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Exhibit A.

A Strategic Plan
By
Steamboat Springs Fire Rescue
(September 2015)

Table of Contents
Contents
Mission, Vision and Values ........................................................................................................................ 3
Introduction ................................................................................................................................................. 3
Current Status of Steamboat Springs Fire Rescue ...................................................................................... 5
Strategic Plan Overview ............................................................................................................................. 6
Steamboat Springs Fire Rescue in the Future ............................................................................................. 6
Appendixes ................................................................................................................................................11

Mission, Vision and Values


MISSION
Our mission is to serve the City of Steamboat Springs and the surrounding community by
reducing human suffering and property loss, protecting the environment, and promoting life
safety through incident response, public education, and fire prevention programs.

VISION
We will actively participate in our community, serve as role models, and endeavor to efficiently
employ all required resources to provide a service deemed excellent by the community of
Steamboat Springs and its visitors.

VALUES
Professionalism - to be an expert and have specialized knowledge
Preparedness - to be ready for any emergencies
Timeliness - to respond quickly
Compassion - to show concern for the suffering and misfortune of others
Honesty - to exhibit genuine, reputable and respectable behavior
Integrity - to adhere to a high moral and ethical code
Fiscal Responsibility - create, optimize and maintain a balanced budget
Progressive - continue steady improvement by increments

Introduction
Preface
To develop a valid strategic plan, many perspectives and factors must be considered. Input is
required from EMS and fire service personnel, elected officials and financial experts. This
document was drafted in 2013 by EMS and Fire Services personnel and provides information
based on current and projected service levels and standards in EMS and Fire Services and
adopted by the City of Steamboat Springs City Council on April 15, 2014.
The plan will be reviewed, up-dated and presented annually with the proposed operational
budget for the following year.

Past and Present


Prior to 2002, Fire Service was provided by the City of Steamboat Springs (City) with firefighter
volunteers, a full-time Fire Chief and Fire Marshall plus the administrative support of the City.
EMS/Ambulance Service was provided by the Steamboat Springs Area Fire Protection District
(District) with part-time EMS providers, two full time paramedics, a full-time EMS Chief and a
part-time Administrator/CFO.
Currently, emergency services (fire and EMS) are provided by Steamboat Springs Fire Rescue
(SSFR), which is a department of the City; though an intergovernmental agreement (IGA), which
was developed in 2002 between the City and the District, SSFR provides service to both the City
and District.
SSFR serves at total of 384 square miles (City and District) and a varying population of up to
40,000 residents and visitors. In 2014, SSFR call volume was 1,987 and the assessed valuation
was $728M ($554M City and $173M District). See addendum A for details on annual call
volume and assessed valuation since 2002.
In 2002, when SSFR started providing emergency response for both EMS and fire calls, SSFR
was initially staffed with two full-time response personnel per shift that were cross-trained in fire
and EMS. The teams of two covered rotating 24 hour shifts which provided 24/7 coverage. In
addition, dual role and single-role providers (Fire and EMS volunteers and part-time staff) still
responded to calls as needed. All single role (fire and EMS) staff were encouraged, but not
required, to cross-train in both fire and EMS; however, only dual-role trained personnel were
considered for promotion and only dual-role trained personnel were used to cover shifts for fulltime staff. The Fire Chief, EMS Chief and Fire Marshal managed the operations while
administrative and infrastructure support was provided by the City. Under the 2002 IGA, the
City and District share costs for operations and capital.
Over the last 10 years, the City and District, with recommendation from the Fire Chief(s), have
provided financial support to improve service by increasing emergency response staff and upgrading equipment and facilities. See addendum B for details on the Stations with Emergency
Vehicle inventory and the current Organizational chart.
4

Current Status of Steamboat Springs Fire Rescue


Today EMS, Fire, Rescue and other Emergency Services are provided by 7* to 8 on-duty
Firefighter/EMT professionals that staff two stations. The Mountain Station maintains minimum
staffing of 5 personnel that staff an engine and an ambulance and the Central Station maintains
staffing of 2 personnel that primarily staff an ambulance. Generally, the Mountain Station
Engine responds with the closest ambulance to all calls. The Engine responds to EMS calls to
provide adequate staffing in order to help manage medical care and provide safe movement of
incapacitated patients and help with bystanders and family members. An ambulance responds
with the Engine to fire calls to provide minimum staffing as recommended by the National Fire
Protection Association (NFPA). On-duty staff handle the majority of calls, however, the
department depends on call-back (staff responding from home) when call volume or severity
overwhelms the ability of the on-duty staff. Off duty staff responds to the closest station and
responds with additional fire trucks and equipment. Typically, 7 to 10 off-duty staff will respond
to a fire.
Staffing to cover time-off is provided by part-time staff and off-duty full time staff. Reserve staff
members are scheduled to supplement on-duty staff.
Fire Prevention services are provided by the on-duty Firefighter/Plan Reviewer (also responsible
for emergency response) and supported by an Administrative Assistant and the Fire Marshal.
(* Current minimum staffing is 7 FF/EMTs per shift)

