki.
3. Tori shifts out and forward to the left raising his right hand up and under
Ukes striking arm. Tori then strikes Ukes throat with a right Boshi Ken
whilst slapping Ukes right shoulder on the back to topple him over.
Atemi Dori Henka
1. Follow steps 1 through 3, but when slapping Ukes shoulder on the back,
sweep Ukes supporting right leg from under him.

Taki Otoshi (Dragon Drop/ Waterfall Drop)


1. Uke steps in with a right hand to grab Toris left lapel.
2. Tori blocks this with Uke Nayashi whilst also blocking a left tsuki from Uke.
3. As Tori blocks Ukes tsuki he steps in and to the right slightly allowing Ukes
right arm to trail along his body whilst holding it lightly in place
4. Tori also slides his left hand down towards Ukes left hip placing it just
behind
5. Tori then places his right foot behind Ukes right foot, presses his hip up
against Ukes right hip, he lifts Uke sweeping Ukes legs back and then drops
him down.

70

SHIME WAZA KIHON (Basic Choking Techniques)


Hadaka Jime (Naked Strangle)
This technique can be done from a standing position or upon the floor.
NOTE: If the starting position is from a standing point its best executed if Tori
drags Uke backwards placing him off balance.
1. Tori performs this technique by standing behind Uke.
2. Toris right forearm slides over Ukes right shoulder and across Ukes throat
Toris palm facing down.
3. Tori then brings his left hand into play and clasps his right hand from
underneath whilst resting his left forearm over and on the back of Ukes left
shoulder.
4. Tori tightens the stranglehold by pulling back with his right forearm and
pressing his left forearm against Ukes left should and at the same time
pushing Ukes head forward with Toris own head whilst pulling Uke off
balance.
Hadaka Jime Ni (Naked Strangle Two)
This technique is similar to the first if done from a standing position. Both
position 1 and 2 are best done whilst on the floor.
NOTE: If done whilst on the floor its best that Tori wraps his legs around Ukes
midsection (or lower ribs) locking the ankles as he does so and squeeze.
1. Follow steps 1 and 2 in Hadaka Jime
2. This time Tori brings the whole of his left arm over Ukes left shoulder and
rests his right hand on top of his left bicep clasping his left gi sleeve.
3. Toris left arm is then brought up and behind resting Toris left hand on the
back of Ukes head.
4. Tori tightens the strangle hold by resting his head on his left hand and
pushes forward whilst pulling Uke backwards and off balance.
Hitori Kin Jime (Single Lapel Strangle)
As with the above techniques Hitori Kin Jime and Hitori Kin Jime Ni are again
best executed whilst on the floor remembering also to lock Uke down with a
crippling body crush to the midsection with the legs.

71

Hitori Kin Jime continued.


1. From behind Uke tori reaches over Ukes right shoulder with his right hand
and grabs Ukes gi on the left lapel clasping with the thumb tucked inside
Ukes gi.
2. Tori then brings his left hand up and under Ukes left arm and across to
grab Ukes right lapel lower down clasping with thumb tucked inside Ukes
gi.
3. Tori now pulls Ukes left lapel tightly into Ukes neck and rests his head
against Ukes for support whilst also pulling Ukes right lapel tighter with his
left hand. Choking Uke in the process.
Hitori Kin Jime NI (Single Lapel Strangle Two)
1. Tori follows step 1 and part of 2 from Hitori Kin Jime, but instead of
grabbing Ukes right lapel with his left hand Tori brings his left hand up
underneath Ukes left arm and then places it at the right side of the back of
Ukes neck.
2. Tori then pulls Ukes left lapel into his neck with his right hand and pushes
Ukes neck forward with his left hand whilst pulling Uke back off balance.

KUKISHINDEN RYU (Stick Fighting School)

Hanbo Suwari Gata Henka (Variation Of Floor Forms / Hanbo)

Naname Ushiro Omote Waki Uchi Hidari Migi


Naname Mae Ura Waki Uchi
Naname Mae Omote Waki Uchi
Mawashi Kote Uchi Omote
Mawashi Kote Uchi Ura
Kote Uchi Omote
Kote Uchi Ura
72

Kata Te Tsuki
All of the above are variations of the Hanbo Kihon found on pages 38-41.
Practiced well these eight techniques can be executed easily from a seated
position.
KENJUTSU (Sword Fighting)
These are just a few more Kamae, some are similar but these are actually more
basic than the previous ones from the Yon Kyu section.
Dai Jodan (Above Head Sword Pointing Back)
Hasso (To Side Of Head Pointing Up To Heaven)
Ichi (Hands Shoulder Height Sword Pointing Forwards)
Jodan (Hands Waist Height Sword Pointing At Opponents Eyes)
Chudan (Hands Waist Height Sword Pointing Forward)
Gedan (Hands Waist Height Sword Pointing At Opponents Feet)
Again as before these Kamae should be performed with Mushin showing no
emotion.
Kihon Happo Uchi (Eight Basic Cuts)
Kesa Kiri (Vertical Cut) Migi
Do Kiri (Horizontal Cut) Migi

and Hidari
and Hidari

Gyaku Kesa Kiri (Reverse Vertical Cut) Migi

and Hidari

Tento Kiri (Above the Head Cut)


Kiri Age (Rising Cut)
There you have the Kihon Happo Uchi which should be practiced regularly
along with the Kamae youve already learnt from Yon Kyu and as stated above
for San Kyu.

