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RUNNING HEAD: Behavioral Intervention Plan

Jamey Flaccavento

EDS-534-51HY
Classroom Management in Inclusive Settings
Professor Haspel

Monmouth University

Behavioral Intervention Plan

Fall 2015

Behavioral Intervention Plan

Table of Contents

Characteristics of Learner and Setting..Page 3-4


Goals and Specific Behavioral ObjectivesPage 5
Baseline DataPage 6-7
Interventions.Page 8-10
Evaluation/Analysis.Page 11-12
References.Page 13
Appendix.Page 14-22

Behavioral Intervention Plan

Characteristics of Learner and Setting


Learner:
Name- Mario (pseudonym)
Age- 5
Gender- Male
Race- White
Disability- None classified, anger management issues noticed
Physical Characteristics/Needs- Mario shows no abnormal physical characteristics. He is one
of the bigger children in his class which does cause some concern if his anger was to reach a
physical level.
Academic Levels/Grade Levels- Marios academics seem average or above average compared
to his peers thus far. Given that he is only in Kindergarten, many aspects are based more on observation than hard data. As the year progresses and more data is collected, more information
will be added to pertinent areas.
Behavioral/Social Levels- Mario seems to be friendly with his classmates. In the start of the
year he was the first to help a fellow student (who happens to be classified) in the hallway as well
as in the classroom. After the first week, Mario began to show some outburst of anger. Some of
these are small and easily fixed with teacher assistance and others are disruptive to the class as
a whole. This anger has seemed to hinder his ability to make friends slightly but not totally. Mario
has still been able to bond with the other kindergarteners, however sometimes his anger is directed at them which has caused others to shy away at times.
Current and Past Placements- Currently Mario is placed in Mrs. Langos Kindergarten class in
Betty McElman Elementary School in West Long Branch New Jersey. It is an inclusive classroom
with a regular education teacher, a special education teacher (90% of in class time) and a one on
one aide for another student. I am also in the classroom two full days a week for this semester
and will take over in January as the student teacher. The class includes 21 Kindergarteners, 12
boys and 9 girls, 5 of which are classified special education students with a few who will likely
become classified by the end of the year.
Other- Mario usually has typically good days with small or large outbursts of anger throughout.
Some of the noticeable triggers involve a few dances that are done throughout the day. There is a
months of the year dance done during calendar time to the tune of the macarina. Every time he
just stands there angrily and says its too hard. The same happens when we sing and dance to
the rise and shine song. Interestingly, Mario does not have the same reaction to Go Noodle
videos which also involve dancing. Other outbursts are notices when he is not able to answer a

Behavioral Intervention Plan

question or add to a class conversation, when his crayons break, and when other students are
not following the directions given.

Community and School:


Geographic Location- Betty McElman Elementary School is
a PreK-4th grade school attached to the towns middle school
in West Long Branch New Jersey. West Long Branch sits
only about a mile and a half away from the Atlantic Ocean
shore line and is a suburban Monmouth County town.

Community Population- According to the 2014 census


quick facts, West Long Branch is home to 30,522 people, 51.9% of which are white, 14.2%
African American and 28.1% Latino. 40.9% of households stated they spoke a language other
than English. The poverty level is higher than NJ as a whole with 15.9% compared to 10.4% and
an average household income of $49,218 compared to $71,629.

School Population- According to Start Class, Betty McElmon Elementary School houses 237
students with 10:1 student ratio. There are slightly more boys than girls enrolled and less than
10% of students are eligible for free or reduced lunch.

Other Environmental Information- Both of Marios parents are educators in New Jersey and are
appropriately involved in their sons academic and social life.

Behavioral Intervention Plan

Goals and Specific Behavioral Objectives

Overall Long-Term Goals: Considering the fact that Mario is not classified for any behavioral issues
and his young age, the long term goals involve him being able to control his anger on his own. If the
correct interventions are in place in kindergarten and he learns how to use them, this issue may not
continue throughout his school life.

