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I.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
A.

Introduction

The Philippine Institute of Development Studies (PIDS) believes that education is one of
the most important things an individual can have. With educated people, the Philippine
economy has a chance to grow and bring this country to a national competitive level.
Today, the Philippines has a very big amount of educational institutions however most of
these institutions are considered to have low quality educations. Due to the small amount of
high quality educations, many Filipino families, especially those from the province, allow their
children to move into dormitories that are located near the campus.
There are a lot of factors that hinders a student to achieve quality education or to satisfy
ones dreams; may it be financially, socially, physically, family conflict or location wise poor.
In here enters the idea of dormitory or student housing residence. Urban universities
increasingly look to mixed-use urbanized student housing to add vitality to their surroundings
and enhance environment relations. It is a concept of a homey environment providing
utmost satisfaction at the same time, students are just few steps away from the campus. As
time passes by, innovations are needed for better service. Coupled with the growing market
for student housing, a new wave of thinking has to change the way buildings are renovated
and built. A new trend towards off-campus living also stems from increased expectations of
the students and parents. They are looking for more of an experience. This translates
housing that supports student life by fostering social interaction, accessible and comfortable
living, and serves a well maintained and sustainable working and living environment.
Modifications and modernization are now made to develop, enhance and provide quality
lifestyle to a student during his/her dormitory life.
B.

Background of the project

Students prefer living near campus, as to not waste time in transit and maximize the
time to do schoolwork, participate in activities, or make friends. With this, the project calls for
the creation of an in campus dormitory for the university. The dormitory should be (1) homelike in character, (2) have physically comfortable surroundings, (3) different study spaces,
and (4) semi private spaces. The maximization of the natural elements and surroundings is
also a must to promote sustainability.
Due to the lack of high quality educations in the Philippines, many parents prefer to
send their children to good schools despite the distance from their homes. This projects goal
is to create a dormitory for these students that provides a comfortable environment and is
able to promote their personal development in all aspects. Such as: discipline, teamwork, and
adaptability in their social and academic life.
C.

Project Objectives
1.

To provide an active and youthful Walk-Up Dormitory that will be conducive for
resting and learning and would increase students opportunities for a wider social
experience by considering the psychological needs of the users and providing the
proper spaces and features to satisfy them. One example would be to provide the
proper common spaces to encourage interaction between students. Another would
be to provide the proper features to create a feeling of safety among the users.

2.

To develop a Walk-up Dormitory utilizing easy-to-maintain building materials,


natural daylight and ventilation, and cost-efficient water collection and distribution
system to be able to create a sustainable and environment friendly structure that
minimizes the use of unnecessary materials and maximize the natural resources in
the area.

D.

3.

To create a human-scaled, relaxing and rejuvenating environment for students by


maximizing the use of open spaces and natural elements of the site like
vegetation, natural ventilation, and natural light.

4.

To provide different types of room accommodation that promotes and safeguards


the students welfare by zoning each space properly from common and private
spaces to give a feeling of safety as well as individualism.

Summary of Succeeding Part of Report

Dormitories are nonetheless a necessity nowadays. It is a big factor to a students


learning condition as it becomes part of a students environment. This makes every detail
crucial. One has to carefully go through every aspect for everything affects someone and his /
her future. Students particularly those from the provinces stay in boarding houses or
dormitories which are considered temporary dwellings. Their living conditions in these
dwellings may result to beneficial and/ or prejudicial contributions to their holistic well-being.
Some reports reveal that students temporary dwellings fail to consider the provisions of
basic and other facilities that will meet the various needs of the occupants. These findings
suggest administrative interventions and legislative actions on the part of the school and the
Local Government, respectively. Most school administrators consider the quality of life of their
students living in boarding houses or dormitories not as a pressing concern. Their
responsibility to them is confined only within the boundaries of the school or those off
campus but school-sanctioned activities. Although, they have no control over the students
other activities and whereabouts, administrators are in agreement that things that happen
outside the campus affect academic performance. Thus, it is imperative that administrators
are informed of the conditions of student boarders/ dormers to anticipate problems that may
possibly occur. As a result, they may provide precautionary and proactive measures.
This study is made for the designer to have a comprehensive and detailed information
about the site and its environment. It includes maps, zoning ordinances, topographic data,
geological information, hyrographic data, soil classification and the like. It is then examined
and analyzed for one to be able to establish the sites advantage and limitations. After a
thorough analysis and study of the site, it is then possible to come up with plans and
conclusion whether what part is suitable to house a certain building. If the land is found
suitable, further study has to take place to establish other specific parameters

II. SITE SURVEY


A.

Off- Site Context and Its Changes


Every site is directly affected by its surroundings and its specific location. Santa Rosas
population and demographics affects the type and number of users of the site. The
structure of the government and its current and future projects can directly affect the
development of the surrounding areas which can affect the surrounding areas which may
benefit or cause negative effects. There are many different factors that affect the site in
many different ways. The location of power plants and local water distributing systems can
even affect the zoning and flow in the given site. It is important to understand the
surrounding areas to be able to understand and create the best solution for the site.

1. Geographic Location
Santa Rosa, Laguna is located 1216' latitude and 14.19' longitude, 40 kilometers south
of Manila. It is bounded on the northwest by Bian, on the South and southwest by Cabuyao
and on the west by the province of Cavite. Bordering the Northeast is Laguna de Bay. Santa
Rosa's land area is approximately 54.13 square kilometers (5413 hectares).
The municipality is linked to Metro Manila and other southern provinces by the South
Luzon Expressway (SLEX), the Manila South Road and the Philippine National Railroad
southline. From the SLEX interchange, the municipality can be accessed through a national
road leading to the adjacent municipality of Silang, Cavite. Water transport to the nearby
coastal towns is also available.

These maps show the location of the site from the the Philippine map, the CALABARZON area,
down to the Sta. Rosa City until Brgy. Malitlit where the site is situated. It shows the relation and
location of the site with its nearby places.
It is bounded on the NE, along lines 1-97 by Laguna de Bay; on the SE, along lines 97255 by the Cabuyao River; along lines 255-430 by the Municipality of Cabuyao; along lines
430-537 by the Diezmo River; on the SW, along lines 537-544 by the Municipality of Silang,
Cavite; on the NW, along lines 544-714 by the Sta. Rosa River; along lines 714-809 by Bian
Estate; on the NE, along lines 809-to the point of beginning by Laguna de Bay.
2. Population and Demographics

The table shows the general population of Sta. Rosa City and its breakdown into
different categories such as gender, educational attainment, registered voters etc. Not only
that, the table also houses census about private building construction, agriculture, banks and
pawnshop.
The population was surveyed in the years 2000, 2007 and 2010. There is a larger annual
growth rate from 2000-2007 that 2007-2010. This is a good indication that Sta. Rosa Citys
population does now grow rapidly thus making it not overpopulated, giving more room for
citizens outside Sta. Rosa to stay. Also, from years 2000-2010 the consistency of female
population from the male population is evident. Female population is always larger than the
males. It is shown in the table the literacy rate of the city. Sadly every year the rate
decreases. More and more citizens are not having enough education. This gives the project
more challenge in catering its mission.
6

LEVELS AND GROWTH PATTERN


The municipality of Santa Rosa registered a total population of 138, 257 in 1995.
From 41, 335 in 1970, it increased by more than three times over a 25-year period.
While the population level exhibited consistent growth over the years, the rate growth
was highest during the periods 1975 1980 and 1990 1995. There was a significant
tapering off during 1980 1990. Assuming the persistence of the geometric rate of
growth of 7.3% registered between 1990 and 1995, the 1998 mid-year population of the
municipality was estimated to reach 168, 766. (refer to table 1.1)
Table 1.1

CENSUS YEAR
1970
1975
1980
1990
1995

(6
(1
(1
(1
(1

MAY)
MAY)
MAY)
MAY)
MAY)

TOTAL
POPULATION
41, 335
47,639
64,325
94,710
138,257

AVERAGE
ANNUAL
GROWTH RATE
(%)
2.9
6.2
3.9
7.3

The growth pattern of Santa Rosas population from 1970-1975 and 1980-1990 has
been consistent with that of the province. Thus, it may be construed that the
unprecedented increase in population growth experienced by the municipality during
the two periods ( 1975-1980 and 1990-1995) was spurred by events that transpired
within the local boundaries and not a natural occurrence across the whole province of
Laguna. (refer to table 1.2)
Table 1.2
CENSUS YEAR
1970
1975
1980
1990
1995

(6
(1
(1
(1
(1

MAY)
MAY)
MAY)
MAY)
MAY)

ANNUAL PGR
LAGUNA
SANTA ROSA
2.8
2.9
3.9
6.2
3.5
3.9
3.3
7.3

POPULATION AGE-SEX STRUCTURE


The age and sex composition of Santa Rosas population in 1995 is shown in Table
1.3. There were slightly more females than males, thus the over-all sex ratio,
approaches 98, i.e., there were 98 males for every 100 females in the municipality. The
sex ratio, however was highest in the extreme lower and upper age groups. The sex
ratio, however, was highest in the extreme lower and upper age groups, registering as
much as 107 males per 100 females. Consequently, the females outnumbered the
males within the bracket corresponding to the more productive years of working life
span, at ages 15 to 34 years. This does not mean, however that the diminishing
productivity beyond age 34, but rather it shows that the population structure is very
much influenced by the presence of jobs in the locality, the nature of which often
require younger and female workers. The recent population structure clearly manifests
the selective in-migration taking place in Santa Rosa spurred by its continuously
growing economic activities. The dominance of males over females in terms of number
began to pick up only after age 35 up to age 49, after which, it tapered off dipping as
low ratio again strengthens the conjecture of longer life expectancy among the females.
While it defines the volume of demand for various goods and services and supply
of human resources, the age-sex structure of a population distribution presents
7

important implications to future population growth, both in terms of immediate and


long-term effects. For instance, the fact that 57% of the female population of Santa Rosa
in 1995 were in their reproductive ages (15- 49 years) may indicate a rising birth rate at
least in the near future.
AGE GROUP

TOTAL

0-4
5-9
10-14
15-19
20-24
25-29
30-34
35-39
40-44
45-49
50-54
55-59
60-64
65-69
70-74
75-79
80-84
85 & OVER

18, 939
16, 352
14, 086
14, 639
13, 953
13,641
12,099
10,250
7,591
5,090
3,451
2,731
2,057
1,428
898
555
363
134
138,
257

TOTAL

% TO
TOTAL
13.7
11.8
10.2
10.6
10.1
9.9
8.8
7.4
5.5
3.7
2.5
2.0
1.5
1.0
0.6
0.4
0.3
0.1
100.0

MALE

FEMALE

SEX RATIO

9,802
8,365
7,203
6,982
6,346
6,498
6,000
5,143
3,899
2,641
1,701
1,341
954
650
415
221
138
69
68,
368

9, 139
7,881
6,885
7,659
7,604
7,148
6,097
5,102
3,705
2,461
1,756
1,396
1,106
774
484
332
221
69
69,
820

107.3
106.1
104.6
91.2
83.5
90.9
98.4
100.8
105.2
107.3
96.9
98.0
86.3
83.9
85.7
66.7
62.5
100.0
97.9

Table 1.3
The age-sex structure can also be interpreted in terms of its implications to economic
productivity. Overall, the population of Santa Rosa had a mean age of 23.7 years in 1995. With
mean age of 23.4 years, females were younger than males who averaged 24 years..
Migration
The rapid rate of economic development came with the growth in population. Population
growth due to migration was dramatically high until the 1990s (13.66%) but slowed down
thereafter. However, the increase in population will still be high despite the declining growth
rate. It is expected that the population will increase further given the profile of the migrants to
8

the city. According to the law of selectivity of migration, younger people tend to migrate to find
their fortune and be employed in the companies located in Santa Rosa. It is likely that migrants
in Santa Rosa are young who are also of marrying age and are those who are ready to have a
family; thus, the rate of natural growth is also high.

Rate Of
Natural Growth
Per Annum
(Percent)

Growth Per
Annum Of
Migrants
(Percent)

Population Growth
Rate (Natural And
With Migration)
(Percent)

18,579

3.12

17.16

6.19

59,477

35,242

5.39

13.66

8.05

199 138,257
5

91,853

46,404

9.08

5.66

7.86

200 185,633
0

133,582

52,051

7.78

2.32

6.07

200 266,943
7

174,383

92,560

3.88

8.57

5.33

201 284,670
0

260,588

24,082

Number Of
Natural
Residents

Number
Of
Migrants

197 47,639
5

39,223

8,416

198 64,325
0

45,746

199 94,719
0

Yea
r

Populati
on

197 41,335
0

Population Distribution
Age Sex Distribution
Of the 289,946 estimated population of Santa Rosa in 2012, there was almost equal
distribution of males (49.6) and females (50.4) as shown in Table 5. The sex ratio in the city was
recorded at 98 males for every 100 females.
The total age dependency ratio1 of the city was estimated at 48 per hundred working
persons in 2012. This implies that 100 working individuals would have to support 48 persons aside
from themselves. For every 100 individuals who are able to work in the city, there are 44 young
dependents who are too young to earn a living (infants, children, and adolescents below 15 years

old) would depend to them for support. Moreover, the old dependents aged 65 years old and
above, only constitute four percent of the total economically productive population of the city.

Area

2000

2010

*2012

Total

Total

Total

Aplaya

5,469

5,557

11,026

7,029

7143

14,172

7,160

7,275

14,435

Balibago

6,172

6,272

12,444

7,424

7,544

14,968

7,562

7,684

15,245

Caingin

4,708

4,783

9,491

9,230

9,378

18,608

9,401

9,552

18,953

Dila

10,72
9

10,90
3

21,632

13,421

13,638

27,059

13,670

13,890

27,561

Dita

6,477

6,581

13,058

10,218

10,382

20,600

10,407

10,575

20,982

Don Jose

2,623

2,666

5,289

5,979

6,075

12,054

6,090

6,188

12,277

Ibaba

1,823

1,852

3,675

2,250

2,286

4,536

2,292

2,329

4,620

Kanluran

2,234

2,271

4,505

2,144

2,178

4,322

2,183

2,219

4,402

Labas

4,881

4,960

9,841

7,483

7,603

15,086

7,621

7,744

15,366

Macabling

4,278

4,348

8,626

8,456

8,593

17,049

8,613

8,752

17,365

Malitlit

7,408

7,528

14,936

11,023

11,200

22,223

11,227

11,408

22,635

Malusak

974

989

1,963

2,605

2,648

5,253

2,654

2,697

5,350

Market Area

4,754

4,831

9,585

6,491

6,595

13,086

6,611

6,718

13,329

Pooc

7,573

7,696

15,269

16,638

16,906

33,544

16,946

17,220

34,166

Pulong Santa
Cruz

5,478

5,567

11,045

9,561

9,716

19,277

9,739

9,896

19,634

Santo Domingo

642

653

1,295

1,576

1,602

3,178

1,606

1,631

3,237

Sinalhan

7,879

8,007

15,886

9,465

9,617

19,082

9,640

9,796

19,436

Tagapo

7,969

8,098

16,067

10,204

10,369

20,573

10,393

10,561

20,954

City of Santa
Rosa

92,07
4

93,55
9

185,63
3

141,19
6

143,47
4

284,67
0

143,81
3

146,13
3

289,94
6

Source: National Statistics Office, Sta.Mesa, Metro Manila, Philippines.

School Age Population


In 2012, the City of Santa Rosa has a total of 102,055 school-age population. This is the
population between the ages of seven and twenty-four, inclusive, irrespective of the existing
requirements of compulsory education or the period of education provided for in various types of
schools. An increase of almost 1,800 school-age individual living in the City of Santa Rosa was
recorded for the periods 2010 to 2012.

10

City of Santa Rosa

School-Age Population

2010

*2012

7-9
y/o

10-14
y/o

15-19
y/o

20-24
y/o

7-9
y/o

16,5
12

26,200 26,500 31,000 16,8


04

10-14
y/o

15-19
y/o

20-24
y/o

26,686 26,991 31,575

100,212

102,055

Total Population

284,670

289,946

Ratio of School-Age to Total


City Population

0.352

0.352

Voting-Age Population
The voting-age population (18 years old and over) accounted for 65.01 percent of the total
population of the city in 2012. The voting-age population in 2010 is almost the same share at
64.99 percent.

Area

Total Number of Registered Voters


2007
(Manual)

2010
(Automated)

2013
(Automated)

Aplaya

8,195

8,548

8,281

Balibago

9,130

9,927

8,451

Caingin

6,832

10,664

11,194

Dila

15,057

14,240

14,245

Dita

9,635

10,949

10,523

Don Jose

5,928

6,180

5,822

Ibaba

2,731

3,182

3,234

Kanluran

4,267

4,360

4,309

Labas

6,474

8,091

7,709

Macabling

6,708

7,250

7,164

Malitlit

9,176

10,102

9,336

Malusak

1,795

2,986

3,760

Market Area

5,916

7,605

8,155

Pooc

10,372

10,685

16,552

Pulong Sta.Cruz

7,574

8,212

8,487

Santo Domingo

1,752

3,084

2,816

Sinalhan

10,608

11,673

12,002

Tagapo

11,223

12,330

12,230

11

Total Number of Registered Voters

133,373

150,068

154,270

Registered Voters Who Actually Votes

90,011

108,967

Ratio of Actual Voters Over Registered


Voters

0.67

0.73

Source: Commission on Election (COMELEC) City of Santa Rosa, Laguna


However, the total number of registered voters and voters who actually votes related to
a particular election year are shown in table 8. In May 2010 annual election, the registered
voters who actually votes is 73 percent of the total registered voters. It is 6 percent higher
than the registered voters who actually votes recorded in 2007 manual election. The
increased can be accounted to the massive participatory campaign of both national and local
government units (LGUs) to encourage first time voters to register in order to exercise their
right to suffrage. A comprehensive review of existing database was conducted to remove the
departed and redundant names on the lists.
The recent automated midterm election was held last May 13, 2013. Data on the
number of registered voters who actually vote is not yet available but it was recorded that
there are 154, 270 registered voters in Santa Rosa.
Population Density
One of the indicators of population distribution is gross population density by barangay,
which is expressed as the number of persons per unit of land area usually in hectares (has.)
or square kilometer (sq.km.).
Historically, Santa Rosa had a density of 1,749 and 3,351 persons per square kilometer
of land area in the year 1990 and 2000 respectively. In 2012, Santa Rosa had a population
density of 5,226 persons per square kilometer of land area.
pattern suggests that despite the slowing down on population growth rate, the number
of births continue to increase due to population momentum. Moreover, the emerging status
of Santa Rosa as the location of middle to high-class subdivisions will further contribute to the
increase in population. This means that as population continuously to increase, the
competition for the demand of fixed commodity like land will be higher.