73

(2

ND

NI KYU
Grade Student Green Belt 3 Gold Stars)
TAIHENJUTSU
DAKENTAIJUTSU
KERI
Shiho Tobi Zenpo Keri (Four Way Leaps With Front Kick)
Shiho Tobi Ushiro Keri (Four Way Leaps With Back Kick)
TSUKI (Upper Strikes)
Shiho Tenchi Tobi Shuto (Four Way Leaps With Shuto)
Shiho Tenchi Tobi Shako (Four Way Leaps With Shako)
JUTAIJUTSU (Grappling Techniques)

Tomoe Nage (Stomach Throw/Coma Throw)


This is where Toris foot is placed either into the stomach or front of the hips of
Uke as he Drops down and back once he has hold of Uke.
1. As Uke attacks Tori by grabbing him with his left hand on his right lapel and
goes to strike Tori with a right Jodan tsuki.
2. Tori first blocks Ukes right tsuki with a left Uke Nagaeshi to Ukes right
forearm or elbow then grabs Uke with his right hand at Ukes right lapel
and under Ukes left arm at the gi with his right, as Tori steps back slightly
with his right foot.
3. Tori then shifts back with his left foot as he drops to the ground on his back
pulling Uke off balance
4. Tori then places his right foot into Ukes stomach, hips, or even Ukes groin
to throw him over and onto his back.
Tai Otoshi (Body Drop/Sacrifice Throw)
This is a very fast and effective technique if done correctly, there are many
variations to Tai Otoshi. In this section well just concentrate on the basic
variation of this movement.
74

Tai Otoshi continued.


1. Uke grabs Toris left lapel with his right hand.
2. Tori immediately responds by grabbing Uke with his left hand at his right
sleeve just under Ukes elbow, and Toris right hand grabs Ukes gi by his
left lapel.
3. Tori now steps left and back slightly pulling Uke off balance, Tori then
sweeps his right foot across placing it in front of Ukes leading right foot
and spins his left foot around anticlockwise (Tori is now facing away from
Uke), pulling uke at the same time to throw him to the ground.
Ashi Burai (Leg Sweep)
1. Uke grabs Tori with both hands at his lapels.
2. Tori pulls back and grabs one hand under Ukes sleeve under his elbow and
one hand at the opposite lapel.
3. Whichever foot Uke leads with is the foot Tori should sweep (the sweeping
point being just above the ankle).
4. If Ukes right foot is forward Tori sweeps with his left and vice versa.
5. It also helps if whichever foot Tori sweeps with Pull uke against the sweep
so he topples over easily.
Kumi Uchi (Ground Sparring)
1. In Kumi Uchi always remember that if your opponent is on top, your guard
should remain up in front of your face with your hands open.
2. With your hands open not only will it reduce injury to your hands and face,
but will aid in you being able to block oncoming strikes and grapples as
well as to allow you a chance of grappling back.
Koppo Jutsu (Use Of Grappling To Break Bones)
There are many techniques in Koppo Jutsu that enables Tori to grab twist
(lock), strike and break. When in practice it is Ukes responsibility to signal Tori
when certain techniques become uncomfortable. Kumi Uchi and Koppo Jutsu
techniques will be covered in greater detail in the Glossary of Techniques in the
back of this book.
Shime Kihon (Basic Strangle/Choke)
Shime Kihon have already been covered in the San Kyu section of this book.
Use the previous Shime as a refresher, but with the addition of Uke performing
a techniques of sorts before hand.
75

Shime Otoshi (Throw With Strangle)


Shime Kudaki (Lock With Strangle)
Shime Uchi (Strikes With Strangle On)
Eri Jime (Strangle With clothing)
Shime Otoshi, Shime Kudaki, Shime Uchi and Eri Jime should all be performed
in the style of Shinken Gata (real Fighting) as Tori should now be placed in a
situation whereupon Uke attacks without giving notice. In this case Uke should
note not to give 100% at first otherwise when Uke becomes Tori the other Uke
may not hold back either. It is always a question of trust amongst training
partners to help each other otherwise training becomes uncontrolled.
Again, all the above techniques will be covered in greater detail in the Glossary
of Techniques at the back of this book.
KENJUTSU (Sword Fighting)
Shinobi Ken (Ninja Sword) Techniques In Drawing The Sword Fast..
The drawing of a Japanese sword takes a lot of skill, its not as simple as just to
pull the sword from its sheath. In the Glossary of techniques the drawing of a
sword will be covered and its many variations too. The swords thatll be used
are as follow:
1. The Japanese Katana: Showing the different methods in distancing and grips
to the handle. The wonderful amount of techniques one can use at different
stages in their training of the sword, and so on.
2. The Shinobi Katana or Ninja To: A short yet effective blade used in general
by the Shinobi. The variations of deceptive technique used, and techniques
in hiding the blade.
3. The Tachi: The Japanese Long Sword. Methods on how to use this sword in
broad wide body movements and so on.
SHURIKEN JUTSU (Throwing Blades)
Uchi Waza (Throwing Techniques)
Look to the Glossary of Techniques for a full description on the many
throwing blades and how to throw them.

KUSARIFUNDO (Weighted Chain)


Kihon Waza (Basic Techniques)
Look to the Glossary of techniques to get the full spectrum of Kusarifundo
Kamae and so on.
76

ICHI KYU
(1 Grade Student Green Belt 4 Gold Stars)
st

TAIHENJUTSU
DAKENTAIJUTSU
KERI
Tobi Keri (Leaping Kick)
Tori can perform this by at first shifting back from Ukes attack, then leaping
forward kicking with either Sokuyaku (dancing foot) or Sokugyaku (toe fist)
striking with the tip of the toes to vulnerable areas of Ukes body.
Yoko Tobi Keri (Side Leaping Kick)
Tori avoiding Ukes attack can either use Yoko Tobi Keri whilst leaping away
or leaping in sideways after avoiding Ukes strike. Technically the use of
Sokuyaku is ideal for leaping in as you can use your bodyweight to crush your
target. One leaping out one would in general use Sokugyaku or a usual Yoko
Mawashi Keri to the softer areas of Ukes Body.
Ushiro Tobi Keri (Back Leaping Kick)
This does not mean to kick backwards as such. The actual technique and
variations would be to first avoid attack by shifting back then kick, or kick and
then shift back.
Tobi Mawashi Keri (Leaping Roundhouse Kick)
As with Ushiro Keri the movements here varied:
1. To leap and strike out with a Mawashi Keri.
2. First avoid Ukes attack by leaping back and wait for Ukes second attack
before striking with a Mawashi Keri.
3. Strike Uke with a Mawashi Keri then Leap away avoid any further attack.
Tobi Keri or Leaping Kicks are fully covered in the Glossary of Techniques at
the back of this book.