Target Behavior: Marios exhibits a few small target behaviors that amount into anger outbursts. For
his small outbursts he clenches his jaw/fists, tilts his eyes and will occasionally hit something and/or
yell. His large outbursts consist of the same behaviors but are classified as large due to the amount of
time it takes to bring him down from them. The small outbursts are easily controlled by small teacher
intervention (after observation and collaboration about the issues). The larger outbursts disrupt the
class and/or involve other students and take a longer time/more effort to diffuse.

Purpose: Mario is a good student with potential and makes a valiant effort at making friends and establishing relationships. When he acts out because of anger he could drive away friends and disrupt his
education. The purpose of this intervention is so that Mario can learn to prevent or defuse these emotions in a manner that allow him to keep his positive social interactions and succeed academically without teacher involvement.

Specific Learning Objectives:


1. Mario will go two full school days without any anger outbursts or intervention strategies.
2. Mario will be able to self monitor his anger and imply an self intervention if those emotions occur in order to prevent an outburst.

Behavioral Intervention Plan

Baseline Data
For Data Forms See Appendix A

Current Status of Students Behavior


Student struggles with controlling his anger. He is extremely sensitive to other peoples actions and also
hard on himself. When the student does not get his way (i.e. is not called on, does not get to go first in
partner work) he yells, stomps, and clenches his teeth. When the student can not compete a task asked
of him (i.e.months of the year dance, writing es) he gets extremely upset, cries, and sometimes refuses
to complete the task at hand.
Multiple Types of Assessment Data
ABC Data
The ABC data showed that when Mario does not get his way he has difficulty regulating his anger
and reacts outwardly. The antecedents, although wide in range, can be narrowed into two main t
types; difficult tasks and not getting his way. In response to these antecedents, Mario reacted in
either avoidance or attention getting behavior and the consequences were either attention given
or disciplinary action (in this case having his clip moved down) respectively. In a few cases, the
behavior was ignored but that was only relevant in one of the situations recorded in the ABC
chart.

Difficult Tasks

Avoidance

Attention

Not his way

Attention getting

Discipline

Motivation Assessment Scale


The results of the Motivation Assessment Scale reflected part of
what was represented in the ABC data. Mario scored the highest in
attention seeking and tangible. Attention seeking matched what
was seen in previous data however tangible does not. Mario did
score high on escape as well which is reflective of the observation
data. Marios main intention seems to be to have everything be in
order. This order, however, is his own personal preferences. There
fore, when he witnesses something out of order he employs
various functions in attempt to mediate the situation whether that
be avoidance, attention seeking, or tangible in nature. Although
escape was not the highest scoring in this test, it will be concentrated on in the intervention plan
for it most effects Marios and his classmates concentration and inevitably education.

Behavioral Intervention Plan

Frequency Chart
For seven sessions spanning between 5 and 7 hours long, Marios behavior was recorded on a
frequency chart. The sessions totaled 40 hours of observation and occurred over a 8 week period. During the observations, if Mario outwardly expressed his anger a tally mark was recorded.
The outburst were categorized into two types; small outbursts were considered as such if they
were easily resolved by a teacher or the student himself. These usually were only minimally disruptive to the class or not at all. These outbursts clearly effect Mario, however he is able to get
back into the lesson with some assistance. Larger outbursts effected Marios entire day. Although
most of the class can go on with this happening, Mario remains in an agitated state for most of
the day and has smaller outbursts much more frequently. Over the 40 hours, Mario had about 40
small outbursts as well as one large one. This translates to a one outburst per hour. The large
outbursts were much less frequent (ac-cording to the data
only about 2% of the time)
however, they are much more
taxing on the student as well as
his peers and teachers. Before
the data was taken it was clear
that Mario had a difficult time
controlling his anger, however
after translating it into numbers,
it is clear that intervention is
warranted.

Intensity Scale

In addition to frequency, the intensity of the outbursts


was measured (see appendix A for intensity scale). Intensity of an outburst is measured from 0-5 with 5 being
the greatest Marios outbursts, although short in time
frame, average around a 3.76 in intensity. The adjacent
graph represents the results of this data.

Intensity Average

5
Intensity Scale

4
3
2
1
10/5

10/6 10/13 10/20 10/21 10/26 10/27

Date

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Interventions
Immediate Behavior Response Plan
Student Strengths
Mario is social and easily motivated. He is smart and quick to catch on to new ideas.
Operational Definition of Target Behavior
Mario has difficult controlling his emotions; especially anger. The target behavior is when he
clenches his teeth, slants his eyes, grunts, yells, hits something, stomps and/or folds his arms.
Patterns of Behavior
The behavior occurs when Mario is faced with a task he deems too difficult or when things are not
going his way. It does not occur when he is familiar with a task and finds it easy or all elements
seem to be in order for him.
Results of Function-based Assessment of Motivation Assessment Scale
The Motivation Assessment Scale showed that the function of Marios behavior was split between
attention seeking, avoidance, and tangible. For the case of this Intervention Plan, the motivation
of the behavior will be seen as avoidance for it has the greatest potential to effect his education.
Results of Direct Method of Data Collection
The frequency data collected reveled that Mario had approximately one small outburst per hour.
There was one large outburst in the 40 hours observed which translates to about 2% of the time
in class.
Resulting Hypothesis
Student seeks attention, attempts to avoid difficult activities or obtain tangible objects by expressing his anger through physical expressions and actions when faced with difficult tasks or is unhappy with teacher/student made decisions.
Initial Support Strategies
In order to lower the chance of the behaviors happening, planned teacher time will be put in place
as well as adding choices for the student.
Replacement Plan
In order to replace the angry actions, the teacher will teach Mario ways of coping with anger and
ways of letting it out in more productive fashions.
Response Plan
In order to encourage less of the behavior a reward system will be employed for days in which no
angry behaviors are exhibited.
Interventions
Intervention 1: Planned Tell Me Time
Student will have a planned tell me time during afternoon centers in which he can meet with the
teacher and express anything that has bothered him through out the day and how to cope with it

Behavioral Intervention Plan

more easily. Some of the tasks Mario finds difficult can be made simpler by a few one on one
times. An example of this is the months of the year dance. This, and any other routine tasks he
dislikes, can be explained/modeled during tell me time or at other conveniences. The class is al
ready riddled with built in choices during two center periods and independent reading time. In order to provide more, his parents will be asked to send in some books he is known to enjoy so that
he can have the option of reading them or art supplies for center time. Other choices will be
added when it comes to handwriting time. Mario finds letters that he can not create perfectly frustrating. To ease this difficult task, Mario will be given the option of tracing the letter a few times
first before he begins to write freely.
Intervention 2: Number Based Emotion Chart & Spin Chart
The ultimate goal is for Mario to be able to self regulate his anger and be able to
monitor his emotions and employ coping strategies when necessary in order to avoid disrupting
friendships and/or requiring discipline. Mario will be able to learn these strategies and decipher
his favorites during tell me time. Once the teacher has learned his preferred methods of coping, a
flick chart will be create and used when Mario gets to a certain level of anger.
In order to be able to recognize his own emotions, Mario will be introduced to the Five-point
Scale (pictured in Appendix B). The teacher will discuss with him how he feels at each stage.
After defining the levels of his emotions, the teacher will explain that when he is at a 3 or above
he should spin his wheel (Appendix B) for a coping strategy, or pick his favorite. When he is at a
3, if he does not want to use a strategy that is alright but he must know that he should not interact
with his peers until he reaches a 2. If he reaches a 4 or above a coping strategy must be used.
The flick chart is a round chart with five options of coping strategies listed. Mario can either flick
the arrow to choose a strategy or pick on of his own. The five options are as follows: 1. Play with
his lavender scented play dough, 2. Take a walk, 3. Use breathing board, 4. Do jumping jacks,
and 5. Color.
Intervention 3: Reward System
Considering the ultimate goal is for Mario to self employ alternatives to anger, he will be rewarded
when he shows this. During teacher time, the teacher will ask Mario how he feels he did during
the day, where he fell on the emotion scale at different points of the day and what he did to help
fix it. At the end of the conversation, Mario and the teacher will decide if he gets a sticker for the
day. The sticker does not mean he did not get angry but it is given if he recognized his emotions
and handled it to the best of his ability. Teacher should emphasize Marios ability to self monitor
here and encourage him to do most of the decision making and planning for how to handle things
better in the future if necessary. The parents will be informed and involved in the process and
monitoring of the progress. Stickers will amount weekly to a goal chosen by the student.

