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Jennifer Gauthier (order #2768631)

Thank you for your purchase from


In the Hands of a Child
Your Premiere Lapbook Provider since 2002!!

A Little House in the Woods


HOCPP 1213
Published: December, 2007

Authors:
Katie Kubesh
Niki McNeil
Kimm Bellotto

For information about other products available from In the Hands of a Child
Call 1-866-426-3701 or visit our website at www.handsofachild.com.
Entire contents of this Project Pack 2007
In the Hands of a Child.
3271 Kerlikowske Road
Coloma, MI 49038
Permission is hereby granted to the individual purchaser to reproduce student materials in this
project pack for noncommercial individual or classroom use only. In the Hands of a Child gives
permission for one copy of all written material to be copied and or printed. Classroom teachers
have permission to reproduce one copy for each student in class. Members of co-ops or
workshops have permission to reproduce one copy for up to 10 children per unit. Reproducible
graphics may be reprinted as many times as needed. Permission is not granted for school wide or
system wide reproduction of materials.
Printed in the USA.
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Jennifer Gauthier (order #2768631)

Bringing Laughter and Learning Together


In the Hands of a Child
From the day we first began using and creating Project Packs we fell in love with
them. We knew that this type of hands-on learning experience was just the thing
that was needed to make boring unit studies not only educational but fun and
exciting too!
To help you get started with your Project Pack, we have included some of the
most frequently asked questions we receive about our Project Packs.
What is a Project Pack?
A Project Pack contains both the activities and the lesson plans or research
guide needed to complete the activities. Imagine your child not only learning
about the life cycle of a butterfly, but also creating a cocoon of his or her own.
Students dont just read the story, Blueberry Sal by Robert McCloskey- they
enjoy a blue day complete with a recipe for blueberry pancakes, making a
blue collage, and dont forget painting a blue picture!
Why is this a better way to learn? How does this help me?
Student learning improves when lessons incorporate hands-on projects or crafts.
Children learn by doing. Project Packs put learning into their hands! The
possibilities are endless when your student begins a lapbook with a Project Pack
from In the Hands of a Child. There are no age or skill limits and any topic or
subject can be worked into a Project Pack.
When you purchase a Project Pack from In the Hands of a Child, all the work is
done for you-the parent/teacher, but not for the student. In addition, Project
Packs are easy to store, are an instant review tool, scrapbook, and a ready-made
portfolio of all your students studies.
How do I make a Project Pack?
A Project Pack is simply a file folder refolded into a shutter-style book. Open a
file folder flat, fold each side into the middle and crease the fold neatly. There
you have it!
What supplies do I need?
You need file folders, paper in different colors and weights*, your students
favorite coloring tools, tape, glue, scissors, and a stapler.
*For a more colorful and appealing Project Pack, it is suggested you print some
of the reproducible graphics on colorful, multi-purpose paper. We recommend
24# weight or cardstock.

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Jennifer Gauthier (order #2768631)

I have a Project Pack, NOW what?


We hope you are delighted with your new purchase, wed like to share a few tips
with you that weve found beneficial to other customers.
Here is a brief introduction to our product layout.
Table of Contents

Guide

Core Concepts

Graphics

Folder Instructions

Sample Pictures

Each unit starts with a Table of Contents and is followed by a Research Guide.
The Research Guide contains all of the lessons needed to complete the activities
laid out in a chapter-like format. This format helps to build students listening,
reading, and comprehension skills. Included in the Research Guide is a
Bibliography, which also makes a great resource for finding information for any
rabbit trails you may choose to follow during your study. Related books and
websites are included in the Research Guide.
Next, you will find a list of core concepts to be covered during the study, each of
the concepts is represented by a graphic organizer or template. Each graphic
organizer or template helps students take bite-sized pieces of information
learned in the Research Guide and complete a hands-on activity to help retain
that information. If you implement graded assignments in your curriculum the list
of concepts will be essential for you, the parent/teacher, to know what to test the
student on. Under each concept you will find the folding instructions for each of
the graphic organizers or templates. Each one has a corresponding activity
number to make following along easy.
Reproducible graphics for the graphic organizers and templates follow. You may
want to make a copy of each graphic for each student completing the unit. An
instruction sheet for folding file folders and photos of sample lapbooks are
included in the back section of each Project Pack. If you and your students are
visual learners you will find the folder instructions and sample photos quite
helpful.
Project Packs from In the Hands of a Child make great stand-alone unit studies
or can easily be added as a supplement to an existing curriculum. When using as
a stand-alone product we recommend completing 2 - 3 activities per session (30
- 45 minutes). Start out by reading through 2 - 3 sections of the Research Guide
and then complete the corresponding hands-on activities. The hands-on
activities correlate to each section in the Research Guide.
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Jennifer Gauthier (order #2768631)

Vocabulary and Timeline activities do not have to be completed in one day.


Vocabulary words can be learned throughout the entire study. We recommend
that your student learn a few new vocabulary words each day or learn them as
they are written in the Research Guide (all words in bold are vocabulary words).
We also recommend Timeline activities be completed a little each day. Choose
the vocabulary words and time periods you are going to add to your vocabulary
books and timelines as you read them in the Research Guide.
If you are working with young children or a group of children, cut out all of the
graphics a day or two before beginning the lapbook and store them in a zip-top
bag. It is also helpful to have all materials organized before beginning. All of
our early childhood Project Packs include a full supplies list on one of the very
first pages!
Your students completed Project Pack does not have to look like the photo
featured at the end of the Pack. The photo is simply a reference to help you
understand the folds and the process of putting the file folder together. If you run
out of room or things do not fit, add another file folder or an extension! Allow
children to take an active role in designing the layout of their project so that it
becomes personal for them. The personalizing of their projects aids in the
reinforcement of the study.
Your students may choose to attach the various activities to their folders as each
one is completed or they may choose to wait until all activities are completed and
then attach them to the file folder. If you choose to do the latter, simply store the
activities in a zip-top bag, expandable file, or folder until you are ready to
assemble them in a file folder.
Should you have any questions as you go about your study please do not
hesitate to contact us, we are here to help you bring laughter and learning
together in the Hands of Your Child!!
Niki, Kimm, and Katie
www.HandsofaChild.com
Niki can be reached at Niki@HandsofaChild.com or 1-866-HANDS-01
Kimm can be reached at Kimm@HandsofaChild.com
Katie can be reached at Katie@HandsofaChild.com

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Jennifer Gauthier (order #2768631)

Adapting a Project Pack to Fit the Needs of Your Student


Adapting a Project or Research Pack is key to ensuring that you provide the best
lesson for your student. At first glance, some might just skip over an activity
because they feel it is too easy or too difficult for their student. We want you to
use all the activities we providethey are easily adaptable!
For example, if you have a PK-3 student the vocabulary activities might be
difficult for him or her to complete. Here are some tips to help you adapt the
activities that require your student to write:
1. Have your student dictate vocabulary words and their meanings as you
write them.
2. Have your child draw a picture instead of writing.
3. You write the word or sentence first so your student can see how it is
written (many of our Project Packs also include activities with dotted lines
for easy copy work).
4. Practice. Practice. Practice. In the car, on a walk, in the shopping cart!
Practice saying the vocabulary words and what they mean. Before you
know it your preschooler will be telling others what those words mean!
5. Contact us. We would be happy to give you ideas for adapting specific
units to a grade level.
On the other hand, some of the activities may seem too easy for your student.
Does your 5th grade level student want to learn about butterflies, but the Project
Pack seems too easy? Try it anyway; just change things up a bit to suit your
students grade level and skill. Here are some tips to help you adapt the
activities to make them a little more difficult:
1. In addition to writing down vocabulary words and their meanings, ask your
student to use the word in a sentence; either verbally or written.
2. Give your student one hour (or reasonable time frame) to research the
topic on his or her own either online or at the library. Give your student a
set of questions and see what he or she can find without your guidance.
3. Encourage your student to expand on the topic or choose a related
subject to learn about.
4. Take a look at some of our preschool unitsthere is a lot of clipart related
to each topic included. Have an older student cut these out and write a
story or play about the pictures.
5. Contact us. We would be happy to give you ideas for adapting specific
units to a grade level.
These are just few ways you can adapt a Project Pack to meet the needs of your
student. Let your student be the judge if something is too easy or too
difficultyou just might be surprised!

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Jennifer Gauthier (order #2768631)

The Website links we have included in our guides are references we found that
contain relevant information. However, the sites are not owned or maintained by
In the Hands of a Child. The content may have changed or become a dead
link. If you find the site contains inappropriate material or is no longer a relevant
site, please let us know. Thank you.

Educator Notes:_____________________________________
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Jennifer Gauthier (order #2768631)

Table of Contents
Planning Guide
Related Reading
Bibliography
Activity Instructions
Folder Instructions
Sample Picture
Research Guide
Laura Ingalls Wilder
Garth Williams
Characters
Setting
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
Chapter 7
Chapter 8
Chapter 9
Chapter 10
Chapter 11
Chapter 12
Chapter 13
Additional Questions
Vocabulary
Wisconsin
Animals of the Big Woods
Corn Husk Dolls
Vocabulary
Reproducibles
Answer Key

Page 9
Page 12
Page 13
Page 14
Page 20
Page 21
Page 23
Page 23
Page 24
Page 24
Page 25
Page 25
Page 26
Page 26
Page 27
Page 27
Page 27
Page 28
Page 29
Page 29
Page 29
Page 30
Page 31
Page 31
Page 32
Page 33
Page 35
Page 35
Page 39
Page 33
Page 40
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Jennifer Gauthier (order #2768631)

Vocabulary
Words

Book and Guide


Reading

Author &
Illustrator
(1-2 Days)

A Little House in the Big


Woods
Laura Ingalls Wilder
Garth Williams

Setting &
Characters
(1 Day)

Characters
Setting

Chapter 1
(2-3 days)

bank, brindle,
brine, chopping
block,
cracklings, head
cheese, lard,
pot liquor,
trundle bed

Chapter 2
(1-2 Days)

butter pat,
churning,
enormous, Jack
Frost, kerosene,
patty pan, trap
lines

Chapter 3
(1-2 Days)

briar, hearth,
ramrod, ravine,
thrashing

Complete

Continue
Activities

Activities

2 Laura Ingalls Wilder


3 Illustrating the Little
House

4 The Ingalls Family


5 Story Setting

Chapter 1
Chapter 1 Summary

7 Where Is the Little


House?
8 Butchering Time
9 Describing Lauras
House
10 My House and Lauras
House

1 - Vocabulary

Chapter 2
Chapter 2 Summary
*Making Butter

11 Helping With Chores


12 Entertaining the Girls
Make and Color Your Own
Butter p. 12 of Guide

1 - Vocabulary

Chapter 3
Chapter 3 Summary
Corn Husk Dolls

13 Making Bullets
14 The Voice in the Woods
Activity C What is a Corn
Husk Doll?
Optional Make a Corn
Husk Doll

1 - Vocabulary

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Jennifer Gauthier (order #2768631)

Chapter 4 flatiron, gaiters,


pokeberries,
(1-2 Days)
whittle

Chapter 4
Chapter 4 Summary

15 Christmas Dinner
16 Comparing Christmas

1 - Vocabulary

Chapter 5
(1-2 Days)

sampler, tan

Chapter 5
Chapter 5 Summary
Wisconsin Additional Topics

17 What to Do on Sunday?
Wisconsin Activity 1 Where
is Wisconsin?

1 - Vocabulary

Chapter 6
(2-3 Days)

lantern,
powder and
shot

Chapter 6
Chapter 6 Summary
Animals of the Big Woods
Additional Topics

18 Animals of the Big


Woods
Animals of the Big Woods
Activity 1: Mini Report

1 - Vocabulary

Chapter 7
(1-2 Days)

basque,
delaine,
trough

Chapter 7
Chapter 7 Summary
Wisconsin Additional Topics
*Hasty Pudding

19 Maple Syrup Timeline


Wisconsin Activity 2: Major
Industries
Make Hasty Pudding p. 15
of Guide

1 - Vocabulary

Chapter 8
Chapter 8 Summary

20 Descriptive Paragraph
Activity D Snow Candy

1 - Vocabulary

Chapter 9
Chapter 9 Summary
Wisconsin Additional Topics

21 Word Paintings
22 Going to the Store
Wisconsin Activity 3 Rivers
and Lakes

1 - Vocabulary

Chapter 8 corset, hewed,


jig
(1-2 Days)

Chapter 9
(1-2 Days)

calico, curry,
galluses

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grubbing hoe,
rennet,
whetstone,
whey

Chapter 10
Chapter 10 Summary

23 Green Cheese
24 Getting Honey

1 - Vocabulary

Chapter
cradles, shock
11
of feed
(1-2 Days)

Chapter 11
Chapter 11 Summary

25 Treating Charleys Stings

1 Vocabulary

26 Autumn is Great Fun


Wisconsin Activity 4 How
Big Is It?
Make Johnny-cake p. 17 of
Guide

1 Vocabulary

27 The Deer Lick


Closing Activity

1 Vocabulary

Chapter
10
(1-2 Days)

Chapter
12
(1-2 Days)

Johnny-cake

Chapter 12
Chapter 12 Summary
Wisconsin Additional Topics
*Johnny-cake

Chapter
13
(2-3 Days)

chinked, deer
lick

Chapter 13
Chapter 13 Summary

Have student complete vocabulary words slotted for each day from activity 1, then
read the sections of the guide slotted for the day and any extra books you have on
the topic. Finish up each day by having them complete the activities scheduled for
that day.
NOTE: Items marked with a * are in text-boxed areas in the guide.
NOTE: As each family and/or student may move through the book at a different
pace, the planner is broken up into chapters rather than days. Feel free to move
through each chapter as slowly or quickly as your students need to. Each chapter
day may be completed in one or more days. A suggested number of days is
given for each chapter or section.

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Related Books and Websites


From In the Hands of a Child
Pioneers HOCPP 1023
Owls HOCPP 1050
Bees HOCPP 1127
Pigs HOCPP 1125
Forest Habitats HOCPP 1099
Plain Tall Sarah HOCPP 1142
Deer HOCPP 1209
State by State HOCPP 1210
More Books by Laura Ingalls Wilder
A Little House Christmas Treasury
A Little House Traveler
Farmer Boy, 1933
The First Four Years
Little House on the Prairie, 1935
On the Banks of Plum Creek, 1937
On the Way Home
By the Shores of Silver Lake, 1939
The Long Winter, 1940
Little Town on the Prairie, 1941
These Happy Golden Years, 1943
West From Home
Other Pioneer Stories
Across the Rolling River by Celia Wilkins
Addie Across the Prairie by Laurie Lawlor
A Tribute to Laura Ingalls Wilder by Frances Flanagan
Authenticity of the Historical Background of the Little House Books by Bernice
Cooper
The Bears of Blue River by Charles Major
Black-Eyed Susan by Jennifer Armstrong
Caddie Woodlawn by Carol Ryrie Brink
It is Better Farther On by William T. Anderson
Lauras Album by William Anderson
Laura Ingalls Wilder and Rose Wilder Land: The Chemistry of Collaboration by
Rosa Ann Moore
The Laura Ingalls Wilder Songbook by Eugenia Garson and Herbert Haufrecht,
Eds.
The Little House Guidebook by William Anderson
Meet Kirsten: An American Girl by Janet Shaw
My Little House Craft Book by Carolyn Strom Collins
Little Town at the Crossroads: Little House Series: The Caroline Years by Maria
D. Wilkes

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Old Town in the Green Groves: Laura Ingalls Wilders Lost Little House Years by
Cynthia Rylant
Pioneer Girl: The Story of Laura Ingalls Wilder by William Anderson
Sarah, Plain and Tall by Patricia MacLachlan
Sign of the Beaver by Elizabeth George Speare
Skylark by Patricia MacLachlan
West From Home: Letters of Laura Ingalls Wilder, San Francisco 1915 by Laura
Ingalls Wilder
Young Pioneers by Rose Wilder
http://www.easyfunschool.com/article1497.html
http://jas.familyfun.go.com/arts-and-crafts?page=CraftDisplay&craftid=10747

Bibliography
Walker, Barbara M. The Little House Cookbook: Frontier Foods from Laura
Ingalls Wilders Classic Stories. New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 1979.
Wilder, Laura Ingalls. Little House in the Big Woods. New York: Harper & Row
Publishers, 1953.
http://www.ricochet-jeunes.org/eng/biblio/illus/williams.html
http://www.wisconsin.gov/state/core/wisconsin_facts.html
http://www.everythingwolf.com/facts.aspx
http://www.abf90.dial.pipex.com/bco/fact2.htm
http://www.dnr.state.wi.us/org/caer/ce/eek/critter/mammal/fawn.htm
http://www.littlehousebooks.com/

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Activities and Instructions


Vocabulary
1. As you go through the story and this unit learn a few new vocabulary
words each day. It is NOT necessary to learn every word included in this
unit. Pick and choose the words you feel need to be learned.
Fold Instructions: Shaped Pocket Book Fold back tabs on pocket and glue
to back of front cover. Allow glue to dry. Print out as many sets of cards as
needed. Cut cards apart. Write one word and definition per each side of the
cards. Store cards in pocket.

Author and Illustrator


2. Write a brief biography of Laura Ingalls Wilder.
Fold Instructions: Shape Book Choose the lined pages best suited to the
childs ability. Stack pages (use as many as you need) and staple at top edge.
3. Garth Williams illustrated the Little House in the Big Woods as well as
many other childrens books. Choose your favorite scene from Little
House in the Big Woods, briefly describe it, and then illustrate it.
Fold Instructions: Mini Book -- Choose the lined pages best suited to the
childs ability. Stack the pages inside the cover. The cover is the set with the
blank pages. Fold in half and staple along left edge. Write your scene
description on the lined pages and draw the illustrations on the blank pages.

Characters
4. Name the five people in the Ingalls family. As you become familiar with
each character while reading the book, give a brief description of each
one.
Fold Instructions: Side Flap Book Cut on dotted lines to create five flaps.
Fold flaps over. Write one family members name per flap. Open flap and write
description beneath. Remember that you can use the back side of the flap too!

Setting
5. What is the setting of the story?
Fold Instructions: Matchbook Fold large sections in half then fold small
section up to close like a matchbook. Write answer inside.
6. Although there is not much of an established plot to this book there are
many different themes that can be found running through it. A theme is a
particular idea that the writer wants to get across to his or her readers.
List at least three different themes that you find as you read the book and
tell which chapters these themes run through.
Fold Instructions: Trifold Book Fold book in thirds. Write one theme per
sections. Remember to include the chapters each theme can be found in.

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Chapter 1
7. In what state is the little house in the Big Woods? Find it on the map
provided.
Fold Instructions: Map No folding necessary; simply mount in lapbook.
8. What things did each family member do to help during Butchering Time?
Fold Instructions: Shutter Book Fold both sides in so they meet in the middle
like shutters. Open shutters and list the different tasks each person did.
9. In Chapter 1, the inside of the log cabin and the yard are described. Write
a description of each in your own words using at least 5 adjectives in each
description. (An adjective is a word that describes nouns and pronouns.
For example: Upstairs there was a large attic)
Fold Instructions: Double Flap Book Cut on dotted line to create two flaps.
Fold flaps down and attach cover labels. Open flaps and give the descriptions.
10. Compare Lauras house to your own house. How are the two different
and alike?
Fold Instructions: Venn Book Fold in half and cut top layer only on dotted
line. Lift each flap. Write things unique about yours and Lauras houses under
the corresponding flap. List things common to both under the center flap.

Chapter 2
11. List the work that belonged to each day of the week for Ma and the girls.
List one chore for each day of the week that you could do to help your
family.
Fold Instructions: Multi-Flap Book Cut on dotted lines and fold all flaps over
the center boxes marked with the days of the week. Open flaps and list Mas
chores on the left flaps and list the chores you could do on the right flaps.
Decorate the outside of each flap with drawings, clipart or stickers.
12. Name three things Pa did to entertain the girls in the evening?
Fold Instructions: Circle Book Cut on dotted line. Fold one section behind
the other until it looks like a single wedge. List one activity per section.

Chapter 3
13. List the steps Pa took to make bullets.
Fold Instructions: Fan Book Stack pages with cover on top and fasten
with a brad where indicated on cover. List the steps on the fan pages.
14. In the story Pa and the Voice in the Woods, what was Pa
supposed to do, what did he do instead, and what lesson did he
learn?
Fold Instructions: Layer Book Stack pages beginning with longest
on bottom up to shortest on top as shown in the illustration to the right.
Staple layers at top corners. Answer the prompts on each page.
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Chapter 4
15. Thinking about the foods that Ma put up for the winter and the things that
Laura mentions, design a complete menu for the Ingalls Christmas Day
dinner. What might Ma have prepared for the main course? What about
side dishes?
Fold Instructions: Menu Shutter Fill in the boxes according to the prompts.
Fold both side in to meet in the middle and close like shutters. Design a cover
for your menu.
16. Compare the Christmas that Laura Ingalls Wilder describes to your own
family Christmas.
Fold Instructions: Three Flap Book Cut on dotted lines to create three flaps.
Fold flaps to the right and label the covers as follows: Lauras Christmas, Both,
My Christmas. List things unique to each under their flaps and things common to
both under the center flap.

Chapter 5
17. List some of the activities the girls could and could not do on Sundays.
Fold Instructions: Concept Book Cut on dotted line to create two flaps. Fold
flaps up. Label one cover Could and the other cover Couldnt. List the coulds
and couldnts under their corresponding flaps.

Chapter 6
18. Bears were commonly found in the Big Woods and Pa trapped smaller
game for furs to trade. What other types of animals could be found in the
Big Woods? List and briefly describe four woodland animals.
Fold Instructions: Flip Flap Book Fold side flaps inward then fold cover flap
down. Write about one animal per block.

Chapter 7
19. Create a timeline of the steps that Grandpa took to get the maple syrup.
Fold Instructions: Timeline Strip Pocket Fold back tabs on pocket and glue
to folder. DO NOT cut apart the strips. Fold them accordion style; one page
forward, one page back and so on. Add more pages by attaching another strip
sheet to the tab at the end. Write the steps on the strips. Store folded strips in
pocket.

Chapter 8
20. Write a descriptive paragraph. Use at least five strong adjectives to
describe one of these topics: Grandma and Grandpas house, the ladies
dresses, or the dance.
Fold Instructions: Pocket Report Fold back the tabs on the pocket and glue
to lapbook. Choose the writing paper best suited to individual abilities. Write
your paragraph then fold it and store it in the pocket.

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Chapter 9
21. Imagery is when a writer uses words to create an imaginary picture. We
know that Laura had brown hair and Mary had blonde hair, but Laura
Ingalls Wilder used imagery to help the reader imagine each girls hair.
Marys hair was beautifully golden, but Lauras was only a dirt-colored
brown. Give 5 examples of how the author used imagery to create an
imaginary painting of the town for the reader.
Fold Instructions: Accordion Book Keeping cover on top, fold one page
back, one page forward and so on. Attach a second set of pages by gluing to tab
at bottom of first set. Use on page per example.
22. What kind of items did Pa and Ma purchase in the store? (Note: Galluses
are suspenders).
Fold Instructions: Fold-n-Lock Book Follow the illustrated instructions
included with this activity to complete the fold. Inside, list the items Ma and Pa
bought.

Chapter 10
23. What is meant by the word green when used the way Ma did when she
referred to the cheese?
Fold Instructions: Shaped Card Close like a greeting card. Write answer
inside.
24. How did Pa get honey?
Fold Instructions: Shaped Card Close like a greeting card. Write answer
inside.

Chapter 11
25. Charley was stung by yellow jackets. What remedies did Ma and Aunt
Polly use to treat the stings and the fever?
Fold Instructions: Shaped Trifold Fold book in thirds. Inside, describe the
treatments and remedies that were used.

Chapter 12
26. Autumn was great fun. There was so much work to do, so many good
things to eat What were some of the things that had to be done to
prepare for winter? What were some of the good foods that were eaten?
Fold Instructions: Split Matchbook Fold large sections in half. Cut top layer
on dotted line. Fold narrow section up to close like a matchbook. Inside, answer
the prompts on each cover.

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Chapter 13
27. What is a deer lick and how did Pa make one?
Fold Instructions: Fold Instructions: Double Flap Book Cut on dotted line to
create two flaps. Fold flaps down to close. Open flaps and answer cover
prompts inside.

Bonus Activities
Wisconsin
Activity A
1. Where is Wisconsin located in the United States? What other states
share its borders?
Fold Instructions: Map No folding required; simply mount to lapbook. Color
and label Wisconsin and its neighboring states.
2. What are the major industries of Wisconsin?
Fold Instructions: Mini Accordion Keeping cover on top, fold one page back,
one page forward and so on. Write one industry per page.
3. List major rivers and lakes of the state.
Fold Instructions: Mini Bowtie Book Fold in half to close like a greeting card.
List each answer under its prompt. Label your cover Major Lakes and Rivers.
4. How much land does Wisconsin cover?
Fold Instructions: Mini Card Book Fold in half like a greeting card. Write
answer inside.
Animals of the Big Woods
Activity B
1. Write a mini report on an animal found in the Big Woods.
Fold Instructions: Mini Book Stack pages with cover on top and fasten with
brads, yarn or ribbon where indicated. Choose the pages that are best suited to
the childs writing ability.

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Corn Husk Dolls


Activity C
1. What is a corn husk doll and how did the craft begin?
Fold Instructions: Pop up Book Follow the illustrated instructions included
with this activity to complete the fold. Write answer inside.
Snow Candy
Activity D
Make Snow Candy
Ingredients:
1 cup molasses
1 cup brown sugar
Fresh, clean snow or crushed ice
Directions:
Boil the molasses and sugar together in a large pot until the mixture
reaches the hard crack stage on a candy thermometer or a
spoonful of cold water forms a hard ball and cracks when dropped
into the mixture.
Remove from heat.
Scoop fresh, clean snow or crushed ice into a shallow pan.
Dribble one spoonful of syrup in circles, curlicues, and squiggledy
things like Mary and Laura did.
The syrup will harden and become candy.
Lift candy off the snow and place on wax paper to dry.

Optional Closing Activities


To be done on your own notebook paper and stored in the large storage pocket
that has been provided.
Write a letter to future children to tell them what life is like now.
Choose a scene from the book and rewrite it as a short play. Act the
play out.
Fold Instructions: Large Storage Pocket Fold tabs back and glue to back of
lapbook. Store your optional activities in the pocket.

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Creating a Lapbook Base


Basic Lapbook Base
Open a file folder and lay it flat.
Fold both right and left edges toward the center so they meet and close like a pair of
shutters.
Crease firmly.

Base with Single or Double Extensions


Complete the basic lapbook base.
Open base and lay flat.
Cut another folder in half or use a sheet of cardstock for the extension.
Lay the extension in the center of folder at either the top or bottom. (You may add
two extensions if need be; one at the top and one at the bottom).
Attach to base with clear packing tape.
Single Extension

Double Extension

Double Folder Base


Make two base folders.
Open them and lay them side by side with outer
flaps pointing straight up, not flat.
Where the two flaps meet glue them together.
Fold center flap to one side, fold both shutters in
and close folders like a book.

