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Heads-Up Display for a

Manufacturing Microscope
Prepared By:
Noah Bergman,
Greg Kuhn,
Mike Kelly,
Garrett Hembry

Submitted To:
Bob Dearth
Honeywell Intl. Inc.
Dr. Jaeyoun Kim
Iowa State University
Dr. George Amariucai
Iowa State University

Microscope HUD

MAY1607

Contents
1 Introduction

2 Project Statement

3 Design Requirements

4 Deliverables

5 Functional Overview
5.1 Main Control Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2 DLP Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.3 Optical System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4
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6 Detailed Hardware Design


6.1 Main Control Board . . . . . . . . . .
6.1.1 HDMI Receiver - ADV7611 . .
6.1.2 Microcontroller - MSP430F2274
6.1.3 Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.2 DLP Controller Board . . . . . . . . .
6.2.1 DMD Controller - DLPC3438 .
6.2.2 LED Controller - DLPA2005 . .
6.3 Optical Design . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.3.1 Modified Optical Engine . . . .
6.3.2 Collimating Optics . . . . . . .

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7 Testing
7.1 Objective Lens Integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.2 Camera Port Integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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8 Conclusion

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Appendices

10

A Operation Manual

10

B Alternative Designs
10
B.1 Objective Lens Integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
B.2 Camera Port Attachment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Schematic Files

15

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MAY1607

List of Figures
1
2
3
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5
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8

Block Diagram . . . . . . .
Power Regulator Schematic
Optics Diagram . . . . . . .
Objective Lens Setup . . . .
Objective Lens Output . . .
Lens Array Diagram . . . .
Lens Housing Model . . . .
Camera Port Model . . . . .

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Page 2

Microscope HUD

MAY1607

Introduction

Honeywell technicians assemble miniature mechanisms under a microscope.


They face repetitive movements and eye strain while checking work instructions which are displayed on a nearby computer. A Kansas State design team
outlined several solutions to this problem: a small tablet mounted next to
the microscope, a virtual environment using technology similar to the Oculus
Rift, and a heads up display inside the microscopes field of view. We are
exploring the last of these options.

Project Statement

Optically inserting a virtual screen inside the microscopes field of view allows the operator to seamlessly refer to work instructions during assembly.
This setup could potentially improve workplace ergonomics and reduce manufacturing time while ensuring all components meet Honeywells high quality
expectations.

Design Requirements
Allows users to interact with PDFs that contain embedded pictures,
videos, and links to other work instructions.
Does not obstruct the 15 vertical workspace below the objective lens.

Does not restrict airflow in the workspace to maintain ISO Class 7 clean
room standards.
Remains in focus during normal microscope operation.

Deliverables
Design workking prototype of heads-up display system.
Provide all design documents, schematics, and code.

Operations Manual to demonstrate how to setup and use the system.

Future design manual that outlines improvements and ideas for development down the line.

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Microscope HUD

MAY1607

Functional Overview

To meet all the requirements, our group designed a DLP projector with
custom optics, hardware, and firmware. Our design is centered around the
Texas Instruments DLP3010 chipset and uses the DLP3010 EVM optical
engine and DLP controller board. The entire system can be broken down
into three main parts: main control board, DLP control board, and the
optical system. These subsystems work together to display the final image
inside the microscope. Figure 1 shows the block diagram of the final design.

Figure 1: Block diagram of the main board, DLP controller, and Optical
system

5.1

Main Control Board

The main control board was designed to take an HDMI input and convert the
data to 24 bit RGB format which is fed directly to the DLP3438 display controller. The on-board microcontroller, MSP430F2274, serves as both a user
interface hub and system coordinator. The power-on switch and navigation
buttons are connected GPIOs. These inputs are configured in software to
trigger certain events in the projector. For example, the left and right buttons can be used to change screen size, zoom, and cropping while the power
switch simply triggers all the initialization code to run. The MCU communicates with both the ADV7611 and the DLPC3438 over I2 C. All the power
for the system is routed through the main board. The 5V input is stepped
down to 3.3V and 1.8V using buck regulators.

5.2

DLP Controller

The DLP controller board was part of an evaluation kit from Texas Instruments. The board consists of the DLPC3438 display controller and the
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Microscope HUD

MAY1607

DLPA2005 PMIC / LED driver. These two integrated circuits work in tandem to control the DLP3010, digital micro-mirror device.