77

JUTAIJUTSU (Grappling Techniques)

Kihon Kumite (Basic Sparring)


Kihon Kumite between Tori and Uke should include such techniques as Omote
and Ura Gyaku, Musha and Muso Dori, Sanshin No Kata, Kihon Happo Gata,
Shime Waza and so on. All of the above starts at 50% power working up to
90% power just short of a real fight situation. It is important to note once
again that control of the above techniques be first and foremost as sloppy form
leads to injury.
At this stage of training Tori should at least be able to perform many different
variations of the above techniques.
Gyaku Taki Otoshi (Arm Lock Throw)
Gyaku Taki Otoshi similar to Taki Otoshi but with the addition of a lock.
Example:
1. As Uke grabs Toris left lapel with his right hand and attempts to follow
through with his left hand, Tori responds with a left hand grab (Omote
Gyaku style grip) to ukes right hand whilst stepping out left and slightly
forward with his left foot
2. Tori also palms down Ukes follow up attempt using his right hand against
Ukes left, then sliding it down to Ukes hip (as in Taki Otoshi) whilst
stretching out Ukes right arm still maintaining the lock.
3. Tori proceeds with the hip sweep and dropping of Uke, but still holds the
Omote lock.
4. Once Uke hits the ground on his back reverse the hold to Ura Gyaku which
will turn Uke onto his front. From here Tori can step over and maintain an
elbow lock by placing his left leg over Ukes right elbow and puts his weight
down on Ukes arm extending the lock.
Gyaku Nage (Wrist Lock Throw)
1. Uke steps through with his right foot throwing a right Jodan or Chudan
tsuki.
2. Tori steps out to the left blocking Uke Nayashi with his right at Ukes right
wrist, grabs and twists it and lifts Ukes arm up.
3. Tori then steps around placing the back of Ukes elbow over his left
shoulder, grabs Ukes right wrist with his left hand and locks off Ukes
elbow joint.
4. Tori now steps back with his right foot and twists his body whilst pulling on
Ukes extended arm, and throws him to the ground.
78

Eri Otoshi (Ogoshi With Neck)


1. Uke attacks by stepping in with his right foot and attempts to grab Toris
left lapel with his right hand.
2. Tori evades by shifting to his right slightly and blocks Ukes right hand with
a left Uke Nagaeshi.
3. Tori then shifts in and across with his right foot and grabs Uke with his left
hand at the sleeve (level to Ukes right bicep).
4. Tori shifts his right hip into Ukes right hip pocket whilst wrapping his right
arm up over and around the back of Ukes neck.
5. Tori then grabs Ukes neck with his left hand on the left side, braces, drops
his weight, pushes his hips back and throws Uke over his right shoulder.
Uchi Mata (Inner Thigh/Groin Throw)
1. As Uke grabs Toris left lapel with his right hand, Tori responds by grabbing
Ukes right sleeve below the elbow with his left hand.
2. Tori then steps in and across with his right foot, and places his right arm
over Ukes left shoulder grabbing his gi from behind Ukes neck.
3. Tori turns sharply to his left raising his right leg backwards between Ukes
legs to strike either Ukes left inner thigh or groin as he throws him over his
right shoulder.
Uchi Gake (Inner Thigh Hook Throw Landing On Top)
1. Both tori and Uke are in a grapple.
2. With ever one of Ukes legs are forward Tori will use his opposite leg to
hook Ukes leg forward putting Uke off balance so he falls backwards.
3. Tori may now use a variety of strikes to finish Uke off.
Ate Nage (Hit and Throw)
1. Uke grabs Toris right lapel with his left.
2. Tori immediately responds by grabbing Ukes left hand at the wrist with his
right and bends Ukes wrist up.
3. Tori now shifts his left foot across to his right as he bends slightly ducking
under Ukes left arm.
4. Tori strikes Boshiken or Fudoken to Ukes left Butsumetsu (floating ribs) as
he steps through bring Ukes arm over his head and swaps his grip from
right to left hand grip on Ukes wrist as he steps through and twists
clockwise.
5. Tori still with Ukes wrist in his left hand places his right hand on top of
Ukes now bent arm, kicks the back of Ukes left ankle dropping him to the
floor.
79

Kuruma Nage (Cartwheel Throw)


1. As Uke steps in to strike or grab with his right, Tori avoids by shifting
slightly right and then straight in to Uke.
2. Tori now cups both of his hands around Ukes neck and drops backwards
onto his left shoulder pulling Uke down with him.
3. Tori pulls on uke to roll him over him and at the same time Tori rolls
backward to land on top of Uke, then Tori strikes with two Fudoken to
Ukes face.
It is important to note that Tori should hold on to Uke throughout the above
technique, otherwise Uke may up and escape.

Metsubushi (Blinders)
Metsubushi has a wide range of tools that are used to perform certain
techniques. Nature also has its own methods in metsubushi enabling Shinobi
the advantage of escaping or other wise. Metsubushi will be covered in great
detail as to its use and how to create tools for use in blinding or covering the
enemy. Find out more on Metsubushi in the Glossary of Techniques at the back
of this book.
Reneshi (Skin Grabs)
Reneshi, an excellent addition to the arsenal of Budo Taijutsu Ninjutsu and a
great equalizer in any fight situation. For more details look at the Glossary of
Techniques. This is covered well with very painful close ups photographically.
Shinobi Iri (Stealth Methods)
Goton Po Jutsu (Hiding/Escaping, Using The Elements)
Shinobi Iri and Goton Po Jutsu are at most very important within the art of
Ninjutsu or any military force come to that. It takes a lot to learn field skills
and stealth tactics, in fact your looking at years of patience to acquire these
clandestine techniques, so hopefully this book will help you on that road to
your own personal goal.

