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HD 412-1P WORKING WITH CHILDREN

AND FAMILIES IN A DIVERSE WORLD (3 units)

PACIFIC OAKS COLLEGE


SCHOOL OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
SYLLABUS-FALL 2015
Faculty: Sheree' Bielecki, M.Ed.
E-mail: sbieleckihawkins@pacificoaks.edu
Office hours: please email me to schedule a time via phone, GoToMeeting, or in
person.
Course Section Information
HD 412-01P
Working with Children and Families in a Diverse World
Dates: 9/12-13, 10/10-11, 11/14-15
Hours: Saturday: 8:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m., Sunday: 8:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m.
Room: TBA
Course Description
This class examines the psycho-social needs of children and families and a
developmental/constructivist approach to supporting their growth and well-being. It
includes the critical importance of culture/ethnic traditions, values and beliefs, social
identity development, the dynamics of interpersonal power and how these all affect our
work as practitioners and advocates. Students will observe children and families in a
variety of contexts, hone skills for critical reflection, and develop effective facilitative
strategies applicable to teaching, counseling, parenting, social services and advocacy.
Emphasis will be on valuing diversity and respecting the individual; active experiential
learning; interaction between theory and practice; and the impact of social contexts on
oneself and others.
Institutional Outcomes
Development: Understanding of developmental theories.
Diversity: Understanding and valuing diversity, including an anti-bias approach.
Communication: Ability to communicate with others in a connective way.
Research: Ability to collect, process, and evaluate data through research.
Praxis: Ability to observe, critically reflect, implement theories and empower others.
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BA Student Learning Outcomes


I.

Students will analyze the role of diversity and its construction within
children's development.

II.

Students will critically analyze their role within power relationships in settings
where adults and children encounter one another.

III.

Students will analyze the impact of systemic and institutional power upon
childrens diverse developmental styles.

IV.

Students will apply theory to practice by examining what it means to be a


culturally competent practitioner and develop practices grounded within
constructivism that bring about positive social and educational change.

V.

Students demonstrate growth in this class, indicated by an improvement in


writing or critical thinking skills, a willingness to take risks and authentically
engage with course material and classmates; or an openness to new
information and perspectives.

Course Requirements
Readings
Other Peoples Children, 6th edition, Lisa Delpit,
ISBN: 1595580743
Price: $17.95

Preschool in Three Cultures, Joseph J. Tobin, David Y. H. Wu, Dana H. Davidson


(buy original book, not the revisited version)
ISBN: 0300048122
Price: $21.00

Children of Immigration, Carola Suarez-Orozco and Marcelo M. Suarez- Orozco


ISBN: 0674004922
Price: $24.50

A World of Difference: Readings on Teaching Young Children in a Diverse Society, Carol


Copple
ISBN: 192889609X
Price: $22.75

Required books available on MBS or other book websites


In addition to required books, there will be handouts and articles given throughout the
course.

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Weekly CANVAS Engagement:


Each week there will be a MANDATORY short prompt on the discussion board in
Canvas for you to respond to. These prompts ask you to reflect on (a) the course content
and assignments, (b) your learning processes and experiences, or (c) application of
content to your development. I will respond to your check-in posts in a variety of ways
individually, to the whole group, to describe themes that emerge, or to provide
clarification or resources, etc Remember these weekly on-line engagements are
mandatory.
Assignments
Persona Doll:
Student is required to create a persona doll and its story. This doll is to represent the
development of your own personal, cultural identity. This assignment will include an oral
presentation as well as a 4-5 typed page written story describing the formation of your
identity.
Due: Sign-up for presentation
SLO I
Observation:
Students do in-depth observations of diverse groups of children. Each student is required
to do a minimum of 5 hours of observation (of children), at two or more locations. At
least one of the observations should involve children interacting with adults (minimum of
6 typed pages).
Due: October 11
SLO I, II, IV
Multicultural Curriculum:
Students are required to write a research paper, which creates an approach to a
multicultural curriculum bringing about true inclusivity for a diverse group of children.
The paper will include the following factors: Identity; Bias; Social Justice; Parent
Communication. This research paper will be between 6-7 typed pages, using references
and a bibliography in APA format. A minimum of 5 references are required.
Due: November 14
SLO I, II, III, IV
Final Self Evaluation Paper
Students are required to write an in-depth reflection upon their experience in class, the
assignments and the readings. The paper will be 4-5 typed pages, following guidelines
for reflection.
Due: November 15
SLO I, II, III, IV

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Journal Writing #1
Journal assignment will include questions covering the following issues:
A reflection on your particular cultural/familial background, and the strengths,
weaknesses and contributions you bring to working with children and families.
A reflection on Other Peoples Children, including how dynamics apply to your
life and ways ideas can be used to make a difference with children.
Due September 19
SLO I, II
Journal Assignment #2
Journal assignment will include questions covering the following issues
A reflection on Children of Immigration, examining the complex dynamics of
immigrant families, unique conditions of modern times, and issues of immigrant
children.
A reflection of the ways this information can be used to support immigrant
children and families as a teacher.
Due October 10
SLO II, III
Journal Assignment #3
Journal assignment will include questions covering the following issues:
A reflection on Preschool in Three Cultures, examining the ways that preschools
reflect cultural values of the country.
Reflecting upon the challenges facing families and preschool programs in each
country.
Reflecting upon insights gained about American preschools and ways to apply
these to work with children and families.
Due November 14
SLO I, III, IV
Signature Assignment: Multicultural Curriculum
Online Check-In Component: You will be required to check in through canvas each
week that the class does not meet. Listed below is your assigned check-in questions. The
questions are designed to support you with journal writing and other assignments for the
class.
We will discuss this along with other assignments on the first day of class.
Details of assignments will be reviewed at first class session.

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COURSE CALENDAR
Online Posting 1- Week of September 7, Introduce Yourself.
Please post a 2-paragraph introduction and describe yourself for our new learning
community. Let us know about both your personal and professional experiences. You
must make this post by Wednesday of the first week of this Semester. Post must be made
no later than 11:59 pm PST Wednesday, September 9, 2015. (Do not post before Sept.
7th).
Class Meetings 1 & 2: September 12-13
A. Review of the Syllabus and overview of course,
B. Culture and development
C. Culture and learning
D. Overview of Other Peoples Children
Readings:
Other Peoples Children, articles on culture and development, environments
Children of Immigration
Online Posting 2 for the week of September 21:
From the discussion on your Observation Assignment, describe where and how you will
be approaching your two observations. Discuss any concerns you have regarding your
observations, and how you plan to address these concerns.
Online Posting 3 for the week of September 28:
From the assigned readings discuss the differences between earlier immigrant groups and
those of today. Include at least three major differences discussed in your book, Children
of Immigration.
Provide an update on your Observation Assignment. You should have completed one
observation. Where did this take place? Describe one positive or negative factor that
stood out for you in this observation.
Online posting 4 for the week of October 5:
From the reading on immigrant children, identify four psychosocial risk factors of
immigrant children. How could you address these difficulties facing immigrant children
as an early childhood educator?
You should have completed your second observation. Where did this take place? What
was one factor that stood out for you? Discuss an insight you gained from the
observation.

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Class Meetings 3 & 4: October 10 - 11


A. Immigrant Children
B. Bias and Stereotyping
C. Multicultural Curriculum
Readings: Articles: Anti-Bias and stereotyping
Preschool in Three Cultures
Online posting 5 for the week of October 19:
From the assigned readings for the second class meeting, discuss ways that children can
be stereotyped. Describe some examples and how this could affect each child.
Discuss the kind of multicultural curriculum you will be creating for this class. Describe
the group of children will it be addressed to?
Online posting 6 for the week of October 26:
Describe three ways your multicultural curriculum (or alternative curriculum) would
address the issue of bias.
From your reading of Preschool in Three Cultures, discuss some ways each preschool
reflects the cultural values of the country where it is located.
Online posting 7 for the week of November 2:
Discuss how your multicultural assignment will address cultural identity through program
activities and the environment.
Discuss some insights you gained from Preschool in Three Cultures, and how you can
make use of these as a professional educator.
Class Meetings 5 & 6: November 14 15
Topics covered:
A. Preschool in Three Cultures
B. Children in Crisis
C. Crisis Intervention