5.3

Optical System

This optical engine uses three LEDs, red, green, and blue, to project a full
color image. The light is combined and reflected off the DMD and out
through the custom optical system. The optics we designed take the projected light, magnify, correct for aberrations, and finally collimate the image
before it is sent into the infinity space of the microscope. The EMZ-8TRU
has a camera port attachment that was removed and modified to change the
direction of the beam splitter. This allowed the image to be reflected up
through the eyepiece where the user can view the virtual screen.

6
6.1
6.1.1

Detailed Hardware Design


Main Control Board
HDMI Receiver - ADV7611

The ADV7611 receives HDMI signals from the input source, converts the data
format, and provides display information to the source over I2 C. Before any
pixel data can be transferred, the source must know some basic information
about the display. The External Device ID is 128 bytes of data that holds
manufacturer information, serial number, display dimensions, data speeds,
and color information. The final byte holds a check-sum of the data block.
Once this information has been transferred over and a confirmation has been
sent, both devices are ready to communicate.
The image data is transmitted over four differential pair wires, three for
data and one for clock, at 60 frames per second for 1080p displays. This
corresponds to a data rate of 3.4Gbps. Routing high speed signals on a
circuit board requires special attention. The propagation delay of the signal
is directly proportional to the dielectric of fiberglass and length of trace. This
becomes incredibly crucial for differential pairs as a mismatch in timing can
cause excess power draw on the lines or even corrupt data.
The ADV7611 converts the video into 24 bit RGB format. This parallel
interface uses 8 bits per color per pixel. Each pixel is clocked in like a
typewriter, each pixel placed to the right of the previous. At the end of each
line, the HSYNC line is pulsed, notifying the receiver to start the next line.
The last row of pixels is clocked in and followed by a pulse on the VSYNC

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Microscope HUD

MAY1607

line. The receiver sets up for the next frame in the same manner as before,
starting in the corner and clocking across.
6.1.2

Microcontroller - MSP430F2274

The on-board MSP430F2274 acts as the main coordinator for the system.
The DLP controller and ADV7611 are both controlled via I2 C. All settings
and events are routed through the microcontroller and sent to the respective
chip.
6.1.3

Power

Finally, the main board acts as the power distribution center. The 5V system
power is converted to 1.8V and 3.3V using two switching regulators. All
three control voltages are necessary for normal operation. When power is
first applied, the system waits for the 5V and 3.3V power to stabilize before
turning on the 1.8V supply. This power-up sequence is necessary for a clean
program start and ensures none of the components are damaged.

Figure 2: The 3.3V and 1.8V voltage regulator circuit.

Page 6

Microscope HUD

6.2
6.2.1

MAY1607

DLP Controller Board


DMD Controller - DLPC3438

The DLPC3438 directly controls the DMD and the LED driver. The control
chip only takes in 24 bit RGB data, but can also render its own splash screens
and test patterns. The MSP430 can call specific operations over I2 C such as,
image cropping, changing brightness, image angle, and many more.
6.2.2

LED Controller - DLPA2005

The DLPA2005 uses a feedback resistor on the cathode side of the LEDs to
track current. An internal DAC is set to limit LED current, the output is
compared to the voltage across the shunt resistor and the channel is pulsed
off until the current comes back within range. The original value of 39m
was intended for current control between 1.5 and 2.1 amps per channel. This
device was originally designed to produce 150 lumens and was not intended
for direct line of sight out of the box. Replacing the original with a 100
resistor allowed us to test the LEDs down to a few milliamps.

6.3
6.3.1

Optical Design
Modified Optical Engine

Projector optical engines are not designed to work while facing the display.
Removing the projection optics reveals the small DMD hidden inside. The
small rectangle glows brilliantly as the thousands of tiny mirrors silently
toggle back and forth. DLP systems typically use a white bulb with a color
wheel or colored LEDs to generate the full color spectrum.
6.3.2

Collimating Optics

The lens system was designed to collimate the image projected directly from
the DMD. Our system uses three different types of lens to tweak various
aspects of our system.
Bi-Concave The Bi-Convex lens has a focal length of -30mm and is placed
approximately 34.5mm away from the DMD. This produces a smaller virtual
image within range of the second lens.
Bi-Convex This intermediate lens magnifies the virtual image and prepares it for the final collimation. This lens makes it easy to fine tune the
balance between longer focal length and apparent image size.
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Microscope HUD

MAY1607

Achromatic Bi-Convex The final lens consists of two different materials


glued together. The difference in the index of refractions corrects for color
aberrations in the image. The final image is much clearer because the colors
all collimate together.