80

SHINOBI KOBU JUTSU (Ninja Weaponry)


Katana (Sword)
Ninja To (Short Straight Sword)
Tanto (Knife)
Hanbo (3 Foot Staff)
Yari (Spear)
Yumi Jutsu (Archery)
Kama Jutsu (Sickle)
Jutte Jutsu (Half Sided Sai)

HENSO JUTSU (Impersonating & Disguise)





History of the Togakure Ryu Ninpo Taijutsu


Treatment Of Injuries
Presentation Of Literary Choice

81

Photo No.9
Takamatsu Toshitsugu. The 33rd Grandmaster of the
Togakure Ryu Ninpo Taijutsu.

Photo No.10
Takamatsu demonstrating a wristlock back in the days
Soke Masaaki Hatsumi would visit him to train.

82

Photo No.11
Soke Masaaki Hatsumi in Ichimonji No Kamae
(first receiving stance). This photo was taken
At the UK Tai Kai London back in 1987.
The subject: Kusari Fundo and Ninpo Taijutsu.

Photo No.12
An early photo of Soke Hatsumi and Takamatsu Toshitsugu using
Rokushaku Bo ( six foot staff).

83

Diagram No.31

KUJI-IN
(Nine Cutting Seals)
There are many books that cover the subject of meditation and I recommend
reading them all for study purposes!
The art of Kuji-In and Kuji-Kiri dont necessarily have to be a part of your Budo
Taijutsu training but Id like to think Youd want to learn it as a part of the
traditional Japanese spectrum.
The origins of Kuji-In came from the Hindu belief system which served as a way
for the Hindu monks to bring certain virtues in to their already mundane
existence. The original system of Kuji-In was not as we know it today!
Buddhism was born of Hinduism, and from that the Kuji-In became more
structured.
Kuji-Ins basis is to centre ones emotional engineering. Its purpose is to allow a
clear mind through changing ones view. A calmness if you will that directs
ones emotional status. Mudra (hand gestures) play an important part within
the Kuji-In. The Shinobi would use this method before a mission allowing
them to clear their minds of general crap. This would ensure the mission no
matter how insignificant would run smoothly.
The diagram above shows the nine seals one would perform to attain a level of
calmness. On the next page youll see both the mudra and mantra with a good
explanation as to what each one means.

84

RIN

Photo No.13
(r i )

Rin is the first seal of the nine mudra. It symbolises the Dokko-in, Vajra
(diamond thunderbolt) which brings about a union of opposites and the
transcendental power that breaks through all obstacles to enlightenment. The
meaning of it is to attend, open, or to call upon. Rin opens the gateway to the
higher self.
The mantra for Rin is this: ON BAI SHIRA MAN TO YA SOWAKA.
Translation: All hail the Vajra of glory and sacrifice.
Divinity: the God form called upon here is Bishamon-ten. He is the God of all
warriors, but is also revered as the giver of good fortune, prosperity and
wealth.
Features: Bishamon-ten holds a spear in his left hand and a pagoda in his right.
He is generally clad in armour. He is the most powerful God amongst the
guardians of the four directions, he is guardian of the North.

Photo No.14
PYO

(Direction of energy)

Pyo, Kyo, or Hyo is the second seal of the nine mudra. It symbolises the Dai
Kongo-in (the Great Diamond Thunderbolt). A gathering of energy, to
empower your intentions. The meaning of this is to be one with all around
85

you likened to a general who would gather his troops around him for greater
support. Shinobi never worked alone, they worked as a team always knowing
each others purpose was, they worked as one unit.
The mantra for Pyo is this: ON ISHA NAYA INTA RAYA SOWAKA.
Translation: All hail the instrument of divine righteousness.
Divinity: The God form called upon here is Gozanze Yasha / Gozanze Myo-o.
he is a guardian of the East. The one who overpowers. He carries the arrow of
mercy to shoot those who stray from the path of enlightenment.
Features: Gozanze Yasha / Myo-o, has three threatening faces; eight arms; the
enemy against foolishness and anger.

TO

Photo No.15
(Harmony with the universe)

To is the third seal of the nine mudra. It symbolises Sotojishi-in, sign of the
outer lion. The meaning of this seal is to be brave and strong, determined and
courageous like a soldier in battle holding no fear, yet to be in harmony with
your surroundings.
The mantra for To is this: ON JI RE TARA SHI ITARA JIBARATANO O
SOWAKA.
Translation: All hail the exultant and glorious celestial jewel.
Divinity: The god form called upon here is Jikoku Ten. He is the guardian of
the Nation, the protector of the World. He commands an army of celestial
musicians and vampire demons. He is also a guardian of the East.
Features: Clad in armour he holds a sword in his right hand with a closed left
fist resting on his left hip, behind his head is a ring of fire. He is able to
eliminate evil influences and suppress enemies.

86

SHA

Photo No.16
(i r)

Sha is the fourth seal of the nine mudra. It symbolises Uchijishi-in, sign of the
inner lion. The meaning of this seal is the healing of self and others. You are the
master of your own temple and combined with Sotojishi-in this seal empowers
your to control the health both physically and mentally of yours and others
around you.
The mantra for Sha is this: ON HAYA BAI SHIRA MATA YA SOWAKA.
Translation: All hail the swift thunderbolt of exulted strength, virtue and glory!
Divinity: The God form called upon here is Kongo Yasha Myo-o. He is the
guardian of the North, the destroyer of foolish human desires, he also
symbolises strength and has the power to remove impurities within the body.
He is also effective when dealing with demons within the body and
vanquishing enemies. He is also capable helping one gain the love and respect
from others.
Features: Bluish-black in colour Kongo Yasha has three faces and six arms
standing upon a lotus with his right leg raised. His central face has five eyes,
whilst the other two both have three. His three left hands hold a Vajra bell,
bow and wheel, and his three right hands hold a five pronged Vajra, arrow
and sword.