Year

Population

Land Area

Density

(sq km)

(persons/sq km)

Percent Change

1990

94,719

54.15

1,749

2000

185,633

55.39

3,351

0.92

2010

284,670

55.48

5,131

0.53

2012

289,946

55.48

5,226

0.02

Source: National Statistics Office, Sta.Mesa Manila (Population); City Assessor Office, City of
Santa Rosa, Laguna (Land Area)
Santa Rosa had recuperated less than a hundred hectares of land primarily because of the
big investment of the City Government on the state-of-the-art Geographic Information System
(GIS). This system was able to properly identify the accurate boundaries to other adjacent towns in
Laguna (Cities of Bian, Cabuyao, and Calamba) and Cavite (Municipality of Silang).
Among the 18 barangays of Santa Rosa, Brgy.Malusak is the densest barangay at 36,921
persons per square kilometer of land area. This barangay also has the smallest land area of 0.14
square kilometer and main land uses is residential (Table 10).

12

On the other hand, Brgy.Santo Domingo is the least dense barangay in the city at 402
persons per square kilometer of land area. This is the bordering barangay of Santa Rosa from the
neighbouring Silang in Cavite. This barangay in the southwest portion has the third largest land
area with the least number of recorded populations. Most lands in this barangay are still idle
awaiting the future development of its developers.
Area

Land Area
(Sq Km)

2012
Population

2012
Population Density

Aplaya

0.72

14,435

20,137

Caingin

1.2

18,953

15,813

Sinalhan

1.88

19,436

10,359

Tagapo

3.37

20,954

6,222

Macabling

2.76

17,365

6,303

Balibago

2.51

15,245

6,084

Dila

1.57

27,561

17,527

Dita

4.13

20,982

5,078

Malitlit

10.42

22,635

2,173

Market Area

0.44

13,329

30,548

Malusak

0.14

5,350

36,921

Kanluran

0.22

4,402

20,169

Ibaba

0.44

4,620

10,431

Labas

0.93

15,366

16,571

Pooc

1.58

34,166

21,676

Pulong Sta.Cruz

4.56

19,634

4,310

Don Jose

10.58

12,277

1,161

Santo Domingo

8.06

3,237

402

City of Santa Rosa

55.48

289,946

5,226

Source: National Statistics Office, Sta.Mesa Manila (Population); City Assessor Office, City of
Santa Rosa, Laguna (Land Area).
Urban Rural Distribution
Another indicator of population distribution is the extent of urbanization. This is
consistent with the morphology (internal structure) of most Philippine municipalities/cities
characterized by a compact urban area (poblacion) and scattered villages (barrios) (HLURB,
2007).
Many villages have grown over the years and it is common nowadays to find rural
barangays/barrios which have larger populations than urban barangays/poblacions and are as
urbanized. NSO defines urban areas as (1) a barangay that has a population size of 5,000 or
more; or (2) a barangay has at least one establishment with a minimum of 100 employees; or
(3) a barangay has 5 or more establishments with a minimum of 10 employees and 5 or more
facilities within the two-kilometer radius from the barangay hall (NSCB, 2003).
Based on the criteria set forth by NSO on urban areas, population data and number of
establishments with required number of employees shows that all barangays in the City of
Santa Rosa was 100 percent urban. The barangay can be an urban area if it has a population
size of 5,000 or more; or if it has at least one establishment with a minimum of 100
13

employees; or if it has five or more establishments with a minimum of ten employees; or if it


has five or more facilities within the two- kilometer radius from the barangay hall (NSCB
Resolution No.09, 2003).
In terms of population size, majority of barangays (83%) has a population of 5,000 or
more followed by barangays (17%) with less than 5,000 population count. These barangays
are Brgy.Ibaba, Brgy.Kanluran, and Brgy.Sto.Domingo.
, the presence of NUVALI Solenad 1&2, master-planned communities in
Brgy.Sto.Domingo, the strategic location of Brgy.Ibaba and Brgy.Kanluran at the heart of
Santa Rosa were many fast food chains, 24/7 convenience store, other commercial, retail,
and financial establishments are situated, satisfy the other requirements of an urban area.
3. Social Structure
Sta. Rosa, Laguna consists of 18 barangays and is considered the premier city and hub
of South Luzon. It is the Makati of the South in terms of economic activity. Greenfield City is
where most of Santa Rosa's financial resources are concentrated. From an agricultural land
during the Spanish era Sta. Rosa Laguna now has adopted to a highly urbanized modern
lifestyle with new economic and residential developments.
The City Health Office (CHO) in Santa Rosa is divided into Health Office I and Health
Office II. Each health office is equally attending the 18 barangays in the city.
The Health Office 1 covers the barangays of Tagapo, Market Area, Kanluran, Ibaba,
Malusak, Labas, and bayshore barangays of Caingin, Sinalhan, and Aplaya. On the other
hand, CHO 2 covers the barangays of Macabling, Balibago, Pooc, Dila, Dita, Malitlit, Pulong
Sta.Cruz, Don Jose, and Santo Domingo.
4. Political Structure
Santa Rosa City is governed primarily by the city mayor, the vice-mayor and the city
councilors. The mayor acts as the chief executive of the city while the city councilors acts as
its legislative body. The vice-mayor, besides taking on mayoral responsibilities in case of a
temporary vacancy, acts as the presiding officer of the city legislature. The legislative body is
composed of 10 regular members and representatives from the barangay and the youth
council.

14

5. Economy
Santa Rosas economy is continuously growing. Through the years, Santa Rosa has
become the home of the largest bottling plant of Coca-Cola Bottlers and the Philippines first
and only world-class theme park. The notable business industry locators in Santa Rosa come
from electronics and semi-conductor, automotive and automotive parts, metal, packaging,
food processing, and the promising Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) Industry in Santa
Rosa.
The Services sector particularly from the commercial areas is the biggest employer of
the working population both the formal and informal sectors of the local economy. The
Industry sector comes second especially from the manufacturing industry of food and
beverage, automotive assembly, electronics and related areas. The said sector is forecast to
dominate the local economy in the future particularly the sectors related to the Off-shoring
and Out-sourcing industry such as call centers, animation, medical transcription and software
development, linked to the global business market.
Small scale and micro-industries are also prevalent operated by small entrepreneurs and
cooperative enterprises. These forward and backward linkages of big, medium and small
scale industries are the key to the long term sustainable growth of the local economy.
On the other hand, the Agricultural sector will shrink further in terms of employment in
view of the decreasing hectares of land devoted to farming, livestock and fishing and
seemingly lack of interest of farmers to cultivate the land. The Strategic Agricultural and
Fisheries Zone Areas of Santa Rosa situated alongside the lakeside areas are not fully utilized
by the farmers-fishermen for food production purposes especially the cultivation of high value
crops and raising of livestock animals.
Major commercial banks in the Philippines operate in the city. At this time, there are 30
banking institutions offer banking services to businesses and residents. Most of these are
concentrated in Barangay Balibago, Don Jose, Macabling, Pulong Santa Cruz, and Tagapo.
Other than that, public markets in Santa Rosa are often divided into two: the dry goods
section and the wet goods section. Commerce in these public markets are in full swing,
especially in the early morning.
Modern shopping malls are scattered among the city. Santa Rosa is the 2nd
municipality/city in Southern Luzon to have both an SM and Robinsons after Dasmarias City
in Cavite. While automobile manufacturers that have plants in Santa Rosa City include Nissan
Motors Co., Ltd., Toyota Motor Corporation, Honda Motor Co., Ltd., and Ford Motors. It is also
the location for the headquarters of Santarosa Motor Works, Inc. Another growing sectior is
the information technology hub. Santa Rosa is lined up with continuously growing and
outsourcing of call centers which includeConvergys, KGB, and Teletech.

15

6. Ecological and Hydrographic system


Features attributed to this map refer
to the preservation of ecological balance
and local fishing grounds. The river
system drains to the northeast, meeting
Laguna Lake. The fishing grounds/ fish
pens for subsistence fishing is mainly
found by the lakeside areas of Santa
Rosa whose residents rely on fishing for
sustenance and profit.
Ten of the 18 barangays rely on the
Cabuyao-Santa Rosa- Bian Waterworks
System sourced from the springs of
Matang Tubig in Cabuyao
(Comprehensive Town Plan, Santa Rosa,
Laguna). The remaining barangays rely
on deep wells, artesian well, open wells
and springs. As can be seen, the
majority of water comes from
underground sources. The depletion of
such sources is a result of the increasing
demand of water by residential,
industrial and commercial sectors. Aside
from the demand, the quality decreases
as leachate from dumpsites, industries,
oil spills and septic tanks infiltrate into
aquifers.
The entire municipality lacks liquid
waste
treatment
facilities.
The
municipality resorts to discharging
wastes into surface waters, local rivers and creeks. Consequently, Santa Rosa contributes to
the unfavorable Class C status of Laguna Lake

Fig. 1 Map of Sta. Rosa Watershed showing political and watershed boundaries

The Sta. Rosa River Basin is one of twenty-four watersheds surrounding the Laguna de
Bay. The watershed is located approximately between 14 08 and 14 21 North Latitude
and between 120 59 and 121 10 East Longitude. The watershed has an area of about
120 km2 comprising 4.1% of the Laguna Lake Basin. It is one of four elongated basins
emanating from the Tagaytay ridge and draining towards Laguna Lake. The watershed has a
population of 570,000 and covers practically the whole City of Sta. Rosa and Cabuyao
municipality, the southern part of Bian and several eastern barangays of the municipality of
Silang, Cavite.

16

The Santa Rosa


Watershed,
being
close to Metropolitan
Manila, has similarly
felt
the
stress
associated
with
urbanization
and
industrialization,
not
only
within
its
boundary
but
also
from its neighboring
towns.
Rapid
population
growth,
intensive
land
development
and
landscape
changes
have
reduced
its
natural capacity to
retain water and hold
rainfall during rainy
days. It has resulted in
wide flooding, water pollution and emerging water scarcities.
Fig.
2
Flood
Vulnerability Map of
Lower
Sta.
Rosa
(shows
the
flood
vulnerability map for
the lower watershed.
Because
flooding
does not recognize
political boundaries,
it becomes an intermunicipal problem,
as in the case of
Binan
and
Santa
Rosa city.)
During
moderate to heavy
rains, the Santa Rosa
River overflows its
banks due to large
volume
of
runoff
coming
from
its
watershed and its inadequate capacity. The flooding was further aggravated by the
inadequate capacity of the citys drainage system to convey local runoff to the waterways.
The irrigation system at Macabling weir, now heritage structures, served as conduit for
stormwater in the absence of formal drainage systems.
Flooding occurs along the lakeside of the municipality in Barangays Caingin, Aplaya and
Sinalhan. During periods of flood, solid waste that has not been properly disposed of, whether
on land or in waterways, finds its way to the lake. Not only thus this further detriment the
quality of the lake, it endangers the health of the people.
Depletion of Groundwater Resources
Ten of the 18 barangays rely on the Cabuyao-Santa Rosa- Bian Waterworks System
sourced from the springs of Matang Tubig in Cabuyao (Comprehensive Town Plan, Santa Rosa,
Laguna). The remaining barangays rely on deep wells, artesian well, open wells and springs.
As can be seen, the majority of water comes from underground sources. The depletion of
such sources is a result of the increasing demand of water by residential, industrial and
17

commercial sectors. Aside from the demand, the quality decreases as leachate from
dumpsites, industries, oil spills and septic tanks infiltrate into aquifers.
The groundwater resources in the western bay of Laguna Lake are reported to be fair to
extensive. Following the surface gradient, the groundwater flows northeast from the Taal
caldera in the general direction of Laguna Lake.
The hydrogeology of Santa Rosa watershed is characterized by both unconfined and
confined aquifers. The unconfined aquifer is found in the alluvium areas in the plains near the
lake. These alluvium areas are tapped by shallow wells, mostly for domestic use.
Several layers of confined aquifers can be found at greater depths (>100 m). A confined
aquifer is an aquifer bounded above and below by clayey layers having lower permeability,
called aquitards. Aquitards maintain upward hydraulic pressure that protect water below
them from above ground contaminants.
Topography exerts an important influence on groundwater flow. The Santa Rosa
landscape can be divided into areas of recharge and areas of discharge (or production). The
recharge zone lies west of the fault line and forms part of the elevated plateau of the Silang
Municipality. Here, the dominant land cover is agriculture, grasslands and shrub lands. These
lands are permeable which allows rainfall to infiltrate and percolate into the groundwater.
Pollution of Laguna Lake
Considering the expected depletion of groundwater resources due to effects of
increasing population, industrialization and commercialization, Laguna Lake is seen as
potential source for potable water. At present, the environmental quality of Laguna Lake is
only suitable for fisheries and aquaculture otherwise categorized as Class C (Annual Water
Quality Report on the Laguna de bay and its tributary rivers. Laguna Lake Development
Authority, 1996). This is in part due to land activities resulting in contaminated surface runoff draining into rivers and streams before flowing into the lake. To diminish the lake's role as
a pollution sink, the LLDA formulated the Laguna de bay Comprehensive Water Quality
Management Plan. Since its implementation, the lake has undergone considered
improvement. However, the plan's continued success is highly dependent on the participation
of all bordering municipalities.
Saltwater Intrusion to the Lake
At the end of the dry season, the level of Laguna Lake is lower than that of Manila Bay.
Consequently, a reversal flow from the saltwater bay into the freshwater lake occurs.
However, the presence of the hydraulic control structure in the Napindan Channel prevents
seasonal backflow. In 1996, LLDA undertook a water quality study that concluded that
saltwater intrusion was not a significant problem. Therefore, saltwater intrusion is not
perceived as a problem so long as the flow control channel is operational. On the other hand,
the hydraulic control structure prevents the periodic presence of saltwater to control algal
blooms contributing to the lakes' turbidity.
7. Land use patterns (Zoning)

18

Fig 4. General Zoning Map


The future scenario of land uses in Silang is relevant to anticipating the effects to flooding
downstream. The CLUP of Silang shows the headwater of the Santa Rosa watershed located
northeast of Silang as zoned for general development (in yellow) (Figure 7). This will allow
agricultural, shrub lands and grasslands to become subdivisions, industrial parks, roads and other
built up uses.
Assuming zoning plans are fully realized, the built up areas will expand from 30% to 50% of
the total land area, while agricultural land will decrease from 60% to 38%. Hydrologic modeling
results show slight increase in runoff from 62.8% to 65.5% of rainfall. While groundwater recharge
will be reduced from 13.2% to 11.5% of rainfall. Flood modeling in the seven sub-basins of Silang
show future increases in runoff volumes by magnitudes of 2% to 20% and increases in flood
intensities by -5% to 11%.

LAND USE DEVELOPMENT


Santa Rosa used to be one of the major food suppliers to Metro Manila. This is evidenced
by the towns land use indicating that in 1946, around 96% of the land area was devoted to

19

agriculture. Until the late 1970s, Santa Rosa maintained its role as a food-producing
municipality.
Major changes in the municipalitys character were experienced in the 1980s. Due to its
proximity to Metro Manila, the municipality became suburb of the sprawling metropolis
absorbing population overspill and drawing in-migrants from other southern provinces. To
service the demand of the growing metropolis, residential subdivisions were developed.
In the latter part of the 1980s to the early 1990s, Santa Rosa started to shift from
agriculture to an industry-based economy. This was triggered by the location of Coca-Cola
Bottlers Philippines, Inc. and the construction of the Santa Rosa interchange of the SLEX in
1990. Land use implications of this became pronounced as agriculture areas gave way to
residences and industries. (refer to table 1.4)

Table 1.4 Comparative Land Uses, 1946, 1980 and 1990


LAND
USE
Built-up
Agricult
ure
Total

1946
Area
(ha.)
213

1980

3.93

Area
(ha.)
507

5,202

96.07

5,415

100.00

1990

9.37

Area
(ha.)
3,492

64.49

4,908

90.63

1,923

35.51

5,415

100.00

5,415

100.00

PRESENT LAND UTILISATION


According to data from the Municipal Assessors Office, Santa Rosa has a total land area
of 5, 543 hectares, as compared with the prevailing NSO figure of 5,415 hectares. This
difference is mainly due to the inclusion of the public domain in the lakeshore area.
Santa Rosa is very conducive to urban development, with 92% of its total land area
classified as highly suitable for urban development. However, recent actual mapping
activities reveal that 1,209 hectares (21.8% of total area) are not being utilized. A large
portion of former agriculture areas has been left idle due to land speculation.
The actual area of productive agricultural land has been reduced from 1,923 hectares in
1990 to 1,166 hectares as of June 1999 to give way to the development of new industrial
estates (IEs) and residential subdivisions. This is supported by the fact that from 1993 to
1997, some 137 hectares have been converted from agricultural use to other urban uses.
The actual built-up area has expanded from the Poblacion to scattered residential
subdivisions, industrial estates and commercial districts all around the municipality. This
dispersed urban growth has resulted to a non-cohesive development pattern.
Table 1.5 Actual Land Use, June 1999
LAND USE

AREA (ha.)

Percentage

Residential
Industrial
Commercial
Institutional
Agriculture
Recreational
Idle/ open Space
Utilities
Total

1,593
780
143
16
1,417
368
1,209
17
5,543

28.73
14.07
2.59
0.30
25.56
6.63
21.81
0.31
100.00
20

The Santa Rosa Municipal Government owns some 10.11 hectares of land that are
currently being used for a variety of uses (table 1.6). These government properties are
concentrated mostly in the northeast section of the municipality. Residential areas are idle
lands that are occupied by squatters.

Table 1.6 Government-owned Land, 1999


Actual Use
Residential
Road Lot
Commercial
Institutional
Total

Area (ha.)
3.39
1.38
5.17
0.16
10.11

Percentage
33.51
13.71
51.20
1.58
100.00

URBAN FORM AND CHARACTER


The SLEX divides the whole of Santa Rosa into a northeast and southwest section. The
northeast section consists of
the town proper ad is bounded
by the Laguna Lake on the
eastern side. Most settlements
are located within its section
especially along major roads,
railway line, and the waterfront
area. The portion of the
Laguna lake shoreline within
the municipal boundaries was
classified in the 1991 Zoning
Ordinance as public domain
but is now largely inhabited.
Only 100 meters of easement
from
the
lake
(as
per
requirement of the LLDA) are
now left. New residential subdivisions have also developed in the section particularly near the
SLEX.
Industries in the northeast section are mostly of the light to medium type an are
generally located along Balibago Road and the National Highway. These extend northward to
the end of the municipality, and towards the southern end leading to Cabuyao (Purefoods
Mills, Asia Brewery, bonded warehouses)
The main settlement of Santa Rosa began on the area where the existing Poblacion is
located. The area was firmly established as a municipality during the Spanish period as
evidenced by its layout consisting of a church, a plaza and a municipal building as the centre
of the town. At present, this basic layout has been retained though only the municipal
buildings and the church have maintained their Hispanic character. The main access road
within the area is the old road (Calle Real) which connects to the Manila South Road.
The southwest section of Santa Roosa was formerly the sugar area of the municipality.
The main feature of this section is its large industrial area that caters to several industrial
firms.the Laguna technopark is the biggest industrial estate within the area and houses big
firms such as Toyota Motors and Acer. A more organized growth can be seen in the area as
compared to the northeast section since residential and commercial districts that support
the industry area are being established as complete communities on large portions of land.
21

However, there are settlements of squatters located in the interiors particularly behind
industrial sites (e.g. Piltel).
The main access road in the southeast portion is the Tagaytay-Santa Rosa Road Mobility
to the inner portions of this section is very limited, as interior roads are often part of private
landholdings. Passages that lead to the squatter settlements are often dirt roads that may be
difficult to transverse during rainy days.

The main activity centres of the municipality are the large commercial establishments
located along the main roads. On the northeast side, there are three prominent activity
centers: the corner of Walter Mart leading to Enchanted Kingdom, the Santa Rosa Commercial
Complex and Santa Rosa Town Centre in Barangay Balibago, and the Poblacion area. These
centers are located away from each other at an average of 1.75 kilometers. This presents a
serious concern in terms of traffic flow of these establishments are loacated along the most
traversed route in the municipality.
On the southeast side, the expected major activity generator is the Santa Rosa Business
Centre that is currently being constructed by Greenfield Development Corporation.
Assuming that a current growth trend persists, a linear growth pattern will continue
along the major corridor while major intersections will have intensified activities especially in
22

the commercial areas. The inner town area located in the northeast section will be
characterized by sporadic redevelopment efforts and in-fill development. Existing idle and
agricultural lands will also be developed sporadically into residences and commercial areas.
Private developers will lead large-scale development of complete communities in
consolidated lands (southwest portion). The development will further attract population that
will require more services and facilities.

The municipality recognizes that it has to provide a strong framework for urban growth. This
shall be done through the employment of policy driven approach which sets definite guidelines for
development. These policies are guided by the following principles: enhanced accessibility,
ecological sustainability and social responsibility. Enhanced accessibility: pertains to the provision
of equal access to economic opportunities across Santa Rosa. The principle of ecological
sustainability is anchored on the environmental profile of the area of Santa Rosa. Social
responsibility puts the issue that development should not detriment the public welfare.
Santa Rosas Land use plan shall focus more closely on the processes of development and not
on achieving a fixed end state. The Structural framework outlines the land character and the
development considerations that strongly influence he land use plan of the municipality. Limited
road infrastructure at the interior portions of the eastern section of the map has resulted to the

23

presence of what is left of the municipalitys remaining agricultural lands. The productivity of these
lands has significantly declined due to the effects of urban growth.

8. Access systems (Road maps)

24

Movement systems in Santa Rosa: A grid network of roads, a railway and a ferry system
define the movement systems in Santa Rosa. These systems shall be closely inter-connected and
provided with adequate transition (such as enchanced accessibility to PNR terminals and the
proposed ferry station)

9. Related destinations and facilities


Santa Rosa is currently a growing urbanized area with less and less agricultural zones to
make way for urbanized and residential areas. This has an effect on the site and will cause
further development and population and activity growth in the area.
The growing transportation system in the area also greatly affects the development of
the area and will impact the site greatly. Santa Rosa City is accessible via South Luzon
Expressway. Two exits are available namely, Santa Rosa Exit and Greenfield City ETON city.
A four-lane national highway was also extended from Alabang, Muntinlupa City up to
Pagsanjan, Laguna across the South. Public transportation within the city, like in most of the
urban areas in the Philippines, is facilitated mostly using inexpensive jeepneys and buses.
Tricycles are used for short distances. In Laguna Bel Air, residents uses exclusive multicab
shuttles within the village complex.

Public
Transportation within the
city, like most of the urban areas in the Philippines, is facilitated mostly using inexpensive
jeepneys and buses. Tricycles are used for short distances. In some villages like Laguna Bel Air
residents uses exclusive multicab shuttles within the village complex.

Significant Destinations (and their distance to the site)


Greenfield City (1.7 km away)
25

Greenfield City is a 300-hectare


integrated
commercial,
residential and industrial park
in Sta. Rosa, Laguna. It is one of
the town's largest mixed-use
development project, accessible
from the bustling Makati CBD
District by mere 40 minutes.
Accomplished projects and future developments in Greenfield City includes:
- Paseo 3
- Sta. Rosa Business Park
- Laguna Central
Eton City (1.7 km away)

Soon to become a grand development in the south


of Manila is the 1,000-hectare Eton City in Sta. Rosa and Cabuyao, Laguna. Capitalizing on
Lagunas progressive industrial enclaves, this mega-township project will host several
integrated communities ranging from exclusive house-and-lot enclaves to mid-rise and highrise residential towers.
Sta. Elena City (1.9 km away)

45 minutes away from Manila, Sta. Elena City's. Located right at Sta. Rosa, Laguna's
educational and commercial hub, Sta. Elena City features 9 themed residential developments and
premium educational facilities all within its own backyard. The Acacia Waldorf School and the
University of Santo Tomas Sta. Rosa are both within accessible distance. Vital lifestyle hubs include
the upcoming commercial centers like Centro Sta. Elena and the Business District, offering
pleasurable retail, shopping and recreational possibilities.

26

Sta. Elena City is surrounded by some of the Philippines' top golf courses: the Sta. Elena Golf
Club, The Country Club and the Canlubang Golf and Country Club are all a swing away.
Laguna BelAir I (2.7 km away)

Laguna de Bay (23 km away)

Schools near the site:


Malayan Colleges Laguna (2.6 km away)

Malayan Colleges Laguna is a modern international park-like campus and an energy-efficient


and environment-friendly development designed to accommodate 5,000 students per year. To
minimize the impact of buildings to the environment, the design reduces the carbon footprint of
27

the development by integrating the human activities of learning, living, working, shopping and
dining within a walkable distance.
De La Salle University - Science and Technology Complex (5.4 km away)

The Beacon Academy (5.7 km away)


Adventist University of the Philippines (6.5 km away)
The Sisters Of Mary Girlstown Biga Campus (13 km
away)
Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies
(14 km away)

Here are some of Santa Rosas tourist destinations:

Santa Rosa de Lima Parish Church


It was built in 1792 upon the arrival of Father Francisco Favie. It has also a Philippine Independent
Church twin after 1902.

28

Enchanted Kingdom
A world-class theme park opened on July 28, 1995. Located at RSBS Blvd., San Lorenzo South,
Balibago in Santa Rosa, right in front of Villa De Toledo and Dominican College of Sta. Rosa.

Solenad blends essential shopping with leisure and dining in a relaxing, al fresco, lakeside
environment. The area is connected to the now operational Lakesize Evozone commercial area by
dedicated pedestrian and bike lanes. The Lakeside Evozone is the refreshing campus-like
commercial area of Nuvali. It creates a new space for offices and businesses to thrive in an
environment of productivity and connectivity. Solenad sits at the entrance of the Lakeside Evozone
area coming from the Sta. Rosa-Tagaytay Road, and is nestled next to a 4-hectare lake.

Facilities
The implementation of the MCX project will have an effect on the public transportation of Sta.
Rosa. The project focuses on the further development of the PNR station which will reduce the
need for road linkages and provide a more reliable public transportation system for accessing the
area. This directly affects the site by making it more accessible and giving the surrounding areas a
chance to develop as well.

29

MERALCO is the main distributer of power around Santa Rosa. It is a fully functional system
with no current problems but plans have been made to develop the system to ensure the reliability
of the system especially with the growing developments in the area.

B. On-site Data
1.

Physical Data

a. Site Inventory

30

Basically, the present site is only made up of tall grasses. Along the property line are
huge fences to mark the extents of the site. There are also concrete 5 meter roads inside the
site.

b. Geology and the Soil

Alluvium rocks are found in the remainder of the site. These rocks consist of an
unconsolidated mixture of gravel, sand, silt and clay.

Meanwhile Santa Rosa has four series of soil types but the site is rich with the Lipa
loam. The Lipa soils span deep as it provides moderately well to well drainage capabilities.
The terrain is characteristically undulating to rolling. Both the estimated hydraulic
conductivity and filtration rate are moderate. Specific to the municipality is the Lipa loam
type of soil, which has the best physical characteristics among the soil types found in the
province of Laguna.
The subsurface soil is characteristically brown to dark-brown in appearance. Other
attributes signify it as mallow, loose and very friable fine granular loam. Its horizontal
boundary is smooth and clear. Subsoil is a dark-brown clay of friable clay granular
tuffessus material with concretions and an irregular and abrupt boundary. The substratum
iis highly weathered tuff mixed with tuffaceous gravels and concretions. Its boundary is
broken and abrupt.
Sine Santa Rosa is a generally flat area, it is characterized by none to slight erosion.
Out of the total land area, only 114 hectares or 2.06% is subjected to slight erosion. The
area most susceptible to erosion is the southwestern tip of Santo Domingo.
Three categories of land formations constitute the area of Santa Rosa. These are the
lacustrine alluvial plains, broad alluvial plains, and the undulating tuffaceous plains. The
31

site situated at Brgy. Malitlit is considered as Broad plains which consist of higher and
more stable flood plains on level to nearly level terrain formed by alluviation. The soils are
moderately well drained. It has the same formation with majority of the barangays,
including the Poblacion, Kanluran, Malusak, Labas, Dila, Dita, Pooc and portions of the
Market Area, Ibaba, Pulong Sta. Cruz, and the lakeside barangays.
Geologic Hazard
Earthquake Hazard
The region of Laguna is strongly faulted given the presence of the Marikina Valley Fault
which traverses a north-south direction. The fault is disrupted by a number of minor steep
faults along its course that is reflective of the volcanic activity relative to the area.
Earthquakes are a hazard in Santa Rosa as the West Marikina Valley Fault traverses Sto.
Domingo.
Flood Hazard
The site of UST Sta. Rosa is lake side, therefore higher flood levels are expected during
rainy season. Floodplains of the municipality sprawl a total area of 302 ha. Situated in this
zone are Sinalhan, Aplaya and Caingin, and in portions of Tagapo, Ibaba, Labas, Pooc, Dila
and Dita.
Slight seasonal run-off flooding is characterized by accumulated shallow run-off flood,
which subsides within a short period ranging from a few hours to three days. This occurs in
low to moderately low flood plains situated in Kanluran, Malusak and Ibaba. Floods in these
areas are due to run off accumulation coming from surrounding elevated areas, their low
physiographic positions, poor infiltration, permeability characteristics and drain ability outlet.
These areas are perceived as poor for urban uses. Flood limitation could be minimized by
proper and adequate drainage planning for draining unnecessary water.
Moderate seasonal flooding is characterised by more frequent and deeper run-off water.
Subsistence of floodwater takes a week to a few months. This condition is observed along the
lakeshore in Caingin, Aplaya and Sinalhan and in the adjacent northeastern tip of Ibaba,
Market Area and Tagapo. These areas serve as the catchment of water coming from the
higher areas and are characterised by poor drain ability outlets, very low infiltration and
hydraulic conductivity.
Land Resources
For the purpose of guiding the formulation of the land use regulations, areas in Santa Rosa are
subdivided into the following land classification:
LAND CLASSIFICATION

BARANGAYS

Low Intensity
Development Area

Sinalhan, Aplaya, Caingin, Market Area

Urban Redevelopment
Area

Tagapo, Market Area, Poblacion, Labas,


Pooc, Balibago, Dila, Dita

Growth Management
Area 1

Tagapo, Macabling, Balibago, Dila,


Pulong Sta.Cruz, Dita, Malitlit

Growth Management
Area 2

Pulong Sta.Cruz, Malitlit, Don Jose,


Santo Domingo

Shoreland Area

Sinalhan, Aplaya, Caingin, and Market.

Historical
Redevelopment

Poblacion, Malusak, Kanluran, Ibaba

32

LAND USE

SANTA
ROSA

SILAN CABUYA BIA


G
O
N

LAND
CLASSIFICATION0 BARANGAYS
Coconut
0.07

TOTA
L

0.07

District
CommercialExisting General
Residential
Santa Rosa Basin
Forest
Areas

0.12

0.02

0.08

0.04

0.25

0.07

0.08

Grass Lands

0.11

0.02

0.06

0.06

0.25

Industrial

0.04

0.02

0.03

0.09

0.08

0.02

0.17

0.16

Santa
is composed

and
two Mixed Crop
0.05
0.04
0.02
three
0.07
0
0.08
province of Rice Lands
Santa Rosa,
0.37
0.22
0.25
Bian, and TOTAL
of Cabuyao)
Source: Santa Rosa Watershed Hydrology and
to
the
Hydrogeology Report (2009)
Cavite
Silang). The total land area of the Santa Rosa basin is 115 sq

Land Use Of
In Percentage
Rosa watershed
of
two
municipalities
cities of which
belongs to the
Laguna (City of
the young City of
the Municipality
and one belongs
province
of
(Municipality
of

km (100%).

Based on Santa Rosa Watershed Hydrology and Hydrogeology Report (2009), the City of
Santa Rosa comprised of 37 percent of the Santa Rosa basin, the municipality of Cabuyao go
after at 25 percent, the municipality of Silang at the nearby province of Cavite holds 22
percent, and the city of Bian grasp the least proportion at 16 percent.
In terms of land use categories, the City of Santa Rosa does not have any areas marked
with forest annotations on the GIS map including coconut farm holdings. Santa Rosa holds the
majority of grasslands area (11%) in the whole watershed because this large areas owned by
prominent property developers in the city (e.g Ayala Land, Eton, and Greenfield) decided to
temporarily left it idle that are aligned for their future development rather than use it for
vegetation and other agricultural activities. This areas dominated by grasses are sometimes
been cleared for temporary car parks or play grounds.
It was no surprise that Santa Rosas land use were been transformed from agricultural
town to a major residential, industrial, commercial, and recreational center in the South
Luzon Region. Majority of agricultural land (rice land and mixed crops) are found in Cabuyao
(10%) followed by Santa Rosa (9%), Silang (4%) and Bian (2%). Majority of commercialresidential-industrial are very evident in Santa Rosa (16%) compared to Cabuyao (10%),
Bian (7%), and Silang (2%).

c. Water Sources
The government is ready to increase the number of water sources, mainly the use of deep
wells and pump stations. In the short term the system to be created to provide for a population of
33

22,000, a population of 46,000 for the medium-term, and a population of 42,000 for the long-term.
These water systems are not only meant to serve Santa Rosa but neighboring towns as well.
The government is ready to make further improvements to the sewage, sanitation, and
drainage systems because of the growing development of the area. There are currently short term
projects to create septage treatment plants. For long term plans, the government plans to create
more sewage collection lines and improve treatment plants to accommodate highly populated
areas and developing ones. Further improvements of the drainage system has also been planned
especially along highly populated areas and access roads including the South Luzon Express Way.
SURFACE WATER
Rivers, lakes, and springs
The Santa Rosa river is sourced from the watersheds of neighbouring Cavite.
The river acts as a natural boundary from the municipality of Binan before it drains
into Laguna Lake. DENR categorizes the river as class C, meaning it is suitable for
aquaculture, fisheries, recreation and extraction for industrial uses.

Santa Rosa River


The Laguna Lake
Ebbing the northeastern shores of Santa Rosa is the largest lake in the
Philippines, Laguna de Bay also referred to as Laguna Lake. The lake has a total
surface area of 90,000 hectares, an average depth of 2.8meters, and a total
volume of 3.2 billion cubic meters. There are 21 tributaries contributing to the lake
and among these are the rivers of Santa Rosa.
Thus far, the lake is only suitable for aquaculture, fisheries, recreational
activities and industrial uses. Although the lake is naturally euphoric and highly
productive, it is polluted as a result of human activities in the watershed carried via
tributaries or directly into the lake.

Laguna de Bay
Surface water quality
Neither the DENR nor the LLDA monitors Santa Rosa Rivers water quality.
However, an Environmental Impact Study conducted for the proposal of the Santa
Rosa Business Park undertook a water quality study. The study concluded that the
Santa Rosa river exhibited very good upstream quality but poor downstream
quality.

34

The lake, however, has undergone extensive and continuing study because of
its role as the most significant resource in the area. In 1996, the LLDA conducted a
water quality study which monitored several points in the lake and within selected
tributary rivers. The station in closest proximity to Santa Rosa was station 1 or the
West Bay located south of the mouth of the Pasig River and northeast of the
municipality.
GROUNDWATER
The types of rocks lain beneath the municipality are clastic and alluvium both
known for good water bearing abilities. As such, the area possesses fair to good
groundwater resource.
Ground water quality
The quality of ground water is questionable as a result of waste disposal methods.
The municipality generally openly dumps solid waste either in vacant lots, dump
sites and waterways while liquid wastes are directly discharged into water bodies.
In any case, infiltrates into groundwater sources or intrudes via channels.
WATER CATCHMENT/ WATER AREA
Due to good water bearing capabilities of the alluvium and clastic rock underlain in
Santa Rosa, groundwater sources are accessible. Two categories of wells are identified.
Potential areas of saline intrusions are identified as well.
Potential areas of saltwater intrusion
Saltwater intrusion is a perceived problem should waters from Manila Bay
flush into the lake and lakeshore communities exceed the safe yield limits of their
aquifers.
Potentially high yielding wells
In areas from the lakeshore barangays and Pulong Sta. Cruz, Malitlit Don Jose and
Sto. Domingo, the municipality can utilize high yielding walls.
Deep well areas
Brgy. Malitlit which includes the site together with Pulong Sta. Cruz, Don Jose and
Sto. Domingo constitute this category.

Drainage Condition
Generally, flood plains are classified as naturally flooded, moderately flooded and slightly flooded.
Naturally/ moderately flood prone areas
The municipality's flood prone areas are found on the level lands along the lakeshore while
the inland areas are subject to moderate flooding.
Slightly flood prone areas
Occurs in Tagapo, Kanluran, Malusak, Labas, Pooc, Balibago, Dila and Dita. The eastern
portions of Tagapo, Kanluran, Malusak, Labas, and Pooc serve as transition into moderately flooded
areas.
River Preservation

35

Features attributed to this map refer to the preservation of ecological balance and local fishing
grounds. The river system drains to the northeast, meeting Laguna Lake.
Fishing grounds/ fish pens for subsistence fishing
This category refers to the lakeside areas of Santa Rosa whose residents rely on fishing for
sustenance and profit.
Rivers, streams and creeks
Easement of 3 - 40 meters from both sides throughout the entire length of any river is
considered environmentally critical. Areas within this range are subject to easement of public
use in the interest of recreation, fishing, etc.
d. Topography

36

Santa Rosa covers a total land area of 5,543 hectares. It is almost entirely plain with 97.89%
of its local land area having slopes ranging 0.0 to 2.5% indicating level lands. Only about 114
hectares or 2.06% of the total land area of the municipality is subjected to erosion.
Being primarily flat, the lands of Santa Rosa are subject by none to slight erosion.
remaining areas experience no apparent erosion. There are two types of terrain in the city:

The

Level to very gently sloping. Areas with slopes ranging from 0.0 to 2.5% are ideal for any sort
of development.
Undulating to rolling terrain. Areas characterized by slopes of 5.0 to 18.0%. Santa Rosa,
mainly Sto. Domingo, has terrain with 2.6 to 5.0% slopes. Note that slope characteristics rate the
southwestern portion, a section of Sto. Domingo, as fair
e. Microclimate
The climate of the area is characterized by two pronounced season dry from November
to April and wet for the rest of the year. According to Mang Vergel, One of the caretakers of
the site, the weathers mostly fair. The air is usually cool everyday especially at night and
also during summer. Fresh breeze is felt due to many trees surrounding and inside the site.

f. Ecology
According to Vergel Marquez, one of the caretakers of UST-Santa Rosa Laguna lot, the soil is
in very good condition and it is a great source of fertilizers.

37

The site is located at Brgy. Malitlit where we can find the Clastic Rocks, rocks available
and can be found most at Laguna. These rocks consist of inter-bedded shale and sandstone
with occasional thin lenses of limestone, as well as tuff and reworked sandy tuffs and partly
tuffaceous shale.

Some crops on site are:


Talbos ng kamote

Corn

Patola

38

Sitao

Mangos- they are along river side.

Sugarcane- these were before when the site is still not property of UST.

39

Other plants found in the site are:


Talahib (Saccharum Spontaneum) According to the caretakers, UST-Santa Rosa is also
experiencing heavy floods came from the river near the site. Because of this talahib
grass quickly colonises exposed silt plains created each year by the retreating monsoon
floods, forming almost pure stands on the lowest portions of the floodplain.
Elsewhere, its ability to quickly colonize disturbed soil has allowed it to become an
invasive species that takes over croplands and pasturelands.

Makahiya (Mimosa Pudica)

Chamomile
Flower
chamomile plant is known to be susceptible to many fungi, insects, and viruses.

The

40

Waste Management
Solid Wastes
Increasing economic (production and consumption) activity, in effect, would boost the
generation of solid wastes in any given community. Based on the Citys Environmental
Code (City Ordinance No.1720-2011), Solid Wastes refer to all discarded household,
commercial wastes, non-hazardous institutional and industrial wastes, street sweepings,
construction debris, agricultural wastes, and other non-hazardous/non-toxic solid wastes.
The findings of the WAC Study in 2004 on individual solid waste generation of
0.6kg/person in a day may not be relevant today due to increase economic activity of the
people living in Santa Rosa. Also, the Census Office (NSO) already issued an actual population
of 284,640 in 2010.
The table shows that projected waste generation per day of the City of Santa Rosa until
the year 2017. The total solid waste generation of the city with estimated population of
310,258 (2010), is about 186 metric tons per day based on the average rate of
0.6kg/person/day (WACS, 2004). An estimated 53% of the total wastes generated are
recyclable.
10-Year Projected Waste Generated, Diverted, And Disposal, City Of Santa Rosa, 2008-2017

Yea
r

Projecte
Populati d Waste
on
Generat
(Projecte ed
d)
(MT/Day
)

Project
ed
Waste
Diverte
d
(MT/Da
y)

Projecte
d Waste
For
Disposal
(MT/Day
)
Recycla
ble

Projected
Waste For
Disposal
(MT/Day)
Biodegrada
ble

Project
ed
Waste
For
Dispos
al
(MT/Da
y)
Residu
al

Project
ed
Waste
For
Dispos
al
(MT/Da
y)
Total

200 280,664
8

168.4

58.94

57.08

49.61

2.77

109.46

200 295,090
9

177.05

70.82

55.4

48.14

2.69

106.23

201 310,258
0

186.15

83.77

53.39

46.4

2.59

102.39

201 326,205
1

195.72

97.86

51.03

44.35

2.48

97.86

201 34,2972
2

205.78

113.18

48.29

41.97

2.34

92.6

41

Yea
r

Projecte
Populati d Waste
on
Generat
(Projecte ed
d)
(MT/Day
)

Project
ed
Waste
Diverte
d
(MT/Da
y)

Projecte
d Waste
For
Disposal
(MT/Day
)
Recycla
ble

Projected
Waste For
Disposal
(MT/Day)
Biodegrada
ble

Project
ed
Waste
For
Dispos
al
(MT/Da
y)
Residu
al

Project
ed
Waste
For
Dispos
al
(MT/Da
y)
Total

201 360,601
3

216.36

136.31

41.75

36.28

2.03

80.05

201 379,135
4

227.48

161.51

34.4

29.9

1.67

65.97

201 398,623
5

239.17

188.95

26.19

22.76

1.27

50.23

201 419,112
6

251.47

213.75

19.67

17.09

0.95

37.72

201 440,655
7

264.39

237.95

13.79

11.98

0.67

26.44

Source: 10 Year City Solid Waste Management Plan, City of Santa Rosa,
Laguna.
Solid Waste Collection
The City Government, through the supervision of the City ENRO, is providing daily garbage
collection on the 18 barangays, including almost all private subdivisions. It is spending Php 54
million per year for the collection and hauling of garbage (City ENRO, 2008).
Pilotage Trading and Construction (PTAC) is a private contractor that owns a sanitary landfill
located in San Pedro, Laguna is in charge in the everyday garbage collection of the city. PTAC is
using 29 dump trucks tracking different routes per day. (Excerpt from the 10-Year City Solid Waste
Management Plan)
Liquid Wastes
The entire city lacks wastewater treatment facilities. The city resorts to discharging wastes
into surface waters like local rivers and creeks. Consequently, Santa Rosa contributes to the
unfavourable Class C status of Laguna Lake.

g. Related Man Made Structures


WATER TANKS
This water tank found in the site serves as their water supply aside from bukal
(their natural and major source of water) and river.

42

There is a temporary structure situated on the site that has GI sheets roofing as walls.
This temporary structure serves as the sites temporary office for visitors and their
staffs.

h. Sensuous Qualities

43

The Univeristy of Santo Tomas Santa Rosa is far from civilization. The only structures
that are near the site is the Sta. Elena City subdivision, located right at Sta. Rosa, Laguna's
educational and commercial hub, Sta. Elena City features 9 themed residential developments
and premium educational facilities all within its own backyard. The Acacia Waldorf School and
the University of Santo Tomas Sta. Rosa are both within accessible distance. Vital lifestyle
hubs include the upcoming commercial centers like Centro Sta. Elena and the Business
District, offering pleasurable retail, shopping and recreational possibilities.
Sta. Elena City is surrounded by some of the Philippines' top golf courses: the Sta. Elena
Golf Club, The Country Club and the Canlubang Golf and Country Club are all a swing away.
With this situation, the noise pollution is very low and will not affect the University.
The sites light quality is very good since it is open area and the climate in Laguna was
fair and fine. The heat of the sun wont be problem at all because there are many trees
around the area but the future structures should also provide sun breakers to prevent too
much heat.

B. Cultural Data
a. Resident and Using Population
Projected Population
44

Age
Group

2015

2020

2025

2030

Both

Both

Both

Both

0-4

31,80
0

16,40
0

15,40
0

33,10
0

17,10
0

16,00
0

34,50
0

17,80
0

16,70
0

35,90
0

18,50
0

17,40
0

5-9

29,30
0

15,20
0

14,10
0

30,50
0

15,80
0

14,70
0

31,80
0

16,50
0

15,30
0

33,10
0

17,20
0

15,90
0

9-14

27,40
0

14,00
0

13,40
0

28,50
0

14,60
0

13,90
0

29,70
0

15,20
0

14,50
0

30,90
0

15,80
0

15,10
0

1519

27,70
0

13,40
0

14,30
0

28,90
0

14,00
0

14,90
0

30,10
0

14,60
0

15,50
0

31,20
0

15,10
0

16,10
0

2024

32,40
0

14,80
0

17,60
0

33,80
0

15,50
0

18,30
0

35,20
0

16,10
0

19,10
0

36,70
0

16,80
0

19,90
0

2529

31,80
0

14,40
0

17,40
0

33,10
0

15,00
0

18,10
0

34,50
0

15,60
0

18,90
0

35,80
0

16,20
0

19,60
0

3034

27,70
0

13,20
0

14,50
0

28,90
0

13,70
0

15,20
0

30,10
0

14,30
0

15,80
0

31,30
0

14,90
0

16,40
0

3539

21,40
0

10,50
0

10,90
0

22,30
0

11,00
0

11,30
0

23,20
0

11,40
0

11,80
0

24,20
0

11,90
0

12,30
0

4044

18,90
0

9,300

9,600

19,70
0

9,700

10,00
0

20,50
0

10,10
0

10,40
0

21,30
0

10,50
0

10,80
0

4549

15,30
0

7,400

7,900

15,90
0

7,700

8,200

16,50
0

8,000

500

17,20
0

8,300

8,900

5054

11,80
0

5,700

6,100

12,40
0

6,000

6,400

12,80
0

6,200

6,600

13,40
0

6,500

6,900

5559

8,600

4,100

4,500

8,900

4,200

4,700

9,300

4,400

4,900

9,700

4,600

5,100

6064

5,700

2,600

3,100

6,000

2,700

3,300

6,300

2,900

3,400

6,500

3,000

3,500

6569

3,300

1,400

1,900

3,500

1,500

2,000

3,700

1,600

2,100

3,800

1,600

2,200

7074

2,400

1,000

1,400

2,400

1,000

1,400

2,500

1,000

1,500

2,600

1,100

1,500

7579

1,300

500

800

1,400

500

900

1,400

500

900

1,500

500

1,000

80 & 1,000
over

300

700

1,100

400

700

1,200

400

800

1,200

400

800

TOT
AL

144,2
00

153,6
00

310,4
00

150,4
00

160,0
00

323,3
00

156,6
00

166,7
00

336,3
00

162,9
00

173,4
00

297,8
00

Source: National Statistics Office, Sta.Mesa Metro Manila, Philippines and Excerpt from the Field
Study of P.G.Velasco (2013) entitled Prospects and Challenges of Population Growth to ECCD
Services of the City of Santa Rosa, Laguna.
Among the 18 barangays comprising the City of Santa Rosa, the most populous barangay is
Brgy. Pooc with a projected population size making up 11.78 percent of the total city population by
2030. It was followed by Brgy. Dila (9.51%), Brgy. Malitlit (7.81%), Brgy. Dita (7.24%), and Tagapo
(7.23%).
45

The least populated is Brgy. Sto.Domingo with 1.12 percent share to the projected total
population of Santa Rosa. Adding to the group with least share on the total population is Brgy.
Kanluran (1.52%), Brgy. Ibaba (1.59%), and Brgy. Malusak (1.85%).

2010

*2011

*2012

*2013

*2014

*2015

*2016

*2017

*2018

*2019

*2020

Aplaya

14,17
2

14,30
3

14,43
5

14,56
8

14,70
2

14,82
6

14,95
1

15,07
8

15,20
5

15,33
4

15,45
3

Balibag
o

14,96
8

15,10
6

15,24
5

15,38
6

15,52
8

12,61
0

15,79
1

15,92
4

16,05
9

16,19
5

16,32
1

Caingin

18,60
8

18,78
0

18,95
3

19,12
8

19,30
4

15,65
8

19,63
1

19,79
7

19,96
5

20,13
4

20,29
0

Dila

27,05
9

27,30
9

27,56
1

27,81
5

28,07
1

4,745

28,54
7

28,78
8

29,03
2

29,27
7

29,50
5

Dita

20,60
0

20,79
0

20,98
2

21,17
5

21,37
1

4,521

21,73
3

21,91
6

22,10
2

22,28
9

22,46
2

Don
Jose

12,05
4

12,16
5

12,27
7

12,39
1

12,50
5

19,96
2

12,71
7

12,82
4

12,93
3

13,04
2

13,14
4

Ibaba

4,536

4,578

4,620

4,663

4,706

13,69
0

4,785

4,826

4,867

4,908

4,946

Kanlura
n

4,322

4,362

4,402

4,443

4,484

5,495

4,560

4,598

4,637

4,676

4,713

Labas

15,08
6

15,22
5

15,36
6

15,50
7

15,65
0

35,09
1

15,91
5

16,05
0

16,18
6

16,32
3

16,45
0

Macabli
ng

17,04
9

17,20
6

17,36
5

17,52
5

17,68
7

21,55
0

17,98
6

18,13
8

18,29
2

18,44
7

18,59
0

Malitlit

22,22
3

22,42
8

22,63
5

22,84
4

23,05
4

15,78
2

23,44
5

23,64
3

23,84
3

24,04
5

24,23
2

Malusak 5,253

5,301

5,350

5,400

5,450

23,24
8

5,542

5,589

5,636

5,684

5,728

Market
Area

13,08
6

13,20
7

13,32
9

13,45
1

13,57
6

17,83
5

13,80
5

13,92
2

14,04
0

14,15
9

14,26
9

Pooc

33,54
4

33,85
3

34,16
6

34,48
1

34,79
9

20,16
6

35,38
8

35,68
8

35,99
0

36,29
4

36,57
6

Pulong
Sta.Cru
z

19,27
7

19,45
5

19,63
4

19,81
5

19,99
8

3,325

20,33
7

20,50
9

20,68
2

20,85
7

21,01
9

Santo
Doming
o

3,178

3,207

3,237

3,267

3,297

21,52
2

3,353

3,381

3,410

3,439

3,465

Sinalha
n

19,08
2

19,25
8

19,43
6

19,61
5

19,79
6

19,46
6

20,13
1

20,30
1

20,47
3

20,64
6

20,80
7

Tagapo

20,57
3

20,76
3

20,95
4

21,14
8

21,34
3

28,30
7

21,70
4

21,88
8

22,07
3

22,26
0

22,43
2
46

City of
Santa
Rosa

2010

*2011

*2012

*2013

*2014

*2015

*2016

*2017

*2018

*2019

*2020

284,6
70

287,2
96

289,9
46

292,6
21

295,3
20

297,8
00

300,3
20

302,8
61

305,4
24

308,0
09

310,4
00

Source: National Statistics Office, Sta.Mesa Metro Manila, Philippines and Excerpt from the Field
Study of P.G.Velasco (2013) entitled Prospects and Challenges of Population Growth to ECCD
Services of the City of Santa Rosa, Laguna"
Highlighted above is Brgy. Malitlit, the barangay where the site is situated. The Table
presents the population projection from 2015 to 2040 in the City of Santa Rosa using the medium
assumptions including Barangay . The estimated total population for Brgy. Malitlit for the year
2005 was computed using linear interpolation with the population from the 2000 Census of
Population and Household (CPH) as base population and population from the 2010 CPH as end
population. Linear interpolation was also used to estimate the population of the barangay for years
2015 to 2040 with the 2010 CPH count as base population, and the 2040 projected population
from the 2000 Census-based population projections as end population. The percentage of
population of the City of Santa Rosa to that of the Province of Laguna from the 2010 CPH was used
to estimate the population of the city for years 2015 to 2040. In 10 years time of interpolated
computation of data from 2010-2020, there is just a little amount of added population. There is
only a difference of 2,000 citizens.

b. Adjacent Behavioural Setting


Numerous developing subdivisions immediately surround the site namely Augusta village,
Georgia club village, Mesa Homes, La Residencia De Sta. Rosa, Hacienda Sta. Elena, The country
club and Belle Reve. Most of the houses are owned by well off citizens. Though there are a lot of
subdivisions around, there are only a few people staying and some are just staying during
vacation. At present, there are no much establishments around making the area peaceful and
dangerous. The area of empty lots are still larger than that of the developed ones.
Nature
The Nature is covered with green grass and bushes of large trees. A lot of areas are still
undeveloped. There is a larger percentage of green areas than that of the developed ones
may it be commercial or residential. Though there is a long list of the prospect up coming
projects for Sta. Rosa Laguna is starting to develop economically and also a nice place to
situate business and residence.
Location
The location of the site is surrounded by either vacant lots covered with grass and tress
or subdivisions such as Augusta Vilage, Georgia Village, La Residencia De Sta. Rosa, Hacienda
Sta. Elena and others.
Stability
Economically, If UST Sta. Rosa were to be built in the site, it wouldnt be economically
stable for the population of students around the vicinity wouldnt be enough to suffice the
target number of students to fill every college UST would build. Physically speaking, the site
is stable, free from deadly accidents, earthquakes nor large floods.
Participants
The student population around the vicinity is too low. Even the total population is not the
high yet. Sta. Rosa Laguna is still on its process of developing. Therefore, much time is still
needed to meet the target number of students.
47

Conflicts
There are no much conflicts for the site is still far from other Universities nor
dormitories. The competition wouldnt be that strong.

c. Site Values, Rights and Restraints


Ownership and Values
The establishment to be built on the site is University of Santo Tomas, Sta. Rosa
branch. UST is headed and run by Dominican fathers, Order of Preachers. Dominicans
are known for its prayer, community, schools and preaching. Prayer is a reference point
through which we all better know God. The Eucharist and the Liturgy of the Hours are
the essential elements of Dominican prayer. The gift of the Holy Rosary also has a
special place in our life. Each student must also embrace personal prayer, essential to
our life and preaching. Some set aside a specific part of the day, others a specific
location in which they choose to pray, study the Gospel, read literature, write down
thoughts or meditate. But no matter what form it takes, each student regularly and
religiously sets aside part of every day for contemplation. The integral nature of
Dominican community life lies in the fact that the community continually shapes,
supports and challenges each friar. More than just residences, a Dominican community
(priory) is a home a place where the student lives, prays, recreates and continually
encounters Christ in his brothers. Because of this, it is often the starting point for
preaching. Students spend at least five years in studies. Even after the end of initial
formation and the beginning ministry a students commitment to study and his ongoing
formation will continue throughout his Dominican life. Preaching the Word is the first
priority of the Dominicans. Each student is actively involved in preaching. It is required
to take very seriously the honor and responsibility that come with preaching the Gospel
of Jesus Christ. The Dominican legacy calls us to preach the truth of the Gospel, first and
foremost. Our lives of prayer, study and community provide the environment for
Dominican preaching to grow and take root.
Legal Controls: Zoning and other regulation
48

The establishment is a university. It is privately named / owned by University of Sto.


Tomas. It was registered on the 7th day of August in the year 1913 in the registration
book of the office of the Deeds of Laguna. Some of its design guidelines/regulations are
the natural setting and planned landscape shape the text of UST environment. It is
therefore asked to preserve its natural state and prevent alteration. ( See page 72 for
Zoning and Ordinances of Sta Rosa City)
Accepted territories
The 300-hectare UST Sta. Rosa branch plans to include a Commercial/Mixed Use
development, Medical Facilities, Specialized school, Botanical Garden, Dormitory,
Elementary and Highschool Department, Transient Housing, Specialized education,
Convention center, Grandstand, Research building and more.

d. Past and Future


I. Site and its traces
The UST-Sta. Rosa campus is only the second expansion effort of the University during
its 395-year history. The University first expanded its facilities in the early part of the 20 th
century, from the walls of Intramuros to the bigger, wider, sulucan campus, its present site.
Until the 1970s, Santa Rosa, where the site is located was just a sleepy town, with its people
largely dependent on basic agriculture and family-owned enterprises for livelihood. The
University of Santo Tomas Sta. Rosa Laguna site is within the Sta. Elena State, a 300-hectare
masterplan located at the heart of Sta. Rosa, Laguna.
Its traces: The Quiros Legacy
The Quiros family is synonymous with Sta. Rosa, a land that is bound by tradition and
style that makes it unlike any other region in the country. The family has left its indelible
mark by the numerous developments in the area. They echo the rich colorful past during the
explosive growth of the sugar industry.
Sta. Elena is located in Sta. Rosa, the fast rising new residential area and financial
district of the South, just a short 45 minute drive to Makatis CBD.
The Quiros family together with Vista Land envisioned a development in the South that
successfully combines old world charm with world class developments that co-exist with its
49

natural environment. The Quiros family made a commitment to develop the land of their
heritage into a premier master-planned city.

II. Private intentions for future use and conflicts


UST will start constructing a 44-hectare teaching hospital campus in Sta. Rosa; its going to
be 5 times the size of its Espana campus thats 21.5 acres. The campus will be huge, it will
envisioned to include a commercial complex and a residential development within that are aimed
for the families of its doctors, faculty members, officials, employees and students.
Intentions for future use: Medically inclined
According to UST Rector Fr. Tamerlane Lana O.P. The 44 hectare extension campus in Sta.
Rosa, Laguna will initially offer courses related to the sciences, particularly, Medicine. A hospital
will also rise over a five hectare land donated by business tycoon Lucio Tan. The structure will
start as a basic health hospital, and would slowly become a full-fledged hospital where it can
provide training programs for interns, medical technologists, nurses, clerks and the like.
It is also envisioned to become an IT learning center. It will be so huge that a commercial and
residential development will be constructed within. UST Grade School will also be transferred here.
Conflict: Lack of funds and sponsors
Lana said the Sta. Rosa extension campus will need the procurement of a loan through the
ADB, and the help of international financial institutions. UST can also enter into a partnership with
other universities to raise the necessary funds. Lana said that despite some minor financial
setbacks, the extension campuses are doing very well. He also vowed that by 2011, there would
already be at least minor operational structures on both campuses.
e. Cultural Images

The UST site here in Sta. Rosa is easy to locate because of


the master-planned city (Sta. Elena). The heritage of the site
envisioned by the Quiros family (mentioned in Part I) is to
successfully combine the old world charm with world class
developments that co-exist with its natural environment.
Historical timeline
Santa Rosa was Barrio Bukol of the Municipality of Binan, when the latter was discovered by the
Spanish Conquistador Juan de Salcedo( grandson of Miguel Lopez de Legaspi) while exploring the
Laguna Lake Region in 1571.
It derived its name from its patron saint Santa Rosa de Lima
of Peru which was reputed to have generously given material and spiritual blessings and favors to
its devotees for the past 207 years.
50

The majority of the people are Roman Catholics. Other religious groups represented include the
Church of God International, the United Church of
Christ in the Philippines, Jesus Is Lord Church, Baptist and Fundamental Bible churches.
Santa Rosa de Lima Catholic Church

It was built in 1792


upon the arrival of
Father Francisco
Favie. In 1812 on 4th
of August, Santa Rosa
De Lima Catholic
Church was formally
inaugurated and
blessed.

The Heritage of Santa Rosa Museum


The museum was established to give pride to the rich history of the City and to commemorate the
heroic deeds of Santa Rosa heroes. The museum is the home of the culture and tradition of people
of Santa Rosa, Laguna.

People:
Some inhabitants of Santa Rosa today erroneously refer to themselves as "Rosanians". But since
Santa Rosa is a Spanish name, the correct demonym should be "Rosenses".
Ethnic groups
Like other places in Metro Manila, the original settlers are Tagalogs. Throughout the centuries,
there has been constant migration of Spaniards, Visayans, Bikolanos, Ilokanos, Chinese and
Americans.

51

Events
The city celebrates their feast day same with the patron Saint Rose De Lima.
is honored together with Martin de Porres and Turibius of Mogrovejo with a
feast day on the liturgical calendar of the Episcopal Church (USA) on August
Other Landmarks
Brittany Corporations Georgia Club Community is the upscale property
inspired by the charming communities of the American South. Homes take
design cues from classic Colonial architecture. Gardens and trees grow

She
23.

abundantly across the landscape.

Greenfield city is a 300-hectare integrated commercial, residential and industrial park in Sta.
Rosa, Laguna. It is one of the town's largest mixed-use development project, accessible from the
bustling Makati CBD District by mere 40 minutes.
Accomplished projects and future developments in Greenfield City includes:
- Paseo 3
- Sta. Rosa Business Park
- Laguna Central
Note: Refer to the related destinations for other landmarks. The site is surrounded by gold courses
and residential areas.

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III. DATA CORRELATION


A. SWOT Analysis ( tabulation based on the Off-site and On-site data)
Strengths

Easily accessible by both private and public transportation


o Located in Santa Rosa, Laguna which is linked to Metro Manila by the Southern
Luzon Expressway (SLEX) and the Philippine National Railroad.
The total site for the campus is 40 hectares making it very spacious and allowing
the freedom of development.
The property is also very simple in contours and is not affected by erosion which
o This allows freedom in design of structures and even zoning.
The property big but is rich in vegetation, proving that the site is fertile and allows
for future landscaping plans.
a great number of users for the specific project
o Many residential developments surrounding the property is a strength to the site
by allowing.
The nearby commercial areas like Solenad, Paseo de Sta. Rosa, greenfield city, and
so forth also becomes a strength to the site because it brings additional value to
the project and creates more attractions by the site.

Weaknesse
s

Property was clear and free from trees


o This becomes a weakness to the project because of the lack of natural
landscapes that may help in sun shading, wind deflection, and even improve air
quality.
Overflowing of the river by the site.
o Based on the data collected and the interviews conducted, the river by the site
always overflows during storms and rainfall which causes flooding.
Accessible by one road and it is only a single lane.
o This will definitely cause traffic, affect travel time, and lessen proper
accessibility.

Opportuniti
es

The site is surrounded by different developments like residential areas, commercial


spaces, communication technology offices, car dealerships, schools, and so forth.
Sta. Rosa, Laguna is a well-developed and populated area providing more
opportunities for the site based on the number and kinds of users.
More than half of the population of Laguna is urbanized and has received an
education.
The project will be able to provide more opportunities for the citizens to continue
their educational attainment and allow students from different regions to continue
their education as well.
The growth in Sta. Rosas economy has a great effect on the site by providing more
opportunities for development and even raising the land value of the site.
The development of the site will allow Sta. Rosa to become a self-sufficient region,
serve as a landmark, and allow the University of Sto. Tomas to expand.

Threats

Over urbanization of the area.


Decreasing literacy rate
o This proves the lack of proper education in the area making this project vital to
the citizens of Sta. Rosa. The project will not only help the literacy rate but
improve on the current number of citizens who have received a degree as well,
which is around 4% of the population.
Over urbanization of Laguna lessens the agricultural sectors
o This affects not only the economic aspect of the region but the employment of
the citizens as well
The growing developments around the area also have a detrimental effect on the
existing water supply system.
o The depletion of water sources has continued and even the quality due to the
infiltration of the natural
o Sta. Rosa has a lack of proper treatment facilities and allow discharging of
wastes in to natural resources
Sta. Rosa River Basin which has been affected by the continuous population growth
53

affecting its capacity to retain water especially during rainy days.


o This becomes a threat because of the possibility of flooding, water pollution and
water scarcity in the site.
Possible congestion of the area due to the growing population of its surroundings
and the growing population due to the project.
o This in turn may affect the surrounding areas causing:
Traffic
Noise pollution
Overcrowding.

Sta. Rosa directly accessed by SLEX

Residential Developments of Sta. Rosa

54

Single Lane road and the only access way of the site

Existing Property with no existing trees

Map of Car Dealers in Sta. Rosa

55

Flooding in Laguna (The site experiences flooding on low areas of up to the chest level)

B. Social Impact Assessment


a. Environmental Setting
The site is located within the city of Santa Rosa, a part of the Calabarzon Region which is
a first-class city in the Laguna province. It is located just 37 kilometers south of Manila via the
South Luzon Expressway, making it a suburb of Metro Manila. Calabarzon has varied
landforms as well, consisting of flat coastal areas, upland interior areas of slightly moderate
undulating plains, hill and mountains. Almost 60% of the regions land area has a slope
ranging from 0-180.
The site is a generally flat area, it is characterized by none to slight erosion. Out of the
total land area, only 114 hectares or 2.06% is subjected to slight erosion. The soil found in
the site is Lipa soils which span deep as it provides moderately well to well drainage
capabilities. The terrain is characteristically undulating to rolling. Both the estimated
hydraulic conductivity and filtration rate are moderate.
The climate of the area is dry from November to April and wet for the rest of the year.
The mean annual temperature is 27.6 degree Celsius and is relatively cool due to the sites
elevation and favorable air shed condition. The warmest month is May with an average of 30
degree Celsius while the coolest month is January with an average temperature of 25 degree
Celsius.
Northeasterly winds prevail during the months of October through February. Winds come
from southeast during March and April. Southerly winds prevail during May while June through
September southwesterly winds prevails. The average speed of winds is 5 kilometers per
hour.
Annual average rainfall is notably 1,950 millimeters. The maximum rainfall occurs in
October while minimum rainfall is gauged at 2 millimeters. Though the municipality is located
in a region subject to typhoons, Santa Rosa is hardly affected due to protection from the
outlying mountain areas.

56

b. On-site
Micro SocioImpacts (see
conditions

Macro and
Economic
applicable
under this)

On Site Macro Socio Economic Impact


Employment Impacts
The specific project will be able to provide more opportunities for the residents of
Santa Rosa. The school will not only seek teaches but of all sectors from assistants to
managers. This will create a boost in the employment rate of Santa Rosa. The overall
project not only affects the educational aspect of the region but is able to create more
job opportunities for the citizens of Sta. Rosa and the Filipino people.
Orientation to surrounding dwellings
The City of Santa Rosa has, in the past decade, emerged as a rapidly developing
industrial and urban center. It is known for its commercial and industrial activities in the
province of Laguna. It is host to 50 major multi-national and local manufacturing
companies. These companies provide local employment, generate export earnings,
increase local revenues and serve as instruments for the transfer of technology, with
linkages to its local economy.
Developments found outside the site will greatly affect the site in many different
ways. Outside developments not only improve land value but determine the facilities in
it. Because of the existing commercial areas and residential developments, the project
may rely on these things as well.
Site Access
The access ways also affect the flow inside the site. The project is greatly
dependent on these entryways and the existing transportation systems. Santa Rosa is
accessed by both public and private transportation through the SLEX and the PNR.
Relocation of existing residents

57

The site is an untouched land that is currently being occupied by a caretaker and
his family. There are no existing structures or informal settles, making it easy for the
project to be started without the consideration of the existing residents.
Macro Future Residents
Due to the surrounding residential developments, it is easy for the users to be
provided with different housing opportunities. This project is also specifically for
residential purposes for the students of the University of Sto. Tomas. The future users
are most likely to be of the university and at an age of 16-23 years old. The common
user would be students from different provinces and living without their families.
Living in a boarding house or dormitory is necessary for students who come from
far places. In Davao City, an observable statistics of university students from
neighboring provinces and the citys outskirts live in these temporary residences. Based
on existing data, student-boarders/dormers, and reveal that a students stay in a
boarding house and dormitory has significant contributions to his/her personal, social,
academic and emotional growth. Results demonstrate further, that respondents have
recognized their boarding houses and dormitories possessing good basic housing
facilities. These studies show the positive effects of a dormitory and proves that it is
beneficial for the users of the facility.
On Site Micro Socio Economic Impact
Sound
The site is surrounded by low density residential developments which dont bring a
high amount of sound pollution. Therefore it is not a main concern although, because
the project is a highly developed university, when constructed might cause sound
pollution problems for these residential areas.
Ventilation
The site is generally free from existing trees allowing the possibility of winds to be
harsh but may be addressed through natural or man-made technological solutions. The
air quality of the area is generally clean because Santa Rosa is not full of many industrial
companies and traffic is somewhat light due to the regulation and rules for these factors
made by the local government.
Power
Meralco is the main distributer of power around Santa Rosa. It is a fully functional
system with no current problems but plans have been made to develop the system to
ensure the reliability of the system especially with the growing developments in the
area.
Water
The region of the site is endowed with an advantageous natural topography and
environment that includes plentiful underground water reserves pegged at 300 million
gallons. During the site visit, the group noticed one main water tank which serves the
exiting users and used for maintenance of the land.
Waste
The City of Santa Rosa envisions to be a model in waste management and free
from any form of pollution. The City recognizes that the increasing level of economic
activities and population growth would lead to an increase in the volume of wastes and
have adverse impact on the environment and health of the populace, and has created
different principles to follow like: adhering to provision RA 6969 Ecological Solid Waste
Management of 2000, demolishing the use of plastic bags, and the segregation and
collection of each barangay for the residents, establishing a materials recovery facility,
and so forth.
58

Protective devices
There are also changes in the land use upstream affect hydrology processes
including the quantity and quality of water draining to downstream communities. The
Municipality of Silang of the Province of Cavite support the headwaters of seven subbasins four of which including the Santa Rosa River Basin drain towards Laguna Lake,
while three others drain towards Manila Bay. This brings continuous flooding to the site
which affects zoning, planning, and designing of the campus.
Acceptance factors
The project is a great addition to the educational community in the region, with a
teaching hospital and facilities that will offer degree programs in health care and other
university degree programs to produce graduates who will be able to find good
employment in the region. This can create a huge economic growth for the country.
Social Relations
Laguna is a leisure and vacation destination. This makes Sta. Rosa an attraction
which is able to bring in different users and promote the creation of more developments
which directly affects the site. The overall project of the University of Sto. Tomas, Sta.
Rosa, is able to bring many different positive effects to its surrounding areas. Not only
does it serve as an educational hub for Sta. Rosa but allows and attracts different
students from other regions. This allows an attraction to not only the school but to the
surrounding developments as well. The project will continue to have a positive effect on
not only its surroundings but to the actually university as well. The In-Campus dormitory
is able to promote different users from different regions and all the university to be a
community.

59

C. Findings and Recommendations


Findings
The University of Sto. Tomas (UST) is the oldest university in Asia and is also the biggest
Catholic university in the world, in terms of student population. The university is planning to
start constructing a 44-hectare teaching hospital campus in Sta. Rosa, which will be 5 times
the size of its Manila campus. The proposed campus is envisioned to include a commercial
complex and a residential development within that are aimed for the families of its doctors,
faculty members, officials, employees and students.
There is currently a propped design of the campus designed by Palafox Associates with
the goal of providing holistic development to its students. The institution features academic
buildings, sports facilities, health care, a place of worship and places to live in this campus.
Three entrances follow a comprehensive semi-grid pattern. The dormitories, convent, church,
ossuary as well as ecclesiastical and seminary buildings provide the ambiance of a pleasant
and congenial academic life within the campus.

