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Lesson Plan Template

Teacher Candidate: Sara Zapalowski


Grade Level: Third Grade
Date: 2/8/16 (Lesson 1)
Relevant background of this class (number of students, special learning needs, etc.):
In this classroom, there are 27 students, six of which are identified with special learning
needs. Within this classroom, two students have learning disabilities, two students have
autism, one student is other health impaired, and one student has cerebral palsy. The student
with cerebral palsy has an individual aide for physical needs, both gross and fine motor needs;
also, two of the other students share this aide, as required by their IEPs, for refocusing and to
address any major behavioral needs. In addition, 14 students are identified as struggling
readers while 10 students are identified as struggling writers. As a result, this lesson segment
involves heterogeneous grouping, the frequent use of graphic organizers, and opportunities for
redirection and checking for understanding so that all students needs are addressed. Since
the students have had very few lessons taught about comparing and contrasting in past years,
this lesson segment is also highly scaffolded so that all students can be successful in this
learning segment.
Planning
Lesson overview or summary: As the first lesson in the segment on writing a compare and
contrast essay, this lesson introduces the concepts of compare and contrast and writing
comparing and contrasting sentences.
Common Core State Standard(s) addressed in this lesson:
Subject: English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical
Subjects
Grade: Grade 3 students:
Strand: Writing
Domain: Production and Distribution of Writing
Standard: 4. With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the
development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose. (Grade-specific
expectations for writing types are defined in standards 13 above.)
Learning Target/Objective:
Given prompting and a compare/ contrast worksheet, students will identify comparing and
contrasting sentences and key words with at least 80% accuracy, and write at least three out of
four comparing and contrasting sentences using keywords.
Academic Language:
Within this lesson, the students will be asked to work, collaborate, and communicate to peers
and the teacher in order to define key vocabulary and to indicate keywords.
Vocabulary words: compare, contrast, same, different
Keywords to indicate comparison: same as, similar to, similarly, compared with, too, both,
as well as, also, like, in common, in the same way
Keywords to indicate contrast: different from, as opposed to, instead of, although, however,
eitheror, but, on the other hand, unless, differ, even though, unlike
Assessment
Remember: You must align each learning target/objective with an assessment strategy.
Assessment:
Formative: During the guided practice for identifying, I will assess whether the students
understand the concept of comparing and contrasting when the students use their answer
cards. Since all of the students will be participating, I will be able to determine which and how
many students need more practice before moving on to the higher level of thinking (writing)
and independent practice.
Furthermore, during the guided practice for writing, I will informally assess the students ability
to produce comparing and contrasting sentences during the partner work. Firstly, I will walk
around the room, observe and listen to their conversations, and ask any guiding questions.
Secondly, when the partners share their sentences to the whole class, I will be able to

Lesson Plan Template


determine which partners may need more practice and which ones have the ability to move
forward.
Summative: At the end of the lesson, the students will be provided with an exit ticket that will
provide me with concrete evidence of which I can grade and assess the students
comprehension of the concept of comparing and contrasting. Furthermore, I will be able to
assess their ability to write comparing and contrasting sentences. See the attached
assessment and graded assessment to see how each section is scored.
Instruction
Anticipatory Set:
To introduce the topic, I will have the students partake in a standing and sitting similarities and
differences activity. I will tell the students that we are going to learn how to identify and write
about similarities and differences between two passages, items, or animals. Then, I will tell the
students that we are going to play a quick game that shows similarities and differences among
just our own classmates. I will tell the students to stand if they go to this school, are a boy, are
a girl, have a sibling, like basketball, etc. to see who they have things in common and different
from each other.
After finishing the activity, I will tell the students that we will be looking at items and passages
that have similarities and differences so that we can learn to compare and contrast in our
reading and writing.
Sequence of Instruction:
1. Introduction of compare and contrast:
I will use the attached PowerPoint to introduce the concept of compare and
contrast.
I will define the vocabulary words and explain why we compare and contrast
items/passages/etc. (to find their similarities and differences)
I will also identify and give examples of key words that signify comparison and
contrast.
I will also introduce the keyword anchor chart that shows the words that are
commonly used to signal comparing or contrasting.
2. Modeling for identifying:
While using the PowerPoint, I will model how to identify keywords in sentences
that signal the reader to know if the writer is either comparing or contrasting two
things.
I will use a think aloud to read the sentence, use strategies such as looking at
the anchor chart, and or ask myself questions such as Is this writer telling me
two things are the same? Or is the writer telling me that these two items are
different? Is there a keyword that gives me a hint?
Once I model and think aloud about the strategies, I will then read the sentence
again, highlight the keyword, show the students the keyword on the anchor
chart, and explain how I know that the writer is either comparing or contrasting
two things.
Transition: Now that I demonstrated how to look for keywords in sentences, lets practice
together on finding the keywords in these next sentences.
3. Guided Practice for identifying:
I will then have the class helper hand out the comparing and contrasting
answer cards to the class.
I will turn to the next slide in the PowerPoint that will show us comparing and
contrasting sentences.
I will then ask for a student to read the first sentence. I will then have the
students use the think-pair-share method to talk with a partner to identify the
keyword and whether the sentence is comparing and contrasting. After the
students talk with a partner for about a minute, I will have each student raise the