Figure 3: The optical schematic

7
7.1

Testing
Objective Lens Integration

When this project began, testing consisted purely of attempting to send any
sort of light through the microscope and receiving it at the eyepieces. The
simplest method to test this was to implement the projector circuit below
the objective lens. After this initial proof of concept was developed, the
complexity of testing increased. The next task was to prove it was possible
to project an image through the microscope for the user to see. The beam
splitter is placed at a specific angle below the objective lens, and the projector
was able to reflect an image up into the objective lens for the user to see.
Unfortunately, the light received from the projector was much too bright.
In order to dim the light from the LED, more resistance was added to the
projector circuit.
After the brightness issue was resolved, it became apparent that much
of the available workspace below the microscope was now being occupied by
our setup under the microscope. To decrease the amount of workspace used
by our project, we modified the angle between the beam splitter and the
objective lens. To free up the workspace for the lab technicians we made
incremental adjustments until we found the smallest working angle that still
provided an acceptable quality image to the user. The image received had its
own issues as well, so alternative ways to implement the system to improve
the image quality were sought out.
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Microscope HUD

7.2

MAY1607

Camera Port Integration

Implementing the setup in the camera port relocated our circuitry so that
it was completely out of the workspace and also allowed for the use of more
precise optics that were already in place. With some slight modifications to
these optics the image could be projected through the microscope to the eyepiece with little outside interaction. The resulting image was much clearer
and legible. The next step was to use actual work instructions as the projected image to determine the legibility of text instructions. After this step
in testing, it was determined that the text instructions could successfully be
projected through the microscope and read by the microscope operator using
our setup.
Much of the remaining testing process for this concept dealt with the
creation of custom hardware in order to hold and house our projector circuit
in the most optimal way. The first iteration of this hardware simply attached
our optical system to the microscope, and we quickly realized the hardware
would also need to hold and support the rest of the circuit in addition to
attaching the system to the microscope. The final version of the hardware
would not only house the circuit and attach it to the microscope, but it would
also allow for the optical system to be adjusted when necessary.

Conclusion

During these past two semesters of senior design we managed to successfully create a heads-up display and integrate it into a microscope. In order
to get this product working successfully we used many skills from varying
branches of science and engineering. We had to employ our knowledge of optics and lenses, 3D-modeling, circuit design, and microcontrollers to create
a working heads up display. Overall, this was a fascinating and worthwhile
project where we managed to successfully complete our project using creative
problem solving and teamwork.

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Microscope HUD

MAY1607

Operation Manual

1. Prepare the Workspace


Set up the microscope by attaching the stand and the microscope
together.
2. Modify the Existing System
Remove the camera port and replace with a modified version.

Attach the unit securely, as it will hold the lenses which are
sensitive to small changes in alignment.

3. Optical Setup
The lens configuration should be placed in the lens tube.

Place lens at the focal point to ensure optimal image quality.

Insert the lens tube securely into thelens housing apparatus.

4. Circuit Setup

Attach the projector circuit to the modified camera port


Power the circuitry via and electrical outlet

Connect the projector to the storage system containing instruction


document
Activate the projector by turning on the switch

5. User Information

The image will be displayed into the eyepiece of the microscope

Toggle between the workspace view and the instructions by powering on and off the system

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Microscope HUD

B
B.1

MAY1607

Alternative Designs
Objective Lens Integration

Our design process began by brainstorming various methods of inserting a


projection into the microscope system. With our intentions focused only on
providing the instructions directly to the user, we predicted three potential
points of insertion. These projection possibilities ranged from the area immediately in contact with the user (the eyepiece), to a portion of the optics
tangential to the overall system (the camera port), and also the portion of
the microscope already being used to capture images (the objective lens).
We decided to pursue a strategy that utilized the objective lens as the
insertion point of the projected image for our first design. This was a result
of the compactness of the eyepiece component, which had no tolerance for
customization, and also that the default position of the camera port system
allowed only for image capture. Later it became apparent that the camera
port could be changed to display an image to the eyepiece, which we took
advantage of at a point farther along in the design process.
Because the objective lens purpose is to capture light and display it to the
user, pursuing this design allowed us to focus more on the projection system
as a first priority. We began by purchasing a commercial projector for testing
of the various lens and component setups to be used in conjunction with an
image source. This was chosen as a way of getting immediate feedback on
the methods of focusing the image as it traveled to the objective lens. It
is relevant to note that as a result of our project being almost completely
hardware oriented, progressing through suggested concepts requires actual
testing, and so many of our designs are focused on allowing us to get results
on feasibility and quality in a very short time frame.
As part of experimenting with the various lens arrangements and several different beam splitters, it was necessary to disassemble and adapt the
purchased pocket projector to better fit our needs. We removed all of the
casing and added a small circuit board attachment to optimize the brightness
setting of the projector. We were then able to find the correct beam splitter alignment in conjunction with the projectors position so that the image
would be viewed properly in the eyepiece. This was very important because
as the light travels through the microscope system, the image is reflected off
of many surfaces and is displayed in a different orientation than was initially
projected at the beginning of the process.
The final part of our design required us to build a physical structure to
not only hold each of the components in their particular positions, but also to
attach them securely to the microscope itself. The resulting model is shown
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MAY1607

in Figure 4, where the beam splitter is placed just below the objective lens
with the projector and its controlling circuitry held to the side. The projector
and beam splitter are placed at specific angles so that the image is reflected
directly into the objective lens, but while the power is off, the beam splitter
allows for the view below the system to enter into the lens unobstructed.

Figure 4: Design using modified commercial projector underneath the


objective lens.
This was a good result for our first design, but there were several disadvantages that we wanted to optimize as our project developed. The main
issue with the objective lens integration setup was that the angle of reflection
required the beam splitter and projector to be placed in the users workspace.
We built our model in such a way so that the components were held off to the
side, but this design still posed a considerable obstruction to the workstation.
Another topic of concern was that the distance between the projector and
beam splitter needed to be adjusted each time the zoom of the microscope
was changed. This is because the focal point of the projection system needed
to be changed in accordance to the magnification being viewed by the user.
Finally, the projected image presented a double image when viewed (shown
in Figure 5), which was a result of the beam splitter having two reflective
surfaces.

B.2

Camera Port Attachment

As the project progressed, we were able to spend more time learning about the
internal optics used in the microscope and to get more comfortable adjusting
various parts of the system. At one point we experimented with manipulating
the set of mirrors used by the camera port in such a way so that they reflected
light in a direction of our choosing. This allowed us to change that part of
the microscope which was only initially used for capturing images so that it
could actually input a light source to be viewed by an eyepiece.
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MAY1607

Figure 5: Image produced by the objective lens design as seen through


eyepiece.
Once this development was made, we decided to pursue it as our second
method of design for the project. At this point we determined all of the
necessary changes to be implemented for the new system. This list included
adjusting the camera port mirrors so that the image could be sent in a
direction of our choosing, redesigning the camera port hardware itself to allow
for easier input of images as well as to hold the project and other components
being used. We also knew that we would be able to change our beam splitter
implementation completely, swapping in a lens array for focusing because we
only needed to consider inserting the image as the camera port attachment
does not obstruct the central optics used by the microscope.
In order to enact these changes we employed a few programs in conjunction with the usual testing and experimenting that is the staple of this
project. One program which was vital to determining the optimal distances
used for the lens array that focused our image was WinLens 3D. This optical
simulation program not only allowed us to find those distances to be used,
but also to test the impact that various types of lenses and optical components had on our projected image. As shown in Figure 6, we went with a
three lens system after completing the testing process with that program.
We utilized one biconcave and two biconvex lenses with achromatic lenses to
correct for color aberration.
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Figure 6: Lens array schematic with dimensions optimized by WinLens 3D