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A Little House in the Woods


Based on the story Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder
Once upon a time, sixty years ago, a little girl lived in the Big Woods of
Wisconsin, in a little gray house made of logs. The story, Little House in the Big
Woods written by Laura Ingalls Wilder, longer than 60
years ago now, is the story about the Ingalls family
who lived in the mid to late 1800s. The reader sees
what life was like in the Big Woods through the eyes
of the main character (and author) Laura Ingalls and
through her memories of her fathers stories.
The Ingalls family struggles to survive harsh winter
weather and wild animals roaming right outside their
door, but they continue their adventure with love and
devotion to each other. Little House in the Big Woods is the first in the series of
Little House Books written by Mrs. Wilder and the entire series is based on her
actual life.
Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder
New York: Harper and Row Publishers, 1953.
Grades: 3-5

Laura Ingalls Wilder


Laura Elizabeth Ingalls was born February 7, 1867 in a log cabin near Pepin,
Wisconsin. Her parents, Charles and Caroline, moved the family to Missouri
when Laura was three years old. Laura spent her childhood as a pioneer - her
family moved several times across the Midwest and the Great Plains. They
traveled by covered wagon through Kansas, Minnesota, Iowa, and the Dakota
Territory.
When Laura was 15 years old, she earned her teaching certificate and was hired
as a teacher. It was then that Laura met Almanzo Wilder, a local farmer. In
1885, Laura and Almanzo married. In 1886, their daughter, Rose, was born. In
their later years, the Wilders lived at Rocky Ridge Farm, in Mansfield, Missouri
and Laura began writing articles for area magazines. She wrote her
autobiography titled Pioneer Girl, in 1930.
Laura Ingalls Wilder began writing her Little House series of books in 1932 when
she was 65 years old. She began writing to preserve the tales of early American
history and the pioneer period, as well as the stories of her childhood and what it
was like growing up in the 1870s and 1880s. Children all over the world know
and love her books. Laura died on February 10, 1957 at the age of 90.

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Garth Williams
Garth Williams illustrated the Little House series books. Born in New York in
1912, Williams was the son of a well-known magazine illustrator and an artist.
When Garth was 10 years old his family moved to the United Kingdom, where he
eventually studied architecture. Next, Williams began studying sculpture and
painting and was the headmaster of Luton Art School.
Garth Williams moved back to the United States where he began illustrating for
The New Yorker, a popular magazine. When asked to illustrate the childrens
book Stuart Little by E.B. White, Garth Williams found a new career as a full-time
childrens book illustrator. He illustrated books for Margaret Wise Brown, Russell
Hoban, Randall Jarell, Laura Ingalls Wilder, and many other successful authors.
Garth Williams also wrote seven childrens books. Garth Williams died in 1996 in
Mexico.
Some of his work include:
Stuart Little by E.B. White
Charlottes Web by E.B. White
On the Banks of Plumb Creek by Laura Ingalls Wilder
Little House on the Prairie by Laura Ingalls Wilder
Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder
Farmer Boy by Laura Ingalls Wilder
The Long Winter by Laura Ingalls Wilder
Cricket in Times Square by George Selden
The Rescuers by Margery Sharp
Mister Dog by Margaret Wise Brown

Characters

Laura: Laura is the main character of the story. She is an active young
girl and admires her father very much. She has a beloved rag doll named
Charlotte and she is sometimes jealous of her big sister.
Pa: Lauras Pa is Charles Ingalls. He is a hardworking, fun, and devoted
husband and father. He liked to roughhouse with his daughters, play the
fiddle, joke, and tell stories. Charles sets traps, hunts, butchers, plants,
and trades furs to support his family.
Ma: Lauras Ma is Caroline Ingalls. Laura described her as a slender
woman who liked pretty things. She expected her daughters to do their
chores and taught them to act like ladies.
Mary: Mary is Lauras older sister. She is polite, obedient, and neat.
Laura describes her as a pretty blonde.
Baby Carrie: Baby Carrie is the youngest in the Ingalls family.
Jack: Jack is the family dog

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Setting
The story, Little House in the Big Woods,
is set in the big woods of Wisconsin. It is
an isolated place in the early 1870s and
not very populated. Some of the people
who live nearby are farmers or
woodsmen. To live in the Big Woods,
people had to be self-sufficient. The
Ingalls family lived in the Big Woods from
1863 to 1869 and from 1871 to 1874.
They lived in a small gray log cabin that
kept them safe from blizzards, wolves,
bears, and other dangers of the Big
Woods.

Chapter 1 Little House in the Big


Woods
Summary
A little girl
named
Laura lives
in gray log
cabin in the
Big Woods
of
Wisconsin
with her
father, mother, and sisters; Mary and
Carrie. The woods are scary at night and
Laura lay awake in her trundle bed
listening to a wolf howl.
Lauras Pa supports the family by hunting
and trapping animals. Laura tells how her
family prepares the meat for winter. She
also tells about her favorite time- at night
when theyd sit by the fire and listen to
Pas stories as he cleaned his traps.
Suggested Chapter 1 Vocabulary:
bank, brindle, brine, chopping block,
cracklings, head cheese, lard, pot liquor,
trundle bed,

On Thursdays, Ma made butter by warming


cream in a tall crockery churn. In the winter,
she added carrot coloring to give the butter
a pretty color.
Try making butter yourself!
You will need:
1 medium carrot
cup homogenized milk
3 cups heavy whipping cream, chilled
Pinch of salt
To make:
Grate the carrot and add to milk.
Heat in a small saucepan.
Strain warm tinted milk into a glass
jar with a tight lid (do not put lid on
yet)
Add chilled cream.
Fasten lid.
Shake jar, 1 minute.
Remove lid to release gas and
refasten.
Continue shaking for about 15
minutes (you may need to take turns
with a partner) until mixture forms a
thick mush.
Pour mixture through strainer into a
bowl.
Empty the milk from the bowl into
another container (this is buttermilk).
Turn butter pat into bowl and cover
with cold water. Stir, strain, and
discard water. Repeat until water is
clear.
Work liquid out of butter by stirring
and pressing it against the bowl.
When all liquid has been pressed out,
work in a little salt.
Press butter into mold or dish.
Rinse with cold water and chill.

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Recalling Chapter 1 Oral Discussion


Who is telling the story?
Where do Laura and her family live? Do you think you could live in a log
cabin like they did?
What was the Ingalls family dog named?
What part of the pig did Laura and Mary like to eat the most?
Why did Pa hang the deer up?

Chapter 2 Winter Days and Winter Nights


Summary
Winter comes and Pa spends his days hunting and
trapping in the Big Woods. The girls help Ma with the
chores, but they have fun things to do as well, like play
with the paper dolls that Ma makes them, playing games
with Pa, and listening to Pa sing and play the fiddle, as
well as tell the girls stories.
Suggested Chapter 2 Vocabulary: butter pat, churning,
enormous, Jack Frost, kerosene, patty pan, trap lines
Recalling Chapter 2 Oral Discussion
Who did Ma say made the pictures on the window panes after a cold
night?
What did Mary and Laura use to make patterns in the frost on the
window?
How did the bear help Pa get a pig?
How did Ma color the butter?
What was the game of mad dog?

Chapter 3 The Long Rifle


Summary
Every night before stories are told, Pa makes bullets, and
cleans and loads his gun. One night he tells the girls the story
about when he disobeyed his father.
Suggested Chapter 3 Vocabulary: briar, hearth, ramrod,
ravine, thrashing
Recalling Chapter 3 Oral Discussion
What did Pa do each night before story time?
What chore did Laura and Mary help Pa with?
Why do you think it was important for Pas gun to be
loaded and easy for him to reach?
How do you think Ma and Pa wanted their daughters to behave?
What was the voice in the woods in Pas story?
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Chapter 4 Christmas
Summary
It is Christmas at the Ingalls house and they have special
visitors. They go to bed on Christmas Eve and when they
wake up Santa has arrived and there are gifts in all of the
childrens stockings, including a special gift for Laura.
Suggested Chapter 4 Vocabulary: flatiron, gaiters,
pokeberries, whittle
Recalling Chapter 4 Oral Discussion
What craft did Pa do to turn pieces of wood into a work of art?
Who came to visit for Christmas and how did they arrive?
How did Prince the dog save Aunt Eliza?
What special gift did Santa bring Laura? Were the other girls jealous?
Why or why not?
What did Ma slip into their guests pockets to keep them warm on the
journey home?

Chapter 5 Sundays
Summary
For the Ingalls family, Sundays were a day to rest. It was Lauras least favorite
day because she was not allowed to run and play, but had to sit quietly and rest.
Suggested Chapter 5 Vocabulary: sampler, tan
Recalling Chapter 5 Oral Discussion
What did each of the family members do on Saturday night to prepare for
Sunday?
The Ingalls family had a lot of schedules and rules. Why do you think
schedules and rules were so important to living in the Big Woods?
Compare a typical Sunday for your family to that of the Ingalls family.
What did Lauras grandpa and his brothers do in The Story of Grandpas
Sled and the Pig?
How old did Laura turn?

Chapter 6 Two Big Bears


Summary
Pa said that spring was coming and he headed into town to trade his furs. While
he was away, Laura and Ma had an encounter with a bear. Luckily, they
returned safely to the cabin and waited for Pas return.

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Suggested Chapter 6 Vocabulary: lantern,


powder and shot
Recalling Chapter 6 Oral Discussion
What animal did Laura and her Ma
mistake for Sukey, their cow?
What gifts did Pa bring for Ma, Mary,
and Laura?
What object did Pa mistake for a bear?
Have you ever thought you saw
something in the dark that wasnt really
that at all?
What are some of the signs of spring in
the Big Woods?

Chapter 7 The Sugar Snow


Summary
When Pa spotted the sugar snow, he left
quickly for grandpas house to help him with
the maple syrup. He returned home with treats
for the girls and good news for Ma.
Suggested Chapter 7 Vocabulary: basque,
delaine, trough
Recalling Chapter 7 Oral Discussion
What did Pa bring back from Grandpas
house?
How did the girls
eat the maple
syrup? What would
you do with maple
syrup?
What is sugar
snow?
What was the good
news for Ma?
Describe Mas
delaine dress.

But for supper, Grandma made


hasty puddingThen Uncle
George came with a smaller
bucket of syrup, and everybody
ate the hot hasty pudding with
maple syrup for supper.
Hasty Pudding
Hasty pudding was originally made in
England with oatmeal or wheat flour,
but early Americans adapted the
recipe to cornmeal.
Cooking this dish is tricky! The
cornmeal must be added very slowly
so it does not get lumpy.
Ingredients:
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup stone ground yellow
cornmeal
Maple syrup
To Make:
Boil 4 cups of water in a kettle.
Stir in salt.
Stirring the water with a spoon
in one hand, slowly sprinkle
the meal in with the other
hand.
When all of the meal has been
stirred in, reduce heat and
simmer for 1 hour, stirring
every 10 minutes.
Pudding is done when it looks
like cooked oatmeal.
Serve warm in bowls with syrup.
Servings: 6.

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Chapter 8 Dance at Grandpas


Summary
Laura and her family traveled to her grandparents house so Pa could help
Grandpa with the maple syrup. There was a big dance at Lauras grandparents
house and everyone was dressed in his or her best party clothes.
Suggested Chapter 8 Vocabulary: corset, hewed, jig
Recalling Chapter 8 Oral Discussion
How did the Ingalls travel to Grandpas house?
List some of the animal tracks that Pa pointed out along the way.
Who won the jigging contest? Grandma or Uncle George?
What did Laura and the other children do with the snow?

Chapter 9 Going to Town


Summary
Pa promised the girls a trip to the town of
Pepin after the crops were in. They were very
excited because it was their first time to town
and they did not know what to expect. When
they arrived, the store and all the houses that
were there overwhelmed Laura.
Suggested Chapter 9 Vocabulary: calico,
curry, galluses
Recalling Chapter 9 Oral Discussion
How many miles was it from Lauras house to town?
How was the store built differently from the Ingalls home?
Why was Laura feeling jealous of Mary?
How was Laura greedy and what happened because of it?

Chapter 10 Summertime
Summary
Summertime came and the Ingalls had more frequent visitors. Mary and Laura
were allowed to visit their new neighbor, Mrs. Peterson, who lived down the hill.
Ma would prepare for visitors by cleaning and cooking. Ma and Pa worked very
hard during the summer months and at night they were tired.
Suggested Chapter 10 Vocabulary: grubbing hoe, rennet, whetstone, whey
Recalling Chapter 10 Oral Discussion
Why did Laura slap Mary? What was Lauras punishment for doing that?
Where were the Petersons from? Find their homeland on a map and see
how far it is from Wisconsin.
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What did Laura and Mary use for a


playhouse in the summer?
Who were some of the visitors that
came to the Ingalls house?
How were summer nights different
from winter nights?
Mary and Laura had a dilemma on the
way home from Mrs. Petersons
house. They each ate half a cookie
so they could share the rest with Baby
Carrie. When they put the two halves
together, Baby Carrie had a whole
cookie to eat. The girls didnt think
that was fair. How could they have
made it fair?

Chapter 11 Harvest
Summary
Harvest time was a busy time for Pa. He
and Uncle Henry traded working each others
crops to help each other out. Lauras cousin,
Charley was a very naughty boy who did not
help the men with the harvest and caused
trouble instead.
Suggested Chapter 11 Vocabulary:
cradles, shock of feed
Recalling Chapter 11 Oral Discussion
How did Pa and Uncle Henry cut the
oats?
Why was it important to harvest the
oats before rain came?
What important lesson can be learned
from Charley getting stung by the
bees?
Why do you think Pa called Charley a
liar even though he hadnt said a
word?
What would have happened if Pa
didnt get home in time to milk the
cows?

Laura always wondered why bread


made of corn meal was called
Johnny-cake. It wasnt cake.
Johnny-Cake
Johnny-cake originated in colonial times
and was actually meant to be called
journey cake, but New Englanders
pronounced it jonny.
In the early 1870s when Laura Ingalls was
a young girl, there were many different
recipes for this bread made of cornmeal
and water. It was a common staple for
pioneers.
Ingredients:
2 cups cornmeal
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 tablespoons drippings (or one
egg)
2 tablespoons molasses
cup boiling water
1 cup cultured buttermilk
To Make:
Preheat oven to 400 F.
Mix cornmeal, salt, and baking
soda.
Place drippings in center.
Stir molasses into cup boiling
water and pour on the drippings.
Stir until drippings are melted and
meal becomes a paste.
Stir in buttermilk. Mix well.
Grease a baking sheet and pour
batter onto it. Spread evenly.
Bake 20-30 minutes until surface is
cracked and edges are brown.
Serve warm with molasses, honey, baked
beans, or meat. Servings: 6.

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Chapter 12 The Wonderful Machine


Summary
Ma made beautiful hats by braiding straw and then sewing the braids together.
She even made one for Lauras doll. The days started growing shorter and the
nights were cooler in the Big Woods. It was time to gather food and prepare it for
the long winter. Pa had help from other men and a wonderful machine called a
threshing machine to harvest the wheat.
Suggested Chapter 12 Vocabulary: Johnny-cake
Recalling Chapter 12 Oral Discussion
What did they often have for supper?
What was the wonderful machine? How did it save Pa and the other men
time?
What did Ma and the girls prepare for the men to eat?
Why was Laura proud of her Pa?

Chapter 13 The Deer in the Wood


Summary
Pa went out to hunt, but came home without any
fresh meat. When he explained to the girls why he
did not shoot any animals, they understood why.
The nights are getting colder now and it is time once
more for stories and Pas fiddle before bed. The
story ends with Laura laying awake in bed and
listening to Pas playing and thinking about how
thankful she is for right now.
Suggested Chapter 13 Vocabulary: chinked, deer lick
Recalling Chapter 13 Oral Discussion
What did Laura and Mary start working on?
What kinds of things did Pa do to prepare the little house for winter?
How does your family prepare for winter?
Why did Pa come home without any fresh meat?
Was Laura content with her life in the Big Woods? Why or why not?

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Additional Questions for Discussion


1. What are the most frightening parts of the story? What helps Laura
keep from being afraid of the noises and frightening things that live
in the Big Woods?
2. What important things did a home provide in the Big Woods?
3. Where do Laura and Mary play house in the winter?
4. Think back to when you were five years old. How was your life at
that age similar or different to Lauras?
5. What are Lauras two favorite days of the week? Why? What is
her least favorite day and why?
6. What is Pas nickname for Laura?
7. What is the name of Pas big green book that the girls are allowed
to look at on Sundays?
8. What kind of pattern is the fabric on Mas delaine?
9. How does Ma curl the girls hair before they go to town?
10. What was your favorite part of this book? Why?

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Vocabulary
Banked: heaped up ashes to keep coals hot
Basque: dress with a jacket and short skirt
Briar: prickly bush
Brindle: tan or gray with darker streaks or spots
Brine: mixture of salt and water
Butter pat: butter that has been shaped into a mold
Calico: printed cotton cloth
Chinked: filled in gaps or cracks
Chopping block: wood block for cutting things on
Churn: make butter by dashing milk in a churn
Corset: close-fitting undergarment worn by a woman
Cracklings: roasted pig rind
Cradles: tools that hold grain while it is being cut
Curry: comb and rub a horse
Deer lick: place where deer get salt
Delaine: fancy dress
Enormous: very large
Flatiron: iron heated on the stove
Gaiters: covering for the instep of the foot and ankle
Galluses: suspenders
Grubbing hoe: tool used to dig up roots and stumps
Head cheese: meat loaf made from a pigs head
Hearth: fireside
Hewed: shaped with the blows of an ax or knife
Hollow: empty inside
Jack Frost: make-believe person who makes frosty pictures on glass
Jig: lively dance with kicking and jumping steps
Johnny-cake: cornmeal bread
Kerosene: thin oil used in lamps and stoves
Lantern: case to hold and protect a light
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Lard: shortening made with pig fat


Patty Pan: pan for a small pie
Pioneer: person or group of people who is the first to do something
Pokeberries: red berries used to make ink
Powder and shot: gunpowder and caps
Pot liquor: broth from boiled meat
Ramrod: rod used to clean a gun barrel
Rennet: the lining of a young calfs stomach
Ravine: long, narrow, deep hole with steep sides
Sampler: needlework
Self-sufficient: able to provide what is needed to survive
Shock of feed: bundles of grain standing upright
Tan: to make animal skins into leather by soaking in tannic acid
Thrashing: spanking
Trap lines: series of traps set for different animals
Trough: long, open container that holds water or food for animals
Trundle bed: bed that has wheels and is small enough to roll under another bed
Whetstone: stone used to sharpen knives with
Whey: clear liquid left from milk after the fat and curd are separated
Whittle: cut wood with a knife