KAI

Photo No.17
(rii r)
r)

Kai is the fifth seal of the nine mudra. It symbolises Gebakuken-in, sign of the
87

outer bonds fist. The meaning of this seal is the all and everything, the
premonition of danger, the ability to know from the heart things that will
happen.
The mantra for Kai is this: ON NO O MAKU SANMANDA BASARADAN
KAN.
Translation: homage to all-pervading diamond thunderbolts. Utterly crush and
devour!
Divinity: The God form called upon here is Fudo Myo-o. He converts anger
into salvation and can bring health and wealth. He also has immovable faith
and seeks to threaten people into accepting the teachings of Buddha.
Features: Fudo Myo-o has a furious glaring face, his left eye is often closed and
his teeth bit upon his upper lip. Fudo has two fangs, one pointing upwards and
the other pointing downwards. He hold the kurikara (devils subduing sword)
in his right hand, which represents wisdom cutting through ignorance. He holds
a rope in his left hand so he might catch and bind demons and a third eye (the
all seeing eye). He is always pictured sitting or standing on a rock.

JIN

Photo No.18
(Knowing the thoughts of others)

Jin is the sixth seal of the nine mudra. It symbolises Naibakuken-in, sign of the
inner bonds fist. The meaning of this seal is to know the thoughts of others by
opening the mind. Like the God Agni, he carries messages to the other Gods
through the flames and smoke of a fire. Open your mind like the fluttering
flames, become the smoke allowing your mind to wander, listen to the
universe and youll soon hear the thoughts of others.
The mantra for Jin is this: ON AGANAYA IN MAYA SOWAKA.
Translation: All hail the glory of Agni God of the sacred fire!
88

Divinity: Katen / Agni, God of fire who carries messages, thoughts to the other
Gods.
Features: Depicted as an old man with a stern look upon his face.

RETSU

Photo No.19
(Mastery of space and time)

Retsu is the seventh seal of the nine mudra. It symbolises Chiken-in, sign of the
wisdom fist. The meaning of this seal is to split, rend, or tear open the fabric of
space and time. Have you ever noticed that for some a day can pass quickly,
yet for yourself that same day has slowed to a snail pace? Mastery of time can
be a valuable asset to the Shinobi especially when on a mission. Learn to
examine others and their actions, to feel their next movement, to know the lay
of the land. Once mastered youll always be one step ahead of everybody else.
The mantra for Retsu is this: ON HIRO TAKI SHANOGA JIBA TAI
SOWAKA.
Translation: All hail the radiant divine all-illuminating light bursting and
streaming forth in all directions!
Divinity: The God form called upon here is Komokuten. He is the king of the
West, Lord of limitless vision. He sees evil and eliminates the power. He has
the power to suppress enemies. He also encourages one to aspire to
enlightenment.
Features: Komokuten is often depicted holding a writing brush in the right
hand and a sutra in his left symbolic of the power to overcome ignorance, evil,
and all obstacles. He is clad in armour and a ring of flames rest behind his head.

89

ZAI

Photo No.20
(r
(r r)

Zai is seal number eight of the nine mudra. It symbolises Nichirin-in, sign of the
ring of the sun. the meaning of this seal is existence, survival, being one with
your surroundings. As the suns rays help to grow plants and trees, you must
nurture your senses and become one with nature and creation.
The mantra for Zai is this: ON CHI RI CHI IBA ROTAYA SOWAKA.
Translation: Glory to divine perfection!
Divinity: The God form called upon here is Daikokuten. He is a God of the
Earth, wealth and prosperity.
Features: Sometimes seen with a sack of magic, sometimes seen wearing a hood
or with a mallet in the right hand. A short stumpy and jolly God.

Photo No.21
ZEN
(Ei
(Ei)
Ei)
Zen is the final seal of the nine mudra. It symbolises Ongyo-in, sign of the
concealed form. The meaning of this seal is that which is in front of us all, the
path to enlightenment. Clear the mind and listen to your inner self. Youll be
amazed what you will learn if you practice this often. Know yourself before
you ask Who am I?
The mantra for Zen is this: ON A RA BA SHA NO SOWAKA.
Translation: All hail a ra pa ca na.
90

Divinity: The god form called upon here is Zochoten. He is the King of the
South and Lord of spiritual growth.
Features: Nearly always dressed in armour, looking ferocious and carrying
weapons such as a spear and a sword shown standing atop evil spirits symbolic
of the power he has to repel and defeat evil. Sometime Zochoten is depicted
with a halo of fire behind his head.
That covers the nine seals of the Kuji-in, but that is not the end?! The next step
is Kuji Kiri, or nine cuts.
KUJI KIRI

Diagram No.32
????
The first thing one should know about Kuji Kiri is that it differs from the actions
of Kuji-in. Kuji-in is a form of meditation where the practitioner performs
Mudra and Mantra combined to help centre themselves. Kuji Kiri on the other
hand is a form of magic. Its about connecting your will with the universe to the
point that it will create change in the world around you!
Kuji Kiri ( the nine symbolic cuts), is a method where one can turn his/her will
into reality. It can also be used to empower the method of Kuji-in, as a sort of
seal the deal type of thing.
91

Methods of Kuji Kiri


As stated before, Kuji Kiri can be used alongside Kuji-in to greatly increase its
power! What Id like to show you now is how to perform Kuji Kiri as a stand
alone method. Its sole purpose is to bring about changes in your life. Changes
that will help with almost all situations?! As a form of magic that anyone can
learn, youll find it fairly simple, but very effective and it can be performed
sitting or standing, drawn on your hands with a finger, or even written upon a
piece of paper in the form of a talisman to be carried with you wherever you
go.