software.
Another useful software tool was the 3D modeling program, Solidworks,
which was used to design two vital components for this optical integration
method, shown in Figures 7 and 8. The first part that we needed to construct
was a custom mounting bracket which would attach to the camera port and
hold the focusing lenses in perfect alignment. The second component that
we needed to build became apparent after a few iterations of testing with
the stock camera port, which had enough hindrances in its design that we
eventually decided to construct our own version. This was made so that
we could integrate smoothly into the microscope with our projector and lens
array, and also to provide support for our circuit board assembly. After some
testing with these new components, we came up with a few changes to the
initial design and made a second model with optimized dimensions.
While we conducted tests for the physical parts just constructed, we also
worked with the projection system to provide the best image through the
optics housed in that hardware. We made a small structural piece for the
projector to provide support and attachment holes to lock it in place so
that it remains aligned to the camera port. It was also necessary to design
a custom PCB to remove all the unnecessary components not being used
by the projector, which also helped to reduce the size and allow for easier
integration on the camera port. Part of this new PCB was a simple on/off
switch which serves as the main control for our projection system and allows
for easily displayed instructions once the system is attached.
There are several benefits that this new design has over our initial concept,
the first of which concerns the focus of the displayed image. Previously, any
time the operator adjusted the magnification of his view he would then have
to refocus our image before being able to view his instructions. With this new
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Figure 7: Custom lens mounting bracket to support the lenses used for
focusing the image.

Figure 8: Custom camera port design to support the projector and house
the lens array
design, our projection enters into the eyepiece directly from the camera port,
meaning it is independent to the focus of the microscope system. Another
advantage of our second concept is that all of our circuitry and optics are
housed internally or held behind the microscope. This keeps our attachment
out of the workspace and enables for a much lower impact to the rest of the
microscope system.

Page 15

POWER.sch

POWER

CONNECTOR.sch

CONNECTOR

MSP430.sch

MSP430

HDMI_INPUT.sch

HDMI_INPUT

Size: B
Date: Sat 26 Mar 2016
KiCad E.D.A. kicad (2015-04-17 BZR 5609)-product

Title: PROJECT HIEARCHY

IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY - SENIOR DESIGN MAY1607


Sheet: /
File: HDMI2RGB.sch

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10nF

C23

10nF

C25

ADV_CVDD

GND

AP
LRCLK

INT1
MCLK/INT2
SCLK/INT2
HPA_A/INT2

HS
VS/FIELD/ALSB
DE
LLC

U5

ADV7611

ADV_PVDD

0.1uF

C19

10nF

C21

TVDD
TVDD
TVDD

PVDD

DVDDIO
DVDDIO
DVDDIO

DVDD
DVDD
DVDD
DVDD

CVDD
CVDD

RXA_5V

CEC

XTALP
XTALN

DDCA_SDA
DDCA_SCL

SDA
SCL

RXA_C+
RXA_C-

RXA_2+
RXA_2RXA_1+
RXA_1RXA_0+
RXA_0-

0.1uF

C18

8
5
11

64

ADV_TVDD

61

HDMI_CEC
HDMI_PWR

58
59

63
62

13
12
10
9
7
6

HDMI_RX2_P
HDMI_RX2_N
HDMI_RX1_P
HDMI_RX1_N
HDMI_RX0_P
HDMI_RX0_N

R8
33
R9
33

56

RESET_ADV7611
RESET

HDMI Receiver: ADV7611

4.7k
R3

4.7k
R4

SHLD

4.7k
R5

4.7k
R7

12
11
10
9

6
7
8

12

10
9

10

10nF

C27

GND

GND

10nF

C28

ADV_DVDD

33

HDMI_HPA

HDMI_INT1

HSYNC_CS
VSYNC_WE
DATEN_CMD
PCLK

PDATA16
PDATA17
PDATA18
PDATA19
PDATA20
PDATA21
PDATA22
PDATA23

PDATA8
PDATA9
PDATA10
PDATA11
PDATA12
PDATA13
PDATA14
PDATA15

PDATA0
PDATA1
PDATA2
PDATA3
PDATA4
PDATA5
PDATA6
PDATA7

PDATA[0..23]

