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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula


www.smdailyjournal.com

Monday June 20, 2016 XVI, Edition 264

King wins title!


Warriors shot to repeat dashed by Cavs
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND LeBron James cradled the shiny gold trophy and


struggled to sum up what might be
his sweetest championship yet,
the one he is so proudly bringing
home to his native northeast Ohio
just as he promised to do when he
returned to the Cavaliers two summers ago.

James and his relentless, nevercount-them-out Cavs pulled off an


improbable NBA Finals comeback, and Cleveland is title town
again at long last.
Unfazed by the criticism and
chatter all series, James delivered
on a vow to his home state and
brought the Cavs back as they
became the first team to rally from
a 3-1 finals deficit, beating the
defending champion Golden State

Warriors 93-89 on Sunday night


to end a 52-year major sports
championship
drought
in
Cleveland.
Im happy to be a part of history, James said, then added, Im
home. Im home. ... Im at a loss
for words. This is unbelievable.
In a testy series of blowouts
and a few blowups the winner-

REUTERS

Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James (23) celebrates with the Larry
OBrien Championship Trophy after beating the Golden State Warriors in
See CAVS, Page 28 game seven of the NBA Finals at Oracle Arena Sunday. More page 11.

Medicine disposal
program on hold

SUN SETS ON FAIR

California Board of Pharmacy


considering new regulations
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

NICK ROSE/DAILY JOURNAL

The San Mateo County Fair ended its 10-day run Sunday, June 19.

New head for labor council


Shelley Kessler retiring, Julie Lind Rupp takes over top job in August
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Shelley Kessler is stepping


down as the San Mateo County
Central Labor Councils top official after 31 years of service.
On Monday, the councils delegates unanimously selected Julie
Lind Rupp to replace her.
Rupp is the councils current
political director and will take
over Kesslers job as executive
secretary-treasurer starting Aug. 1.
The council endorses local candidates who are union friendly and

advances legislation to protect workers


rights. It also
urges boycotts
of local businesses that do
not
employ
union workers
and advocates
Rupp
for members
during collective bargaining.
Rupp joined the council in 2010
and staffs the Airport Labor
Coalition.
Julie is well suited to lead the

council in the next phase of organizational development necessary


to meet the upcoming challenges
the labor movement will face.
This is the opportunity for the
next generation to reinvigorate
the fight for social and economic
justice in our community and we
wish her the greatest success,
Kessler wrote in a letter to members.
With an uptick in office and
apartment construction, local
labor is doing fine as far as being

See LABOR, Page 20

A drug disposal ordinance the


San Mateo County Board of
Supervisors approved last year is
on hold as the state Board of
Pharmacy considers regulations to
allow pharmacies to serve as takeback locations for unwanted or
unused medicine.
Earlier this month, elected officials from five Bay Area counties
sent a letter to the board urging it
to expedite approval of the regulations.
Alameda, San Francisco, San
Mateo, Santa Clara and Marin
counties have all passed ordinances that require the pharmaceutical industry to pay for retail
pharmacies to host drug take-back
programs.

The laws cannot be implemented, however, until the counties get


regulatory direction from the
state.
It is our hope that the Board of
Pharmacy will recognize safe disposal at retail pharmacies as an
important way of keeping unwanted drugs out of the environment,
Debbie Raphael, director of the
San Francisco Department of the
Environment, wrote in a statement.
The
Federal
Drug
Enforcement
Administration
(DEA) has already set a high regulatory bar for pharmacies to collect all medicines. We are looking
to the state to follow the lead of
the DEA and ensure a practical and
accessible system for local governments to implement these pro-

See DRUGS, Page 28

Budget keeps growing


for city of Burlingame
By Austin Walsh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Revenue keeps increasing in


Burlingame and so does the citys
budget, as officials expect to collect more money than the year
prior, primarily through growth in
property and hotel taxes.
The citys comprehensive budget and capital improvement spend-

ing plan for the upcoming fiscal


year is set to be approved by the
Burlingame City Council during
its next meeting Monday, June 20.
Of the citys projected $65.8
million in general fund revenue,
the largest sources are $26 million
in transient occupancy tax, up
about $80,000 from the last fiscal

See BUDGET, Page 20

FOR THE RECORD

Monday June 20, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day


Anyone who keeps the ability to
see beauty never grows old.
Franz Kafka, Austrian author and poet (1883-1924).