Strategic Plan Overview


The strategic plan is a tool to envision and plan for the future within the values and purpose of
the organization, the governing bodies and the community. This plan is a product of
management, staff and elected officials and is to serve as a guide for maintaining and improving
services over the next seven years.
This plan is a living document and will be reviewed regularly and modified as necessary.
The Strategic Plan will address key components through a Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities
and Threats (SWOT) analysis. The components that will be evaluated are:
 Staffing
 Equipment
 Facilities
 Training
 Finance
 Governance Structure/IGA
The SWOT analysis is a tool to provide a framework or structure for the Strategic Plan. The
SWOT analysis was started by the Public Safety Director, Fire Chief, Fire Marshal, Training
Captain and the three shift Captains.
The charts for the SWOT analysis can be found in appendix C

Steamboat Springs Fire Rescue in the Future


The following provides an overview of the goals based on the results of the SWOT analysis. The
goals are based on a conservative 3% per year call volume increase and a 5% per year increase in
concurrent calls. The specific years are used only for reference, actual implementation will be
affected and controlled by factors such as fiscal reality and service demands.

2014
(Projected 1961 calls with 448 concurrent calls)Actual, 1,987 calls with 470 concurrent calls
Create 3 engineer (Driver/Operator) positions within existing staff (completed)
Take delivery of new 4x4 Type I Engine (completed)

2015
(2047 calls with 494 concurrent calls)
Goal to reach 9 FT paramedics by creating 3 new paramedic positions within existing staff
over 3 year period, started in 2013. (currently at 8 paramedic positions in 2015) provides
for staffing of 3 paramedics per shift
Add 3 reserve firefighter positions (total of 6 reserve FF positions)
Replace 2005 ambulance (completed)

2016
(2108 calls with 518 concurrent calls)
Expand minimum staffing of 8 per shift to the busiest 6 months of the year to better handle
emergency calls and fire prevention duties
Add 2 part-time FF positions (total of 7 part-time FF) move to 2017
Create 3 paramedic positions within existing staff over next 3 years (add one in 2016 for 9 in
2016) (will allow staffing of 3 paramedics per shift)
Develop site for training facility and apply for grant for temporary training facilities
Start planning for a new Central (main) Fire Station*
*The New Central Fire Station will become the main station and house administration, fire prevention,
training as well as emergency response personnel and equipment

2017
(2171 calls with 544 concurrent calls)
Increase minimum staffing to 8 per shift 365 days/year to better handle emergency calls and
fire prevention duties
Add 2 part-time FF positions (total of 7 part-time FF)
Final year of goal to reach 9 FT paramedics by creating 3 new paramedic positions within
existing staff over 3 years; started in 2013. ( add one (1) paramedic positions in 2017 to reach
goal of 9 paramedics) provides for staffing of 3 paramedics per shift
Add full-time Deputy Fire Marshall (to address increase plan review load and manage preplans and commercial inspections)
District assessment for West District Fire Station
Solidify location for new Central Fire Station and start the design process

2018
(2236 calls with 571 concurrent calls)
Complete design and plan construction of new Central Fire Station

2019
(2303 calls with 600 concurrent calls)
Build new Central Station
Add Training Captain
Expand Training Center to encompass permanent training tower, meeting room, and props.

2020
(2373 calls with 630 concurrent calls)
Finish Central Station (move engine crew and admin to Central Station)
Add 9 FTE to provide for staffing an engine with an Officer, a DO/Engineer and a Firefighter
at the Mountain Station, in additional to a staffed engine in the new downtown station.
Replace 1984 Sutphen 75 ladder truck with new 75 4x4 ladder truck
Add 1.5 FTE (3 part-time FF positions-total of 10 part-time FF) for increased PT staffing

2021
(2444 calls with 661 concurrent calls)
Add Admin Assistant (total of 2)( to meet increasing Fire Prevention and Emergency Service
Admin needs)

2022
(2517 call with 694 concurrent calls)
Design & Build West District Fire Station (based on outcome of 2017 assessment)
o
o

Apparatus for West Fire Station; Wildland/Urban Interface Structural Engine (New),
Ambulance (New), and Tender (existing).
Staff West Fire Station, add 6 FTE to staff West District Fire Station with 2 FTE
(Paramedic/Officer and Engineer) supplemented by up to six (6) resident/reserve FF)

Future
Remodel Mountain Station for reserve program

Summary
Based on conservative growth projections, by 2021 the department could be responding to more
than 2,400 EMS and fire calls and protecting well over a billion in assessed valuation In order to
maintain current service levels, this strategic plan proposes the following:
Personnel: Highly trained and dedicated personnel are the foundation of Emergency Services.
Using this plan, by 2022, personnel could be stationed in 3 locations with 13 on-duty each shift.
Providing service with full-time and part-time emergency responders would maintain a high
level of service and be cost effective. Also, having a larger pool of part-time would be cost
effective for back-fill of full-time staff, improve off-duty response for large emergency events
8

or periods of high call volume and provide a ready pool of trained candidates to readily fill
vacancies in full-time positions.
Stations and Equipment: Under this plan, there could be three stations by 2022 (there are
currently two stations). One new (additional) station would be located in the District just west of
the City. Personnel and equipment at the Districts station would provide quick response to the
west and north portions of the District and would be well placed to back-fill in the City when
needed. The central (main) station would be located in the downtown area of the City and would
house emergency, prevention and administration functions. The central station would house the
most equipment and personnel and would provide primary response to the downtown area and
west part of the City; it would provide back-up to the Mountain Station and west District station.
The Mountain Station would serve the mountain area as well as the eastern and southern portions
of the District. Like the west District station, the Mountain Station would provide assistance and
respond to the downtown area when needed.
(see appendix B for maps with station locations and response zones.)

Appendix
Appendix A Call Volume and Assessed Valuation ............................................................................... 11
Appendix A Call Volume and Staffing .................................................................................................. 12
Appendix B Stations .............................................................................................................................. 13
Appendix B - Organization Chart ............................................................................................................. 15
Appendix B - Emergency Vehicle inventory ............................................................................................ 16
Appendix C ............................................................................................................................................... 17
STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES, OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS ................................................. 17
Analysis of Staffing: ................................................................................................................................. 17
Appendix C ............................................................................................................................................... 18
STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES, OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS ................................................. 18
Analysis of Staffing: ................................................................................................................................. 18
Appendix C ............................................................................................................................................... 19
STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES, OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS ................................................. 19
Analysis of Staffing: ................................................................................................................................. 19
Appendix C ............................................................................................................................................... 20
STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES, OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS ................................................. 20
Analysis of Facilities: ............................................................................................................................... 20
Appendix C ................................................................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES, OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS ..Error! Bookmark not defined.
Analysis of Facilities: ................................................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
Appendix C ............................................................................................................................................... 22
STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES, OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS ................................................. 22
Analysis of Equipment:............................................................................................................................. 22
Appendix C ............................................................................................................................................... 23
STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES, OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS ................................................. 23
Analysis of Equipment:............................................................................................................................. 23
Appendix C ............................................................................................................................................... 24
STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES, OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS ................................................. 24
Analysis of Equipment:............................................................................................................................. 24
Appendix C ............................................................................................................................................... 25
STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES, OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS ................................................. 25
Analysis of Training: ................................................................................................................................ 25
Appendix C ............................................................................................................................................... 26
STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES, OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS ................................................. 26
Analysis of Training: ................................................................................................................................ 26
Appendix C ............................................................................................................................................... 27
STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES, OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS ................................................. 27
Analysis of Finance: ................................................................................................................................. 27

10

Appendix A Call Volume and Assessed Valuation

Call volume and Assessed Valuation


2001-2014
2007

2037

1987
1852
1765

1554
1484

1428

1652
1464

1153

1052

$509

$488

1384

1424

1594

1237
1108

$1,139 $1,144

298

239

275

287

271

296

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

District

City

$768

$727

$607

$591

$509

$891

$884

$869

$847
$487

1492

1379

1573

1245

1491

1802

1533
1339

1256

1892

1904

434

385

388

381

378

401

412

393

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

Total Call Volume

11

Assessed Valuation (Millions)

Appendix A Call Volume and Staffing


2600

60
2517
2 7
2444
2171
2

50

2047
2

2007

2100

1892 1904

1852
40

2303

1802
1600

1554
1

1428

1379
4

30

1
Volunteer

1
1

4
3

2
2

Reserve

1
1100

PT Staff
FT Staff
Calls

10
20

16

15

694
15

26
10

86

6
0

18

104

21

427

351

345
24

24

494
49
94

544
54
44

600
33

33

Concurrent Calls
600

33

24

24

100

12

-400
0
2001200220032004200520062007200820092010201120122013201420152016201720182019202020212022

12

Appendix B Stations
3 Mile Zones (based on road miles)

13

Appendix B
5 mile Zones (based on road miles)

14

Appendix B - Organization Chart

15

Appendix B - Emergency Vehicle inventory


Mountain Fire Station
Central Fire Station
2600 Pine Grove Rd
842 Yampa
Ambulance 6-3
Ambulance 6-1
Ambulance 6-4
Tender 6-1
Engine 6-2
Engine 6-1
Ladder Truck 6-2
Tender 6-4
Brush Truck 6-4
Ladder Truck 6-1
Air Trailer

16

Ambulance Barn
911 Yampa
Brush Truck 6-1
Ambulance 6-2

Appendix C
STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES, OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS
Analysis of Staffing:
Strengths
Weaknesses
Personnel
Dedicated (willing to
Limited numbers (little
work extra)
relief, high OT needs)
High Morale
Highly Trained
Motivated

Opportunities
Additional Staff
Creative rewards
Staff Development

Challenges
Retention
Funding additional Staff
Promotional
opportunities
Burn-out

Occupies current staff


Time and associated
costs for Academy
Limited promotional
opportunity

Part-time and fulltime openings


Resident program
Less need for OT
Lt Positions

Retention
Funding additional
recruits
Funding

Recruitment

Desirable Profession

Compensation

Competitive Pay Plan


Benefits

Administration

Chief
Fire Marshal
Deputy Chief
Admin. Assist

Deputy Chief
responsibilities
Admin Asst. (2nd)
Lt Positions

Funding
Implementation/timing
of new positions
Office/facility space

Emergency
Responders

24/7 professional
staffing
Adding Paramedic
Positions

Minimum staffing of 3
person engine crew
Limited Paramedic onstaff (occasionally
only have one
paramedic on-shift)
Paramedic Overtime

More opportunity for


part-time staff to
work additional
hours
Promotional Opps.
Staff are interested in
paramedic training
Grants for training
and backfill costs

Additional personnel
(PT & FT staff)
Funding
Continued success with
Paramedic Training
Grants

17

Appendix C
STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES, OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS
Analysis of Staffing:
Fire Prevention
Deputy Fire Marshal
Dedicated Fire
(need)
Marshall and
Over-time to meet plan
Firefighter/Plan
review demands
Reviewers (aka Fire
Little room to manage
Prevention Specialist)
growth in demand for
FP services (plan
reviews and
inspections)
Impact on emergency
response with 7 person
min staffing.
Officers
Committed and well
Heavy work load (short
trained
staffed, need move to
8 person minimum
shift staffing)

Staff are interested in


FP training and
promotional
opportunity.

Training plus job


responsibilities
Staffing levels (one
person filling dual
roles)
Service to public

Officers highly
trained and good
experience, able to
move into more
advanced officer
roles

Development and
implementation of more
officer positions (i.e
Lieutenants)

Staffing GOALS:

Match staffing levels to meet service needs


Retain existing staff for an optimal cost effective, well trained and experienced team
Offer a competitive wage and benefit package (2016)
Implement a structured pay plan that rewards experience and training
Provide promotional opportunities

Staffing OBJECTIVES:
Return to 8 person minimum staffing per shift
Create 3 Driver/Operator positions (1 per shift), promoted from current existing full-time staff (done in 2014)
Develop a structured pay plan and maintain a competitive wage and benefit package (2016)
Maintain a robust part-time Firefighter program to provide back-fill, extra staffing and for a qualified pool of full-time firefighter
replacements
18

Appendix C
STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES, OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS
Analysis of Staffing:

2015
Incorporate 3 additional FT paramedic positions within current staff over 3 to 4 years (currently there are 8 FT paramedic positions
on 2015) for a total of 9 paramedics. This would allow for 3 paramedics per shift and ensure consistent paramedic level care on all
medical calls and reduce back-fill overtime. (promoted from currently and future trained existing staff)
Add 3 reserve positions for a total of 6 reserves to strengthen the reserve program and provide a stronger trained pool from which to
hire entry level full-time firefighters