Lesson Plan Template


answer card for which they believe the sentence is (either compare or contrast).
After seeing all of the students answers, I will call on students to share their
answers. I will ask them questions such as:
o Is this sentence comparing or contrasting?
o How do you know?
o What keyword(s) gave you a hint?
o Is there anything else in the sentence that gives a hint?
A student or I will then come to the board to highlight the keyword and write
either comparing or contrasting under the sentence.
I will do this with about 4 to 5 sentences but will do more if needed.
Transition: Now that we seem to be experts on identifying whether sentences are comparing
or contrasting two items, lets try to write some comparing and contrasting sentences of our
own.
4. Modeling for writing:
I will then go to the next slide of the PowerPoint that has two item pictures on it
(orange and apple.)
I will again do a think aloud to brainstorm how the two are the same (fruits). I will
then think aloud to go through the list of keywords that signal comparison and
choose one to use when writing my sentence.
I will then write the sentence: The apple and the orange are both fruits that grow
on trees.
After writing the sentence, I will then highlight the keyword and explain that I am
writing a sentence that tells how the two items are similar.
Then, I will think aloud to brainstorm how the apple and orange are different (the
apple has a red skin while the orange has an orange rind.)
I will then think aloud when going through the list of keywords that signal
contrast.
I will then write the sentence: The apple has a red skin, but the orange has an
orange rind.
I will then do this same process with at least one other set of two items.
Transition: Now we will work together to write sentences of own that compare and contrast
two items. Find a place in the room where you and your partner can write and see the board.
5. Guided Practice for writing:
I will have the second and third classroom helpers pass out the practice pages
in page protectors and the dry erase markers to each set of partners.
I will then show the students two items on the Smart board to compare and
contrast.
I will tell the students that they have three minutes to write a comparing and a
contrasting sentence about the items with their partner. I will tell the students
that each student writes one of the sentences. I will also remind the students to
use keywords in their sentences and to underline or circle them.
After three minutes, I will have some of the groups present their sentences to
the class. I will type the sentences as the students say them so that the whole
class can see them. I will have the students check the other groups work
collectively.
I will do this another two or three times or as many as deemed necessary. I will
make sure that I rotate around the room to observe the students working
together and call on each group of students at least once.
Transition: Now that we are experts on identify sentences that compare and contrast and can
write them ourselves, we will now work on our exit tickets independently.
6. Independent Practice:

Lesson Plan Template

Another classroom helper will pass out the exit tickets. The students will then
complete them and hand them in as an assessment.

Instructional Materials:
1. Personally made PowerPoint
5. Personally made exit ticket
2. Personally made answering cards
6. Pencils
3. Personally made sentence strips in page protector
4. Dry ease markers
Differentiation /Accommodation for students with special learning needs:
Accommodations:
Students with IEPs and struggling writers: During the partner section of guided practice, I will
heterogeneously group students by ability so that students who have more difficulty with writing
can work with a student who writes well. In this manner, the students can work together and
help each other while learning to write comparing and contrasting sentences.
Students who need frequent redirection and refocusing: Throughout this quickly paced lesson,
the students will be able to get up and move and talk to partners throughout the classroom. In
this manner, the students will be able to move and refocus themselves without sitting in the
same position for the hour block. Also, due to the amount of guided practice, I will be able to
personally redirect, guide, question, and refocus the students easily throughout the lesson.
Students with an aide/ shared aide: During partner work, I will be able to place the students
who need the aide in close proximity to her so that they can receive the guidance that they
need from her.
UDL Principles:
2.1 Clarify vocabulary and symbols: During the modeling portion, I clearly define comparing
and contrasting so that the students know and understand the two key vocabulary words of
the lesson.
4.1 Vary the methods for response and navigation: Throughout the lesson, the students
respond and navigate through the lesson using a variety of tools such as the SMART board,
answer card, sentence strips in a page protector, in partners, and individually. As a result, the
students are equipped with a variety of ways to respond to the questions and information that
are presented to them.
8.3 Foster community and collaboration: During both of the guided practice portions, the
students are required to talk to each other, listen to each others ideas, and communicate their
own to a partner. Even more, the students must respond to each set of partners; therefore, this
lesson foster collaboration and community because it requires the students to discuss and
work together to learn the concept.
Closure: After all students complete their exit tickets, I will ask at least 4 students to give a
gist (a commonly used term in this classroom for debriefing) of what we learned in this
lesson.
Reflection on Student Learning
References:
Think-pair-share and heterogeneous grouping:
Slavin, R. (2014). Making cooperative learning powerful. Educational Leadership, 72(2), 22-26.
Answer cards:
Cakiroglu, O. (2014). Effects of preprinted response cards on academic response.
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 39(1), 74-85.

Lesson Plan Template


Teacher Candidate: Sara Zapalowski
Grade Level: Third Grade
Date: 2/9/16 (Lesson 2)
Relevant background of this class (number of students, special learning needs, etc.):
In this classroom, there are 27 students, six of which are identified with special learning
needs. Within this classroom, two students have learning disabilities, two students have
autism, one student is other health impaired, and one student has cerebral palsy. The student
with cerebral palsy has an individual aide for physical needs, both gross and fine motor needs;
also, two of the other students share this aide, as required by their IEPs, for refocusing and to
address any major behavioral needs. In addition, 14 students are identified as struggling
readers while 10 students are identified as struggling writers. As a result, this lesson segment
involves heterogeneous grouping, the frequent use of graphic organizers, and opportunities for
redirection and checking for understanding so that all students needs are addressed. Since
the students have had very few lessons taught about comparing and contrasting in past years,
this lesson segment is also highly scaffolded so that all students can be successful in this
learning segment.
Planning
Lesson overview or summary: In this second lesson, the students will read the passages to
compare and contrast animals, identify and write critical facts from each passage, and to
create criteria that apply to both passages.
Common Core State Standard(s) addressed in this lesson:
Subject: English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical
Subjects
Grade: Grade 3 students:
Strand: Writing
Domain: Production and Distribution of Writing
Standard: 4. With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the
development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose. (Grade-specific
expectations for writing types are defined in standards 13 above.)
Learning Target/Objective:
Given a passage that compares and contrasts two different animals and a T-chart, the students
will identify at least 4 correct facts about each animal and correctly complete all of the boxes
on the T-chart about the specific criteria.
Academic Language: Within this lesson, students will need to verbally or orthographically
communicate with peers during the guided instruction portion.
Key vocabulary: Compare, contrast, criteria
Vocabulary in text: carnivores, predatory, transparent, parasitic
Assessment
Remember: You must align each learning target/objective with an assessment strategy.
Assessment:
Formative: During the guided practice for creating facts, I will go to each group and
listen to their conversations and ask guided questions such as What text have you
looked at? Can you learn more from this text feature? In this manner, I will be able to
determine whether the students can use text and text features to identify facts. Also,
during the guided practice for criteria, I will call on each set of partners at least once to
get their ideas about the criteria, I can then determine which students need more
scaffolding or more practice before moving onto independent practice.
Summative: As a summative assessment, I will have the students complete the
independent practice packets. I will be able to then assess if the students can
generalize the skills that they learned during instruction to a separate passage about
sea turtles. I will be able to determine whether the students can find facts about the
turtles and then create appropriate criteria. I will grade them by awarding points for
each fact and correct criteria. See attached assessment sheet for how points will be

Lesson Plan Template


awarded.
Instruction
Anticipatory Set: In order to build and reactivate background knowledge, I will ask the
students to raise their hand to tell me either a vocabulary word or keyword that we learned
yesterday (compare, contrast, same, different, however, although, too, both, etc.) After I
receive about eight words and what they mean or signify, I will tell the students that we are
going to build off of these words and skills and apply them to our frog books. I will tell the
students that we are going to identify facts about two different types of frogs, and determine
what is similar and different about them.
Sequence of Instruction:
I will use the SMART Board, white board, and the projector throughout this lesson.
Modeling:
I will set the purpose by stating, We will be reading about two frogs, the Amazon
Horned frog and the Glass frog, to find similarities and differences between the two. As
I read, I would like to find important facts about each frog that we can use later to
determine what is the same and different with each frog. We will use the T-chart (which
will be displayed on the white Board) to keep our facts organized. We will put our facts
about the Amazon Horned frogs in this column (point to column) and our facts about the
Glass frog here (point to column).
I will begin by reading aloud about the Amazon Horned frog. I will tell the students to
follow along in their books. I will use the camera projector to show the students where I
will be reading. After reading the entire page, I will choose one portion of the text to
reread (p. 20 Enormous Gape). After rereading it, I will write the fact has a mouth that
is wider than its body length on a post-it. I will then place the post-it in the correct
column on the T-chart. I will explain that this is a key fact that shows one important
feature about this frog.
Next, I will ask the students to turn to page 32 and follow along as I read about the
glass frog. I will use the camera projector to show the students where I am reading
from. After reading the entire pages, I will reread at the top of page 32 and will write
blends in with its surroundings on a post-it note. I will explain that this is an important
key fact that we should know about the glass frog.
I will remind the students that we should always look at all of the text and all of the text
features to get as many facts as possible about our frogs. I will then point out the hand
and frog illustrations at the bottom of page 32. I will explain that I learned that the frog is
about as big as my ring finger, 1-3 inches long. I will then write the fact on a post-it note
and place it in the correct column on our class T-chart.
Transition: Now we will work in groups to find out as many facts as possible about our two
different frogs.
Guided instruction:
I would like you to reread the text with your group, look at all of the text features, and
create at least 10 facts about each frog. Group A will work on the Amazon Horned frog
and Group B will work on the Glass frog. Your group needs to have correct and as
many facts as possible so that we can all be experts on these frogs at the end of the
lesson.
I will then list the groups on the SMART Board and give the students 1 minute to get
situated in their groups.
I will then tell the students that they have 8 minutes to come up with as many facts as
possible in their groups and to write them on post-it notes. I will tell the students that I
want all students participating and that I will be watching each group to make sure they
are using both the text and the text features to find correct facts.
After 8 minutes, I will have the students come back to their seats. I will then have the
Amazon Horned frog group come up to the front to present their facts, show where

Lesson Plan Template


they found their facts, and place them in the correct column on the T-chart. I will then
do the same with the Glass frog group.
I will then ask if there are any other facts that we should know about each frog, asking
anyone. If there are, I will write and place them on the board.
Transition: Now we will categorize and create criteria for our facts so that they are even more
organized.
Modeling:
I will then tell the students that I will show us how to make criteria for our frog facts. I
will tell them that by the end of the lesson, we should have at least five different criteria
that will help us to organize our information.
I will tell the students that I will look for facts that talk about similar ideas. I will begin
reading through some of the facts for each frog. When I find two that talk about a
similar idea, such as physical adaptations (horns and see-through body) I will place
them both on a similar place on our t-chart across from each other. I will state that
these both talk about physical adaptations about our frogs, so we can name our first
criteria physical adaptations. I will then write this on the correct spot on the T-chart.
Transition: Lets work all together as a class to find at least four other criteria that we can use
to organize our information.
Guided Practice:
I will then call on different students to come up to the T-chart and read one fact about
one frog. I will then ask other students to come up and find another fact that talks about
a similar idea about the other frog.
I will then ask the class to talk with a partner to talk about what word(s) we could use
for our criteria. I will then call on different partners to get ideas. When the majority
agree, we will write it in the correct spot on the T-chart and place the facts there too.
We will do this until all facts are accounted for. We will make criteria such as Tadpole
Stage, Where they Live, Where they lay eggs, Extras/ Misfits.
After all are accounted for, we will review the facts to make certain that they are placed
in the correct places on the T-chart.
I will then tell the students that we will be using our T-chart in order to compare and
contrast our two frogs even more.
Transition: Now that we have learned how to find facts and categorize them into different
criteria, you are going to work independently to do the same about sea turtles.
Independent Practice:
I will have my classroom helper pass out the independent practice packets.
I will explain the directions.
I will give the students 20 minutes to complete the packet.
They will hand it in at the end of class.
Instructional Materials:
1. Smart Board
6. Personally made independent practice packet
2. T-chart
7. Pencils
3. Camera Projector
8. Sea Turtles by Katherine Kanking
4. Everything You Need to Know about frogs and Other Slippery Creatures Text book
5. Post-it notes
Differentiation /Accommodation for students with special learning needs:
Accommodations/ Modifications:
Students who are struggling readers: I used heterogeneous grouping during guided instruction
so that students who cannot read as well are placed with students who read on grade level. In
this way, students can work together to get all the facts about the frogs.
Students who need redirection: By calling on different sets of partners randomly and by
allowing for redirection prompts, I will be able to address these students needs.
Students who need directions repeated: I will speak the directions, have the directions written

Lesson Plan Template


on any worksheets, and even on the SMART Board so that students can receive the directions
repeated multiple times for each learning task.
Students who have a full-time or shared aide: The aide will be available in the classroom
throughout this lesson.
UDL Principles:
2.5 Illustrate through multiple media: Throughout this lesson, I use the SMART Board, the
camera projector, post-it notes, and class discussion. In this way, multiple media is used so
that students can take in the information.
5.3 Build fluencies with graduated levels of support for practice and performance: Through
modeling and the different forms of guided practice (group work, partner work, whole class),
the students skills are scaffolded so that all students can practice and learn how to perform
with the required skills.
8.3 Foster collaboration and community: Through group work, partner work, and whole class
interaction, the students collaborate and communicate to work towards a common goal.
Closure: I will ask students to identify at least one fact or something that they learned about
throughout the lesson before leaving the classroom.
Reflection on Student Learning
Next Steps: In the next lesson, I will teach the students how to use a Venn Diagram and how
to transfer data from the T-Chart to a Venn Diagram.
References:
Think pair share and heterogeneous grouping:
Slavin, R. (2014). Making cooperative learning powerful. Educational Leadership, 72(2), 22-26.
T-chart graphic organizer:
Baxendell, B. (2003). Consistent, coherent, creative: The three cs of graphic organizers.
Teaching Exceptional Children, 35 (3), 46-53.

Teacher Candidate: Sara Zapalowski


Grade Level: Third Grade
Date: 2/10/16 (Lesson 3)
Relevant background of this class (number of students, special learning needs, etc.):

Lesson Plan Template


In this classroom, there are 27 students, six of which are identified with special learning needs.
Within this classroom, two students have learning disabilities, two students have autism, one
student is other health impaired, and one student has cerebral palsy. The student with cerebral
palsy has an individual aide for physical needs, both gross and fine motor needs; also, two of
the other students share this aide, as required by their IEPs, for refocusing and to address any
major behavioral needs. In addition, 14 students are identified as struggling readers while 10
students are identified as struggling writers. As a result, this lesson segment involves
heterogeneous grouping, the frequent use of graphic organizers, and opportunities for
redirection and checking for understanding so that all students needs are addressed. Since
the students have had very few lessons taught about comparing and contrasting in past years,
this lesson segment is also highly scaffolded so that all students can be successful in this
learning segment.
Planning
Lesson overview or summary: As the third lesson in this segment, the students will be using
their work from the prior lesson to complete a Venn Diagram.
Common Core State Standard(s) addressed in this lesson:
Subject: English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical
Subjects
Grade: Grade 3 students:
Strand: Writing
Domain: Production and Distribution of Writing
Standard: 4. With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the
development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose. (Grade-specific
expectations for writing types are defined in standards 13 above.)
Learning Target/Objective:
Given passages about two different animals and the T-chart from the prior day, the students
will complete a Venn Diagram, writing in at least eight correct facts in the correct area on the
Venn Diagram.
Academic Language: In this lesson, the students will be using discourse to complete a Venn
Diagram with facts from the previous days T-chart.
Key Vocabulary: Venn Diagram, T-chart, criteria, compare, contrast
Assessment
Remember: You must align each learning target/objective with an assessment strategy.
Assessment:
Formative: During guided instruction, I will observe each group and ask leading
questions such as Why did you place these facts here? Why did you place them
across from each other? etc. This way, I can make certain that each group
understands how to use the Venn Diagram and how to analyze the facts.
Summative: I will assess the students ability to use a Venn Diagram from the
independent practice. Students will be awarded points for placing the facts across from
each other, placing them in the correct places, and having at least eight facts total. See
the attached assessment to view how points will be awarded.
Instruction
Anticipatory Set:
I will remind the students that we worked with the T-chart the day before. I will ask the students
to talk with a partner about what we did with the T-chart the day prior. After giving the students
about a minute to talk, I will call on partners to reiterate to the whole class what we worked on
the day before. Once I hear about three partner sets talk, I will tell the students that we are
going to use the work from the day before to fill out a Venn Diagram.

Lesson Plan Template


Sequence of Instruction:
Modeling:
Using a PowerPoint, I will show the students the daily learning targets, what a Venn
Diagram is, explain its purpose, and explain how it will help us to write our comparing
and contrasting paragraphs tomorrow.
See attached PowerPoint for all necessary information.
I will then tell the students that we are going to use our facts from the T-chart the day
before to fill out a Venn Diagram about our frogs. As an enlarged Venn Diagram, we will
be using hula hoops. I will also have a copy of our T-chart displayed and typed facts to
place in our Venn Diagram.
I will model how to label each portion of the Venn Diagram as Amazon Horned frog,
Glass frog and Same.
I will take one set of facts such as the facts about size from the T-chart and read them
aloud. I will then use a think aloud strategy to decide where to place them on our Venn
Diagram. After placing them, I will explain that if they are different, we place them in the
outer circles and if they are the same, we place them in the middle portion. I will explain
that this will make it easier for us to compare and contrast our frogs. I will also explain
that the facts should be placed directly across from each other so that our work is
organized.
I will do about 2 more examples.
Transition:
Now I would like you to work in groups to try to figure out where the rest of the facts should be
placed in our Venn Diagrams.
Guided Practice:
Using the T-chart from the day before, the typed facts, and the hula hoop Venn
Diagram, I will explain to the students that I would like them to place the rest of the
facts in the correct places on the Venn Diagram.
I will display the groups on the SMART Board and have the students move to their
groups. I will place the directions on the board. I will remind the students to work
together, let everyone have a chance to talk, and to have a reason ready to explain why
they placed their facts where they did.
I will give the students 8 minutes to sort the facts into the correct places on the Venn
Diagram.
After 8 minutes, I will ask all of the students to stop. I will then call on a group to explain
a set of facts, where they placed them, and why. After they give their explanation, I will
ask the other groups if they agree or disagree with the presenting group. If they agree,
we will move on. If not, we will have a discussion as to why they are correct or
incorrect.
We will do the same for the rest of the facts.
Before moving on to the independent practice, we will discuss as a class the
importance of the Venn Diagram and why it is helpful.
Transition: Now that we know how to fill out a Venn Diagram, you will use your T-charts from
yesterday to make a Venn Diagram of your own about sea turtles.
Independent Practice:
I will have the classroom helpers pass out the T-charts and passages from yesterday
and the Venn Diagrams for summative assessment.
We will quickly go over the possible facts and criteria that one could have had in their Tchart. I will also allow for the students to notice any corrections on their T-Chart.
The students will then fill out their Venn Diagrams independently and hand them in.

Lesson Plan Template


Instructional Materials:
1. Personally made PowerPoint
2. Copies of the previous days T-chart for each group
3. Hula hoops (2 for each group)
4. Set of typed facts created the previous day (1 set per group)
5. Venn Diagram graphic organizer
6. Previous days graded work
7. Pencils
Differentiation /Accommodation for students with special learning needs:
Accommodations/ Modifications:
Students who are struggling readers and writers: By providing typed facts, the students do not
need to write during the guided practice since they already wrote the facts the day prior.
Furthermore, by using heterogeneous grouping, student who struggle with reading will have
the reading guidance needed within each group.
Students who need redirection: During guided practice, I will walk to each group, ask guiding
questions, and will redirect students as needed.
Students who need check for understanding: Throughout this lesson, there are many
opportunities to check for understanding within the guided practice. I can ask students to
explain why they chose to place the facts in specific spots, etc.
Students who need organizational help: Since these students IEPs request graphic
organizers, this lesson gives explicit instruction on how to use a graphic organizer to organize
information before writing comparing and contrasting paragraphs.
UDL Principles
3.1 Activate or supply background knowledge: During the anticipatory set, the students and I
have a discussion about what we did the prior day and why it is important. In this manner, I
activated their background knowledge about facts and organizing their facts.
5.3 Build fluencies with graduated levels of support for practice and performance: Through
modeling and the different forms of guided practice (group work, partner work, whole class),
the students skills are scaffolded so that all students can practice and learn how to perform
with the required skills.
8.3 Foster collaboration and community: Through group work, partner work, and whole class
interaction, the students collaborate and communicate to work towards a common goal.
Closure: Once all of the students complete their independent practice, we will have a fiveminute discussion about the importance of Venn Diagrams, why they are helpful, and if we
achieved our learning targets for the day that were displayed in the PowerPoint.
Reflection on Student Learning
Next Steps: Once the students understand how and why we use Venn diagrams, I will teach
the students how to write a short compare and contrast essay using the information in the
Venn Diagrams.
References:
Heterogeneous grouping:
Slavin, R. (2014). Making cooperative learning powerful. Educational Leadership, 72(2), 22-26.
Venn Diagram graphic organizer:
Baxendell, B. (2003). Consistent, coherent, creative: The three cs of graphic organizers.
Teaching Exceptional Children, 35 (3), 46-53.

Lesson Plan Template

Teacher Candidate: Sara Zapalowski


Grade Level: Third Grade
Date: 2/11/16 (Lesson 4)
Relevant background of this class (number of students, special learning needs, etc.):
In this classroom, there are 27 students, six of which are identified with special learning needs.
Within this classroom, two students have learning disabilities, two students have autism, one
student is other health impaired, and one student has cerebral palsy. The student with cerebral
palsy has an individual aide for physical needs, both gross and fine motor needs; also, two of
the other students share this aide, as required by their IEPs, for refocusing and to address any
major behavioral needs. In addition, 14 students are identified as struggling readers while 10
students are identified as struggling writers. As a result, this lesson segment involves
heterogeneous grouping, the frequent use of graphic organizers, and opportunities for
redirection and checking for understanding so that all students needs are addressed. Since
the students have had very few lessons taught about comparing and contrasting in past years,
this lesson segment is also highly scaffolded so that all students can be successful in this
learning segment.
Planning
Lesson overview or summary: As the final lesson in this lesson segment, the students will
use their T-chart and Venn Diagram graphic organizers in order to write complete comparing
and contrasting essays that use evidence from the text.
Common Core State Standard(s) addressed in this lesson:
Subject: English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical
Subjects
Grade: Grade 3 students:
Strand: Writing
Domain: Production and Distribution of Writing
Standard: 4. With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the
development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose. (Grade-specific
expectations for writing types are defined in standards 13 above.)
Learning Target/Objective:
Given the previous days Venn Diagram and Sea Turtles by Kathy Kanking, the students will
write a short compare and contrast essay, receiving at least an 8 out of 10 on the provided
rubric.
Academic Language: Students will need to use appropriate vocabulary and syntax in order to
write their comparing and contrasting essays.
Key vocabulary: comparing, contrasting, introduction, topic sentence, details, concluding
sentence
Assessment
Remember: You must align each learning target/objective with an assessment strategy.
Assessment:
Formative: During the guided practice, I will call on each set of partners at least once
to make certain that they understand how to use the graphic organizer and how to form
sentences. I will observe what the students are working on during the partner work and
ask guiding questions as needed.
Summative: I will assess the students independent writing essays for a summative
assessment. I will use the provided rubric to grade the students writing. See attached
rubric for how points will be awarded.
Instruction
Anticipatory Set:
I will ask the students to talk in pairs for a minute about the Venn Diagram and how it helps us
to show what is contrasting and comparing. After a minute, I will call on pairs to talk and