Sword Mudra
Diagram No.33
Performing Kuji Kiri
Here is written a short version on how one performs Kuji Kiri. The first thing
you must do is to empower the tool youll be using throughout your spell
casting. For example:
 Hand
 Knife/tanto
 Sword/katana
The tool of your choice must be empowered to aid in the cutting or opening a
92

Gateway to the universal forces that will work for you and your desire.
Meditation and visualization is the key and here are a few steps to help you fill
your hand, knife or sword with a vibrant power.
The following will be performed with the sword mudra as it takes practice to
write kanji with a knife or sword.
Step One:
Whilst sitting or standing and with your right hand in the sword mudra, held at
chest height in front of you. Visualise a pulsating bright white light entering the
top of your head travelling down through your body to the soles of your feet.
With each in breath the white light begins to fill your body until it reaches your
right hand. Do this for at least two minutes, or until you start to feel your hand
vibrating.
Step Two:
Once your hand is full of energy, hold it out in front of you and visualise each
symbol that you write as brilliant white light piercing the fabric of the universe.
There are two ways the symbols can be written: Katakana or Kanji - , Either way is fine, as long as its written correctly.
Katakana for Power (Riyoku):
Kanji for power:
Katakana for hand (Te):
Kanji for hand:
Katakana for spirit energy (Se-I):
Kanji for spirit energy:
Speaking the words as you write each symbol: Riyoku / Te / Se-I.
Here they are in a larger Kanji:

Each symbol must be written one over the other and held there in your minds
eye for at least two minutes.
93

Step Three:
Whilst holding the images of the three symbols in front of you, imagine the first
begin to pulsate and its brilliant white light growing stronger as it is drawn
towards your third eye and then rest within you. Do the same again, but this
time draw the symbol towards your solar plexus and allow it to rest in your
abdominal area. Again do the same thing, but this time visualise the kanji
growing to a size where it envelopes your whole body and absorbs itself into
your whole being. Do the same with the other two symbols!
It is important when doing this that you slowly repeat the Japanese word per
each symbol you draw into you in you mind as a mantra.
First symbol Riyoku. Second symbol Te. Last symbol Se-I.
Step Four:
Meditate on the words you have just empowered. It is important that when
you meditate upon the word power, this does not mean to think or feel a state
of control. Rather it means to feel the power that swells all around us within
the universe. The same applies to hand, which doesnt mean its powerful grip
or force used in anger, think of the hand in what good it offers, its attention to
detail when touching things, the right hand of god etc! With the kanji of
spiritual energy, let your inner self speak for once and tell you what YOU need
to hear or feel!
Allow yourself to contemplate what feelings and thoughts you have towards
these words and the power each one holds. Allow yourself 15 minutes
minimum to dwell and meditate upon these words.
Practise the above three times a day in succession and meditate once each day
after each dwelling moment for the next nine days! After all of this you should
be ready for the next journey in Kuji Kiri.
The Next Step In Kuji Kiri
After the nine days of practise and meditation you should be just about ready
to step it up a little and begin your journey into the realm of Kuji Kiri.
Remember the section on empowering your sword mudra I spoke about
earlier?! Well! The next step is to empower your left hand in the same way.
This is important as the left hand (as shown in Diagram No.33), acts as a Saya
(sheath/scabbard) for your right hand, and it plays an important part within
the realm of ritualistic Kuji Kiri youll be learning.
Begin the process in step one as before and still write each symbol with your
94

Right hand. Concentrate on each of the symbols when they enter into you and
feel the vibrations from each one fill your body especially the hands. Because
of the practise youve already had empowering your right hand the left hand
should be fairly easy to empower at this point.
Your next step is to empower each of the nine Kuji-in Symbols. My suggestion
would be to charge three symbols the first day, six symbols the second day and
nine on the third day. You then have six more days to fully charge all nine
symbols! If this is to much for you to learn all in one go, then I would suggest
an eighteen day stretch?! Why not try the first three symbols for three days,
followed by six symbols days four to six, then nine symbols days seven to nine.
You then have the remaining nine days to fully charge or empower the Kuji-in
symbols. Example:
Day one, or days one to three.

RIN

PYO

TO

Day two, or days four to six.

SHA

KAI

JIN

Day three, or days seven to nine.

RETSU

ZAI

ZEN

Follow steps three and four on the previous page dwelling upon each of the
symbols above and their meanings.
Rin (strength f mind and body)
Pyo (direction of energy)
To (harmony with the universe)
Sha (healing of self and others)
Kai (premonition of danger)
Jin (knowing the thoughts of others)
Retsu (mastery of space and time)
Zai (control o the elements of nature)
Zen (enlightenment)
95

As you are meditating remember to examine each of the meanings. Example:


Rin: Strength of mind and body, could mean with the aid of your inner self
(spirit), your mind and body can combine as one with the universal forces at
work in your life giving you that extra strength mentally to carry on.
Why not write down how you feel towards each of the Kuji-in meanings as a
record for future study below.
Rin
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Pyo
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
To
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Sha
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Kai
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Jin
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Retsu
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Zai
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Zen
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
You could always use another piece of paper to write down your findings if
you have a great deal to say?!
All of the above are runs of a ladder that will eventually lead you towards a
higher level of the Kuji Kiri. Your path is almost at a pinnacle and it is with
hope that you work at this to the best of your ability. A subject like this is not
everyones slice of cake as it can be time consuming, especially in todays
society where time and patience rarely mix.
96

The Art Of Kuji Kiri


Having read through the previous pages and taken your time to learn and
understand how Kuji-in and Kuji Kiri basically work, lets step it up a bit and get
to know the higher level of the nine symbolic cuts and the magic behind it!
Kuji Kiri is a form of magic that helps you to focus on your objective and
strengthens your will so that whatever it is you desire can manifest not just in
the spiritual realm but in the physical world also.
Simple Steps In Manifesting Needs
As with most forms of magic it helps when you have the aid of a higher
power?! By this I mean working with a god form in mind such as Fudo Myo-o.
He will oversee your efforts and aid in you attaining what you so desire.
Now! Before we begin, it should be noted that the most important rule to
attaining your goal is a simple little thing called belief! Without belief all your
efforts and learning of the Kuji-in and Kuji Kiri will be for nothing. Here is a
simple saying that you should always keep in mind,To believe is to achieve.
You must want, you must feel, you must believe that whatever it is you desire
has manifested. Let the higher powers of the universe work for you and remain
positive in what you want to achieve in life. Trust in your god form, trust in
your self and also keep in mind that thinking positively you will eventually get
you what it is you are looking for!
Kuji Kiri Ritual
Step One:
Find a quiet place away from noise or disturbance of any kind. Whether sitting
or standing allow yourself five, ten, even fifteen minutes to dwell upon what it
is you want to achieve through the art of Kuji Kiri.
Step Two:
Create the To-in mudra with both of your hands held in front of your chest
and call upon the aid of Fudo Myo-o thus:
NO MAKU SAN MAN, DA BA SARA DAN, SEN DA MA, KA RO SHA
DA SOWA TA YA UN TARA, TA KAN MAN.
Repeat these words three times maintaining the image of Fudo Myo-o coming
to your aid in your mind throughout the mantra.
97