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Additional Topics to Research


Wisconsin
Wisconsin, located on the western shore of Lake Michigan and
shares a border with Minnesota, Michigan, Iowa, and Illinois.
Wisconsin was the 30th state to be admitted to the Union on May
29, 1848.
It is the 23rd biggest state in the United States and has a land
area of 54,314 square miles. Major rivers of the state include the Wisconsin
River, Mississippi River, St. Croix River, and Chippewa River. Home to over
14,000 lakes, its major lakes include Lake Michigan, Lake Superior, and Lake
Winnebago.
Wisconsins major industries are dairy products, which include milk, butter, and
cheese; farming, especially corn, machinery, paper manufacturing, beer, and
tourism.
Animals of the Big Woods
Wolf: A relative of the jackal and the domestic dogs, wolves are carnivores, which
means they eat meat. They have powerful teeth and bushy tails. There are two
species of wolf: 1) the timber wolf, also called the gray wolf, and 2) the red wolf.
The timber wolf used to populate many areas but is now found only in Canada,
Alaska, Northern Europe, and Russia (there are some small packs found in other
regions of the world). The red wolf is only found in the southeastern United States
and Texas.
Wolves are found in habitats that include prairies, forests, and mountains. They
travel in packs to search for food and commonly prey on small animals and birds.
They form larger packs in the winter to hunt. When hunting together, a pack of
wolves may prey on reindeer, sheep, and other large mammals. Wolves also eat
carrion, the decaying flesh of dead animals, and berries.
Wolves live in a den or lair inside a cave, hollow tree, or a hole in the ground.
Females have their pups in the spring in litters of 1-11 pups. Pups usually stay
with their parents until the following winter.
Wolves have a way of communicating with each other by howling. They howl to
show dominance over the pack, to mark their territory, to gather members of a
pack, to communicate with other packs, and to express contentment.
The wolf is classified in the family Canidae. The timber wolf is classified as Canis
lupus and the red wolf is classified as Canis rufus.

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Bear: Bears are large powerful animals that have thick, shaggy fur. Bears
are carnivores because the main thing that they eat is meat. They also eat
other foods like fruit (such as berries), leaves, fish, rodents and insects.
Bears use their claws to tear meat and to dig up roots and insects.
There are seven different species of bears and they live in areas that are
north of the equator. Bears are found in Asia, North America, Europe, and
in the Arctic near the North Pole.
The seven different species of bears are:
1) Brown Bears are the largest bears in the world. They live in Europe,
Asia, and North America. The Kodiak bear, Alaskan brown bears, and
grizzly bears are part of the brown bear species.
2) American Black Bears are the smallest bears in North America. They
are the most common bears found in North America. There are over
75,000 black bears in the United States, living in large wooded areas.
3) Asiatic Black Bears are smaller than American Black Bears. They are
the fiercest of all bears. This species of bear is found in forests and
brush regions throughout southern and eastern Asia.
4) Polar Bears are the best swimmers of all bears. Polar bears live in
regions that border the Arctic Ocean.
5) Sun Bears are the smallest species of bears. Sun Bears live in the
forests of Borneo, Indochina, the Malay Peninsula, Thailand, and
Sumatra.
6) Sloth Bears get their names because of their speed. Sloth bears move
very slowly, unless they are disturbed. Sloth bears live in Sri Lanka
and India.
7) Spectacled Bears are the only bears that live in South America. The
Spectacled bear lives in the cool mountain forests and is quite rare due
to hunting and the devastation of its home.
Bears spend their winters in a state that is very similar to sleeping. This
state is called hibernation. Bears prepare for their winter sleep by eating
lots of food during the late summer months. The food they eat turns into
body fat that is stored in their bodies throughout the winter. The stored
body fat gives the bear energy during the winter when food is scarce.
When winter arrives and the food becomes scarce, bears go to their dens
to sleep. Some bear dens are in caves, brush piles, or shelters that the
bear builds of twigs or digs into hillsides. Bears that live in areas with
harsh winters have a longer sleep period than those that live in milder
areas.
Bears have heavy bodies covered in thick fur. Their heads are also quite
large and furry. Bears have small eyes and do not see very well. Their
ears are also small and do not hear very well. Bears have an excellent
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sense of smell. They have short strong legs and very large feet. The hind
foot of some large bears measures 12 to 16 inches long. Like humans,
bears have five toes on each foot.

Black Panther: There is not a distinct species of wildcat called a Black


Panther like the one in The Story of Grandpa and
the Panther in Little House in the Big Woods.
Black Panther is a common name used to
describe several species of large black cats. In
North America, it often refers to a black cougar.
When you see a picture of a Black Panther like
the illustration on page 40, you are probably seeing a cougar, leopard, or
jaguar.

Bee: There are more than 20,000 different kinds of bees, including the
honeybee, bumblebee, carpenter bee, and orchid bee. Bees have three
main body parts, the head, the thorax, and the abdomen.
Bees are social insects. They live in a community and each bee in that
community has a specific job that is necessary for the survival of the entire
colony. There are three types of bees in a colony, queen, worker bees,
and drones.
Why do bees sting? Bees do not sting unless it is absolutely necessary. Is
that because they are nice insects and dont want to hurt anyone? No, it
is because after a bee stings it usually dies shortly after. Therefore, bees
do not sting unless they have to defend their hive. Bees will not sting a
person unless a person touches them, annoys them, or gets too close to
their hive. Bees that do not have hives live in a swarm. Swarming bees
do not usually sting because they do not have a hive to protect. Queen
bees are able to sting many times! Worker bees can only sting once, but
queens can pull their stingers out of their victims and sting again!

Yellow jackets: In the story, Little House in the Big Woods, Charley is
stung by yellow jackets, which is also used with the term bees. Yellow
jackets are actually wasps that have thinner waists than bees and fold
their wings lengthwise when they are resting. Yellow jackets often sting
people or animals when they are hunting for food or protecting their nest
and their sting can be deadly to someone who is allergic to their venom or
is stung many times.
Yellow jackets build their nests close to or underground. A single nest
contains up to 15,000 yellow jackets!

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White-tailed deer: The white-tailed deer, Wisconsins state animal, is


found throughout the state. A medium sized deer, the white tail has redbrown fur that changes to gray-brown in the winter. Also known as the
Virginia deer or whitetail, it is found in most of the United States, southern
Canada, Mexico, Central America and some parts of South America.
Male deer are called bucks and are easy to recognize because of their
antlers, which reach their full growth in the fall. Females are called does.
They usually give birth in May or June and their babies are called fawns.
A fawn has a reddish brown coat with white spots.
An herbivore, the white-tailed deer eats plants. They graze on tree
leaves, herbs, berries, acorns, and grass. In the winter, deer eat twigs,
nuts, and corn.

Owl: There are about 200 different species of owls and they are found all
over the world. Scientists have divided owls into two families: 1) Barn owl
and relatives and 2) Typical or True Owl family.
Unlike any other bird, the owls eyes are in the front of its head and face
forward (Other birds eyes are on the sides of their heads). The
placement of an owls eyes gives it binocular vision and precise depth
perception.
Owls are found on every continent of the world except Antarctica.
Habitats where owls are found include rainforest, grassland, forest, and
desert habitats. Most owls do not build their own nests but use the old
nests of birds such as hawks, eagles, and crows. Other owl species
inhabit hollow trees, cliff ledges, caves, or holes in the ground. Some owls
make their homes in barns or silos.
Owls are hunters, and most hunt at night. An owls body is designed for
hunting; owls can fly fast, silently, and they have excellent night vision and
hearing. Owls prey on rodents and other small mammals. Some larger
owls have been known to carry off small deer or foxes.