60

Recomendation
Opportunities
Strengths provide numerous pavilions
throughout the future campus in
order to provide sufficient shade for
the community
The group also recommends the
maximizing natural landscapes and
providing proper walkways, common
spaces, and the proper facilities.
It is also important to provide the
proper environment for the
Universities users and refrain from
destroying the existing landscapes. A
possible solution is to preserve the
existing landscapes and enhance it
to provide an environmentally
friendly campus.
Maximize the accessibility of Sta.
Rosa by providing more public
transportation areas to create a
steady and easy flow between the
site and its exterior

Threats
Due to the risk of flooding in the site,
the group recommends further planning
to consider this risk from either fixing
the leveling of buildings, creating
natural runoff solutions, water basins,
and so forth.
It is also suggested to follow the
already existing plans of the
government which shows the
preparations of the proper land use of
the Sta. Rosa area by taking in to
consideration the flooding.
Safety and comfort is the main goal in
designing the campus. It is important to
zone spaces correctly to promote safety
and circulation.
Make use of cost-efficient materials that
are not only durable but sustainable as
well
consider the acoustical impact of the
sites structures and materials
61

To also create a steady flow between


the surrounding commercial and
residential developments for the
ease of users by creating more
access systems.
Weaknes
ses

IV.

To consider a design that does not


interfere with the surrounding
landmarks and structures as to
not take away from the existing
aura of Sta. Rosa
create wide walkways, proper
traffic lanes and flow, and
different access systems to avoid
overcrowding
It was important to the group to
create a campus that can
efficiently serve the users and
promote unity and education.
Providing the proper spaces where
in students are given the chance
to work independently and also
learn how to be living in a
community and extend their

Apply widespread roofs and provide


natural landscapes that provide
adequate shelter for the people and
protect the site from strong winds and
flooding
widen roads and crossings for easier
access
utilize acoustically sound materials to
address the noise pollution
Creation of different access points of
the site to remove the congestion in the
only existing entrance.

SITE PLANNING OUTPUTS


A. Contour Plan and Sections

62

Percentages and Land use and activities:

63

A-B 1/7.5 = 13% - can be actively used only for hill sports or free play
B-C 1/23 = 4.35% - suitable for movement and informal activity
C-D 1/3.5 = 28% - may require terracing or cribbing
D-E 1/13 = 7.69% - suitable for movement and informal activity
E-F 1/31 = 3.23% - usable for all kinds of activities
F-G 1/110 = .91% - do not drain well
A-G 5m/190m = 2.63% - usable for all kinds of activities
B. Site Analysis
64

The site that is located at sta. Rosa is a sloped site that is allotted for the
construction of the walk up dormitory and its activity areas. At the highest part of the
site you'll have vistas and viewpoints in mountains on the east, the view of the city
center on the south, and the view of the proposed UST campus on the west.
The northern part of the site is exposed to the noise of the adjacent town. The
western side of the side is exposed to the campus noise and considering also some
traffic and vehicle noise from the side of the 10m wide road

C. Site Development Plan

65

E.

Sustainable Design Solutions


66

Sustainable architecture is designing structures that seek to minimize the negative


environmental impact of buildings by efficiency and moderation in the use of materials, energy,
and development space. Sustainable architecture uses a conscious approach to energy and
ecological conservation in the design of the built environment. Sustainable development can
permanently decrease operating expenses while preserving natural resources, since the cost to
implement many of the technologies and designs are becoming standard.
There are numerous definitions of what green development could mean, green or sustainable
developments are resource efficient buildings that utilize construction materials wisely to decrease
the overall ecological footprint of the building. Every construction project has some impact on the
land and its surrounding environment. The case for building green is to do prevent avoidable
waste, reduce maintenance costs, increase the life span of a building and have a positive impact
on its occupants.
University housing stands to benefit greatly from cost reductions that green development
offers. Besides reducing maintenance costs, green construction also serves as a catalyst to teach
students the principles of conservation. The environments created around green design enhance
the academic experience and increase the social interaction of the students. An example would be
Tufts University in Medford, MA. It exemplifies the movement by following a set of guidelines each
of their new buildings will incorporate:
Careful site selection to minimize impacts on the
surrounding environment and increase alternative
transportation options
Energy conservation to ensure efficient use of natural
resources and reduced utility bills
Water conservation to ensure maximum efficiency and
reduced utility bills

67

Responsible storm waste management to limit


disruption of natural watershed functions and reduce
the environmental impacts of storm water runoff
Waste reduction, recycling, and use of "green" building
materials
Improved indoor air quality through the use of low
volatile organic compound products and careful
ventilation
practices
during
construction
and
renovation.
Reduced urban heat island effect to avoid altering the
surrounding air temperatures relative to nearby rural
and natural areas
Solutions
Solar Hot Water
Solar panels or tubes that collect the suns energy to heat
water serve as one of the primary technologies in reducing
electrical bills and carbon production. As one of the most efficient
technologies, solar produced hot water directly affects one of the
largest uses- residential properties.
This can be specifically applied to the dormitory by adding
solar panels to the roof and allowing the filtered water to be
heated for the users. This will be most effective in this project
because of the amount of water each resident will use and the
amount of energy it can save.
Photovoltaic (PVs)

Photovoltaic Panels can be very beneficial with little maintenance costs. Best of all, since
there are no moving parts, and nominal annual maintenance, PVs are one of the few energy
sources that are carbon neutral. PVs also directly combat one of the largest expenses a building
owner and user faces- electrical usage.
There are different ways of applying Photovoltaic Panels in buildings either roof mounted or
building integrated. Building integrated PVs are not as efficient as standard, roof mounted PVs, but
their growth in popularity will ensure that the technology will continue to be refined.
Because the need for light and electricity is important for students and most especially the
youth today, this can be most efficient because of the amount of money and power saved. This
can be applied as a facade in the building to catch the most light and turn it into an efficient way
of producing electricity.
Wind

68

Wind electrical production is most recognized by the giant white wind mills that slowly turn
with the prevailing winds. A new form of wind based technology from Aerotecture International,
Inc. has created a product that is not only efficient, but also is no longer required to be vertical,
and isnt prone to bird loss or a victim of unsightly aesthetics. Although not yet in mass production
the adoption and refinement of this technology will push for the acceptance of wind generation in
urban areas.
Because of the slightly sloping contour this allows the sight to have a breeze which is not
disrupted because of the few trees found on the site. This allows the application of wind turbines
to be a possibility in the roof of the structure going hand and hand with the solar panels because it
does not disrupt the amount of light it catches. The group decided to place the wind turbines in
the roof because the building is located in the highest part of the site and the higher the wind
turbine is, the more wind it catches therefore creating more energy.

Rainwater/Greywater

69

Rainwater harvesting and grey water recycling provides


a unique opportunity to dramatically reduce usage of the
residents of the project. Because the Philippines is a tropical
country, harvested rainwater collected off the building
rooftops is very efficient. This water can be stored in cisterns
for reuse as building toilet water and open space irrigation.
The cost of water and storm fees will most influence this
technologies feasibility.
Because this is a high density project with the presence
of many users as residents, waste water will be prevalent.
This allows a grey water recycling system to be efficient and
will allow the saving of money.
Vegetated Roof

The Philippines is known for its extreme heat and a popula aid in the reduction of a sites heat
island effect is vegetated roofs. this help to extend the life of roofing systems but dont always
offer the best payback. Vegetated roofs also help to reduce storm runoff which is a problem in the
country as well.
Applying this to the structure will allow the cut back on cooling costs, prevent future disasters
caused by rain, improver over all air quality. This may be applied in the roof or may be used as
vertical gardens in the structure.

Transit Oriented Development

70

Public rail transit increases community well-being by creating jobs, boosting economic
development and property values, and by reducing pollution and traffic congestion. Each person
riding light-rail transit vs. driving an automobile for one year reduces hydrocarbon emission by
nine pounds, nitrogen oxide emissions by five pounds, and carbon monoxide emissions by 62.5
pounds. One electric light-rail train produces nearly 99 percent less carbon monoxide and
hydrocarbon emissions per mile than one automobile does. Student housing located near transit
and the university reduces the need for parking spaces and supports pedestrian friendly
community, which in turn puts less stress on the environment.
This is an important solution because the site is surrounded by many different developments
that may be used by the users. It is important for the site to maximize the different ways of
accessibility to provide ease for its users which will promote the area. A light rail train system may
either be applied around the perimeter of the site or crossing through an integral part of the site.
Modular Construction
Reducing construction costs while ensuring quality has
always been an elusive goal until the recent strides in modular
construction. By constructing the major components of a
building in a factory, quality of workmanship is increased,
construction time and cost is lowered. Although early adaptors
have started to accept modular construction as the inevitable
shift in real estate construction, presently modular construction
works best for student housing and hotels due to the many
similar sized modules. Although this seems like a positive
solution there are some draw backs including the limited size of
each modular component to the size of the truck transporting
each piece.
The project is made up of similar modules or rooms that
are identical in plan, shape, design, size, and so forth. This makes this solution an ideal one in time
saving and cost efficiency. If each room is premade and require only parts to be put together, this
will allow minimization of construction time, labor, and so forth.

71

V. Attachments
STUDENTS FROM CALABARZON AREA HOUSING SURVEY
118 Respondents

Among 118 respondents, 38 percent (45 respondents) are male and 62 percent (73

respondents) are female


72

Almost half of the respondents are in Second Year College (49%, 58 respondents), 29%
comprises of Third Year College students (34 respondents), With equal number of 11 respondents
are First and Fourth year college (9% each), 3% are Fifth Year College Students (3 respondents)

and one taking up Juridical Doctorate.


Most of the Respondents are staying on their own house, 15% are renting, 7% said their
staying in their relatives house and 28% percent are staying in Dormitories / Boarding houses (33
respondents).

Most are riding a Jeepney on their way to school, 54% said they are only walking, 26% are
riding a pedicab or tricycle, 17% owns car and the least with 6% rides a bus.

This graph shows that most of the students are living outside CALABARZON and with
some originally living in other countries. They comprise 48% of the total population. While 15
73

respondents said they live in Cavite, 14 in Calamba, Laguna, 12 from NCR, 6 from Los Baos City,
5 from Bian, Laguna, 4 from Cabuyao, Laguna and 1 from San Pedro, Laguna.

With a great number of 107 which is 91% of the total respondents said that they are
convenient with going to and from the school and their housing.

7 being the greatest number of respondents said that their monthly dormitory rent is PHP
2,000-3,000. With equal number of 6, PHP 3,000-6,000 are their monthly dormitory rent. 3% said
they are only paying Php 500-1,000 and with equal number of 3 said that they pay Php 1,0002,000 and above Php 10,000. The least number of answer is Php 9,000-10,000.

Out of 31 respondents living in dormitories, 15 said they are renting a studio type, 9 said they
are renting a one bedroom unit and 6 said with two bedrooms and one said her unit has 3
bedrooms.

74

Most are living with another student. 10 students said they are 4 in a room, 4 said theyre alone, 3
said theyre 3 and 2 said theyre 5 and 1 said theyre 8.
27 said that theyre environment
is pleasing and 4 said its not
because it is not well maintained
and not pleasing.

CONCLUSION:
It is very evident that Sta. Rosa City is still developing for majority number of students are still
taking the option of staying and living at home than dormitories. It is also a clear sign that there
are no much students from far areas that chooses to study there/
TRANSFER CERTIFICATE TITLE

LOT 1
A Parcel of land (Lot 1 of the consol. Of the subd. Plan, Fcs-04-010112, being a portion of the consol. Of Lots
2168-A-1 and 2168-A-2 (LRC) Psd-289870, LRC Rec No.), situated in the barrio of Brgy Malitlit, Mun. of Sta Rosa, Prov. Of
Laguna. Bounded on the SW., along lines 1-2-3-4-5-6-7 (by Lot 11 (Road) on the NW., along line 7-8-9-10-11-12-13-14-15-1617-18-19-20-21 by Lot 14 (Road) both of the consol. Subd. Plan; on the NE., along line 21-22 by Existing Road (portion of Lot
2168-(LRC) Psd-154968; and on the SE., along lines 22-23-24-25-26-27-28-29-30-31-32-33-34-35-1 by Lot 2 of the consol.
Subd plan. Beginning at a point marked 1 on plan, being 8.51 deg. 19 E., 355.27m, from Mon. No. 35, Sta. Rosa

75

Boundaries
North: NE: Existing Road (Portion of Lot 2168-B)
South: SW: Lot 11 (Road)
East: SE: Lot 2
West: NW: Lot 14 (Road)
Classification: Industrial
Area: 17, 701.00
Market Value: Php 14,514,820.00

Actual Use: Industrial


Assesment Level: 40%
Assessed Value:
Php 5,805,928.00

(Source: Transfer Certificate Title)


LOT 2168-B-1
A Parcel of land (Lot 2168-B-1 of the consol. Of the subd. Plan, Psd-04-141444, being a portion of Lot 2168-B (LRC) Psd154968, LRC Rec No. 8357), situated in the Barrio of Brgy Malitlit, Mun. of Sta Rosa, Prov. Of Laguna. Bounded on the NW., along lines 1-23-4-5-6-7-8 by Lot 2168-B-2; on the NE., along line 8-9-10 by Lot 2168-B-5 both of the Subd. Plan; on the SE., along line 10-11-12-13-1415-16-17-18-19-20-21-22-23-24-25-26-27-28-29-3-31 by Malitlit River; and on the SW., along lines 31-32-1 by Lot 2168-A (LRC) Psd154968. Beginning at a point marked 1 on plan, being N.84 deg. 41 S., 455.87, from Mon. No. 35, Sta. Rosa Estate. Then N.74 deg
04E., 68.86 m. to the point 2;N.77 deg. 18E., 111.31m. to the point 3;
Boundaries:
North: NE: Lot 2168-B-5
East: SE: By Malitlit River
South: SW: Lot 2168-A
West: NW: Lot 2168-B
Classification: Industrial
Area: 250,000.00
Market Value: Php 205,000,000.00
Actual Use: Industrial
Assesment Level: 40%
Assessed Value:
Php 82,000,000.00
(Source: Transfer Certificate Title)
LOT 2196-C-2-A
A Parcel of land (Lot 2196-C-2-A of the consol. Of the subd. Plan, Psd-04-131445, being a portion of Lot 2196-C-2, Psd043428-058293, LRC Rex No. 8375), situated in the Barrio of Brgy Malitlit, Mun. of Sta Rosa, Prov. Of Laguna. Bounded on the N., along line
1-2 by Lot 2196-C-2-, of the subd. plan; on the SE., along line 2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10-11 by Rd; on the SW., along line 11-12 by Lot 2196-C-1,
Psd-043428-058293; and on the NW., along lines 12-13-14-15-16-17-18-19-20-21-22-23-24-25-26-27-28-29-30-1 by Malitlit River.
Beginning at a point marked 1 on plan, being N.71 deg. 56 E., 1040.19m, from Mon. No. 35, Sta. Rosa Estate. Then S.18 deg 24E.,
69.00 m. to the point 2;S.42 deg. 06W., 31.82m. to the point 3; S.63 deg. 48W., 89.49m to pt. 4; S.68 deg. 09W.
Boundaries:
North: NE: Lot 2197-C-2-B
East: SE: By road
South: SW: 2196-C-1
West: NW: By Malitlit River
Classification: Industrial
Area: 32, 301.00
Market Value: Php 52,973,640.00
Actual Use: Industrial
Assesment Level: 40%
Assessed Value:
Php 21,189,456.00
(Source: Transfer Certificate Title)

LOT 2168-A-2
A Parcel of land (Lot 2168-A-2 Of the subd. Plan (LRC), Psd-289870, approved as a non-subdivision project, being a portion of
Lot 2168-A, (LRC) Psd-154968, LRC Record No. 8375), situated in the Barrio of Brgy Malitlit, Mun. of Sta Rosa, Prov. Of Laguna. Bounded on
the N., and the NW., points 1 to 6 by a Road, on the NE., points 6 to 8 by lot 2168-A-1 of the subd plan, on the S., and the SE., points 8 to
27 by the Malitlit River, and on the W., and the SW., points 27 to 29, and 1 by the Bambang River. Beginning at a point marked 1 on plan,
being S. 26 deg 55E., 51.30m from Mon. 35 Sta. Rosa.
Boundaries:
North: NE: Lot 2168-B
East: SE: Lot 4
South: SW: Lot 4
West: NW: Lot 11 (Road)
Classification: Industrial
Area: 50,000.00
Market Value: Php 41, 000, 000.00
Actual Use: Industrial
Assesment Level: 40%
Assessed Value:
Php 16, 400, 000.00
(Source: Transfer Certificate Title)
LOT 3
A Parcel of land (Lot 3 Of the subd. Plan (LRC), Psd-289870, approved as a non-subdivision project, being a portion of Lot
2168-A, (LRC) Psd-154968, LRC Record No. 8375), situated in the Barrio of Brgy Malitlit, Mun. of Sta Rosa, Prov. Of Laguna. Bounded on the
NE., points 2 to 4 by lot 2168-B, (LRC) Psd-154968, on the SE., points 4 to 5 by the Malitlit River, on the SW., points 5 to 6 and 6 to 1 by Lot
2168-A-2 of the subd. Plan and on the NW., points 1 to 2 by a road. Beginning at a point marked 1 on plan being N. 80 deg. 34E., 410.32
m. from Mon. 35, Sta. Rosa Estate.
Boundaries:
North: NE: Lot 2168-B
South: SW: Lot
East: SE: Lot 4
West: NW: Lot 11 (Road)

76

MUNICIPALITY OF SANTA ROSA


ORDINANCE NO. ___
Series of 1999
AN ORDINANCE ADOPTING A LAND DEVELOPMENT GUIDANCE SYSTEM
FOR THE MUNICIPALITY OF SANTA ROSA AND PROVIDING FOR THE
ADMINISTRATION, ENFORCEMENT AND AMENDMENT THEREOF
AND FOR THE REPEAL OF ALL ORDINANCES IN
CONFLICT THEREWITH.
Be it ordained and enacted by the Sangguniang Bayan of Santa Rosa:
WHEREAS, Section 20-c of the Local Government Code provides that local government units shall continue to prepare their
respective Land Use Plans enacted through Zoning Ordinances which shall be the primary and dominant bases for the future use of
land resources;
WHEREAS, the local government of Santa Rosa, in pursuit of its development goals and objectives, formulated its Comprehensive
Land Use and Development Plan which would require the enactment of regulatory measures to translate its planning goals and
objectives into reality;
WHEREAS, this Zoning Ordinance is one such regulatory measure which is an important tool for the implementation of the
Comprehensive Land Use and Development Plan;
NOW THEREFORE, the Sangguniang Bayan of Santa Rosa in a session assembled hereby adopts the following Zoning Ordinance.
ARTICLE I
TITLE OF THE ORDINANCE
Section 1.
Title of the Ordinance. This Zoning Ordinance shall be known as the Santa Rosa Land Development Guidance
System and shall hereinafter be referred to as the LDGS.
ARTICLE II
AUTHORITY AND PURPOSE
Section 2.
Authority. The LDGS is enacted pursuant to the provisions of the Local Government Code of 1991, R.A. 7160 Section
458 (2 ix) authorising the Municipality through the Sangguniang Bayan to adopt a Zoning Ordinance in consonance with the approved
Comprehensive Land Use and Development Plan and in conformity with Executive Order No. 72.
Section 3.

Purposes. The LDGS is enacted for the following purposes:

1. Promote and protect the health, safety, peace, comfort, convenience and general welfare of the inhabitants of the Municipality;
2. Guide the growth and development of Santa Rosa in accordance with its Comprehensive Land Use and Development Plan;
3. Provide the proper regulatory environment to maximise opportunities for creativity, innovation and make ample room for
development within the framework of the Municipalitys over-all goals and objectives;
4. Protect the character and stability of residential, commercial, industrial, institutional, open space and other functional areas within
the Municipality and promote the orderly and beneficial development of the same; and
5. Guide the local government and the private sector in their development decisions.
Section 4.
General Principles. The LDGS is based on the approved Santa Rosa Comprehensive Land Use and Development
Plan as per Resolution No. ___ dated ____.
1. The LDGS reflects the Municipalitys vision of A community with a sustainable economic growth focused on industrial and
commercial development that allows for maximum employment opportunities, and promotes a high quality of life through the
provision of basic services and a humane and balanced environment;
1. The LDGS recognises that any land use is a use by right but provides however that the exercise of such right shall be subject to
the review standards of the LDGS;
2. The LDGS gives the free market the maximum opportunity to spur the Municipalitys development within a framework of
environmental integrity and social responsibility;
3. The LDGS has been designed to encourage the evolution of high-quality developments rather than regulating against the worst
type of projects;
2. The LDGS has been crafted in a manner that it is fully responsive to the ever-changing conditions that the Municipality continually
face;
3. The LDGS functions as a tool for informed decision making on the part of the land use administrators by way of providing specific
criteria to judge the acceptability of developments;

4. The LDGS provides a direct venue for community empowerment where the stakeholders become involved especially in critical
development decisions;
1. The regulations in the LDGS are considered as land use management tools that area necessary to provide a clear guidance to
land development in order to ensure the communitys common good.
ARTICLE III
DEFINITION OF TERMS
The definition of the technical terms used in the LDGS shall carry the same meaning given to them in already approved codes and
regulations, such as but not limited to the National Building Code, Water Code, Philippine Environmental Code and the Implementing
Rules and Regulations promulgated by the HLRB. The words, terms and phrases enumerated hereunder shall be understood to
have the corresponding meaning indicated as follows:
1. Agricultural Zone (AGZ) an area intended for cultivation/fishing and pastoral activities e.g. fish, farming, cultivation of crops,
goat/cattle raising, etc.
2. Agro-Industrial Zone an area intended primarily for integrated farm operations and related product processing activities such as
plantation for bananas, pineapple, sugar, etc.
3. Allowable Impervious Surface Area Ratio (AISAR) - the ratio between the coverage of ground level impervious surfaces to the
total lot area. This is expressed as a percentage over and above the resultant Percentage of Land Occupancy (PLO) for each
development. The computation of impervious surface area coverage shall include spaces outside the building envelope, such as
driveways, walks, parking areas, etc.
4. Buffer Area - these are yards, parks or open spaces intended to separate incompatible elements or uses and to control
pollution/nuisance.
5. Building Height Limit (BHL) - the maximum height allowed for structures or buildings expressed as number of floors or storeys.
6. Central Business District - shall refer to areas designated principally for trade, services and business purposes (Commercial 1
Zone)
7. Certificate of Non-Conformance - certificate issued to owners of all uses existing prior to the approval of the LDGS which do not
conform to the provisions herein provided.
8. Certificate of Zoning Classification a document issued by the Zoning Administrator citing the zoning classification of the land
based on this Ordinance.
9. Compatible Uses - uses or activities capable of existing together harmoniously e.g. residential use and parks and playground.
10. Comprehensive Land Use and Development Plan (CLUDP) - a document embodying specific proposals for guiding, regulating
growth and/or development. The main components of the CLUDP in this usage are the sectoral studies i.e. Environment, Social,
Economic, Land Use, Transport, Infrastructure and Local Administration.
11. Conflicting Uses - uses or activities with contrasting characteristics sited adjacent to each other e.g. residential units adjacent to
industrial plants.
12. Conforming Use - a use that is in accordance with the zone regulations as provided for in the LDGS.
13. Easement - open space imposed on any land use/activities sited along waterways, road-right-of-ways, cemeteries/memorial parks,
utilities and the like.
14. Environmentally Critical Areas - refers to those areas which are environmentally sensitive and are listed in Proclamation
2146 dated 14 December, 1981, as follows:
a.
b.
c.

j.

All areas declared by law as national parks, watershed reserves, wildlife preserves and sanctuaries;
Areas set aside as aesthetic potential tourist spots;
Areas which constitute the habitat for any endangered or threatened species of indigenous Philippine wildlife (flora and
fauna);
d. Areas of unique historic, archaeological, or scientific interests;
e. Areas which are traditionally occupied by cultural communities or tribes;
f. Areas frequently visited and/or hard-hit by natural calamities (geologic hazards, floods, typhoons, volcanic activity, etc.;
g. Areas classified as prime agricultural lands;
h. Recharge areas of aquifers;
i. Water bodies characterised by one or any combination of the following conditions:
tapped for domestic purposes;
within the controlled and/or protected areas declared by appropriate authorities; and
which support wildlife and fishery activities.
Mangrove areas characterized by one or any combination of the following conditions:
with primary pristine and dense young growth;
adjoining the mouth of major river systems;
near or adjacent to traditional productive fry or fishing grounds;

k.

which act as natural buffers against shore erosion, strong winds and storm floods; and
on which people are dependent on their livelihood.
Coral reef characterised by one or any combination of the following conditions:
with 50% and above live coralline cover;
spawning and nursery grounds of fish; and
which acts as natural breakwater of coastlines.

15. Environmentally Critical Projects - refer to those projects which have high potential for negative environmental impacts and
are listed in Presidential Proclamation 2146 dated 14 December 1981, as follows:
a.

b.

c.
d.

Heavy industries
non-ferrous metal industries;
iron and steel mills;
petroleum and petro-chemical industries including oil and gas; and
smelting plants.
Resource extractive industries
major mining and quarrying projects; and
forestry projects such as logging, major wood processing, introduction of fauna (exotic animals) in public/private
forests, forest occupancy, extraction of mangroves and grazing.
Fishery projects
dikes for/and fishpond development projects
Infrastructure projects
major dams;
major power plants (fossil-fuelled, nuclear-fuelled, hydroelectric or geothermal); and
major roads and bridges.

16. Exception- a device which grants a property owner relief from certain provisions of the LDGS where because of the specific use
would result in a particular hardship upon the owner, as distinguished from a mere inconvenience or a desire to make more
money.
17. Floor/Area Ratio (FAR) - is the ratio between the Gross Floor Area of a building and the area of the lot on which it stands.
Determined by dividing the Gross Floor Area of the building and the area of the lot. The Gross Floor Area of any building should
not exceed the prescribed floor area ratio (FAR) multiplied by the lot area.
18. Forest Zone (FZ) an area intended primarily for forest purposes.
19. General Commercial Zone (GCZ) an area for trading, services and business purposes.
20. General Institutional Zone (GIZ) an area principally for general types of institutional establishments e.g. government offices,
schools, hospitals/clinics, academic/research, convention centres.
21. General Residential Zone (GRZ) an area principally for dwelling/housing purposes.
22. Gross Floor Area (GFA) - the GFA of a building is the total floor space within the perimeter of the permanent external
building walls (inclusive of main and auxiliary buildings), occupied by:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.

Office areas;
Residential areas;
Corridors;
Lobbies;
Mezzanine;
Vertical penetrations which shall mean stairs, fire escapes, elevator shafts, pipe shafts, vertical shafts, vertical ducts,
and the like and their enclosing walls;
Machine room and closets;
Storage rooms and closets;
Covered balconies and terraces; and
Interior walls and columns, and other interior features.

Excluding the following:


k.
l.

Covered areas used for parking and driveways, including vertical penetrations in parking floors where no residential
or office units are present; and
Uncovered areas for AC cooling towers, overhead water tanks, roof decks laundry areas and cages, wading or swimming
pools, whirlpool or jacuzzis, gardens, courts or plazas.

23. HLRB/BOARD - shall mean the Housing and Land Use Regulatory Board
24. Impervious Surface - type of man-made surface which does not permit the penetration of water.
25. Land Use Intensity Controls (LUIC) - refer to controls on open spaces (PLO), building bulk (FAR), building height (BHL) and
impervious surfaces (AISAR). The LUIC is imposed to control, among others, traffic generation, requirements on utilities, overbuilding, over-crowding, visual access and to attain the desired zone character. The LUIC is applied as follows:

a.
b.
c.

Maximum Allowable Building Area Per Floor in Square Meters = Lot Area x Allowable PLO
Maximum Allowable Gross Floor Area in Square Meters = Lot Area x Allowable FAR
In determining the maximum number of floors per building, BHL regulations shall apply.

For planned unit development schemes, residential subdivisions and the like, the LUIC shall apply to individual lot parcels. Gross
open spaces (defined as common areas, roads, etc.) shall be governed by the requirements of PD 957, BP 220 and related
regulations. For large scale projects on single blocks, i.e. those that have no lot/parcellary subdivisions, the LUIC shall mean to
apply to the gross lot area of the block and the gross floor area of the buildings to be put up therein.
26. Light Industrial Zone (I-1) an area principally for the following type of industries:
a. non-pollutive/non-hazardous
b. non-pollutive/hazardous
27. Locational Clearance - a clearance issued to a project that is allowed under the provisions of the LDGS as well as other standards,
rules and regulations on land use. This clearance is required prior to the issuance of a building permit.
28. Medium Industrial Zone (I-2) an area principally for the following types of industries:
a. pollutive/non-hazardous
b. pollutive/hazardous
29. Mitigating Device - a means to grant relief in complying with certain provisions of the LDGS.
30. Non-Conforming use - existing non-conforming uses/establishments in an area allowed to operate in spite of the non-conformity to
the provisions of the LDGS subject to the conditions stipulated in the Locational Clearance.
31. Official Zoning Map - a duly authenticated map delineating the different zones in which the whole Municipality is divided.
32. Parks and Recreation Zone (PRZ) - an area wherein uses are designed for diversion/amusements and for the maintenance of the
ecological balance of the community.
33. Percentage of Land Occupancy (PLO) - defined as a percentage of the maximum allowable floor area of any building (at any
floor level) to the total lot size. This includes the main and auxiliary buildings. In case of discrepancy between the specified PLO
in this Ordinance and the Light and Ventilation provisions of the National Building Code, the lesser allowable floor area shall
prevail.
34. Rezoning a process of introducing amendments to or change in the text and maps of the Zoning Ordinance. It also includes
amendment or change in view of reclassification under Section 20 of RA 7160.
35. Setback - the open space left between the building and lot lines.
36. Socialised Housing Zone (SHZ) shall be used principally for socialised housing/dwelling purposes for the underprivileged and
homeless as defined in RA 7279.
37. Variance - a Special Locational Clearance granting a property owner relief from certain provisions of the LDGS where, because of
the particular physical surrounding, shape or topographical conditions of the property, compliance on height, area, setback, bulk
and/or density would result in a particular hardship upon the owner, as distinguished from a mere inconvenience or a desire to
make more money.
38. Warehouse refers to a storage and/or depository of those in business of performing warehouse services for others, for profit.
39. Water Zone (WZ) bodies of water that include rivers, streams, lakes and seas except those included in other zone
classifications.
40. Zone - an area within the Municipality, as defined by manmade or natural boundaries, where specific land use regulations are
applied.
41. Zoning Administrator - a Municipal government employee responsible for the implementation/enforcement of the LDGS.
ARTICLE IV
ZONE CLASSIFICATIONS
Section 5.
Division into Zones. The Municipality of Santa Rosa is hereby divided into five general zones, namely, Low Intensity
Development, Urban Redevelopment, Growth Management 1, Growth Management 2 and Shoreland. Said divisions are for the
purposes of the following:
1. implementing the Santa Rosa CLUDP;
2. defining specific areas of the Municipality of Santa Rosa, each requiring different standards of development to meet different
circumstances present within the zone; and
3. serving the purposes and intent of the LDGS as outlined in Chapter I.
The provisions contained herein anticipate the likelihood and desirability of mixing land uses. Unlike conventional zones, which
segregated various land uses, the LDGS allows mixed uses and places the emphasis on minimising or buffering any nuisance factors
between such uses. Further provisions impose criteria to resolve any possible problems and eliminate what might be negative

impacts when unlike uses are located in proximity. Zones are distinguished according to allowable land use intensities, which are
discussed in detail in succeeding articles.
Section 6.

Description of Zones. The intent and purpose of each zone is described below.

1. Low Intensity Development Zone


The Low Intensity Development Zone (LIDZ) is the Low Intensity Development Area described in the CLUDP. The Zone is one
of the direct urban expansion areas of the Poblacion but is, however, determined to have low development capability.
Limitations are due mainly to it being flood prone with unstable soils in some parts. It is delineated in order to control
development in these environmentally sensitive lands.
The LIDZ further hosts the remaining classified agricultural areas of Santa Rosa. The LDGS does not provide for the reclassification of these agricultural areas. Re-classification shall have to undergo the standard statutory proceedings as required
by the Sangguniang Bayan.
The LDGS provides that the LIDZ shall be a predominantly low-intensity development area having substantial vegetated and
landscaped open spaces. All developments shall carefully consider drainage as well as minimise impervious surface conditions.
Barangays included in the LIDZ (in whole or in part) are as follows: Sinalhan, Aplaya and Caingin.
2. Urban Redevelopment Zone
The Urban Redevelopment Zone (URZ) is the Urban Redevelopment Area described in the CLUDP. It hosts the traditional
business and residential districts of Santa Rosa. These districts have since expanded and evolved into a mixed-use area
predominated by low to medium intensity activities. The zone, however, has moderate development capability in as much as it is
located on environmentally sensitive land and has little room for substantial infrastructure improvement.
It is the intent of the LDGS to encourage urban renewal to enhance the present mixed-use character of the area as well as prevent
the over-burdening of infrastructure. The LDGS further promotes the low to medium-intensity mixed use development in this area,
which can improve the identity and character of the zone in particular and the Municipality in general. A compact urban
development pattern is desired, interspersed with strategic public open spaces.
The central Poblacion area, composed of Bgys. Kanluran and Malusak, is hereby classified as a Historical Redevelopment
District (HRD). This encompasses Rizal Blvd., from the foot of Sta. Rosa Bridge to the corner of G. B. Zavalla St.; F. Gomez St.
from the corner of Anonuevo St. to the corner of P. Gomez St.
Barangays included in the URZ (in whole or in part) are as follows: Tagapo, Market Area, Poblacion, Labas, Pooc, Balibago, Dila
and Dita.
3. Growth Management Zone 1
Growth Management Zone 1 (GMZ-1) is described as Growth Management Area 1 in the CLUDP. It used to be the urban
fringe area of the municipality and has since experience sporadic urban growth, which is now in the process of consolidation. It
also has moderate development capability with limitations due to flooding hazards and limited capacities of access roads.
It is the intent of the LDGS to encourage the well-ordered consolidation of urban growth in this area. Developments shall be of
moderate intensity in consideration of its natural and man-made limitations.
Barangays included in GMZ - 1 (in whole or in part) are as follows: Tagapo, Macabling, Balibago, Dila, Pulong Sta. Cruz, Dita
and Malitlit.