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Relationships to Theories
The interventions employed in this study relate to the student centered approach theories. In all
interventions the student is allowed to make executive decisions. In intervention 1 (teacher tellme time), the teacher is listening to student opinions and struggles and uses them to evaluate
progress and alter interventions. For intervention 2 (emotions and spin chart) the student defines
the levels of emotion based on his own feelings and decided what his options on the spin chart
are. Although the teacher can prompt him to use his chart, the student predominantly decides
when it is time to use the spin chart based on his self-defined emotional scale. Intervention 3
matches with Wong and Wongs idea of not declining but managing. The student runs this as
well. While the teacher guides the questioning, the student decides whether or not he earned a
sticker for that day. Intervention 3 also follows a student centered approach by not disciplining for
wrong doing. Even if the student had anger outbursts throughout the day, if he handled them to
the best of his ability he is still able to earn a reward.
Results of Interventions
During the applications of the interventions both frequency
and intensity data was recorded. Pre-intervention, the small
outbursts averaged one per hour. During the interventions
(which were observed for a total of 24 hours) there were 21

Frequency
10
8
6
4
2
0

outbursts. This translate to .875 outbursts an hour. This

11/2

11/3

# of Hours
Small Outbursts
Large Outbursts

11/9

shows slight progress is rather unreliable given the short time of analysis. The intensity data
shows that during pre-intervention observations the intensity of
Intensity
5
4
3
2
1
0

the outbursts averaged a 3.76. Intensity data during post-intervention shows that there was a slight improvement in intensity
with an average intensity of 2.875. This could be attributed to
the interventions or to Mario simply recognizing that his behavior is different and something to be monitored. In either in-

Pre-Intervention
Post Intervention

stances, the behavior will be continually monitored and


changed if necessary by the teacher.
Plan for Monitoring Implementation of Interventions

In order to ensure that the interventions are remaining relevant and effective, the teacher will take
notes at each tell me time. After reviewing her notes she will give the day an overall rating based
upon the intensity scale used in the baseline and analysis data. At the end of the week, the
teacher will take notes on the progress based on the numbered data. If things should get worse
or stay stagnant for more than two weeks (unless that stagnancy is in 1s or 2s) the teacher and
Mario will re-evaluate the strategies used and make changes where applicable (see chart in appendix 3).

11/10

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Evaluation/Analysis
I. Evaluation of Data
As previously described, the post-intervention data as compared to the pre-intervention data show a slight
progression in frequency and a more impressive improvement in intensity. In both sets of data there was
one large outburst, while pre-intervention, small outbursts averaged approximately one per hour and postintervention about .8 per hour. As for intensity, the average moved down nearly a full point between pre
and post intervention. This data has a few limitations given that it was only collected over a period of 24
hours. Also, the collector/implementer of the interventions was only in class two days per week, leaving
the rest of the week relatively without intervention. Given more time with direct intervention, the results
could have effected.

III. Analysis of Success


The interventions used proved as a successful start to the ultimate goal of Mario self-regulating his anger.
Just having him define his own emotions on the color scale allowed him to view his emotions in a measurable fashion which in turn resulted in him implementing his own interventions. His spin chart was only
used twice during his post-intervention collection and both were teacher directed uses. With more practice and teacher time, it seems as if Mario would be able to do so on his own. Marios age also comes into
play with this analysis. Being only five years old and in his first year of general education, Mario is very
young in terms of self awareness. With time and maturity, his self recognition of emotion and implementation of interventions is bound to improve.