Lesson Plan Template


explain to the entire class. After we talk as a class, I will tell the students that we are going to
use our Venn Diagram to help us write our comparing and contrasting essays.
Sequence of Instruction:
Introduction: I will verbally explain to the students that we are going to write a short essay that
compares and contrasts our two frogs. I will type the example essay that we create together on
the electronic whiteboard so that all students can view the work we complete together. I will tell
them that we will use our Venn Diagram and a brief writing graphic organizer if needed to help
us get our thoughts organized.
Modeling:
I will show the students the sample prompt of which we will be using to guide our
writing.
I will model how to write our introductory sentence(s) that introduces the concept of
comparing and contrasting of the two animals. I will explain that we need to state that
the two frogs are similar and different. We also need to state a general idea of what we
will be talking about.
Modeling how to use the Venn Diagram when writing:
Before writing, I will highlight to the students that we will be using R.A.D.D. (a method
that they are familiar with) to write our comparing and contrasting paragraphs.
I will tell the students that the first paragraph that we will write will be the comparing
paragraph. I will ask the students to tell me where we can find the two details that
compare the frogs (in the center part of the Venn Diagram).
I will have the students highlight/ underline and number the two details that they want to
use in their first paragraph.
Then, I will follow the same steps for the contrasting paragraph. I will ask the students
where we would find the information as well as have the students highlight/underline
and number the sets of details that the students will use in their contrasting sentence.
I will emphasize that for contrasting that we need two sets of details to fulfill the
R.A.D.D. requirement.
Modeling for writing the paragraph:
After modeling how to use the Venn Diagram, I will model how to write a topic sentence
for the comparison paragraph. I will show the students the prompt again will tell the
students that we will have to restate and answer the prompt. I will write, The Amazon
Horn frog and the Glass frog have some similarities. I will then highlight the
restatement in one color and the answer in another.
Then, I will ask the students to remind me of some keywords that signal comparison. I
will also ask the students to give me a detail from the Venn Diagram. I will then create
and write a sentence that uses a keyword and a detail from the Venn Diagram.
I will model how to write good sentences with our details and highlight them in a third
color. I will explain the importance of using keywords and how to form complete
sentences.
I will do this with the topic sentence and the two details.
Guided Practice for writing the paragraphs:
For guided practice, with partners, I will ask the students to talk about a good topic
sentence that restates and answers prompt 2. After giving them a minute, I will call on
partners to tell us their topic sentences. We will choose one together, and I will type it
on the board to highlight it in the restatement and answer colors.
As a class, I will then ask the students to work with their partners to come up with a
detailed sentence from the ideas on our graphic organizer and that uses a keyword. I
will then call on partners after about 1 minute to hear possible sentences that they
came up with. Once we agree on a good sentence, we will type the sentence into the
example paragraph in a third color.
I will do the same for the second detail.

Lesson Plan Template

We will then come up with a concluding sentence that uses a transition word that
summarizes the entire essay.
Once we are finished, we will read our essay together aloud to make sure that our
sentences make sense and sound good.
Independent Practice:
I will have the classroom helpers hand out the previous works, the graphic organizers,
and writing paper.
I will explain the directions and the checklist.
I will have the students write their essays independently.
They will hand it in at the end.
Instructional Materials:
1. Writing paper
2. Pencils
3. Previous days T-charts and Venn Diagrams
4. Sea turtle passages
5. Electronic Whiteboard
Differentiation /Accommodation for students with special learning needs:
Accommodations/ Modifications:
Students who are struggling writers and those who need help with organization: The graphic
organizers are used to organize their thoughts prior to writing.
Students who need redirection: Through the constant changing between partner work and
whole class instruction, the students will be redirected constantly throughout this quickly paced
lesson.
Students who need aide services: The aide will be made available during this lesson.
UDL Principles
3.1 Activate or supply background knowledge: Through the anticipatory set, the students
background knowledge will be activated.
5.3 Build fluencies with graduated levels of support for practice and performance: By using the
graphic organizer and the direct instruction model, the students lesson is appropriately
scaffolded and gives them many opportunities to practice their pre-writing and writing skills.
8.3 Foster community and collaboration: Through partner work and a positive learning
environment, the students will need to collaborate to create third grade sentences and ideas.
Closure:
We will talk about why it is important that we compare and contrast two items and whether or
not we achieved the daily learning target.
Reflection on Student Learning
Next Steps:
After assessing the students essays, I will determine which areas of writing need to be
retaught or enriched. I will then teach whole group, small groups, or individual based upon their
abilities.
References:
Venn Diagram graphic organizer:
Baxendell, B. (2003). Consistent, coherent, creative: The three cs of graphic organizers.
Teaching Exceptional Children, 35 (3), 46-53.