4. Growth Management Zone 2


Growth Management Zone 2 (GMZ-2) is described as Growth Management Area 2 in the CLUDP. It has high development
capability with substantial potential for further development.
GMZ 2 is intended to accommodate the urban expansion requirements of the municipality, directing it away from the more
environmentally sensitive lands. The LDGS promotes mixed-use high-intensity developments in the zone. Substantial ground
open spaces shall be provided along with impervious surface conditions.
Barangays included in GMZ - 2 (in whole or in part) are as follows: Pulong Sta. Cruz, Malitlit, Don Jose and Sto. Domingo.
5. Shoreland Zone
The Shoreland Zone (SZ) is described as the Shoreland Area in the CLUDP. LLDA Resolution No. 23 Series of 1996 or the
Implementing Rules and Regulations of Republic Act No. 4850 define it, as follows:
a. Existing titled lands with elevation 12.50 meters and below including those titled under the Torrens System prior to the
enactment of Presidential Decree No. 813 in 1975; and
b. All other areas below elevation 12.50 meters as referred to a datum 10.00 meters below mean lower low water (MLLW).
Per the said LLDA Resolution, the Shoreland Area is a strip of linear open space designed to separate incompatible elements or
uses, or to control pollution/nuisances and for identifying and defining development areas or zones. The administrative and
regulatory control on the land use of the Shoreland Area is vested upon the Laguna Lake Development Authority. This area is the
declared Strategic and Agricultural Development Zone (SAFDZ) of Sta. Rosa.
Barangays included in SZ (in whole or in part) are as follows: Sinalhan, Aplaya and Caingin.
6. Road Rights-of-Way Zone
It is the intent of the LDGS to ensure the provision of adequate accessibility to all parts of the Municipality as provided in the
CLUDP. With this regard, Road Rights-of-Way Zones (RROW) are delineated. All properties that are affected by the identified new
road alignments shall be required to provide unimpeded road rights-of-way.
Section 7.
Zoning Map. It is hereby adopted as an integral part of the LDGS, the Official Zoning Map of the Municipality, duly
signed by the Mayor and authenticated by the Sangguniang Panlalawigan. The designation, location and boundaries of the zones
herein established are shown and indicated in the said Official Zoning Map. Appendix A and B show the General Zoning Map and
the Historical Redevelopment District, respectively.
Section 8.
Zone Boundaries. The locations and boundaries of the above mentioned zones into which the municipality has been
subdivided are hereby identified and specified as follows:
1. Low Intensity Development Zone
The LIDZ is bounded on the west by the barangay boundaries of Tagapo, Market Area, Ibaba, Labas, Pooc, Dila and Dita.
2. Urban Redevelopment Zone
The URZ is bounded on the west by the Manila South Road and on the east by the barangay boundaries of Sinalhan, Aplaya,
Caingin and Pooc.
3. Growth Management Zone 1
GMZ-1 is bounded on the west by the South Luzon Expressway and on the east by the Manila South Road, as presented in the
Zoning Map.
4. Growth Management Zone 2
The Municipalities of Silang, Binan and Cabuyao bound GMZ-2 to the west, north and south, respectively. The South Luzon
Expressway also bound it at the east.
5. Shoreland Zone
The boundaries of the Shoreland Zone shall be as provided by LLDA Resolution No. 23 Series of 1996 or the Implementing Rules
and Regulations of Republic Act No. 4850.
6. Road Rights-of-Way Zone
The alignment of the RROW Zones shall be as measured from the RROW Zone Map (Appendix C). The measured distance shall
be construed as the centre line of the said RROW. The respective RROW widths shall then be reckoned at an equal distance
from these centre lines. These RROW widths are presented as follows:
RROW
Code
TR-1

Category
Farm-to-market

RROW
Width
(mts.)
10

TR-4
TR-5
TR-6
TR-7

Secondary
Primary
Primary
Secondary

20
30
30
20

Section 9.
Interpretation of the Zone Boundary. In the interpretation of the boundaries for any of the zones indicated on the
Official Zoning Map, the following rules shall apply:
1. Where zone boundaries are so indicated that they approximately follow the centre of streets or highway, the street or highway
right-of-way lines shall be construed to be the boundaries.
2. Where zone boundaries are so indicated that they approximately follow barangay boundary lines, the delineation shall be
based on those indicated on the cadastral maps.
3. Where zone boundaries are so indicated that they are approximately parallel to the centre lines or right-of-way lines of streets
and highways, such zone boundaries shall be construed as being parallel thereto and at such distance therefrom as indicated
in the Official Zoning Map. If no distance is given, such dimension shall be determined by the use of the scale shown in said
zoning map.
4. Where the boundary of a zone follows a stream, lake or other bodies of water, said boundary line should be deemed to be at
the limit of the political jurisdiction of the community unless otherwise indicated. Boundaries indicated as following shorelines
shall be construed to follow such shorelines and in the event of change in the shorelines, shall be construed as moving with the
actual shorelines. Boundaries following bodies of water shall be subject to public easement requirements as provided in the
Water Code, in the provisions of this ordinance and with other applicable regulations.
5. Where a zone boundary line divides a lot of single ownership, as of record at the effective date of the LDGS, the lot shall be
construed to be within the zone where the major portion of the lot is located. In case the boundary line bisects the lot, it shall
fall in the zone where the principal structure falls.
6. Where zone boundaries are said to be as indicated in the Official Zoning Map, the location of the parcel in consideration shall
be referred to from the cadastral map and overlain to the former.
7. The mapped location of the property in consideration shall prevail over that of the textual description.
ARTICLE V
GENERAL REGULATIONS
Section 10. General Provision. The Municipality recognizes that any land use is a use by right but provides that the exercise of
such right shall be subject to the review standards of the LDGS.
Section 11. Classification of Uses. Development proposals shall be classified according to the allowed uses within the following
zones, as defined by the HLRB:

General
Residential
Zone
Socialised
Housing
Zone
General
Commercial
Zone
Light Industrial Zone
Medium Industrial Zone
Heavy Industrial Zone

General Institutional Zone

Special Institutional Zone

Agricultural Zone

Agri-Industrial Zone
Forest Zone
Parks and Recreation
Zone

The definition as well as the list of allowable uses within each classification as provided by the HLRB to the above is adopted in this
Ordinance and are exhibited in Appendix D.
Section 12. Height Regulations. Unless otherwise stipulated in this ordinance, building heights must conform with the height
restrictions and requirements of the Air Transportation Office (ATO), the National Building Code, Structural Code and other rules
and regulations related to land development and building construction.
Section 13. Subdivisions, Condominiums, Economic and Socialized Housing. Projects classified as Subdivisions and
Condominiums or Economic and Socialized Housing shall conform to the rules and regulations of the following:
1. PD 957, Subdivision and Condominium Buyers Protective Law and its implementing rules and regulations;
2. Batas Pambansa 220, Promulgation of Different Levels of Standards and Technical Requirements for Economic and
Socialised Housing Projects and its revised implementing rules and regulations;
3. RA 7279, Urban Development and Housing Act; and
4. Other pertinent government rules and regulations.
Section 14. Building Setback Regulations. Unless otherwise specified in this ordinance, building setback regulations shall be
per the minimum requirements of the National Building Code.
Section 15.

Easement.

Pursuant to the provisions of the Water Code, the following easements shall be observed:

1. The banks of rivers and streams and the shores of the seas and lakes throughout their entire length and within a zone of
three meters in urban areas, 20 meters in agricultural areas and 40 meters in forest areas, along their margins, are subject
to easement of public use in the interest of recreation, navigation, floatage, fishing and salvage.
No person shall be allowed to stay in this zone longer than what is necessary for space or recreation, navigation, floatage,
fishing or salvage or to build structures of any kind.
2. Mandatory five-meter easement on both sides of earthquake fault traces on the ground identified by PHIVOLCS.
Section 16. Specific Provisions in the National Building Code. Specific provisions stipulated in the National Building Code
(P.D. 1096), as amended, relevant to traffic generators, advertising and business signs, erection of more than one principal
structure, dwelling on rear lots, access yard requirements and dwelling groups, which are not in conflict with the provisions of the
Zoning Ordinance, shall be observed.
Section 17. Network of Green and Open Spaces. All residential and commercial subdivisions are required to provide green
strips and forest parks as provided in Sangguniang Bayan Resolution 768-99. The LDGS provides that industrial subdivisions shall
also be required to comply with the provisions of the said Resolution. For this purpose, the suitable tree species are exhibited in
Appendix E HLRB Administrative Order No. 02 Series of 1997.
Section 18. Projects of National Significance. Projects may be declared by the NEDA Board as Projects of National
Significance pursuant to Section 3 of Executive Order No. 72. When a project is declared as such by the NEDA Board, the
Locational Clearance shall be issued by the HLRB pursuant to EO 72, in consultation with the Municipality of Santa Rosa in order
to ensure that the requirements of the LDGS are met.
Section 19. Environmental Compliance Certificate. Projects within the scope of the Environmental Impact Assessment System
or those that are classified as Environmentally Critical Projects or those which are located in Environmentally Critical Areas shall
not be commenced, developed or operated unless the requirements of the Environmental Compliance Certificate have been
complied with.
Section 20. Subdivision Projects. All owners and developers of subdivision projects shall, in addition to securing a Locational
Clearance as provided by this Ordinance be required to secure a development permit pursuant to the provisions of PD 957 and its
Implementing Rules and Regulations or BP 220 and its Implementing Rules and Regulations in the case of Socialised Housing
Projects in accordance with the procedures laid down in EO 71, Series of 1993.
Section 21. Infrastructure Capacities. All developments shall not cause excessive requirements at public cost for public
facilities and services and will not be detrimental to the economic welfare of the community. All developments shall exhibit that
their requirements for public infrastructure (such as roads, water supply and the like) are within the capacities of the system/s
serving them.
Section 22. Traffic Impact Assessment. Major, high intensity facilities such as commercial-residential buildings having four
floors and above, shopping centres, schools, universities, industrial estates and/or other similar developments that are required to
provide 20 or more vehicular parking slots by the National Building Code, shall be required to submit Traffic Impact Assessments
which shall form part of the requirements for Locational Clearance. Other traffic generating developments, as determined by the
Zoning Administrator, shall be required to submit the same.
Section 23. Socio-Economic Impact Assessment.
Major facilities such as industrial estates, industrial establishments,
shopping centres and/or similar facilities that require 50 or more employees during operations shall be required to submit SocioEconomic Impact Assessments which shall form part of the requirements for Locational Clearance. Proponents shall establish that
their developments shall cause direct socio-economic benefits to the municipality such that they prioritise the hiring of qualified
residents of the municipality, provide relevant employee housing facilities/assistance and/or prioritise the sourcing of materials and
supplies from the municipality.
ARTICLE VI
INNOVATIVE TECHNIQUES
Section 24. Innovative Techniques or Designs. For projects that introduce flexibility and creativity in design or plan such as but
not limited to Planned Unit Development, Housing projects covered by New Town Development under RA 7279, BLISS Commercial
Complexes, etc., the Zoning Administrator shall on grounds of innovative development techniques forward applications to HLRB for
appropriate action.
ARTICLE VII
PERFORMANCE STANDARDS
Section 25. Buffer Yards. Building setbacks shall be considered as buffer yards. Aside from providing light and ventilation, buffers
can mitigate adverse impacts and nuisances between two adjacent developments. Whenever necessary, buffers shall be required to
be extended and/or provided with planting materials in order to ameliorate said negative conditions such as, but not limited to, noise,
odour, unsightly buildings or danger from fires and explosions. A buffer may also contain a barrier, such as a berm or a fence, where
such additional screening is necessary to achieve the desired level of buffering between various activities.
1. Buffers Between Adjoining Properties. Between two different developments, e.g. General Residential and General
Commercial, the more intense land use shall provide the proper buffer design and materials. If a development shall occur
beside a vacant lot, the owners of the properties in consideration may submit a contractual agreement whereby the required

buffer for the first area to develop shall be reduced or waived. If additional buffer will be required at the time the vacant lot
develops, it shall be provided by the latter development.
2. Buffers on Simultaneous Developments.
developments occur simultaneously.

The more intense use shall provide the necessary buffer in cases when two

3. Location of Buffers. The building setbacks shall serve as buffer locations, at the outer perimeter of a lot or parcel. In no case
shall buffers occupy public or private street rights-of-way.
4. Types of Buffers. Landscaped buffers with suitable foliage are encouraged. On developments where it may not be possible to
put in landscaped buffers (such as narrow lots), the developer may put up a fence provided the fencing material is compatible
with the design of the building.
5. Land Uses in Buffer Areas. Buffers are part of yards and open spaces and in no case shall buildings encroach upon it. It
may, however, be used for passive recreation such as gardening, pedestrian trails, etc.
Section 26. Environmental Conservation and Protection Standards. It is the intent of the LDGS to protect the natural
resources of the Municipality. In order to achieve this objective, all development shall comply with the following regulations:
1. Views shall be preserved for public enjoyment especially in sites with high scenic quality by closely considering building
orientation, height, bulk, fencing and landscaping.
2. The utilisation of the water resources of the Municipality for domestic and industrial use shall be allowed provided it is in
consonance with the development regulations of the DENR, provisions of the Water Code, the Revised Forestry Code of the
Philippines, as amended, and whenever necessary, be subjected to an Environmental Impact Assessment Study;
3. Heavy water using industrial (e.g. soft drink bottling), recreational (golf courses, water theme parks and the like) and other
facilities shall be discouraged to locate within the Municipality;
4. Land use activities shall not cause the alteration of natural drainage patterns or change the velocities, volumes, and
physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of stormwater. Streams, watercourses, wetlands, lakes or ponds shall not
be altered, regraded, developed, piped, diverted or built upon;
5. All developments shall limit the rate of stormwater runoff so that the rate of runoff generated is no more than that of the site
in its natural condition; and
6. All developments shall undertake the protection of rivers, streams, lakes and ponds from sedimentation and erosion
damage.
7. The internal drainage systems of developments shall be so designed as not to increase turbidity, sediment yield, or cause the
discharge of any harmful substances that will degrade the quality of water. Water quality shall be maintained according to
DENR DAO No. 34 Revised Water Usage and Classification/Ambient Water Quality Criteria;
8. Municipal and industrial wastewater effluents shall not discharge into surface and groundwater unless it is scientifically
proven that such discharges will not cause the deterioration of the water quality. Effluents shall be maintained according to
DENR DAO No. 35 91 Establishing Effluent Quality Standards for Class C Inland Waters;
9. Floodplains shall not be altered, filled and/or built upon without proper drainage design and without proper consideration of
possible inundation effects on nearby properties;
10. Facilities and operations that cause the emission of dust, dirt, fly ash, smoke or any other air polluting material that may have
deleterious effects on health or cause the impairment of visibility are not permitted. Air quality at the point of emission shall
be maintained at specified levels according to DENR DAO No. 14 - Revised Air Quality Standards of 1992.
11. Mature trees or those equal to or greater than 12 inches calliper measured 14 inches above the ground shall not be cleared or
cut; and
12. Easements shall at all times be observed along the banks of rivers, streams and major National Irrigation canals (greater than
2 meters) and the shores of the lake throughout their entire length pursuant to the provisions of the Water Code of the
Philippines; likewise irrigation canals of the National Irrigation Authority shall be provided with similar easements.
Section 27. Historical Preservation and Conservation Standards. Historic sites and facilities shall be conserved and
preserved. These shall, to the extent possible, be made accessible for the educational and cultural enrichment of the general
public.
The following shall guide the development of historic sites and facilities:
1. Sites with historic buildings or places shall be developed to conserve and enhance their heritage values.
2. Historic sites and facilities shall be adaptively re-used.
Section 28. Site Performance Standards. The Municipality considers it in the public interest that all projects are designed and
developed in a safe, efficient and aesthetically pleasing manner. Site development shall consider the environmental character and
limitations of the site and its adjacent properties. All project elements shall be in complete harmony according to good design

principles and the subsequent development must be visually pleasing as well as efficiently functioning especially in relation to the
adjacent properties and bordering streets.
The quality of every neighbourhood shall always be enhanced. The design, construction, operation and maintenance of every
facility shall be in harmony with the existing and intended character of its neighbourhood. It shall not change the essential
character of the said area but will be a substantial improvement to the value of the properties in the neighbourhood in particular and
the community in general.
Further, designs should consider the following:
1. Sites, buildings and facilities shall be designed and developed with regards to safety, efficiency and high standards of design.
The natural environmental character of the site and its adjacent properties shall be considered in the site development of each
building and facility.
2. The height and bulk of buildings and structures shall be so designed that it does not impair the entry of light and ventilation,
cause the loss of privacy and/or create nuisances, hazards or inconveniences to adjacent developments.
3. Abutments to adjacent properties shall not be allowed without the neighbours prior written consent which shall be required by
the Zoning Administrator prior to the granting of a Locational Clearance; and
4. The capacity of parking areas/lots shall be per the minimum requirements of the National Building Code. These shall be
located, developed and landscaped in order to enhance the aesthetic quality of the facility. In no case shall parking
areas/lots encroach into street rights-of-way.
5. Developments that have lot areas of two hectares or more and which attract a significant volume of public modes of
transportation, such as tricycles, PUJs, buses, etc., shall provide on-site parking for the same. These should also provide
vehicular loading and unloading bays so as through street traffic flow will not be impeded.
6. Buffers, silencers, mufflers, enclosures and other noise-absorbing materials shall be provided to all noise and vibrationproducing machinery. Noise levels shall be maintained according to levels specified in DENR DAO No. 30 - Abatement of
Noise and Other Forms of Nuisance as Defined by Law.
7. Glare and heat from any operation or activity shall not be radiated, seen or felt from any point beyond the limits of the
property.
ARTICLE VIII
SPECIFIC ZONE GUIDELINES
Section 29.

Low Intensity Development Zone (LIDZ) Guidelines

1. Allowed Uses
All uses allowed under the following classifications of the HLRB:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.

General Residential Zone


Socialised Housing Zone
General Commercial Zone
General Institutional Zone
Agricultural Zone
Parks and Recreation Zone
2. Land Use Intensity Control Ratings
Following is the LUIC rating that shall be observed in the LIDZ:
Maximum
PLO
0.4

Section 30.

Maximum
FAR
1.0

Maximum
BHL
3.0

AISAR
Plus 10% of resultant
PLO

Urban Redevelopment Zone (URZ) Guidelines

1. Allowed Uses
All uses allowed under the following classifications of the HLRB:
a.General Residential Zone
b.Socialised Housing Zone
c. General Commercial Zone
d.General Institutional Zone
e.Parks and Recreation Zone
2. Land Use Intensity Control Ratings
Following is the LUIC rating that shall be observed in the URZ:

Maximum
PLO
0.6

Maximum
FAR
2.0

Maximum
BHL
4.0

AISAR
Plus 10% of resultant
PLO

3. Historical Redevelopment District


All uses allowed within the URZ are allowed in the Historical Redevelopment District (HRD). Moreover, the applicable LUIC is as
follows:
Maximum
PLO
0.8

Maximum
FAR
2.0

Maximum
BHL
3.0

AISAR
100% of total lot area

The design and construction of all buildings, structures and other facilities therein shall observe a Hispanic Architectural motif,
circa 1800s and must remain compatible with the architecture of the municipal hall. The town plaza shall also be rehabilitated
along the same architectural character. Further, all commercial signages, billboards, advertising signs and the like shall not
exceed six meters in height nor shall be of such dimensions as to dominate the visual landscape and obstruct views. Their
designs and materials shall also conform to the historic character of the District.