To-in Mudra
Diagram No.34
Step Three:
Pull the right hand out of the left and hold it there whilst you rest your left
hand down by your waist on the left side as though holding an actual
scabbard/saya.
Step Four:
Visualise a faint grid in front of you with four vertical lines and five horizontal
lines. Hold your sword mudra out in front of your chest and visualise drawing
a line of bright white light starting from left to right at the top horizontal line.
chant the mantra RIN as you do this. Now draw a line of bright white light
vertically from top to bottom whilst chanting the mantra PYO, and so on as in
Diagram No.32. The Kuji Kiri grid has now been empowered by your own will
so hold this image for as long as you can before moving onto the next step.
Step Five:
This is where the magic of Kuji Kiri really begins. Now the grid has been
empowered and its vibrating with energy let us move into the realm of
substantiating your desire. Youve drawn kanji symbols before, but not in the
way of being able to use them for safe travel, health, wealth, or happiness etc.
The list is endless!
Below are written some kanji symbols that represent some of the basic needs
one might require in his/her life and in case you are wondering? You dont
need to be able to speak Japanese fluently, or even know the correct order of
strokes one would use to write each symbol! You just need a bit of time to
understand and examine each symbol so you dont make any mistakes and end
up writing something that doesnt even match what you are aiming to attain.
Here are a few examples for you to start with and use to your advantage as
98

they are basic everyday needs for some.

Ken - Health: For general health and strength.

Fu - Wealth: Wealth in all things.

Kou - Happiness: Happiness in general.

Ai - Love: To Love, to be loved.

Hiro - Abundance: To have abundance in all things.

Yuu - Courage: To be in high spirit, bravery, heroic.

Jo - Forgive: To forgive, to tolerate.

Shin - Trust: To have faith in, truth.

Shuu - Master: To study, to have discipline in.

Wa - Harmony: To be a peace with all things, in harmony with.

Ketsu - Determination: In what you want, to step forward and win.

Ei - Wisdom: To know all, to share all in knowledge.

99

Following on from step four and with the combination of step five, you can
now choose one of the above kanji symbols you might find appropriate for

you needs. Lets say youve decided on Ei for wisdom?!


1. The grid is glowing brightly and vibrating with electricity.
2. You focus on the meaning of wisdom and what it can do for you.
3. As you begin to write the symbol for wisdom with your sword mudra chant
the mantra Ei a few times and imbue the symbol with the intention of
achieving such a state of mind.
4. Once the symbol is written pull your sword mudra back towards your chest
and hold it there whilst you visualise the kanji of wisdom swelling with
bright white light and growing stronger with every out breath. Allow
yourself to feel the power of this symbol as it pulsates.
5. Concentrate harder on what this symbol means to you and how much you
want its power, chant the mantra Ei a few more time and when ready,
thrust your sword mudra into it with intentional force and project the word
Ei loudly as you do so. With your intention and will the symbol you have
empowered will now enter into the spiritual realms where the universal
forces that manifest desire will work it wonder for you.
6. Return the sword mudra to in front of your chest ad bring into play your
left hand still in the saya mudra, slide the right hand into the left and raise
both to just above your forehead. Place your hands in Gassho (as though in
prayer and speak aloud the mantra: ON KI RI KI YA RA HA RA HA RA
FU TA RAN PA SO TSU SO WA KA. Do this three times as this disperses
the To-in (your spiritual sword and sheath.
7. Still keeping your hands in Gassho, chant the magic mantra; NA MU
HON, ZON WE KAI, MA RI SHI TEN, RAI RIN WE KAU, SONO KAU
SHU GO, SHIMETA MA HE. ON A JI CHIYA, YA HO RISHI, YA
SOWAKA.
8. To finish, bring your palms still in Gassho down towards your chest and
chant this mantra three times: OM NAMO BENZI.
9. Finally and to finish it completely, drop your hand to your sides and relax.
Dwell upon what you have just done and imagine the magic at work in
your life right now.
If you want this to work for you the best way possible, its a good idea to
strengthen the magic by performing it on a daily basis. I would suggest nine
days in a row if you have the time. If not! Why not try every two days for a
duration of nine days in total. For each time you perform the Kuji Kiri method
youll be increasing the power of your will to have your desire come about in
no time. It may take just a couple of days, a week, even a month! The secret is
to put as much positive energy behind you desire as you can and remain
positive throughout.
There are those times where you may have your doubts about whether your
desire will really happen, Dont! If you feel this way, just meditate and bring
100

that feeling of want back into your life. Everyone deserves something good in
life and you are one of them. Remember that?!

Another way of strengthening the magic is to put you desire to paper? Buy a
new pen, buy a new pad to write on. Perform the magic the way you would in
general but this time put power grid on paper and empower that. Itll be a
great talisman to carry about with you!
1. Empower the pen and paper the way you would you sword mudra by
holding the items in both hands.
2. When invoking the power kanji you want for whatever purpose your using
it for, write it over the power grid, fill it with energy and feel the vibrations
coming from it.
3. Make multiple talismans but be sure to keep each one empowered so the
manifestation of your desires will come about and help change your life.
The more you work with Kuji-in and Kuji Kiri the better youll become. As Ive
said before, Believe to achieve! see the positive in everything around you,
the people in your life, and so on.
It may seem as though this form of meditation and magic might be a long and
arduous journey and for some it might just be. But, for others and with
patience, the benefits are real and they continue to be!