This Day in History


The Beatles album Yesterday and
Today was released by Capitol
Records, initially with its notorious
cover photo featuring the Fab Four
dressed in butcher smocks while posing with chunks of meat and parts of dismembered dolls; the
resulting outcry prompted Capitol to recall the albums and
replace the covers with a more conventional group portrait,
making the butcher cover a collectors item.

1966

On thi s date:
In 1 7 8 2 , Congress approved the Great Seal of the United
States, featuring the emblem of the bald eagle.
In 1 8 6 3 , West Virginia became the 35th state.
In 1 9 2 1 , U.S. Rep. Alice Mary Robertson, R-Okla.,
became the rst woman to preside over a session of the
House of Representatives.
In 1 9 4 7 , Benjamin Bugsy Siegel was shot dead at the
Beverly Hills, California, mansion of his girlfriend,
Virginia Hill, apparently at the order of mob associates.
In 1 9 6 7 , boxer Muhammad Ali was convicted in Houston
of violating Selective Service laws by refusing to be draftREUTERS
ed. (Alis conviction was ultimately overturned by the Yoga lovers guide tourists to practice yoga at a water park to cool off in Chongqing, China over the weekend.
Supreme Court).
In 1 9 7 9 , ABC News correspondent Bill Stewart was shot to
death in Managua, Nicaragua, by a member of President
Anastasio Somozas national guard.
lakefront is willing to negotiate a set- Field, home of the Chicago Bears.
Northern California deputy
tlement to allow the project to pro- However, the city is considering
In 1 9 9 0 , South African black nationalist Nelson Mandela
ceed, but only under several condi- demolishing a portion of the
and his wife, Winnie, arrived in New York City for a ticker- shoot, kills man after car chase
McCormick Place convention comtape parade in their honor as they began an eight-city U.S.
CARMICHAEL,
Calif.
tions.
tour.
Friends of the Parks released a memo plex as a backup.
Authorities say a Sacramento deputy
That location would also put the
shot and killed a man after a car chase outlining stipulations under which it
would settle its lawsuit, including a museum by the lake.
in Carmichael.
The Sacramento County Sheriffs legally-binding promise from the city
As the project continues to be litiDepartment says the deputy tried to to protect the lakefront from develop- gated, San Francisco officials are trypull over a man driving erratically but ment for the next century. The memo ing to persuade Lucas to build his
the driver sped away and the deputy says the group also wants 5 percent of museum there instead.
the museums revenues allocated to a
gave chase for more than two miles.
The museum is expected to cost $400
The department says in a statement parks fund for improvements in areas million to build.
that the chase Saturday night lasted lacking funding, The Chicago Tribune
about five minutes and reached speeds reported Saturday.
Hundreds protest pastor
Friends of the Park Executive
of 60 miles per hour in residential
Director Juanita Irizarry sent the memo who praised Florida killings
areas.
The Sacramento Bee reports authori- to group members Thursday, respondSACRAMENTO, Calif. Hundreds
Actress Maria Lark
Actress Olympia
Actress Nicole
ties say the man drove into a dead end, ing to some in her organization who of protesters are chanting love conis 19.
Dukakis is 85.
Kidman is 49.
where deputies ordered him to get out want to be more flexible to the Lucas quers hate outside a Northern
Actor Martin Landau is 88. Actor Danny Aiello is 83. Blues of the car but instead he began acceler- project. The group wants to discuss the California church where last week a
musician Lazy Lester is 83. Actor John Mahoney is 76. ating while driving in reverse.
conditions outlined in the memo with pastor said during his sermon that he
Singer-songwriter Brian Wilson is 74. Actor John McCook is
was upset more people werent killed
The release says the deputy feared for the mayors office.
72. Singer Anne Murray is 71. Actress Candy Clark is 69. the safety of the officers behind the
Lucas wants the museum, which in the attack on a Florida gay nightProducer Tina Sinatra is 68. Rhythm-and-blues singer Lionel suspects vehicle and fired on the driv- would showcase his art collection, on club that left 49 people dead.
Lake Michigans shores near downRichie is 67. Actor John Goodman is 64. Rock musician er. The driver died at the scene.
The Sacramento Bee reports that
The department says the deputy is a town Chicago. The museums con- more than 500 demonstrators holding
Michael Anthony is 62. Pop musician John Taylor is 56.
Movie director Robert Rodriguez is 48. Country-folk singer- 12-year veteran with the department struction was scheduled to begin this rainbow flags and signs that read We
songwriter Amos Lee is 39. Country singer Chuck Wicks is and has been put on paid administra- spring, but the groups lawsuit con- are Orlando and Pride Over Prejudice
tending the 300,000-square-foot proj- are standing outside the Verity Baptist
37. Actress Tika Sumpter is 36. Actress-singer Alisan Porter tive leave pending an investigation.
ect violates laws restricting the areas church in Sacramento on Sunday to
(Film: Curly Sue; TV: The Voice) is 35.
Group suing to stop
development put construction on hold. protest last weeks sermon by pastor
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
Last month, the city of Chicago Roger Jimenez.
Lucas
museum
outlines
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
asked the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of
Hours after the attack at the gay
settlement options
Appeals to dismiss the lawsuit. A rul- Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Jimenez
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
told his small congregation that he
CHICAGO A group suing to block ing is pending.
to form four ordinary words.
The original site planned for the wished more people had been killed
construction of Star Wars filmmaker
GANTY
George Lucas museum on Chicagos museum is a parking lot near Soldier during the attack.

In other news ...

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Martial artist redefines self defense


Millbrae teenager uses karate to fight back against epilepsy
By Austin Walsh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Gino Villeggiante refuses to allow his


epilepsy to define him, and instead uses the
disability to help fuel his motivation for
martial arts.
After four tries, the Millbrae native was
awarded in May his black belt in karate, the
expert certification in his training.
Villeggiante, 15, began practicing the
craft roughly 10 years ago as a means of
helping him cope with his seizures and the
result has been the development of a passion which he believes will serve him for
life.
It has definitely taught me to stay
focused, he said. And if there is something I dont want to do, I just stick with it
and do it. It has taught me discipline.
Karate serves not only as a self defense
method for Villeggiante against potential
foes, but also against his disease, he said.
Epilepsy is triggered by stress, he said.
But karate really helps you not be stressed,
helps you be calm and focused. We do lots of
stretching too and that helps you relax and
be stress free.
His path to landing his black belt was not
without challenges though, as he failed his
first three initial attempts at the qualification, and has also had a seizure at the Dojo
USA center in San Bruno where he trains.
Though he has battled epilepsy for years,
Villeggiante said the experience of a seizure
continues to be frightening and unpleasant.
Ive been having them all my life. I had
one at the dojo. It was pretty scary. I didnt
know what was going on, he said.
Typically in the days after a seizure,
Villeggiante is subjected to a variety of
tests and medical visits designed to recalibrate his prescription in an effort to fend off
the next occurrence, said his karate mentor
Peter Johnson, which can set back his training.

Local briefs
Man robs 7-Eleven of cash
Police are looking for an armed robber
who stole cash from a 7-Eleven store in Palo
Alto early Friday morning.
Officers responded to a report of a robbery
from a clerk at the store located at 708
Colorado Ave. around 2:10 a.m., police
said.
Responding officers were unable to find
the suspect, according to police.
An investigation showed that the suspect
went inside the store and aimed a handgun at
a clerk, who he forced to open the cash register, police said.
The victim followed the suspects orders
and the armed man took the money before he
ran east on Colorado Avenue, according to
police.
There were no other employees or customers inside the store during the robbery,
police said.
The suspect is described as a man standing
about 6 feet 2 inches tall with a medium
build.
He wore a bright blue sweatshirt that had a
large black Nike logo on the front and hood
tied down covering most of his face. He also
wore blue jeans and white high-top shoes,
police said.
He had a dark-colored, compact semi-automatic gun, according to police.
Anyone with information on the robbery
is asked to call police dispatch at (650) 3292413. Those who wish to remain anonymous may send an email to paloalto@tipnow.org or send a text message or voice
mail to (650) 383-8984.

Suspect arrested in connection with


assault, possession of a firearm
Police in Pacifica on Thursday arrested a
San Francisco man in connection with sev-

Gino Villeggiante was recently awarded a black


belt in karate.
But only two days after his seizure during
training, Villeggiante was back in the dojo,
said Johnson, who cited the immediate
return as a testament to his students hard
work and dedication to excellence.
I derive a lot of motivation from him,
said Johnson.
He said the symbiotic relationship formed
over the guidance he offers Villeggiante in
return for an opportunity to witness the
power of his students commitment is fulfilling.
That is what martial arts is about, said
Johnson. Its about fellowship that builds.
Its not one-sided. Its a win-win or no deal.
And learning to apply yourself like that
eral crimes including assault and possession
of a firearm.
Eddie Hegwood, 21, of San Francisco, was
arrested on suspicion of possession of a
loaded firearm in a public place, possession
of a concealed weapon, assault with a
firearm on a person, inflicting corporal
injury on a spouse/cohabitant, making
criminal threats, exhibiting a firearm and
possession of stolen property.
On Thursday around 2:40 p.m., officers
with the Pacifica Police Department
responded to 200 Rockaway Beach Avenue
on a report of a domestic violence incident.
The officers were notified the victim was
assaulted, and the man responsible was at a
bus stop along state Highway 1 at Fassler
Avenue.
The victim told police the suspect, later
identified as Hegwood, had a loaded firearm
in his waistband.
Officers were able to detain Hegwood
without incident and located a loaded semiautomatic handgun in his waistband, police
said. The victim was treated by paramedics
at the scene and did not request further medical attention.

Small plane crashes on train tracks


HAYWARD A small plane crashed on
commuter train tracks in the San Francisco
Bay Area, killing the pilot and interrupting
train service.
Bay Area Rapid Transit spokeswoman
Denise Gonzalez said the Cessna aircraft
crashed Sunday afternoon near the transit
systems transfer tracks in Hayward, east of
San Francisco. That ignited a fire and interrupted service hours before Game 7 of the
NBA Finals in nearby Oakland.
Gonzalez said no other injuries were
reported. Service was stopped at three stations along a nearly 9-mile section of the
Fremont line. She said the agency made
buses available to transport passengers.

makes the greatness come out of everybody


involved.
Villeggiante agreed his relationship with
Johnson has been beneficial as well.
He has helped me through a lot of hard
times. He was there when I had a seizure and
helped me relax and stay calm and be in the
moment, said Villeggiante. Hes a really
good person. And I feel like out of the dojo
we can be best friends, but inside the dojo,
hes the teacher and Im the student.
The partnership infused through karate
follows Villeggiante home too, as his older
brother also holds a black belt.
The lessons learned through his pursuit of
his black belt should continue to pay off,
said Villeggiante, as he plans to get certification to work as an electrician once he
graduates from Mills High School in
Millbrae.
Centering his attention for a sustained
period of time, a skill developed through
karate, will ultimately serve him well in his
preferred career, said Villeggiante.
You have to be very focused on what you
are doing and how you are going to do it and
how you are going to perform it, if you want
to do the job right, he said. Because you
do not want to shock yourself.
Looking forward, with plans to continue
practicing karate, Villeggiante said he
believes his goals are achievable through
the lessons hes learned while training.
If you are feeling like you cant do something, or you are unable to do it, you have to
keep pushing through and you will eventually reach your goal, he said.

Monday June 20, 2016

Police reports
When thirst kicks in
A man stole a bottle of alcohol and then
began drinking it in the parking lot at
the 500 block of El Camino Real in
Millbrae before 8:10 a.m. Wednesday,
June 15.

MILLBRAE
Mi s demeano r warrant. A man was found
to have three misdemeanor warrants at the
300 block of Beverly Avenue before 8:57
p.m. Wednesday, June 15.
As s aul t. A man their a chair at someone at
the 200 block of El Camino Real before
7:30 p.m. Tuesday, June 14.
Vandal i s m. A building was spray painted,
resulting in approximately $500 worth of
damage on the 800 block of Taylor
Boulevard before 8 a.m. Thursday, June 9.
Attempted ro bbery. An unknown person
grabbed a womans arm and tried to take her
wallet on the 500 block of Broadway before
7:24 a.m. Thursday, June 9.

BURLINGAME
Di s t urb an c e . Someone approached a
woman and yelled at her near Broadway and
El Camino Real before 7:44 p. m.
Wednesday, June 15.
Reckl es s dri v er. A driver was seen running stoplights near Mahler Road and Old
Bayshore Boulevard before 4:51 a. m.
Wednesday, June 15.
Dumpi ng . Someone was illegally dumping
computers in a parking lot on Rhinette
Avenue before 8:32 a.m. Wednesday, June 15.
Reckl es s dri v er. Two cars were seen drag
racing on Burlingame Avenue before 7:09
p.m. Tuesday, June 14.

STATE

Monday June 20, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Crews make progress against Western fires


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES Firefighters


battling home-threatening wildfires in the West are bracing for
gusty winds and scorching heat on
Sunday.
They made progress by containing 45 percent of a four-day-old
fire in California coastal canyons
after 40-mph sundowner winds
failed to materialize.
Those evening and night gusts
had driven the flames through
steep, brushy canyons west of
Santa Barbara on previous nights
and forced closure of a major high-

way. However, forecasters warned


of extreme fire danger Sunday
evening due to hot, dry weather
and winds that could gust up to 50
mph.
No homes have burned, but
about 270 homes and ranches are
at risk and campgrounds are evacuated with flames only 2 miles from
more densely populated coastal
communities.
In New Mexico, Gov. Susana
Martinez directed the New Mexico
National Guard to assist in securing communities affected by a
massive wildfire in the central part
of the state. Guardsmen will be

patrolling and protecting evacuated homes from possible looting.


They also will be called on to help
with potential flooding.
The fire, which erupted in the
Manzano Mountains south of
Albuquerque, has burned more than
27 square miles about 6 miles
northwest of Tajique since Tuesday
and spread a pall of smoke as far as
Denver. The damage includes 24
homes and nearly as many structures near the small community of
Chilili.
The blaze is 9 percent contained.
In Arizona, a fire southwest of

Show Low was 30 percent contained. Firefighters beefed up containment areas on the northern and
western sides of the blaze.
Evacuation orders remain in
effect for the community of
Forestdale.
The fire has burned nearly 19
square miles since Wednesday.
Crews in Utah also made gains
against three wildfires in the
southern part of the state.
A 350-acre wildfire near Cedar
City was 30 percent contained, but
the blaze still threatened 20 structures including homes and outbuildings.

More than 1, 200 firefighters


attacked the California fire, which
has engulfed more than 12 square
miles of mountain and agricultural
lands. Overnight, crews nailed
down lines on the fires west side,
which hadnt moved for days,
Santa Barbara County fire Capt.
Dave Zaniboni said.
However, the eastern side of the
blaze was uncontrolled and virtually inaccessible.
Crews were relying on aircraft
water drops and on cutting firebreaks ahead of the flames. They
hoped to set backfires to stop the
spread, Zaniboni said.

STATE/NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday June 20, 2016

State to fire up burners to battle dead tree epidemic


By Scott Smith
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CRESSMAN Californias
drought and a bark beetle epidemic
have caused the largest die-off of
Sierra Nevada forests in modern
history, raising fears that trees
could come crashing down on people or fuel deadly wildfires that
could wipe out mountain communities.
Aerial images show vast forests
that have turned a rust-color. The
epidemic has killed an estimated
40 million trees since 2010 in the
central and southern Sierra, and
its spreading north.
Officials who are cutting down
and stacking the most dangerous
trees in piles across six counties,
however, say they are stumped by
how to get rid of them all.
One solution is to fire up a fleet
of 10 large, mechanized incinerators the state recently purchased.
Promoters say they burn so hot
that they spew little if any smoke,
making them environmentally
friendly.
Environmentalists contend the
burners undercut an emergency
order by Gov. Jerry Brown considered a global leader in the fight
against climate change who
called for sending the trees to biomass plants and converting them
into energy.
Chief Ken Pimlott, who man-

The epidemic has killed an estimated 40 million trees since 2010 in the
central and southern Sierra, and its spreading north.
ages the states response to the
die-off as director of the California
Department of Forestry and Fire
Protection, defended the air burners as one of many tools.
He acknowledged the burners
will contribute to air pollution, as
with any work in the forest, but
much less than a large wildfire,
which the air burners may prevent
by removing dead trees.
We could have a catastrophic
wildfire in any of these communities, he said, adding that sending

trees to electricity-generating
plants remains a priority. We
have to be aggressive in terms of
protecting life and property.
Called air-curtain burners, the
20-foot long, steel containers
blast a sheet of air over the open
top, disposing of up to eight trees
an hour. The state bought them for
roughly $1 million, part of a $5
million investment in equipment
to meet the epidemic.
A lack of visible smoke, however, doesnt mean the air burners are

clean, said Chad Hanson, a forest


ecologist
at
Earth
Island
Institutes John Muir Project. He
called them a waste of taxpayer
money and a misguided approach
to managing Californias forests.
Youre still pumping a lot of
greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, Hanson said.
Living trees absorb and store
carbon dioxide, a major source of
greenhouse gases, which is
released again when the wood is
burned. Hanson said he favors
leaving the trees that need to be
cut down on the forest floor to naturally decompose as wildlife habitat.
He urged Brown to withdraw the
emergency declaration, fearing
that it would increase logging of
dead trees that forests need to
replenish. Hanson added that dead
trees dont fuel more fierce wildfires as commonly believed.
Last year alone 29 million trees
died at the height of Californias
drought now in its fifth year, the
U. S. Forest Service reports.
Officials say theyll soon release
an updated count.
Drought makes trees vulnerable
to the insects attack, officials
say.
A beetle epidemic in forests of
the Rocky Mountain states was
blamed in 2013 for contributing
to Colorados second largest wildfire, forcing entire communities

to be evacuated, said Jeff Mai, aerial survey manager for the U.S.
Forest Service based in Colorado.
Officials removed some trees
throughout the region that threatened people, selling them as lumber products like fence posts.
Most were left to decompose naturally. Mai said that in California,
bark beetles have killed five times
more area of forests than in
Colorado.
Its unclear how many trees in
the Sierra will be cut down.
Officials say the first job is
removing those that threaten
motorists and mountain communities.
Declaring the emergency on
Oct. 30, Brown formed a task
force, including representatives
of the energy industry and environmentalists, that is charged
with carrying out the order,
which emphasizes sending the
trees to biomass plants that turn
agriculture and tree waste into
electricity.
That has moved slowly because
Californias few remaining biomass plants are closing as utility
companies turn to cheaper sources
of solar and wind.
Another solution to turn the
dead trees to lumber has hit obstacles because they quickly deteriorate, and beetles carry a fungus
that stains the wood blue, diminishing its value.