Size: B
Date: Sat 26 Mar 2016
KiCad E.D.A. kicad (2015-04-17 BZR 5609)-product

Title: HDMI INPUT - ADV7611

IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY - SENIOR DESIGN MAY1607


Sheet: /HDMI_INPUT/
File: HDMI_INPUT.sch

65

48
50

R10

HDMI_INT1

R_PACK8

11

12
6

13

14

15

16

R_PACK8
RP3

11

13

14

15

2
3

16

55
51
49
1

10nF

C26

13

R_PACK8
RP2

14

15

16

RP1
1

HSYNC
VSYNC
DATEN_CMD
PCLK

R0
R1
R2
R3
R4
R5
R6
R7

G0
G1
G2
G3
G4
G5
G6
G7

B0
B1
B2
B3
B4
B5
B6
B7

46
47
45
25

22
21
20
19
18
17
16
15

33
32
31
30
29
28
27
26

43
42
41
39
38
37
36
35

PDATA[0..23]

Rev: 1.1
Id: 2/5

CONN_01X06

P2

1
2
3
4
5
6

GND

SPI0_CSZ0
SPI0_MOSI
SPI0_MISO
SPI0_CLK

SPI0_CSZ0
SPI0_MOSI
SPI0_MISO
SPI0_CLK

+3V3

PROJ_ON

PDATA[0..23]

VSYNC_WE

+1V8
+3V3

SYSPWR

SPI0_CLK

SPI0_CLK

2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
36
38
40
42
44
46
48
50
52
54
56
58
60
B1
B2
B3
B4
B5
B6
B7
B8
B9
B10
B11
B12
B13
B14
B15
B16
B17
B18
B19
B20
B21
B22
B23
B24
B25
B26
B27
B28
B29
B30

QTH-030-02-L-DA

VSYNC
PDATA8
PDATA9
PDATA10
PDATA12
PDATA14
PDATA16
PDATA18
PDATA20
PDATA22

GND

A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
A9
A10
A11
A12
A13
A14
A15
A16
A17
A18
A19
A20
A21
A22
A23
A24
A25
A26
A27
A28
A29
A30

J2
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
25
27
29
31
33
35
37
39
41
43
45
47
49
51
53
55
57
59

SYSPWR

PDATA23
SPI0_MISO
SPI0_MOSI
SPI0_CSZ0

PDATA21

PDATA19

PDATA13
HSYNC
PDATA15
3DR
PDATA17

PDATA1
PDATA3
PDATA5
PDATA7
PDATA0
PDATA2
PDATA4
PDATA6
DATEN_CMD
PCLK
PDATA11

SPI0_MISO
SPI0_MOSI
SPI0_CSZ0

I2C0_SCL

I2C0_SDA

3DR

HSYNC_CS

DATEN_CMD
PCLK

PROJ_ON

RESETZ

HOST_IRQ

HOST_IRQ

+3V3

HOST_IRQ_DRIVE

RESETZ_DRIVE

+3V3

PROJ_ON_DRIVE

GND

270
R26

270
R25

270
R24

PROJ_ON_LED

RESETZ_LED

HOST_IRQ_LED

C34
0.1uF

C33
0.1uF

D3

LED

D2

LED

D1

LED

+3V3

Size: B
Date: Sun 27 Mar 2016
KiCad E.D.A. kicad (2015-04-17 BZR 5609)-product

Title: DLP CONNECTION - TO DLP3010 EVM

Sheet: /CONNECTOR/
File: CONNECTOR.sch

0.1uF

C35

SN74 Buffer Caps - Place close to power pins

SN74AUP1G06DCKR

SN74AUP1G07DCKR
GND

GND

SN74AUP1G06DCKR
GND
+3V3

+3V3

U9

U8

U7

DLP Interface Connector

GND
GND
GND
GND
64
63
62
61

5
+
3
5
+
3
5
+
3

Rev: 1.1
Id: 3/5

RAPC712x

1
2
3

GND

200
R27

10uF

10uF

GND

C37

SYSPWR
C36

GND

SYSPWR

SYSPWR

SYSPWR

GND

4.7uF

C39

GND

4.7uF

C38

4
2

4
2

1
3
6
7

1
3
6
7

GND

GND

L2

2.2uH

L1

2.2uH

GND

GND

680k
R33

300k
R32

Size: A4
Date:
KiCad E.D.A. kicad (2015-04-17 BZR 5609)-product

Title:

Sheet: /POWER/
File: POWER.sch

TPS62260

SW
FB
EN
GND
MODE
PP

VIN

U11

TPS62260

SW
FB
EN
GND
MODE
PP

VIN

U10

POWER
LED

J3

R28
270
1
2

D4

150k
R29
150k
R30

+1V8

GND

10uF

C41

VDD_3V3

+3V3

GND

10uF

C40

VDD_1V8

Rev:
Id: 4/5
6

R11

0.0

P3

1
2
3
4
5
6

GND

MSP_VDD3V3

GND

0.1uF

0.1uF

0.1uF

CONN_01X06

C31

MSP_VDD3V3

RESET

R23
4.7k

C30

DEBUG2

DEBUG1

+3.3V

U13

U12

+3V3

+3V3

GND

DEBUG2_DRIVE

GND

SN74AUP1G06DCKR

15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

5
37

DEBUG1_DRIVE

SN74AUP1G06DCKR

POWER_ON
PB_UP
PB_DOWN
PB_LEFT
PB_RIGHT
PB_SELECT

RESET
TEST

29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36

GND

1
3
5
7
9
11
13

P1
2
4
6
8
10
12
14

270
R34

DVCC
DVCC
AVCC

XIN/P2.6
XOUT/P2.7

DEBUG2_LED

DEBUG1_LED

MSP430F2274TRHAR

D6

LED

D5

LED

+3V3

QFN_PAD
AVSS
DVSS
DVSS

P3.0/UCB0STE/UCA0CLK/A5
P3.1/UCB0SIMO/UCB0SDA
P3.2/UCB0SOMI/UCB0SCL
P3.3/UCB0CLK/UCA0STE
P3.4/UCA0TXD/UCA0SIMO
P3.5/UCA0RXD/UCA0SOMI
P3.6/A6/OA0I2
P3.7/A7/OA1I2

P4.0/TB0
P4.1/TB1
P4.2/TB2
P4.3/TB0/A12/OA0O
P4.4/TB1/A13/OA1O
P4.5/TB2/A14/OA0I3
P4.6/TBOUTH/A15/OA1I3
P4.7/TBCLK

RST/NMI/SBWTDIO
TEST/SBWTCK

270
R31

TEST

41
13
4
1

9
10
11
12
23
24
25
26

3
2

6
7
8
27
28
40

39
38
14

R15
VCC_TOOL
VCC_TARGET R16

P2.0/ACLK/A0/OA0I0
P2.1/TAINCLK/SMCLK/A1/OA0O
P2.2/TA0/A2/OA0I1
P2.3/TA1/A3/VREF-/VeREF-/OA1I1/OA1O
P2.4/TA2/A4/VREF+/VeREF+/OA1I0
P2.5/ROSC

P1.0/TACLK/ADC10CLK
P1.1/TA0
P1.2/TA1
P1.3/TA2
P1.4/SMCLK/TCK
P1.5/TA0/TMS
P1.6/TA1/TDI/TCLK
P1.7/TA2/TDO/TDI

U6

RESET

TDO
TDI
TMS
TCK
0.0
0.0

GND

HOST_IRQ
MSP_I2C_SDA
MSP_I2C_SCL
PROJ_ON

ADV_1V8_EN

RESET_ADV7611
HDMI_INT1

MSP_VDD3V3

MSP_VDD3V3

HOST_IRQ
MSP_I2C_SDA
MSP_I2C_SCL
PROJ_ON

MSP_VDD3V3

ADV_1V8_EN

RESET_ADV7611
HDMI_INT1

MSP430F2274, JTAG, I2C, and BUTTONS

4.7k
R14

R19
4.7k

C29

R22
4.7k

CONN_02X07

R21
4.7k

+3.3V

4.7k
R18
4.7k
R20

R17
4.7k
5
+
3
5
+
3

C32

5
4
2

SW1

M2
M1

HOLE1

HOLE1
H3

HOLE1
H2

H1

GND

GND

Size: B
Date: Sat 26 Mar 2016
KiCad E.D.A. kicad (2015-04-17 BZR 5609)-product

Title: MSP430F2274 - PERIPHERAL CONNECTIONS

IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY - SENIOR DESIGN MAY1607


Sheet: /MSP430/
File: MSP430.sch

GND

0.1uF

POWER_ON

GND

2M1-SP1-T2-B4-M6RE

MSP_VDD3V3

R12
4.7k
R13
4.7k

Rev: 1.1
Id: 5/5