101

Photos No. 22 - 27. Soke Masaaki Hatsumi performing a technique from the
Togakure Ryu Ninpo Taijutsu.
102

Photo No. 28
Soke Masaaki Hatsumi showing Shihan and students alike
A technique from the Kukishinden Ryu Daikomyosai
Back in 2007.

Photo No.29
Early footage photo of Soke in the Kukishinden Ryu Hanbo Jutsu
Video from the Bujinkan series. It is noted that Sokes Hanbo also had a hidden
blade and some of his techniques were devastatingly effective.

103

KYUSHO
Weak points/Vital points
The art of Kyusho is a method in which one could strike his/her opponent in
such a way that it would cause a great deal of pain and discomfort, or, at its
most dangerous, death! This is especially true within the circle of the older
Ryuha such as the Gyokko Ryu, Koto Ryu, Togakure Ryu and Shinden Fudo
Ryu etc!
Each Ryuha have their own versions of Kyusho written down, and although
the vital points are basically in the same areas the names and amount may vary
between each school.
The charts on the next two pages are from the Bujinkan Fudo Shin Ninjutsu
Dojo Minami Nishi. They may not look as though they are fully completed,
but thats the beauty of the different schools? You study to understand that
which works for you! There are hundreds of Kyusho points which a person will
learn in time. But for the kyu (or lower grade) student, the basics here
will be more than enough.

104

Diagram No.35
105

Diagram No.36
106

As your experience grows in the art of Budo Taijutsu more knowledge will be
given to you in the form of which technique works well with a given Kyusho.
Below is a closer inspection of the head and neck.

Diagram No.37
As you can see from Diagram No.37, the Kyusho points are few and fairly
basic, and easily understood! The Sain and Yuin are nerve points situated at the
base of the left and right cheek bones, the Asagagiri at the central point of the
front of the chin, Ryuu Fu pointing towards the Adams Apple, Uko the main
arteries of the neck and Ryumon situated in the depression central to both
clavicle.
On examination of the above chart in comparison to a traditional Kyusho
scroll, the above is accurate. A traditional Kyusho scroll on the other hand
might show these points in a different position. Not to say that the artist made
a mistake, it was simply done to confuse those that just did not understand.
A way of understanding the Kyusho and becoming more adept in its
effectiveness is to study the way of Dakentaijutsu in-depth! Ive already stated
the obvious above, which basically means the better you become at
Dakentaijutsu, the easier itll be to understand what technique works best with
certain Kyusho.
Dakentaijutsu has already been covered within the pages of this book, but for
a clearer understanding find out more in the glossary of techniques.

107

Glossary of
Techniques
In this section your journey in Budo Taijutsu will become a visual frenzy of
excitement and wanting more! I will do my very best to cover all the
techniques written in this book photographically, step by step, from rolls and
break falls, to weapons and much more! Enjoy!

Hidden Door School of Ninpo Taijutsu


The Togakure Ryu is better known for its low kamae stances. The use of
Shuko (hand claws/tiger claws), Shinodake (4ft breathing pipe) and Shuriken
(throwing stars). Togakure Ryu Ninpo Taijutsu is also a branch of Kosshijutsu.
Another Togakure Ryu weapon is tetsubishi with spiked ends, sometimes
thrown like shuriken.
Founder: Nishina Daisuke from around the late 12th century.
The main teachings of Togakure Ryu Are:
1. Violence is to be avoided, and Ninpo is Bujutsu.
2. Use the sword to be peaceful, and protect country, family, and nature.
The Togakure Ryu Ninja was required to master 18 forms of Bujutsu (martial
arts) as listed below:
Seishin teki kyoyo (spiritual refinement)
Tai jutsu (unarmed combat)
Kenjutsu (sword techniques)
Bo-jutsu (sticks and staff fighting)
Shuriken-jutsu (throwing blades)
Yari-jutsu (spear fighting)
Naginata-jutsu (halberd fighting)
Kusari-gama (chain and sickle weapon)
Kayaku-jutsu (fire and explosives)
Henso-jutsu (disguise and impersonation)
Shinobi-iri (stealth and entering methods)
Ba-jutsu (horsemanship)

Sui-ren (water training)


Bo-ryaku (strategy)
Cho ho (espionage)
Inton-jutsu (escape and concealment)
Ten-mon (meteorology)
Chi-mon (geography)

TOGAKURE RYU NINPO CONTINUED


Gotonpo (five ways of escaping) was the most secret of all the ninja arts. In the
Togakure Ryu there are twelve forms known as the Tonko No Jutsu which
have been handed down from Soke to Soke. The Gotonpos Tonko No Jutsu
is divided into Ura (inside) and Omote (outside). After this there is the Tenton
Juppo No Jutsu (ten ways of heavenly escape). These are as listed below:
Donton No Jutsu: Earth arts. Includes such concepts as using bushes or other
natural obstacles to hide, raising clouds of dirt, using sand or dirt to blind the
enemy (metsubushi), and related techniques.
Mokuton No Jutsu: Wood arts. Usually refers to the use of trees, climbing
trees, running up trees, or various rope techniques (Shoten-no-jutsu) used with
trees.
Suiton No Jutsu: Water arts. This could be concealment in a river or lake, or
using water for metsubushi.
Katon No Jutsu: Fire arts. Smokescreens, explosives, pepper bombs, and tactical
fires fall into this category. Using explosives to blind opponents (for instance,
the pepper bomb).
Kinton No Jutsu: Metal arts. Shurikenjutsu (the art of blade-throwing) is often
an important part of this, as it can be used to cover escape.
Jinton No Jutsu: Human arts.
Kinto (bird evasion).

Juton (wild animal evasion).


Chuton (bug evasion).
Gyoton (fish evasion).
Nitton No jutsu: Sun art.
Getton No Jutsu: