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HO CHI MINH CITY UNIVERSITY OF EDUCATION

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH

FIRST CERTIFICATE IN ENGLISH


PREPARATION

SPEAKING HANDOUTS

Contents
Contents ...................................................................................................................... 2
B2 SPEAKING EXAMINATION DESCRIPTION ........................................................... 5
PART A: SPEAKING TASKS ..................................................................................... 13
Exercise 1 .............................................................................................................. 13
Exercise 2 .............................................................................................................. 14
Exercise 3 .............................................................................................................. 14
Exercise 4 .............................................................................................................. 15
Exercise 5 .............................................................................................................. 15
Exercise 6 .............................................................................................................. 16
Exercise 7 .............................................................................................................. 16
Exercise 8 .............................................................................................................. 17
Exercise 9 .............................................................................................................. 18
Exercise 10 ............................................................................................................ 18
Exercise 11 ............................................................................................................ 19
Exercise 12 ............................................................................................................ 19
Exercise 13 ............................................................................................................ 20
Exercise 14 ............................................................................................................ 20
Exercise 15 ............................................................................................................ 21
Exercise 16 ............................................................................................................ 21
Exercise 17 ............................................................................................................ 22
Exercise 18 ............................................................................................................ 22
Exercise 19 ............................................................................................................ 23
Exercise 20 ............................................................................................................ 23
Exercise 21 ............................................................................................................ 24
Exercise 22 ............................................................................................................ 24
Exercise 23 ............................................................................................................ 25
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Exercise 24 ............................................................................................................ 25
Exercise 25 ............................................................................................................ 26
Exercise 26 ............................................................................................................ 26
Exercise 27 ............................................................................................................ 27
Exercise 28 ............................................................................................................ 27
Exercise 29 ............................................................................................................ 28
Exercise 30 ............................................................................................................ 28
Exercise 31 ............................................................................................................ 29
Exercise 32 ............................................................................................................ 29
Exercise 33 ............................................................................................................ 30
Exercise 34 ............................................................................................................ 30
Exercise 35 ............................................................................................................ 31
Exercise 36 ............................................................................................................ 31
Exercise 37 ............................................................................................................ 32
Exercise 38 ............................................................................................................ 32
PART 2: TASK RESOURCES................................................................................... 33
Exercise 2 .............................................................................................................. 34
Exercise 3 .............................................................................................................. 34
Exercise 7 .............................................................................................................. 35
Exercise 8 .............................................................................................................. 36
Exercise 13 ............................................................................................................ 38
Exercise 17 ............................................................................................................ 39
Exercise18 ............................................................................................................. 41
Exercise 23 ............................................................................................................ 42
Exercise 27 ............................................................................................................ 44
Exercise 28 ............................................................................................................ 46
Exercise 32 ............................................................................................................ 48
Exercise 33 ............................................................................................................ 50
3

Exercise 36 ............................................................................................................ 51
Exercise 37 ............................................................................................................ 52
References ................................................................................................................ 53

B2 SPEAKING EXAMINATION DESCRIPTION


Common European Framework

Which communication themes


are the test takers expected to be
able to handle?

personal identification; personal qualities; house


and home; daily life; free time, entertainment;
intellectual and artistic pursuits; arts and crafts;
sports; travel; tourism; relations with other people;
health and body care; education; work and
careers; job interviews and meetings; money and
shopping; food and drink; services; banking;
places; language; weather; current events;
environment and pollution; climate; crime and
punishment; technology and tools; Internet-related
language; politics; marketing

Which communicative tasks are


the test takers expected to be
able to handle?

informal and some formal exchanges on a variety


of concrete topics relating to work, school, home,
and leisure activities, as well as to events of
current, public, and personal interest or individual
relevance; comparing experiences and attitudes;
narrating and describing in all major time frames
(past, present, and future) with good control of
aspect; providing structured arguments to support
opinions; constructing hypotheses; discussing
some topics abstractly, especially those relating to
learners particular interests and special fields of
expertise; confident handling of telephone
conversations; transacting basic business;
contributing to role plays

What kind of communicative


activities and strategies are the
test takers expected to be able to
handle?

Test-takers are expected to be able to interact


with native speakers with a degree of fluency and
spontaneity; sustain their opinions by providing
relevant examples and arguments; evaluate pros
and cons; make hypotheses and respond to
interlocutors hypotheses, at all times displaying
familiarity with turn-taking conventions and
strategies to initiate and terminate discourse. At
the higher end of the B2 band they may even
display competence in conversational
management (co-operation strategies),
negotiation skills and in the use of cohesion and
coherence devices. In other words they are active
and participative second or foreign language
users.

What text-types and what length


of text are the test takers

public speeches; job interviews; debates and


discussions; interpersonal dialogues and
5

expected to be able to handle?

conversations; telephone conversations; radio


broadcasts, news

What kind of tasks are the test


takers expected to be able to
handle?

pedagogic tasks reflecting real-life needs outside


the classroom, in the personal and public domains.

CEF scale for Overall Spoken


Interaction:
Can use the language fluently,
accurately and
effectively on a wide range of
general, academic,
vocational or leisure topics,
marking clearly the
relationship between ideas. Can
communicate
spontaneously with good
grammatical control
without much sign of having to
restrict what
he/she wants to say, adopting a
level of formality
appropriate to the
circumstances.

The learners spoken interaction abilities are


consistent with CEF Overall Spoken Interaction
parameters.

(Adapted from British Institutes. (2006). General Exam Description. B2 Level. Common
European Framework.
http://www.britishinstitutes.co.uk/userfiles/File/B2%20Exam%20presentation.pdf)

RELEVANT QUALITATIVE FACTORS FOR SPOKEN INTERACTION


LINGUISTIC RANGE
Edited from General
Linguistic Range; Vocabulary
Range, Flexibility

C2

C1

LINGUISTIC
ACCURACY
Edited from
Grammatical Accuracy
and Vocabulary Control

SOCIO-LINGUISTIC
Edited from Socio-linguistic
Appropriateness

FLUENCY

INTERACTION

Fluency, Flexibility

Edited from Turntaking,


Cooperating, Asking for
Clarification

Shows great flexibility


reformulating ideas in
differing linguistic forms to
convey finer shades of
meaning precisely, to give
emphasis, to differentiate and
to eliminate ambiguity. Also
has a good command of
idiomatic expressions and
colloquialisms.

Maintains consistent
grammatical control of
complex language, even
while attention is
otherwise engaged (e.g.
in forward planning, in
monitoring others
reactions).

Appreciates fully the sociolinguistic and sociocultural


implications of language
used by speakers and can
react accordingly.
Can mediate effectively
between speakers of the
target language and that of
his/her community of origin
taking account of
sociocultural and sociolinguistic differences.

Can express him/herself


spontaneously at length with a
natural colloquial flow, avoiding
or backtracking around any
difficulty so smoothly that the
interlocutor is hardly aware of it.

Can interact with ease


and skill, picking up and
using non-verbal and
intonational cues
apparently effortlessly.
Can interweave his/her
contribution into the joint
discourse with fully
natural turntaking,
referencing, allusion
making etc.

Has a good command of a


broad range of language
allowing him/her to select a
formulation to express
him/herself clearly in an
appropriate style on a wide
range of general, academic,

Consistently maintains a
high degree of
grammatical accuracy;
errors are rare, difficult
to spot and generally
corrected when they do
occur.

Can use language flexibly


and effectively for social
purposes, including
emotional, allusive and
joking usage.

Can express him/herself


fluently and spontaneously,
almost effortlessly. Only a conceptually difficult subject can
hinder a natural, smooth flow of
language.

Can select a suitable


phrase from a readily
available range of
discourse functions to
preface his remarks in
order to get or to keep the
floor and to relate his/her

professional or leisure topics


without having to restrict what
he/she wants to say.

B2

B1

own contributions skilfully


to those of other
speakers.

Has a sufficient range of


language to be able to give
clear descriptions, express
viewpoints on most general
topics, without much conspicuous searching for words,
using some complex
sentence forms to do so.

Shows a relatively high


degree of grammatical
control. Does not make
errors which cause
misunderstand-ing, and
can correct most of
his/her mistakes.

Can with some effort keep


up with and contribute to
group discussions even
when speech is fast and
colloquial.
Can sustain relationships
with native speakers without
unintentionally amusing or
irritating them or requiring
them to behave other than
they would with a native
speaker.

Can adjust to the changes of


direction, style and emphasis
normally found in conversation.
Can produce stretches of
language with a fairly even
tempo; although he/she can be
hesitant as he or she searches
for patterns and expressions,
there are few noticeably long
pauses.

Can initiate discourse,


take his/her turn when
appropriate and end
conversation when
he/she needs to, though
he/she may not always do
this elegantly. Can help
the discussion along on
familiar ground confirming
comprehension, inviting
others in, etc.

Has enough language to get


by, with sufficient vocabulary
to express him/herself with
some hesitation and circumlocutions on topics such as
family, hobbies and interests,
work, travel, and current
events.

Uses reasonably accurately a repertoire of


frequently used
routines and patterns
associated with more
predictable situations.

Can perform and respond to


basic language functions,
such as information
exchange and requests and
express opinions and
attitudes in a simple way. Is
aware of the salient
politeness conventions and
acts appropriately.

Can exploit a wide range of


simple language flexibly to
express much of what he/she
wants.
Can keep going comprehensibly, even though pausing for
grammatical and lexical planning and repair is very evident,
especially in longer stretches of
free production.

Can initiate, maintain and


close simple face-to-face
conversation on topics
that are familiar or of
personal interest. Can repeat back part of what
someone has said to confirm mutual understanding.

A2

A1

Uses basic sentence patterns


with memorised phrases,
groups of a few words and
formulae in order to communicate limited information in
simple everyday situations.

Has a very basic repertoire of


words and simple phrases
related to personal details
and particular concrete
situations.

Uses some simple


structures correctly, but
still systematically
makes basic mistakes.

Shows only limited


grammatical control of a
few simple grammatical
structures and sentence
patterns in a memorised
repertoire.

Can handle very short social


exchanges, using everyday
polite forms of greeting and
address. Can make and
respond to invitations,
apologies etc.

Can establish basic social


contact by using the simplest
everyday polite forms of:
greetings and farewells;
introductions; saying please,
thank you, sorry etc.

Can make him/herself understood in very short utterances,


even though pauses, false
starts and reformulation are
very evident. Can expand
learned phrases through simple
recombinations of their
elements.

Can indicate when he/she


is following but is rarely
able to understand
enough to keep
conversation going of
his/her own accord.

Can manage very short,


isolated, mainly pre-packaged
utterances, with much pausing
to search for expressions, to
articulate less familiar words,
and to repair communication.

Can interact in a simple


way but communication is
totally dependent on
repetition, rephrasing and
repair.

Can ask for attention.

Table C2: ORAL ASSESSMENT CRITERIA GRID (CEFR Table 3)


RANGE

ACCURACY

FLUENCY

INTERACTION

COHERENCE

C2

Shows great flexibility


reformulating ideas in
differing linguistic forms
to convey finer shades of
meaning precisely, to
give emphasis, to
differentiate and to
eliminate ambiguity. Also
has a good command of
idiomatic expressions and
colloquialisms.

Maintains consistent
grammatical control of
complex language, even
while attention is
otherwise engaged (e.g.
in forward planning, in
monitoring others'
reactions).

Can express him/herself


spontaneously at length
with a natural colloquial
flow, avoiding or
backtracking around any
difficulty so smoothly that
the interlocutor is hardly
aware of it.

Can interact with ease


and skill, picking up and
using non-verbal and
intonational cues
apparently effortlessly.
Can interweave his/her
contribution into the joint
discourse with fully
natural turntaking,
referencing, allusion
making etc.

Can create coherent and


cohesive discourse
making full and
appropriate use of a
variety of organisational
patterns and a wide range
of connectors and other
cohesive devices.

C1

Has a good command of


a broad range of
language allowing him/her
to select a formulation to
express him/ herself
clearly in an appropriate
style on a wide range of
general, academic,
professional or leisure
topics without having to
restrict what he/she wants
to say.

Consistently maintains a
high degree of grammatical accuracy; errors are
rare, difficult to spot and
generally corrected when
they do occur.

Can express him/herself


fluently and
spontaneously, almost
effortlessly. Only a conceptually difficult subject
can hinder a natural,
smooth flow of language.

Can select a suitable


phrase from a readily
available range of
discourse functions to
preface his remarks in
order to get or to keep the
floor and to relate his/her
own contributions skilfully
to those of other
speakers.

10

Can produce clear,


smoothly flowing, wellstructured speech,
showing controlled use of
organisational patterns,
connectors and cohesive
devices.

B2
+
B2

Has a sufficient range of


language to be able to
give clear descriptions,
express viewpoints on
most general topics,
without much conspicuous searching for
words, using some
complex sentence forms
to do so.

Shows a relatively high


degree of grammatical
control. Does not make
errors which cause
misunderstanding, and
can correct most of
his/her mistakes.

Can produce stretches of


language with a fairly
even tempo; although
he/she can be hesitant as
he or she searches for
patterns and expressions,
there are few noticeably
long pauses.

Can initiate discourse,


take his/her turn when
appropriate and end
conversation when he/she
needs to, though he/she
may not always do this
elegantly. Can help the
discussion along on
familiar ground confirming
comprehension, inviting
others in, etc.

Can use a limited number


of cohesive devices to link
his/her utterances into
clear, coherent discourse,
though there may be
some jumpiness in a
long contribution.

Has enough language to


get by, with sufficient
vocabulary to express
him/herself with some
hesitation and circumlocutions on topics such as
family, hobbies and
interests, work, travel,
and current events.

Uses reasonably accurately a repertoire of


frequently used routines
and patterns associated
with more predictable
situations.

Can keep going comprehensibly, even though


pausing for grammatical
and lexical planning and
repair is very evident,
especially in longer
stretches of free production.

Can initiate, maintain and


close simple face-to-face
conversation on topics
that are familiar or of
personal interest. Can repeat back part of what
someone has said to confirm mutual understanding.

Can link a series of


shorter, discrete simple
elements into a
connected, linear
sequence of points.

B1
+
B1

A2

11

+
A2

Uses basic sentence


patterns with memorised
phrases, groups of a few
words and formulae in
order to communicate
limited information in
simple everyday
situations.

Uses some simple


structures correctly, but
still systematically makes
basic mistakes.

Can make him/herself


understood in very short
utterances, even though
pauses, false starts and
reformulation are very
evident.

Can ask and answer


questions and respond to
simple statements. Can
indicate when he/she is
following but is rarely able
to understand enough to
keep conversation going
of his/her own accord.

Can link groups of words


with simple connectors
like "and, "but" and
"because".

A1

Has a very basic


repertoire of words and
simple phrases related to
personal details and
particular concrete
situations.

Shows only limited control


of a few simple
grammatical structures
and sentence patterns in
a memorised repertoire.

Can manage very short,


isolated, mainly prepackaged utterances, with
much pausing to search
for expressions, to
articulate less familiar
words, and to repair
communication.

Can ask and answer


questions about personal
details. Can interact in a
simple way but
communication is totally
dependent on repetition,
rephrasing and repair.

Can link words or groups


of words with very basic
linear connectors like
and or then.

(Adapted from Relating Language Examinations to the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages: Learning, Teaching,
Assessment (CEFR). URL: www.coe.int/lang)

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PART A: SPEAKING TASKS


Exercise 1

(Mark Harrison)
Ask and answer the following questions.
Where you live

Where do you live?

How long have you been living there?

What kind of building do you live in?

Who lives with you?

What do you like / dislike about the

village / district where you live?

town /
Travel

Have you been to many other countries? (Which ones?)

Would you like to travel more?

(Where?)
What's the best country / city / region

that
Which country / city / region would you most like to

visit?...
Describe a journey that you often make.

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you've visited? (Why?)


(Why?)

Exercise 2

Student A

Look at the two photographs 1A and 1B. They show people

doing outdoor activities. Compare the photographs and say what the people
are trying to do.
Student A talks on his / her own for about 1 minute.

Student B

Which of the activities would you prefer to do, and why?

Student B talks on his /her own for about 20 seconds.

Student B

Look at the two photographs 2A and 2B. They show people's

rooms. Compare the photographs and say whose rooms they might be.
Student B talks on his / her own for about 1 minute.

Student A

Which of the rooms is most similar to yours, and in what

ways?
Student A talks on his / her own for about 20 seconds.

Exercise 3

Imagine that a local museum is trying to increase visitor numbers. Look at


the ideas in the appendix for special exhibitions that are being considered by
the museum.

First, talk to each other about how good each of the ideas is. Then decide
which two would attract the most visitors to the museum.
Students A and B discuss this together for about 3 minutes.
14

Exercise 4

Students A and B ask and answer the following questions

Do you like going to museums or art galleries?

(Why / Why

not?)

Which of the subjects interests you the most and which interests you the

least?
(Why?)
What are the most well-known museums or art galleries in the place you
come from? What do they have in them?
What kind of things do museums offer to attract young people?
What is the most interesting museum or art gallery that you've been to?
(Why?)
Which museum or art gallery would you most like to visit? Where is it?
What does it have in it? What would you like to see there? (Why?)
Some people think that museums and art galleries are boring. Do you
agree?

Exercise 5

Students A and student B ask and answer the following questions


Family and friends
Describe briefly the members of your family.
Describe briefly one or two of your best friends.
What kind of things do you talk about with your friends?
What influence have your family and friends had on you?
15

What interests do your family and friends have?

Exercise 6

Students A and B ask and answer the following questions

Money and possessions


What would you buy if you suddenly had a lot of money?
Do you want to be richer than you are now?

(Why? / Why not?)

What do people of your age generally want to buy?


What are your favourite possessions?

(Why?)

(Why?)

(Why?)

What would you like to own in the future?

(Why?)

Exercise 7
Student A

Look at the two photographs 1A and 1B. They show adverts

for films. Compare the photographs and say what the characteristics of
each kind of film are.
Student A talks on his / her own for about 1 minute.

Student B

Which of the films would you prefer to see, and why?

Student B talks on his / her own for about 20 seconds.


Student B

Look at the two photographs 2A and 2B. They show people

cooking meals. Compare the photographs and say what you think the
situation is in each photograph.
Student B talks on his /her own for about 1 minute.

16

Student A

Which of the people cooking would you prefer to be, and

why?
Student A talks on his / her own for about 20 seconds.

Exercise 8

Imagine that you are organizing a competition at the place where you work
or study. The prize for the winner is going to be a special day and you have
to choose what kind of special day the prize will be. Look at the special days
offered by a company in their brochure in the appendix.

First, talk to each other about how attractive each of the possible prizes
would be. Then decide which one should be the prize.

Students A and B discuss this together for about 3 minutes.

17

Exercise 9

Students A and student B ask and answer the following questions


Which of the special days would you like to experience personally?
(Why?)
Which of the special days would you definitely not want to take part in?
(Why?)
What dangerous sports are popular in your country?
What makes people want to take part in dangerous sports?
Why do people like going to theme parks? Which ones are good and which
ones are not, in your opinion?
Some people say that young people don't have a wide range of interests. Do
you agree?

Exercise 10

Student A and student B ask and answer the following questions


Sport
What's your favorite sport?

(Why?)

Which sport(s) do you dislike?

(Why?)

Which sports are popular in your country?


Do you support a particular team? Is it a successful team?
What is your experience of taking part in sports?

18

Exercise 11

Students A and student B ask and answer the following questions


The news
Do you take an interest in what's happening in the news? (Why? / Why
not?)
What newspaper(s) do you read? Describe it / them.
What is the news on TV like in your country?
Apart from newspapers and TV, what other sources of news can you use?
What's your opinion of the way the media present the news?

Exercise 12
Student A

Look at the two photographs 1A and 1B. They show people

taking photographs. Compare the photographs and say why the person is
taking the photograph.
Student A talks on his / her own for about 1 minute.

Student B

Which of the photographs being taken do you prefer, and why?

Student B talks on his /her own for about 20 seconds.

Student B

Look at the two photographs 2A and 2B. They show people at

airports.
Compare the photographs and say what the situation is in each one.
Student B talks on his /her own for about 1 minute.

Student A

Which of the people would you prefer to be, and why?

Student A talks on his / her own for about 20 seconds


19

Exercise 13
Imagine that you are responsible for planning a one-day festival that will
take place on a local field. Look at the plan of the field and at the possible
things to include in the festival in the appendix.

First, talk to each other about which things to include in the festival. Then
decide where each of them should be.

Students A and B discuss this together for about 3 minutes.

Exercise 14
Students A and student B ask and answer the following questions
What kind of local events take place where you come from? Do young
people take part in or attend them?
Would you like to organize an event like this?

(Why? / Why not?)

What's the best event you've ever attended? Why was it so good?
What's the worst event you've ever attended? Why was it so bad?
Do you think that local life is changing where you come from? (Why /
Why not?)
Some people think that in the modern world, local communities are not as
important as they used to be. Do you agree?

20

Exercise 15
Students A and B ask and answer the following questions
Music
What's your favorite kind of music? (Why?)
What kind(s) of music don't you like?

(Why?)

What kinds of music are popular with young people in your country?
(Why?)
Have you ever tried to play a musical instrument? Did you do well?
Which instrument(s) would you like to be able to play?

(Why?)

Exercise 16
Students A and B ask and answer the following questions
Technology / Gadgets
What pieces of technology or electronic gadgets do you own?
How did you learn how to use pieces of technology or electronic gadgets^
What do you think are the advantages and disadvantages of new technology
for communicating with other people? (Why?)

Which pieces of technology or electronic gadgets would you like to own?


(Why?)

21

Exercise 17
Student A

Look at the two photographs 1A and 1B. They show people

working. Compare the photographs and say what the people's working
lives are like.
Student A talks on his / her own for about 1 minute.

Student B

Which of the situations would you prefer to be in, and why?

Student B talks on his / her own for about 20 seconds.

Student B

Look at the two photographs 2A and 2B. They show visitors

to a city. Compare the photographs and say what kind of trips the people
are on.
Student B talks on his /her own for about 1 minute.

Student A

Which of the trips would you prefer to lake?

Student A talks on his/her own for about 20 seconds

Exercise 18
Imagine that a friend of yours has a friend from another country staying
with him/her. Your friend has to go out for a day next week and has asked
you to look after the visitor for a day. Look at the ideas for what you could
do with the visitor for that day in the appendix.

22

First, talk to each other about whether each of the ideas would be good for
the visitor and good for you. Then decide which two activities to do with
the visitor and plan the day.
Students A and B discuss this together for about 3 minutes.

Exercise 19
Students A and B ask and answer the following questions

If a visitor from another country came to stay with you, what would

be the first place


you would take that person to? (Why?)
Do many overseas visitors come to your country?

(Why? / Why

not?)
When you go out with friends, what sort of places do you go to and what
do you do there?
How active are young people in your country? Do they prefer to do
things that involve sitting down for long periods?
What entertainment is available in the place where you live? What other
kinds of entertainment do you think should be available?
Some people say that too much entertainment is available to people and
so they are unable to entertain themselves. Do you agree?

Exercise 20
Students A and B ask and answer the following questions
Personal history
How many different places have you lived in during your life so far?
23

Describe the home or homes you have lived in during your life. What kind
of education and/or jobs have you had in your life so far?
What do you like most and least about the town/village/area where you
live at the moment?
Do you think you will continue to live in the same place for a long time?
(Why?/Why not?)

Exercise 21
Students A and B ask and answer the following questions
Reading
How much time do you spend reading?
Do you read a newspaper regularly? (Why/Why not?)
What kind of magazines do you like reading? (Why?)
What kind of books do you like reading? Do you prefer fiction or nonfiction? (Why?) Describe a book that you particularly enjoyed. What was
good about it?
Exercise 22
Students A and B ask and answer the following questions
Games and sports
Which indoor games do you play regularly?
Which indoor games are common in your country?
Do you take part in any outdoor sports regularly? (Which?)
Do you like watching any outdoor sports, live or on TV? (Which?)
Which game(s) or sport(s) do you dislike? (Why?)

24

Exercise 23
Student A: Look at photographs 1A and 1B. They show crowds of people at
different events. Compare the photographs and say what kind of experience
you think the different crowds of people are having.
Student A talks on his/her own for about 1 minute.

Student B: Which crowd would you prefer to be a member of?


Student B talks on his/her own for about 20 seconds.

Student B: Look at photographs 2A and 2B. They show different groups of


people celebrating somebody's birthday. Compare the photographs and say
what you think people did in order to organize the different birthday
celebrations.
Student B talks on his/her own for about 1 minute.

Student A: What kind of celebration would you prefer for your birthday?
Student A talks on his/her own for about 20 seconds.

Exercise 24
Imagine that you are the judges of a photography competition. The title of
the competition is 'Perfect Surroundings'. Look at the photographs that you
have to consider as possible winners of the competition on page 122.
25

First, talk to each other about what each entry shows and how effective
each photograph is in showing 'perfect surroundings'. Then decide which
photograph should win the competition and which should come second.

Students A and B discuss this together for about 3 minutes.

Exercise 25
Students A and B ask and answer the following questions
Do you take a lot of photographs? (Why?/Why not?)
What are your favourite photographs that you possess? Why are they
your favourites?
When do you/your friends/your family take photographs? What do
you/they do with these photographs?
Some people say that taking lots of photographs is a waste of time.
What do you think?
What kind of surroundings do you particularly like to be in? (Why?)
What kind of surroundings do/would you dislike being in? (Why?)

Exercise 26
Students A and B ask and answer the following questions
Habits and routines
What happens on a typical day for you?
Describe a journey that you often make.
What do you usually do at weekends/in your free time?
26

What do you usually do/eat at mealtimes?


Do you have any habits that annoy other people? (What?)

Exercise 27
1

Travelling to work

Student A: Look at photographs 1A and 1B. They show people travelling


to work in different ways. Compare the photographs and say what you
think are the advantages and disadvantages of the different ways of
travelling to work.
Student A talks on his/her own for about 1 minute.

Student B: Which way of travelling to work would you prefer?


Student B talks on his/her own for about 20 seconds.

Shouting

Student B: Look at photographs 2Aand 2B. They show different people


shouting in different situations. Compare the photographs and say why you
think the people are shouting.
Student B talks on his/her own for about 1 minute.

Student A: In what sort of situations do you shout?


Student A talks on his/her own for about 20 seconds.

Exercise 28

27

Look at the pictures in the appendix, which show various skills.


First, talk to each other about the advantages of having each of these skills.
Then decide which two skills are the most important for people to have.
Students A and B discuss this together for about 3 minutes.

Exercise 29
Students A and B ask and answer the following questions
Which of these skills do you have?
Is there a skill that you would like to learn? (Which? Why?)
Are there any skills that you have tried to learn but been unable to learn?
(Which? Why?)
How do people learn the skills that are useful in life?
Which practical skills do you think people should learn at school and
which practical skills do people learn at school in your country?
Some people say that practical skills are more important than academic
ability. What do you think?

Exercise 30
Students A and B ask and answer the following questions
Jobs and careers
What kind of job would you like to have in the future?
How easy/difficult will it be for you to get that job? (Why?)
What kind of jobs and careers do young people in your country want to
have?
Which job(s) would you really not want to do? (Why?)
28

Which jobs do you think are particularly easy to do and which are very
difficult? (Why?)

Exercise 31
Students A and B ask and answer the following questions
Fashion
Do you like to wear fashionable clothes? (Why?/Why not?)
What are the current fashions in clothes in your country?
What kind of music is fashionable among young people in your
country?
Do you think that young people pay too much attention to fashions in
general? (Why?/Why not?)
Which fashion(s) do you think is/are particularly bad for young people?
(Why?)

Exercise 32
1

Waiting

Student A: Look at photographs 1A and 1B. They show people waiting in


different situations. Compare the photographs and say how the people
might be feeling.
Student A talks on his/her own for about 1 minute.

Student B: How would you feel in these situations?


Student B talks on his/her own for about 20 seconds.

TV shows
29

Student B: Look at photographs 2A and 2B. They show people appearing


in different kinds of TV programme. Compare the photographs and say
what you think people enjoy about watching these kinds of TV
programmes.
Student B talks on his/her own for about 1 minute.

Student A: Which kind of programme do you prefer to watch?


Student A talks on his/her own for about 20 seconds.

Exercise 33
Imagine that your school, college or workplace is organizing an Open Day,
when visitors will come to see and find out about the place. People have
been asked to help with various aspects of the event. Look at the pictures
of things connected with the event.

First, talk to each other about what each aspect of the event will involve.
Then decide which one you will offer to help with.

Students A and B discuss this together for about 3 minutes.

Exercise 34
Students A and B ask and answer the following questions
Would you enjoy helping at an event like this? (Why?/Why not?)
Have you ever organized or helped to organize an event? (Which?
How?)
30

What kinds of events are organized at the place where you study or
work?
Is it common for people to organize events for charities in your country?
(What events? Which charities?)
Do many people in your country do voluntary work to help others?
(Why?/Why not? What kinds?)
Some people say that governments and not voluntary organizations
should provide money for everyone who needs it. What do you think?

Exercise 35
Students A and B ask and answer the following questions

Visiting places
What's the most exciting place you've visited? (Why?)
Which place(s) have you been to that were disappointing for
you? (Why?)
Which place(s) would you particularly like to visit? (Why?)
Which place(s) would you really not like to visit? (Why?)
Do a lot of tourists visit the place where you live/your country?
(Why?/Why not?)

Exercise 36
1

Loading equipment
31

Student A: Look at photographs 1A and 1B. They show people putting


different equipment into vehicles for transport. Compare the photographs
and say why you think the people are transporting the different equipment.
Student A talks on his/her own for about 1 minute.

Student B: Which situation would you prefer to be in?


Student B talks on his/her own for about 20 seconds.

Extreme climates

Student B: Look at photographs 2A and 2B. They show people in different


kinds of extreme climate. Compare the photographs and say what
difficulties the people might face in the different places.
Student B talks on his/her own for about I minute.

Student A: Which of the places would you prefer to go to?


Student A talks on his/her own for about 20 seconds.

Exercise 37
Look at the pictures that show different images of friendship in the
appendix .
First, talk to each other about what aspects of friendship each picture
shows. Then decide which two pictures show the most important aspects of
friendship.
Students A and B discuss this together for about 3 minutes.
Exercise 38

32

Students A and B ask and answer the following questions


Do you find it easy to make friends? (Why?/Why not?)
Do you prefer to spend time with one friend or with a group of
friends? (Why?)
What qualities do you think are important in a friend? (Why?)
Some people say that friends are the most important thing in life. Do
you agree?
What kind of person could never become a friend of yours? (Why?)
Do you think you will always have the same friends? (Why?/Why
not?)

PART 2: TASK RESOURCES

33

Exercise 2

Exercise 3

34

Exercise 7

35

Exercise 8

36

37

Exercise 13

38

Exercise 17

39

40

Exercise18

41

Exercise 23

42

43

Exercise 27

44

45

Exercise 28

46

47

Exercise 32

48

49

Exercise 33

50

Exercise 36

51

Exercise 37

52

References
Acklam, R., & Crace, A. (2008). Going for Gold. Pearson Longman.
Cambridge First Certificate in English 5. (2005). Cambridge: Cambridge
University Press .
Evans, V. (2008). FCE Practice exam papers 1. Berkshire: Express
Publishing.
Evans, V. (2008). FCE Practice exam papers 2. Berkshire: Express
Publishing.
.Harrison, M. (2008). FCE Practice Tests. Oxford: Oxford University
Press.
Harrison, M. (2010). FCE Testbuilder . Oxford: Macmillan .
Mann, M., & Taylore-Knowles, S. (2005). Use of English. Oxford:
Macmillan .
Osbone, C. (2008). First Certificate Practice Tests. HEINLE CENGAGE
Learning.
Roberts, P. (2008). Cambridge First Certificate Reaading. Cambridge:
Cambridge University Press.
Simmons, A. (2008). Mastering the FCE Examination. Burlington Books.

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