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Corn Husk Dolls


Corn is a great thing; we use it for corn on the cob, popcorn,
starch, and even ethanol fuel. Pioneer children made dolls
from cornhusks! The craft of turning corn husks into dolls
started with Native Americans who used them for toys and for
religious purposes. European settlers adapted this craft and
made cornhusk dolls for their children.
Make a Corn Husk Doll
You will need:
13 corn husks (you can also buy dried corn husks at
some super markets and craft stores)
Silk hair from corn on the cob
Heavy string, jute rope, or twine
To make:
Dry corn husks and silk in the sun, 3-4 days.
Soak in warm water, 10 minutes.
Head: Crumple one husk into a ball about the size of a large marble.
Fold another husk over the ball like a hood.
Gather the husk snuggly under the ball and tie. Husk should extend about
3 inches below the tie.
Arms: Roll another husk on a pencil.
Pull the pencil out while keeping the husk rolled tightly.
Place arms just below the head, centered.
Take a crumpled piece of husk and place under the arms inside the
extended husk piece of the head.
Tie husk pieces together below the stuffing to form the waist.
Shoulders: Take two pieces of corn husk and cross them on either side of
the head and over the arms. Husks will be criss-crossed on the front and
back of the doll like sashes.
Tie at the same place as the waist.
Skirt: Take three large smooth husks and spread like a fan, leaves
overlapping.
Place doll face up over point of fan. Skirt will appear to be upside down
behind the doll.
Tie tightly at the waist. Repeat on the front.
Carefully bend husks down over the tie for skirt.
You can add corn silks or yarn for hair if desired

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NOTE: Answers for the following Comprehension and Discussion


Questions are in BOLD lettering.
Comprehension and Discussion Questions:
Chapter 1:
Who is telling the story? Laura
Where do Laura and her family live? They live in Wisconsin, in the
woods near Lake Pepin. Do you think you could live in a log cabin like
they did? Answers will vary by student.
What was the Ingalls family dog named? Jack
What part of the pig did Laura and Mary like to eat the most? The tail
Why did Pa hang the deer up? He hung them up so that the wolves
would not be able to get them.
Chapter 2:
Who did Ma say made the pictures on the window panes after a cold
night? Jack Frost
What did Mary and Laura use to make patterns in the frost on the
window? They used Mas thimbles.
How did the bear help Pa get a pig? The bear had already gotten the
pig and was about to eat it when Pa shot it.
How did Ma color the butter? She colored it with grated carrot soaked
in milk.
What was the game of mad dog? Mad Dog was when Pa would
make his hair stand on end and chase the girls around like a mad
dog.
Chapter 3:
What did Pa do each night before story time? He made bullets for the
next days hunting.
What chore did Laura and Mary help Pa with? They helped him load his
gun.
Why do you think it was important for Pas gun to be loaded and easy for
him to reach? If he needed it, he would need it in a hurry. It could
help him fend off wild animals or other dangers in the woods. Also,
if he was always careful to keep it clean and loaded, it would be
ready when he went hunting or traveling in the woods.
How do you think Ma and Pa wanted their daughters to behave? Ma and
Pa wanted their daughters to be responsible and obey the first time,
every time. (Answers may vary by student.)
What was the voice in the woods in Pas story? A screech owl

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Chapter 4:
What craft did Pa do to turn pieces of wood into a work of art? Whittling
and carving
Who came to visit for Christmas and how did they arrive? Aunt Eliza,
Uncle Peter, and cousins Peter, Alice, and Ella came to visit. They
arrived by sleigh.
How did Prince the dog save Aunt Eliza? He growled and snapped at
her and pulled on her skirt hard enough to tear it. This frightened
her enough to stay in the house instead of going to the spring, where
she would have met up with a large panther.
What special gift did Santa bring Laura? A rag doll named Charlotte.
Were the other girls jealous? No. Why or why not? Laura was youngest
and did not yet have a rag doll.
What did Ma slip into their guests pockets to keep them warm on the
journey home? Hot baked potatoes
Chapter 5:
What did each of the family members do on Saturday night to prepare for
Sunday? They each took a bath.
The Ingalls family had a lot of schedules and rules. Why do you think
schedules and rules were so important to living in the Big Woods?
Answers will vary by student, but might include the necessity of
having everything in top working order. They didnt have stores or
service businesses nearby, so if something didnt work, food was
not preserved, or crops were damaged, life would be very difficult for
them.
Compare a typical Sunday for your family to that of the Ingalls family.
Answers will vary by student.
What did Lauras grandpa and his brothers do in The Story of Grandpas
Sled and the Pig? They snuck out on Sunday afternoon while their
father was sleeping to ride their new sled down the hill. While they
were on their way down, a pig stepped out in front of them. It was
swept up on the sled and squealed all the way down, waking up their
father.
How old did Laura turn? She turned 5.

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Chapter 6:
What animal did Laura and her Ma mistake for Sukey, their cow? A bear
What gifts did Pa bring for Ma, Mary, and Laura? They each received a
piece of calico that he picked out for a new dress. Mary and Laura
also received candy.
What object did Pa mistake for a bear? A burnt out tree stump. Have
you ever thought you saw something in the dark that wasnt really that at
all? Answers will vary by student.
What are some of the signs of spring in the Big Woods? The snow and
icicles melted, trees put out baby leaves, and flowers and birds
returned to the woods.
Chapter 7:
What did Pa bring back from Grandpas house? He brought back 2
large, hard cakes of maple sugar and a bucket of maple syrup.
How did the girls eat the maple syrup? They ate it on their bread with
dinner. What would you do with maple syrup? Answers will vary by
student.
What is sugar snow? Sugar snow is a late spring snow. The cold snap
holds back the leafing of the trees and causes the sap to run a bit
longer so that more syrup and sugar can be made.
What was the good news for Ma? There would be a dance at Grandpas
house.
Describe Mas delaine dress. It was dark green with a pattern of
strawberries and had been made by a dressmaker back east. It had
dark red buttons on the front and whalebones stitched into the
seams.

Chapter 8:

How did the Ingalls travel to Grandpas house? They traveled by a sled
pulled by horses.
List some of the animal tracks that Pa pointed out along the way. He
pointed out the tracks of cottontail rabbits, field mice, snowbirds,
foxes, and deer.
Who won the jigging contest? Grandma or Uncle George? Grandma won
the contest.
What did Laura and the other children do with the snow? They gathered
it into their dishes and Grandma poured maple syrup onto it. The
maple syrup hardened into candy. They were allowed to have as
many servings as they wanted.

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Chapter 9:
How many miles was it from Lauras house to town? 7 miles
How was the store built differently from the Ingalls home? It was built of
slat boards instead of logs.
Why was Laura feeling jealous of Mary? Laura was jealous because of
Marys curly blonde hair.
How was Laura greedy and what happened because of it? She was
greedy because she gathered too many pretty pebbles from the
beach. They were too heavy for her pocket and it ripped from her
skirt.
Chapter 10:
Why did Laura slap Mary? She slapped Mary because she was jealous
of Marys blonde hair. Mary had taunted her with it and Laura lost
her temper. What was Lauras punishment for doing that? She was
whipped (or spanked) with a strap.
Where were the Petersons from? Sweden Find their homeland on a map
and see how far it is from Wisconsin.
What did Laura and Mary use for a playhouse in the summer? They each
had a tree that provided a space underneath for a playhouse.
Who were some of the visitors that came to the Ingalls house? Mr. and
Mrs. Huleatt came to visit with their children Eva and Clarence.
How were summer nights different from winter nights? Pa did not tell
stories or play the fiddle because he was tired from working hard all
day in the fields.
Mary and Laura had a dilemma on the way home from Mrs. Petersons
house. They each ate half a cookie so they could share the rest with Baby
Carrie. When they put the two halves together, Baby Carrie had a whole
cookie to eat. The girls didnt think that was fair. How could they have
made it fair? Answers will vary by student.
Chapter 11:
How did Pa and Uncle Henry cut the oats? They cut the oats with a
sharp tool called a cradle.
Why was it important to harvest the oats before rain came? If they did not
harvest the oats before it rained the crop would be ruined.
What important lesson can be learned from Charley getting stung by the
bees? He learned not to interfere with important work and not to call
for help if he didnt need it.
Why do you think Pa called Charley a liar even though he hadnt said a
word? He had pretended to be in trouble several times when he
wasnt. The men came running each time to find out they had been
tricked. Then, when he really was in trouble, they didnt believe him.
What would have happened if Pa didnt get home in time to milk the cows?
The cows would have stopped giving as much milk.
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Chapter 12:
What did they often have for supper? They often had hulled corn and
milk. (Answers may also include stewed pumpkin and Hubbard
squash.)
What was the wonderful machine? It was a threshing machine for
wheat. How did it save Pa and the other men time? It threshed as much
wheat in one afternoon as four men could in a couple of weeks.
What did Ma and the girls prepare for the men to eat? They fixed a big
kettle of cabbage and meat, beans, Johnny-cake, salt-rising bread
and butter, stewed pumpkin, pumpkin pies, dried berry pies, cookies,
cheese, honey, and pitchers of milk.
Why was Laura proud of her Pa? Pa had organized the neighbors to
get together and hire the threshers, which saved everyone a lot of
time.
Chapter 13:
What did Laura and Mary start working on? Patchwork quilts
What kinds of things did Pa do to prepare the little house for winter? He
banked the house with dead leaves and straw held down by stones
to keep out the cold. The windows were shut tight and chinked and a
fire always burned in the fireplace.
How does your family prepare for winter? Answers will vary by student.
Why did Pa come home without any fresh meat? He watched the
animals in the moonlight. He thought the deer was so beautiful that
he just couldnt shoot him. He became fascinated with the bear and
the woods became so peaceful that he forgot about his gun. He felt
that he could not shoot the doe and fawn.
Was Laura content with her life in the Big Woods? Yes. Why or why not?
Her house was cozy, Pa and Ma were with her, and his music
soothed her. Her life was now, not long ago, and she was happy with
it.