2016
Increase minimum shift staffing to 8 people 365 days
Add two (2) part-time positions ( for a total of seven(7) part-time FF positions) move to 2017

2017
Add Deputy Fire Marshal
Add two (2) part-time positions ( for a total of seven(7) part-time FF positions)

2018
2019
Add Training Officer

2020
Add 24 /7 engine crew with an officer, driver operator and firefighter (9 FTE) to the Mountain Station (4 person engine crew will
move to the new downtown station)
Add 3 part-time FF positions (total of 10 part-time firefighters)
2021
Additional Admin Assistant (total of two)
Add FT crew to new West Station (paramedic/officer & engineer) (6 FTE)

19

Appendix C
STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES, OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS
Analysis of Facilities:
Strengths
Weaknesses
Opportunities
Mountain Station
Well located for
Too small for housing
Future use specific to
response to the south
Administration,
Emergency
and east area of the City
Prevention and
Response, public
of Steamboat Springs
Emergency Response
education and recruit
Poorly located for
program
response to the west or
north portion of the
District
Foundation Issues
HVAC Issues
IT/Connectivity Issues
Storage
Lot Size
Central Station
Well located for response No Crew Quarters
Possible expansion of
to downtown area
Questionable expansion
office space and
of bays
crew quarters into
Located in area with high
Located in busy and
police quarters (if
call volume
developing business
vacated)
district
Possible commercial
Not adequately staffed
value to sale for
for response to the west
funding to build
portion of the City or
replacement station
the north and west
portions of the District
Flood plain?
Not up-dated
Ambulance/SAR
Well located for
No room to expand
Possible commercial
Station
downtown response
Limited Crew Quarters
value to sale for
Located in busy and
Crew Quarters
funding to build
developing business
replacement station
district
Park
20

Challenges
Funding Remodel

Funding
Remodel Logistics
Relocation Logistics

Joint
ownership/tenants
and uses.
Relocation Logistics

West Station in
District
South/East
Station in District
Training Facility

Land Opportunities
Hybrid career and recruit
program staffing
Land Opportunities
Hybrid career and recruit
program staffing
No current facility

No definitive land
acquisition planned
Funding/cost sharing
No definitive land
acquisition planned
No current facility

Partnership with other


public agencies or
developers
Partnership with other
public agencies or
developers
Partnership with other
public agencies
Better training
Marketing/revenue
for outside training

City/District IGA
Funding
City/District IGA
Funding
Funding
Location
Funding

Facilities GOALS:
Maintain existing facilities in good order.
Plan for new facilities to meet current and future needs, a significant weakness is neither the Mountain or Downtown station
provide for a good response time to the west district.

Facilities OBJECTIVES: (see appendix C for map of current and future stations)
2016

Plan and implement a training site with temporary training facilities

2017
Start work on replacing current downtown station with new facility that would function as main station for downtown response and
house administration and fire prevention.

2018
Plan for West Station in District
Plan for permanent training facility
Start Central Station
2019
Complete Central Station

2020
Build training facility
2021
Plan new West Station in District.

Future
South Station in the district
21

Appendix C
STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES, OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS
Analysis of Equipment:
Strengths
Weaknesses
Engines
New Engine (2013)
None
(done)
Wildland/Urban
Duplicate Engine
Interface Engine
(2014) (done)
Tenders
Two Tenders (2011)
Design issues
Improvements needed

Brush Trucks
Trucks (Aerials)

Ambulances

Firefighting
Equipment

Opportunities
Trade of 2002 and
2003 Engines for
new Engine

Challenges
Funding
Timing

Modifications to
address issues

Staff time and


funding to
address
weaknesses
None

Two Brush Trucks


(2011 & 2012)
2002 105 Truck (aerial)
Pierce -New/functional

None

Four new(er)
Ambulances

Good design to copy


for future
ambulances
State EMS Grants

Standardization
challenges
SCBA replacement

Federal Grants
Improving
technology
Standardization

x
x
x

Newer equipment is
standardized
New extrication
equipment
Wildland Equipment

Not all wheel drive


1984 75 Truck (aerial)
Sutphen - Old, high
maintenance costs, Safety
issues (open passenger
compartment)

22

Good design to copy


for future apparatus
Functional for next
several years (2002
Truck)
Replacement with
all-wheel drive
aerial in 2019/20?
(1984)