IV. Other Interventions


Some interventions were considered for Mario but not used. For example, on many spin charts an option
is to scream into a pillow or hit something. Since Mario usually does not scream or hit during his anger
outbursts, it was thought detrimental to include these in his options. Another intervention would be to work
with a teacher to write down what upsets him and put them into a balloon. Mario can then pop the balloon
letting out anger and figuratively pop
his frustrations. The teacher can incorporate extra books that include
students who get angry so that the
student does not feel alone in his
management process (list pictured).
If Mario gets bored with the spin
chart, there are many other fun options for picking a calming activity.
One is a fortune teller type choosing

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process (pictured). Given Marios young age, a sensory calming activity should always be included in his
options. Some others than play dough are stress balls, various fidgets, bubble wrap, and anything else
the child can concentrate on and calm down using.

V Modifications for Interventions


For modifications pertaining to change in age and interest please
see following section. All interventions suggested are easily modified and should be constantly analyzed and changed when necessary. If changes need to be made, it may be necessary to
reevaluate what is angering Mario. Check lists such as the What
Pushes Your Buttons included can be helpful here. When looking for changes or additions, the above section of other interventions can be used.

VI Generalization / Maintenance
As Mario grows and improves, the interventions should as well.
The spin chart allows for constant changing based on needs and interests. The choices on this should be
discussed often with Mario and switched when needed. The emotion chart should also be reevaluated.
After time, Mario and the teacher should revisit this chart, reviewing how he described each number initially and discuss whether or not his thoughts are the same. The rewards system should also be adjusted
due to success and weaknesses. If Mario thrives with his interventions, his rewards should become more
challenging. In the same respect, if he regresses, the teacher should encourage him to reward himself for
even the smallest of self monitoring actions. In general, these interventions can be used by Mario
throughout life. While as a teenager he most likely will not be spinning a wheel to chose between coloring
or playing with play-dough, if he finds himself feeling a certain number, he will know that this is not the
best time to make decisions or speak with his peers.