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Additional Questions for Discussion:


1. What are the most frightening parts of the story? What helps Laura
keep from being afraid of the noises and frightening things that live
in the Big Woods? Answers will vary by student.
2. What important things did a home provide in the Big Woods?
Answers will vary by student, but may include shelter, food, a
place to play, and a place to be a family.
3. Where do Laura and Mary play house in the winter? In the attic.
4. Think back to when you were five years old. How was your life at
that age similar or different to Lauras? Answers will vary by
student.
5. What are Lauras two favorite days of the week? Thursday and
Saturday. Why? That was when they churned and baked.
What is her least favorite day and why? Sunday was her least
favorite day because they could not run and play and Pa did
not tell stories or play his fiddle.
6. What is Pas nickname for Laura? He called her his little halfpint of sweet cider half-drunk up.
7. What is the name of Pas big green book that the girls are allowed
to look at on Sundays? The Wonders of the Animal World
8. What kind of pattern is the fabric on Mas delaine? It was a dark
green background with a pattern of ripe red strawberries.
9. How does Ma curl the girls hair before they go to town? She curls
their hair around rags and they sleep this way. In the morning
she unwinds it and brushes out the curls.
10. What was your favorite part of this book? Why? Answers will vary
by student.
Activity 1: Vocabulary
Answer:
See Page 33
Activity 2: Laura Ingalls Wilder
Answer:
Laura Ingalls was born on February 8, 1867 in a log cabin near Pepin, WI.
She spent her childhood traveling as a pioneer in a covered wagon
through parts of Wisconsin, Kansas, Minnesota, Iowa, and the Dakota
Territory. When she was 15 she earned her teachers certificate and was
hired as a teacher. Soon after, she met Almanzo Wilder and they married
in 1885. In 1886 their daughter Rose was born. They later lived at Rocky
Ridge Farm in Mansfield, MO, where she began writing for local
magazines. She wrote her autobiography, Pioneer Girl, in 1930 and
began writing the Little House series in 1932 at the age of 65. Laura
Ingalls Wilder died at the age of 90 on February 10, 1957.
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Activity 3: Illustrating the Little House


Answer:
Answers will vary by student.
Activity 4: The Ingalls Family
Answer:
Laura Laura is a little girl who is telling the story. She is the middle
daughter of the Ingalls family. She admires her Pa and is sometimes
jealous of her sister Mary.
Pa Pas name is Charles. He is hardworking and devoted to his family.
He enjoys entertaining and roughhousing with his daughters. He likes to
be able to live off the land and doesnt like being crowded by a lot of
neighbors.
Ma Mas name is Caroline. She is slender, likes pretty things, and is a
devoted wife and mother. She trains her daughters well and expects them
to act like ladies.
Mary Mary is Lauras older sister. She is quiet, polite, obedient, and
neat. She knows that Laura is jealous of her hair and sometimes taunts
her with it. Laura describes as being pretty and blonde.
Carrie (or Baby Carrie) Carrie is a baby and the youngest daughter of
the Ingalls family.
Jack Jack is the brindle bulldog, the faithful watchdog of the Ingalls
family.
Activity 5: Story Setting
Answer:
The story is set in the woods of Wisconsin near the town of Pepin in the
1860s to 1870s.
Activity 6: Finding Themes
Answer:
Answers will vary by student but may include:
Obedience Chapter 3, 5, 6, 9, 10
Not being greedy or selfish Chapter 4, 8, 9
Responsibility Chapter 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11
Being content with what you have Chapter 1, 4, 6, 7, 9, 11, 13
Activity 7: Where is the Little House?
Answer:
Help your student find Wisconsin on a map or globe.
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Activity 8: Butchering Time


Answer:
Pa butchered the pig, scraped the bristles, hung up the hog, took out the
insides, cut it up into pieces, and salted, pickled, and smoked the meat
Ma rendered the lard, skimmed the cracklings, made head cheese,
made sausage
Mary carried wood for the fire, helped Ma, shared the balloon and the
tail with Laura
Laura carried wood for the fire, helped Ma, shared the balloon and the
tail with Mary
Activity 9: Describing Lauras House
Answer:
Answers will vary by student. You may wish to have a thesaurus available
for students to find fun adjectives to use.
Activity 10: My House and Lauras House
Answer:
Lauras House:
Made of logs
Had a fireplace
Two stories
In the Big Woods
No electricity
No plumbing
No heating or air conditioning
Both will vary by student
My House will vary by student

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Activity 11: Helping With Chores


Answer:
Ma:
Monday Wash
Tuesday Iron
Wednesday Mend
Thursday Churn
Friday Clean
Saturday Bake
Sunday Rest
Me:
Answers will vary by student. This may be a fun time to develop a chore
chart if your student does not already have one J
Activity 12: Entertaining the Girls
Answer:
He told them stories
He played his fiddle
He played Mad Dog with them
Activity 13: Making Bullets
Answer:
Pa melted bits of lead in the big spoon over the coals
He poured the lead into the little hole in the bullet mold
He waited a minute
He opened the mold
He dropped a bright new bullet onto the hearth
Activity 14: The Voice in the Woods
Answer:
What Pa Was Supposed to doPa was supposed to immediately round
up the cows from the woods.
What Pa DidInstead, he stopped along the way to play because he
though he had enough time.
The Lesson Pa Learnedhe learned that if he obeyed what his parents
said, no harm would come to him.

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Activity 15: Christmas Dinner


Answer:
Answers will vary by student, but might include:

Main Course ham, bear meat, venison


Side Dishes squash, baked beans, breads
Drinks milk, water, coffee
Dessert pies, cookies, cake
Other Goodies molasses candy
Activity 16: Comparing Christmas
Answer:
Lauras Christmas:
Presents were handmade
The family started preparing several days ahead
Family came to stay over
Kids played in the snow
All of the food and treats were homemade
Both:
Will vary by student.
My Christmas:
Will vary by student.
Activity 17: What to Do on Sunday?
Answer:

Could look quietly at their paper dolls, listen to Bible stories or


animal stories, look at pictures, talk quietly to their rag dolls and hold
them nicely
Couldnt run, shout, be noisy in their play, sew or knit, make any clothes
for their paper or rag dolls
Activity 18: Animals of the Big Woods
Answer:
Answers will vary by student, but may include:
Wolves a furry, carnivorous relative of the domestic dog
Bears large, shaggy, carnivorous creatures that hibernate in the winter
Black Panther a large cat that is most likely a type of cougar
White-tailed Deer this is the state animal of Wisconsin, but is found all
over America
Owl a bird that is nocturnal and has excellent vision
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Activity 19: Maple Syrup Timeline


Answer:
Grandpa made wooden buckets and troughs
He bored holes in maple trees and hammered in the troughs to collect the
sap in buckets
Every day he drove from tree to tree collecting the sap
He emptied the sap into an iron kettle to boil
He skimmed the sap every few minutes
When it boiled down enough he filled the buckets with syrup
Activity 20: Descriptive Paragraph
Answer:
Answers will vary by student.
Activity 21: Word Paintings
Answer:
Answers will vary by student, but may include:
She knew how Yankee Doodle felt, when he could not see the town
because there were so many houses.
One of them was made of new boards that had not had time to get gray; it
was the yellow color of newly-cut wood.
The waves of Lake Pepin curled up on the shore at their feet and slid back
with the smallest hissing sound.
But Laura and Mary ran along the lake shore, picking up pretty pebbles
that had been rolled back and forth by the waves until they were polished
smooth.
Standing among the stumps, there were more houses than Laura could
count.
Activity 22: Going to the Store
Answer:
Calico for dresses and an apron
Brown denim for Pa
White cloth for sheets and underwear
A pair of galluses
Tobacco
A pound of tea
Store sugar

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Activity 23: Green Cheese


Answer:
Green cheese is cheese that has not yet ripened, or formed a hard rind
from being cured.
Activity 24: Getting Honey
Answer:
He chopped down the tree and split it with his ax. He discovered that the
tree was full of honey, so he gathered the newer honey in buckets and left
enough for the bees.
Activity 25: Treating Charleys Stings
Answer:
They made mud and plastered him with it
They rolled him up in a sheet and tied him up in cloths
They steeped herbs for him to drink to bring down his fever
Activity 26: Autumn is Great Fun
Answer:
Work to Be Done harvest and threshing, making straw hats, gathering
hickory and hazelnuts, storing vegetables
Good Food to Eat nuts, stewed pumpkin, pumpkin pies, baked Hubbard
squash, hulled corn with syrup or milk
Activity 27: The Deer Lick
Answer:
What is a Deer Lick? - A deer lick is an area that has salt that deer like to
lick. These can happen naturally or be manmade.
How Did Pa Make One? Pa made a deer lick by spreading salt on a
patch of ground near a tree that he could hide in.
Wisconsin Activity 1: Where is Wisconsin?
Answer:
Help your student to once again locate Wisconsin, then locate, name and
color the neighboring states.

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Wisconsin Activity 2: Major Industries


Answer:
Dairy products
Farming
Paper products
Machinery
Beer
Tourism
Wisconsin Activity 3: Rivers and Lakes
Answer:
Rivers: Wisconsin River, Mississippi River, St. Croix River, Chippewa
River
Lakes: Lake Michigan, Lake Superior, Lake Winnebago
Wisconsin Activity 4: How Big Is It?
Answer:
Wisconsin covers 54,134 square miles.
Animals of the Big Woods Activity 1: Mini Report
Answer:
Answers will depend on animal chosen and student. You may wish to
assign outside research to older students.
Corn Husk Doll Activity 1: What Is a Corn Husk Doll?
Answer:
A corn husk doll is a doll that is actually made from corn husks. These
dolls were first made by Native Americans for religious purposes. Pioneer
children made them as toys.
Closing Activity
Answer:
Answers will vary by student.

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