Planning for 15
year replacement
of apparatus
Funding

Increasing costs
Continued success
with grants
Local OEM
service
Funding
Grants priority
changes annually
Changing
technology

Appendix C
STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES, OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS
Analysis of Equipment:
Cardiac
Monitor/Defibrillators

New lifepak 15s (4)

Service

Most service is done


by City Shops

Older units use technology


that is becoming out of
date
Manufacture will no long
support old units after
2015
Maintenance/scheduling
software
Limited staff for large fleet
(outside Fire Dept.)
Mechanics not specifically
trained for ERV maint. &
service
Delays in repairs

Improving
technology
State EMS Grants

Accessing new
technology,
cost/benefit
Continued success
with grants

Dedicated/certified
ERV mechanic
Fleet Maint.
Software

Funding
Commitment
Interdepartmental
service
competition

Equipment GOALS:
Keep equipment in good order.
Keep equipment that is functional to the mission of the department and to maintain/improve ISO rating
Timely replacement and/or addition of equipment to stay current with industry

Equipment OBJECTIVES:
2014
Trade-in Engine 6-1 and replace with new all-wheel drive engine similar to Engine 6-2 (completed July 2014)
Up-date Staff Vehicles (Chief) (Chief Vehicle replace in July 2014)Done

23

Appendix C
STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES, OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS
Analysis of Equipment:

2015
Replace 2005 ambulance with new type I ambulance (Done)
Up-date Staff Vehicles (Planned)

2016
Staff Vehicles (Fire Pick-Up replacement)

2017
Replace SCBA equipment

2018
2019
Add Engine (Urban/Interface Engine) to Fleet

2020
Replace 1984 Sutphen Truck (aerial) with all-wheel drive truck.
Replace 2009 Ambulance
West District Station
o Urban/Interface engine (New)
o Ambulance (New)
2021
Replace 2011 Ambulance
Add Ambulance
Add Engine (Urban/Interface Engine) to Fleet
West District Station
o Urban/Interface engine (New)
o Ambulance (New)

24

Appendix C
STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES, OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS
Analysis of Training:
Strengths
Weaknesses
Fire Academy
Brings new staff on the Limited opportunity to
bring on new reserves
department
Provides instructional
from Academy
opportunities for staff
(funding)
Enhances ability to
Lack of a training
facility
evaluate candidates for
Lack of Training
FT & PT Staff
Equipment
Staff assigned to
training
Paramedic
Currently in the 3rd
Vacancy for 6 months
Training
year, working well
Dependent on State
Program
EMS Grants
No positions for
additional paramedics
Training
Captain

Staff Training

Training provided by
internal staff

Need

Lack of a training
facility
Lack of staff time to
provide training to
multiple shifts
Difficulty scheduling
department-wide
25

Opportunities
Growth potential
(more reserve
staff/low cost
recruitment)
Possible resident
program with new
stations
Training facility to
generate revenue

Challenges
Funding
Instructor time
Facility
Faculty
Equipment

Opportunity for
career advancement
of existing
personnel

Students must move to


Denver for 6 months
Continued Grant Funding
Funding match for grants
Scheduling back-fill
Retention/compensation
Funding
Time

Focus on training
Contracting for
outside providers
for specific training
Opportunity to
incorporate training
adjuncts into
planned new station

Funding
FTEs for Training
On-going ALS training
Core training for new staff

trainings
Appendix C
STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES, OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS
Analysis of Training:

Training GOALS:
Provide training to maintain and improve service skills and capabilities.
Supplement Full-time staff with a pool of well-trained part-time and reserve staff

Training OBJECTIVES:
Annual Fire Academy with opportunities for 3-5 new part-time/recruits
Annual Paramedic training to attain and maintain 3 paramedics per shift
Training Captain dedicated to training only (2019)
Add training adjuncts into all new stations
Training Facility

26

Appendix C
STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES, OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS
Analysis of Finance:

City/District
Grants

Strengths
TBD
City Grant Writer

Fees

Fees for Service

Weaknesses
TBD
Not guaranteed revenue,
needed projects may
hinge on grants
Medicare/Medicaid
Un-insured

Finance GOALS:
TBD

Finance OBJECTIVES:
Financial strategy TBD
Pursue grants to off-set planned expenditures
Recoup costs as possible with a prudent fees for service program.

27

Opportunities
TBD
Off-set revenue
expenditures
Improved billing

Challenges
TBD
Success
Keeping up with
insurance and
government
reimbursement
regulations