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References
The Interventions and strategies that were identified in this report can be sourced to the following empirically validated resources.
Allen, K. P. (2010). Classroom management, bullying, and teacher practices. The Professional Educator,
34(1), 1-15. Retrieved from http://bluehawk.monmouth.edu:2048/?url=/docview/375306722?ac
countid=12532
Athanassiou, N., McNett, J. M., & Harvey, C. (2003). Critical thinking in the management classroom:
Bloom's taxonomy as a learning tool. Journal of Management Education, 27(5), 533-555. Re
trieved from http://bluehawk.monmouth.edu:2048/?url=/docview/195728236?accountid=12532
DeLong, M., Winter, D., & Yackel, C. A. (2003). Management, motivation and student-centered instruction
I: Analytical framework. Primus : Problems, Resources, and Issues in Mathematics Undergradu
ate Studies, 13(2), 97. Retrieved from http://bluehawk.monmouth.edu:2048/?url=/docview/
213418175?accountid=12532
Desiderio, M. F., & Mullennix, C. (2005). Two behavior management systems, one classroom: Can ele
mentary students adapt? The Educational Forum, 69(4), 383-391. Retrieved from http://blue
hawk.monmouth.edu:2048/?url=/docview/220658991?accountid=12532
Finn, J. D., & Pannozzo, G. M. (2004). Classroom organization and student behavior in kindergarten. The
Journal of Educational Research, 98(2), 79-92. Retrieved from http://bluehawk.monmouth.edu:
2048/?url=/docview/204197993?accountid=12532
Kwon, K., Kim, E. M., & Sheridan, S. M. (2014). The role of beliefs about the importance of social skills in
elementary children's social behaviors and school attitudes. Child & Youth Care Forum, 43(4),
455-467. doi:http://bluehawk.monmouth.edu:2081/10.1007/s10566-014-9247-0
Leseho, J. (1998). Educators' use of metaphors to deal with anger in the schools. Alberta Journal of Edu
cational Research, 44(3), 336. Retrieved from http://bluehawk.monmouth.edu:2048/?url=/
docview/228664487?accountid=12532
Martell, C. (2015). Age of creative insecurity: Student-centered learning. Journal of Education for Library
and Information Science, 56(1), 112-120. Retrieved from http://bluehawk.monmouth.edu:2048/?
url=/docview/1709561965?accountid=12532
Minter, M. K. (2011). Learner-centered (LCI) vs. teacher-centered (TCI) instruction: A classroom man
agement perspective. American Journal of Business Education, 4(5), 55-62. Retrieved from http://
bluehawk.monmouth.edu:2048/?url=/docview/868858516?accountid=12532
Rice, Marti,PhD., R.N., Kang, Duck-Hee, PhD,R.N., F.A.A.N., Weaver, Michael, PhD,R.N., F.A.A.N., &
Howell, Carol C,PhD., R.N. (2008). Relationship of anger, stress, and coping with school con
nectedness in fourth-grade children. The Journal of School Health, 78(3), 149-56. Retrieved from
http://bluehawk.monmouth.edu:2048/?url=/docview/215673494?accountid=12532
Thiele, Alecia K, PT, DPT, MSEd, ATC,L.A.T., A.C.C.E., Mai, Jennifer A, PT, DPT, PhD,M.H.S., N.C.S., &
Post, S., M.S. (2014). The student-centered classroom of the 21st century: Integrating web 2.0
applications and other technology to actively engage students. Journal of Physical Therapy Edu
cation, 28(1), 80-93. Retrieved from http://bluehawk.monmouth.edu:2048/?url=/docview/
1505351731?accountid=12532
Trentacosta, C. J., Izard, C. E., Mostow, A. J., & Fine, S. E. (2006). Children's emotional competence and
attentional competence in early elementary school. School Psychology Quarterly, 21(2), 148-170.
Retrieved from http://bluehawk.monmouth.edu:2048/?url=/docview/195377070?accountid=12532
Whalen, L. L., Centeio, E. E., Thomas, E. M., Kulik, N. L., Nash, B., Shen, B., & McCaughtry, N. (2014).
Addressing aggressive behaviors through mindful physical education. Research Quarterly for Ex
ercise and Sport, 85, A104-A105. Retrieved from http://bluehawk.monmouth.edu:2048/?url=/
docview/1621829762?accountid=12532

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Appendix
Appendix A: Baseline Data Collection
1. Frequency Chart
Date

# of Hours

Small Outbursts

Large Outbursts

10/5

10/6

10/13

10

10/20

10/21

10/26

10/27

2. Intensity Chart
Date

Average

10/5

3.833

10/6

3.75

10/13

3.46

10/20

3.75

10/21

10/26

10/27

3.571

(Red indicates "large outburst as defined in frequency scale)

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3. ABC Data

15

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4. Motivation Assessment Scale

16

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17

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5. Intensity Scale

sustained high levels of behavior that


substantially impede the students ability to
function and/or present risk of harm to self
or others

Intermittent high levels of behavior that


substantially impede the students ability to
function and may present risk of harm to
self or others

sustained low levels of behavior that may


impede the students ability to function
and/or disrupt his/her learning or the
learning of others

intermittent low levels of behavior that


may impeded the students ability to
function and/or disrupt his/her learning or
the learning of others

minimal to no behaviors

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Appendix B: (Intervention Tools)


1. Five Point Scale

19

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2. Spin Board

3.Breathing Board

20

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4. Lavender Play dough

21

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Appendix C: Intervention Data


1. Frequency Data
Date

# of Hours

Small Outbursts

Large Outbursts

11/2

11/3

11/9

11/10

2. Intensity Data
Date

Average

11/2

2.75

11/3

2.75

11/9

3.5

11/10

2.5

Appendix D:
Weekly Monitoring Form
Sticker? Yes/No
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday

Score

Notes