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ANALYTICAL WRITING RUBRIC

Skill Level
Points Earned
POINT
The paragraph or whole essay makes an
argument, claim, or point. The point is
the driving force of the piece of writing:
all of the evidence in the writing should
support your one main point. The point
you make should be something people
could agree or disagree with; it is your
interpretation, not a fact. If you are
being asked to answer a question, the
point is your main answer to that
question. If you are writing a paragraph,
the point is typically a topic sentence
that begins the paragraph. If you are
writing a whole essay, the point typically
comes at the end of the introduction in
the form of a thesis.

NAME: __________________________________ASSIGNMENT:___________________________ GRADE: _____________


1
2
3
4
5
0
2.5
3
3.5
4

The point is missing


or misinterprets the
prompt or text. The
paragraph begins
with summary
information or
evidence rather than a
point.

There is an attempt at
a point, but it is not
specific enough or
not relevant to the
full writing prompt.
The point may be
more fact than
argument, partially
incomplete, partially
inaccurate or only
connected to some of
the evidence in the
paragraph, rather than
all of it.

The point is only


partially relevant to
the writing prompt,
only partially
addresses the writing
prompt, or merely
restates the writing
prompt. The point
may be mixed with a
statement of evidence
rather than being only
an argument.

The point is relevant


to the main concepts
from the writing
prompt, but it may
not explain the larger
importance or
consequences of the
argument being
made.

The point
demonstrates critical
thinking about the
larger importance or
consequences of the
argument being
made.

Common Areas of Difficulty for POINT:


There is no argument. The statement is factual, not interpretive.
The argument is suggested throughout the paragraph or essay, but it is not directly stated.
An argument is present but it is simple or general, hard to understand.
The point is really a clich or commonly heard saying, not the individual writers interpretation.
EVIDENCE
Each body paragraph uses examples (in
the form of quotation, description, or
paraphrase) from a text, experience, or
other appropriate source to support the
validity of the point. Each example is
very specific, not a vague reference to
the text, and supports your point.

No evidence is used.

In an essay, several pieces of evidence


are necessary to fully support your
point/thesis and convince the reader.

Common Areas of Difficulty for EVIDENCE:


The presentation of the evidence contains too much or too little elaboration, text, or detail.
The use of evidence reveals a misunderstanding of the subject material or text.
There is not enough evidence used to support the point.
Material used as evidence is really simply summarizing the text.
Evidence needs to be ONE specific incident, event, action, choice, or moment in the text not a trend from the whole
story.
Provide context/background information to help the reader understand the evidence.
Include a page citation in parentheses after the evidence.

The evidence used


does not clearly or
thoroughly support
all parts of the point
or all parts of the
prompt.

Some of the evidence


used supports the
point, but some of it
does not.
OR the evidence used
supports the point,
but there is not
enough evidence.

The evidence used


adequately supports
the point.

The evidence used is


effectively selected,
thoroughly
supporting and
developing the
precise point being
explored in the
writing.


Skill Level
Points Earned
ANALYSIS
The analysis explains how the evidence
proves the point and why the evidence is
important or significant. In the analysis,
you need to show HOW the evidence
demonstrates a certain concept that
relates to the point your paragraph or
essay is making: a key character trait, a
choice, a pattern, an action, a theme, etc
AND WHY that concept is important
to your overall point. To write the
HOW, you need to point back to
something specific within the evidence
(a key word in a quotation, for example),
and to explain the WHY, you need to
show why the evidence matters.

1
0

2
2.5

3
3

4
3.5

5
4

No explanation is
given or the
paragraph merely
summarizes or gives
the writers personal
opinions about the
topic or text without
connecting to
evidence or the point.

The explanation
restates the point; it
does not show how
the evidence relates
to the point or why
the evidence is
important to the
point. It offers an
interpretation of a
part of the point or
prompt, but it does
not show a
relationship between
the point and
evidence.

The explanation tells


why the evidence is
important, but it does
not show how the
evidence relates to
the point (or it shows
how but not why). A
part of the
explanation may
merely restate the
evidence or point, but
it offers a limited
interpretation of the
relationship between
the point and
evidence.

The explanation
describes how the
evidence proves the
point and why the
evidence is
important. It offers
an adequate
interpretation of the
relationship between
the point and
evidence.

The explanation
thoroughly and
effectively describes
how the evidence
proves the point and
why the evidence is
important. The
analysis extends the
discussion to consider
the larger
significance or
consequences of the
argument.

Common Areas of Difficulty for ANALYSIS:


Analysis does not connect back to the paragraphs main point or essays main point.
Analysis does not point back to parts of the evidence to show the connection between the evidence and the point.
Analysis does not comment on why the evidence is important.
Analysis mainly restates/repeats the point rather than applying the evidence to the point.

PERSONAL SCORE TRACKING SHEET


DIRECTIONS: Each time you receive a PEA writing rubric, write the DATE in the box to show the score you achieved on that assessment. For example, if I earned skill
level 2 for POINT, I would write 9/12/14 in the box under skill level 2. I would repeat the date for the score I earned for EVIDENCE and for ANALYIS.
Skill Level
1
2
3
4
5
Points Earned
0
2.5
3
3.5
4
POINT
The paragraph or whole essay makes an
argument, claim, or point. The point is the
driving force of the piece of writing: all of
the evidence in the writing should support
your one main point. The point you make
should be something people could agree or
disagree with; it is your interpretation, not a
fact. If you are being asked to answer a
question, the point is your main answer to
that question. If you are writing a paragraph,
the point is typically a topic sentence that
begins the paragraph. If you are writing a
whole essay, the point typically comes at the
end of the introduction in the form of a thesis.

EVIDENCE
Each body paragraph uses examples (in the
form of quotation, description, or paraphrase)
from a text, experience, or other appropriate
source to support the validity of the point.
Each example is very specific, not a vague
reference to the text, and supports your point.

The point is missing or


misinterprets the prompt
or text. The paragraph
begins with summary
information or evidence
rather than a point.

There is an attempt at a
point, but it is not specific
enough or not relevant to
the full writing prompt.
The point may be more
fact than argument,
partially incomplete,
partially inaccurate or
only connected to some of
the evidence in the
paragraph, rather than all
of it.

The point is only partially


relevant to the writing
prompt, only partially
addresses the writing
prompt, or merely restates
the writing prompt. The
point may be mixed with a
statement of evidence
rather than being only an
argument.

The point is relevant to the


main concepts from the
writing prompt, but it may
not explain the larger
importance or
consequences of the
argument being made.

Common Areas of Difficulty for POINT:

There is no argument. The statement is factual, not interpretive.

The argument is suggested throughout the paragraph or essay, but it is not directly stated.

An argument is present but it is simple or general, hard to understand.

The point is really a clich or commonly heard saying, not the individual writers interpretation.
No evidence is used.
The evidence used does
Some of the evidence used The evidence used
not clearly or thoroughly
supports the point, but
adequately supports the
support all parts of the
some of it does not.
point.
point or all parts of the
OR the evidence used
prompt.
supports the point, but
there is not enough
evidence.

The point demonstrates


critical thinking about the
larger importance or
consequences of the
argument being made.

The evidence used is


effectively selected,
thoroughly supporting and
developing the precise
point being explored in the
writing.

In an essay, several pieces of evidence are


necessary to fully support your point/thesis
and convince the reader.
Common Areas of Difficulty for EVIDENCE:

The presentation of the evidence contains too much or too little elaboration, text, or detail.

The use of evidence reveals a misunderstanding of the subject material or text.

There is not enough evidence used to support the point.

Material used as evidence is really simply summarizing the text.

Evidence needs to be ONE specific incident, event, action, choice, or moment in the text not a trend from the whole story.

Provide context/background information to help the reader understand the evidence.

Include a page citation in parentheses after the evidence.

Skill Level
Points Earned
ANALYSIS
The analysis explains how the evidence
proves the point and why the evidence is
important or significant. In the analysis, you
need to show HOW the evidence
demonstrates a certain concept that relates to
the point your paragraph or essay is making:
a key character trait, a choice, a pattern, an
action, a theme, etc AND WHY that
concept is important to your overall point.
To write the HOW, you need to point back to
something specific within the evidence (a key
word in a quotation, for example), and to
explain the WHY, you need to show why the
evidence matters.

1
0
No explanation is given or
the paragraph merely
summarizes or gives the
writers personal opinions
about the topic or text
without connecting to
evidence or the point.

2
2.5
The explanation restates
the point; it does not show
how the evidence relates
to the point or why the
evidence is important to
the point. It offers an
interpretation of a part of
the point or prompt, but it
does not show a
relationship between the
point and evidence.

3
3
The explanation tells why
the evidence is important,
but it does not show how
the evidence relates to the
point (or it shows how but
not why). A part of the
explanation may merely
restate the evidence or
point, but it offers a
limited interpretation of
the relationship between
the point and evidence.

4
3.5
The explanation describes
how the evidence proves
the point and why the
evidence is important. It
offers an adequate
interpretation of the
relationship between the
point and evidence.

5
4
The explanation
thoroughly and effectively
describes how the
evidence proves the point
and why the evidence is
important. The analysis
extends the discussion to
consider the larger
significance or
consequences of the
argument.

Common Areas of Difficulty for ANALYSIS:

Analysis does not connect back to the paragraphs main point or essays main point.

Analysis does not point back to parts of the evidence to show the connection between the evidence and the point.

Analysis does not comment on why the evidence is important.

Analysis mainly restates/repeats the point rather than applying the evidence to the point.