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Course Policies
Pedagogy
We will be using an approach of experiential and reflective learning, making use of many
different ways of engaging with the material. The pedagogy will include class
discussions, open dialogue, small group activities, personal reflection, role-playing, and
presentations. Our goal will be to gain a greater understanding of ourselves, others, and
become more effective in our work with children and their families in a diverse society.
In doing so we will explore oral and written communication with the goal of improving
our effectiveness.
Taking this course will provide an opportunity to learn new theory, skills, and techniques
which will enhance our voices. Learning is co-constructed between the instructor and the
students and student learning happens within a constructivist framework. Within
constructivism students are expected to apply the class content to their lives and
experiences and use this to construct further knowledge around the theories and issues.
The way in which instruction and participation is conducted in this course will hopefully
serve as a model for students in their teaching and work with children.
Participation
Class participation is an important part of the learning process. Taking risks in class
participation will allow students to gain greater knowledge and a greater ability to apply
this in their work with children. The environment in this class should be one of safety,
therefore it is important to respect one another's thoughts, ideas, and feelings, and to
listen with caring and engagement. It is important that we all adhere to standards of
confidentiality regarding information shared by classmates and instructor during class
discussions.
Attendance and timely completion of assignments
Please be on time for the class and plan to stay till the end of the day. This class requires
much practice and class participation. It is the students responsibility to acquire the
homework assignments and any handouts assigned each weekend, as well as turn in all
written work in a timely manner. Please talk with the instructor if you are unable to
attend class.
Evaluations
Faculty have two weeks after the official last day of the semester to complete and submit
student narrative evaluations to the Registrars Office. Should you require your
evaluation immediately due to employer reimbursement or some other reason, please see
me. Or if you need a grade in addition to the pass/fail narrative evaluation, please
follow the following procedure: Submit an official request stating the reason to the
Registrars Office.
Academic Integrity
Academic honesty is essential to a college communitys purpose and pursuits. Thus,
academic integrity is expected of all Pacific Oaks College students. A students academic
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work and conduct should always represent the students personal effort and thus be above
reproach. Those who are dishonest impair their own intellectual and personal growth and
development and undermine the integrity of the community that nurtures them. Several
forms of dishonesty constitute threats to the interests of Pacific Oaks College and
violations of its Academic Integrity Policy.
Violations
Violations of academic honesty are prohibited. Violations of academic honesty are acts
that seek to secure an academic advantage for a member of the Pacific Oaks College
community by illegitimate or unethical means. Such violations include, but are not
limited to, committing, knowingly assisting, or acquiescing in one or more of the
following:
1

Plagiarism (via traditional or electronic means): Representing the words, ideas,


arguments, or findings of another person or persons as ones own: For example,
plagiarism occurs when one copies portions of another persons writing with only
minor changes in wording or fails to give adequate and appropriate credit for
others concepts, theories, or conclusions. When making use of someone elses
work, one must credit that person by using quotation marks, references, or
footnotes, in accordance with one of the conventional documenting systems (e.g.,
that of the Modern Language Association [MLA] or the American Psychological
Association [APA]). Submitting, as ones own, a homework assignment, a term
paper, a laboratory report, or other comparable document prepared wholly or in
part by others or downloaded from the Internet is also an example of plagiarism.

Falsifying research data: Presenting falsified data in papers or essays.

Double dipping: Using the same or substantially the same written work,
research paper, or essay to satisfy the requirements of more than one course,
without the permission of the instructors involved.

Incomplete Policy
Attendance Component: Regular attendance, arriving on time, and timely
completion of class assignments is required. In terms of absences, you are
allowed no more than three (3) during a weeknight Fall or Spring semester class
that meets 15 times. For Summer weekday classes which meet 12 times, you are
allowed no more than two (2) absences (check with instructor, this depends upon
particular needs of a course). For Weekend and Weeklong courses, no absences
are permitted. If the student does not fulfill the attendance requirements, he or
she may receive an incomplete and be required to attend some or all of the class
sessions the following semester. Under certain limited circumstances,
arrangements might be made with your instructor to fulfill an unavoidable
absence.
Coursework Component: If the student is considered by the faculty member to be
in good standing, having completed a substantial amount of the work required for
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the class, but has not completed all of the work required for the class, the student
can be considered for an Incomplete. The student must complete the final
coursework by the end of the following semester; faculty may set an earlier
deadline if they choose. The faculty member must complete the evaluation, and
submit it to College Records by the next semester's evaluation due date. Students
who fails to meet the conditions of the Incomplete contract will receive a grade of
No Credit. Students who have more than 7 units of Incomplete may not register
for the following semester until the course work has been completed. Other
reasons you may receive an Incomplete or No Credit: (1) Work not turned in at
regular intervals and/or preponderance of work turned in the last part of the
semester. (2) Student does not demonstrate comprehension of or engagement
with course concepts. It is not required nor even encouraged for you to agree with
the instructors for the sake of agreeing. What is required is that you engage in
critical thinking and inquiry.
Assessment
Assessment will be based on the quality and completion of all course
assignments. The student learning outcomes (Appendix B) will be used as criteria
to assess the quality of assignments in addition to the students writing ability.
One aspect of the assessment process will be the students final reflection and
evaluation of their learning experience in the class. In addition, assessment will
consider student participation as well as students sensitivity to the participation
of everyone and their ability to listen to others. Attendance and timely completion
of assignments will be included in the assessment process.
Appendix A
B.A. Program Learning Outcomes
Students have upon the completion of their degree program:
Development: Students comprehend and analyze developmental theories.
Diversity: Students value diversity, demonstrate commitment to social justice, and
analyze the dynamics of institutional and individual biases and use of power.
Communication: Students communicate clearly and effectively. They implement and
analyze individual, dyad and group communications for appropriate audience reception,
authenticity, and experience of empowerment for self and others.
Praxis: Implementation, Field Work, or Observation: Students implement a
philosophy of education reflecting developmental theories guided by observation, and
analyze these actions according to results and impact on other persons (ethics, values,
principles and empowerment). Students observe and comprehend developmentally and
culturally appropriate practice with children. Praxis experience may involve activities
such as practica, field work, or students teaching.
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Research: Students are able to distinguish between observations and theory (reality and
fantasy, data and inferences/assumptions). Students collect verifiable and reliable data,
present their findings, and link their research with existing literature in the field.
The PLOs for BA Working with Children in a Diverse World, include development,
diversity and praxis.

Appendix B
BA Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Rubric
Learning
No credit
Emerging
Competent
Outcomes
Students will
Student does
Student has a
Student can
analyze the
not address
growing
apply
role of
diversity in any understanding
understanding
diversity and
of the class
of the role of
of culture and
its construction assignments
culture and
diversity to
within
and is
diversity and its their own lives
children's
unwilling to
impact on their and to
development.
examine issues own lives and
children's
of culture and
children's
development
diversity and
development.
within multiple
their impact
contexts.
upon their own
lives and
children's
development.

Excellent
Student is able
to analyze the
role of culture
and diversity
within their
own lives and
children's
development
throughout
multiple
contexts,
gaining a
nuanced
understanding
their dynamics.

Students will
critically
analyze their
role within
power
relationships in
settings where
adults and
children
encounter one
another.

Student does
not recognize
or understand
their role
within power
relationships
between adult
and child.

Student is
beginning to
recognize their
role within
power
relationships
between adult
and child.

Student is able
to understand
the dynamics of
power relations
and their role in
relationships
between adult
and child.

Student is able
to observe and
analyze the
dynamics of
power
relationships
between adult
and child as
well as their
role in these
relationships.

Students will
analyze the
impact of

Student is
unwilling to

Developing an
understanding

Student
understands

Understands
system

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systemic and
institutional
power upon
childrens
diverse
developmental
styles.

examine the
ways that
institutional
systems treat
individuals in
different ways,
and lacks an
understanding
of system
dynamics and
oppression.

that systems
treat
individuals in
different ways,
is not fully
aware yet of
the connections
between ones
identity and
ones
experience.

system
dynamics and
oppression as
well as its
effects on
children.
Beginning to
identify some
societal causes
of oppression,
not yet
connecting this
to effects on
childrens
education.

dynamics and
oppression and
sees how others
are treated
differently. Can
identify some
of the societal
causes and how
this effects
education.
Has begun to
seek ways to
alter oppressive
dynamics in
order to be
more inclusive
of children's
diversity.

Students will
apply theory to
practice by
examining
what it means
to be a
culturally
competent
practitioner
and develop
practices
grounded
within
constructivism
that bring
about positive
social and
educational
change.

Research paper
does not reflect
understanding
the principles
of an inclusive
multicultural
curriculum.
Literature is
inadequate and
not integrated
with subjects.

Beginning
understanding
of the concept a
research paper
and applying
learning to
develop a
multicultural
curriculum,
with pieces
missing,
literature not
integrated
around
subjects,
opinion mixed
in with results.

Research paper
is largely
correct, with an
inconsistent
understanding
of an inclusive
multicultural
curriculum.
Literature is
complete, but
not well
integrated with
subjects.

Basic research
paper is correct,
including a
clear
understanding
of an inclusive
multicultural
curriculum.
Next challenge
is to develop
depth and
detail, to
speculate and
see where
change can
happen.

Students
demonstrate
growth in this
class, indicated

Student does
not question
assumptions
and beliefs that

Student is
beginning to
question
assumptions

Student has
gained the
ability to
question

Student is able
to question and
move beyond
past

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by an
improvement
in writing or
critical
thinking skills,
a willingness to
take risks and
authentically
engage with
course material
and
classmates; or
an openness to
new
information
and
perspectives.

impact their
own and others
development
and education.
Is unwilling to
move beyond
limited beliefs.
Writing is of
poor quality,
does not use
APA format.

and limited
beliefs that
effect children
in a diverse
society.
Writing is
inconsistent in
clarity and use
of APA format.

assumptions
and limited
beliefs that
impact children
in a diverse
society. Is
gaining the
ability to move
past
assumptions,
but is still
inconsistent in
maintaining
this ability.
Writing could
use greater
clarity and
better use of
APA format.

assumptions
and limited
beliefs that
impact children
in a diverse
society. Has
started taking
actions that
reflect a greater
understanding
of the needs of
diverse
children,
moving beyond
limited beliefs.
Writing has
clarity and uses
APA format.

Appendix C
Academic Policies
Academic Integrity
Participation in this course assumes that each student has read and understands the
Academic Honesty requirements of Pacific Oaks. If you have questions about
what constitutes Academic Honesty, please ask me. Note: The Academic
Integrity Statement appears on Page 37 of the current catalog.
Confidentiality
Classes at Pacific Oaks are interactive, drawing on the rich experiences of faculty
and student alike. Often in the course of these discussions, information of a
personal or potentially damaging nature is shared. It is the expectation of the
college that such information will remain confidential, allowing all to share freely
without fear of disclosure outside other classroom. Breaches of confidentiality
damage the building of community and trust and are not acceptable.
Students with Disability
Any student in this course who has a disability that might prevent him/her from
fully demonstrating his/her abilities should contact Pat Meda of the student CARE
Center immediately to discuss disability verification and accommodations that
may be necessary to ensure full class participation and completion of course
requirements.
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Bibliography
Ayers, William, Hunt, Jean Ann, Quinn, Therese. (eds.) Teaching for Social Justice
Carini, Patricia F. Starting Strong: A Different Look at
Children, Schools, and Standards.
Christensen, Linda. Reading, Writing, and Rising Up: Teaching About Social Justice
and the Power of the Written Word
Cohen, Monroe, D. (ed.) Valuing Each Other: Perspectives on
Culturally Responsive Teaching.
Derman-Sparks, Louise & Brunson-Phillips, Carol Teaching
and Learning Anti-Racism: A Developmental Approach.
Diller, Jerry, Jean Moule. Cultural Competence: A Primer for Educators
Gonzalez-Mena, Janet. Multicultural Issues in Child Care
Gonzalez-Mena, Janet. Foundations: Early Childhood Education in a Diverse Society
Hooks, bell. Teaching to Transgress: Education as the Practice of Freedom
Igoa, Christine The Inner World of the Immigrant Child.
New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.
Kohl, Herbert I Won't Learn from You and Other Thoughts
on Creative Maladjustment.
Kozol, Jonathan. Savage Inequalities: Children in Americas Schools
Lee, Enid, Menkart, Deborah, Okazawa-Rey, Margo (eds.) Beyond Heroes and Holidays
Marshall, Patricia. Cultural Diversity in Our Schools
Peters, Ray De V., Leadbeater, Bonnie, et. al. Resilience
in Children, Families, and Communities: Linking Context to
Practice and Policy.
York, Stacie. Roots and Wings: Affirming Culture in Early Childhood Programs

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