Obama says climate change already damaging national parks


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK


President Barack Obama said Saturday that
climate change is already damaging
Americas national parks, with rising temperatures causing Yosemites meadows to
dry out and raising the prospect of a glacier
preserve without its glaciers someday.
Make no mistake. Climate change is no
longer just a threat. Its already a reality,
Obama said from a podium, with Yosemite

Falls, one of the worlds tallest at 2,425


feet, as a backdrop.
At the California park, where Obama was
spending the weekend with his wife,
Michelle, and daughters Malia and Sasha,
the president also talked about how a rabbitlike animal known as a pika is being forced
further upslope at Yosemite to escape the
heat.
Rising temperatures could mean no more
glaciers at Glacier National Park. No more
Joshua trees at Joshua Tree National Park,

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he said, adding that a


changing climate could
destroy vital ecosystems
in the Everglades and
threaten such landmarks
as Ellis Island and the
Statue of Liberty.
Obama spoke near
Sentinel
Yosemites
of
views
where
Bridge,
Barack Obama
Half Dome, a wellknown rock formation in the park, and

Yosemite Falls created a picturesque background behind him under a sunny, blue sky.
After a night with his family in a rented
cabin in the popular park, Obama stuck to
his usual routine by rising early Saturday
and heading to a recreation center on the
grounds for his daily gym workout.Obamas
weekend in the great outdoors was planned
to encourage more people to appreciate and
visit many of the nations parks.
The National Park Services manages more
than 400 sites around the country.

STATE/NATION

Monday June 20, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Road to 270: Trump stuck on California dream


By Michael R. Blood
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WESTMINSTER, Calif. Bob


Dole thought he could win
California with a fishhook
strategy. George W. Bush came
armed with $15 million. John
McCain was bullish, too. They all
lost.
Donald Trumps prediction that
he can capture the biggest prize in
the November presidential election, the states 55 electoral
votes, rubs up against a dismal
history for Republicans over a
generation. The names on the ballot have changed, but the outcome
has been the same double-digit
wins for Democrats since 1992.
Heres Trumps challenge: unite
Republicans while finding millions of new supporters in a state
where Democrats hold every
statewide office and both chambers of the Legislature. They also
have a 3.1 million edge in voters,
a number equal to the population
of Iowa.
In 1996, Dole was brimming
with confidence about his chances
against
then-President
Bill
Clinton. Doles campaign aimed
to drive up vote margins in
Republican-friendly communities
down the states interior spine,
then up through coastal counties
in the south, roughly in the shape
of a fishhook. Money and staff
poured in. Doles running mate,

REUTERS

Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally


in Phoenix, Arizona Sunday.
Jack Kemp, had special credentials: He grew up in Los Angeles.
It wasnt even close. Clinton
ran up a 51-to-38 percent win.
Since 1996, the California
electorate has swung even more to
the left, said Ken Khachigian, a
former chief speechwriter in the
Reagan White House who ran
Doles campaign in the state.
Five months out, its political
malpractice to rule out any possibility, Khachigian added. But a
Republican win in California
comes as close as anything to an
exception.
The home turf of Richard Nixon

and Ronald Reagan, California


was once Republican in presidential elections. But pronounced
demographic shifts, particularly a
boom in the Hispanic population,
have transformed the state.
The number of Hispanics,
blacks and Asian-Americans combined has outnumbered whites in
California since 1998, and
Latinos alone now outnumber the
white population. Most of the new
voters are Democrats or independents who tend to vote like them.
Trump is looking to expand his
support at a time when he already
faces challenges with Hispanics

and women. That stems in part


from his promise to build a wall
along the border with Mexico and
his verbal attacks on U.S. District
Judge Gonzalo Curiel, who is hearing a lawsuit against Trump
University. Trump also has criticized New Mexico Gov. Susana
Martinez,
who
heads
the
Republican
Governors
Association.
Richard Hoyt, a registered independent from Westminster, in
Orange County, is the kind of
voter Trump needs to pull his way.
But the 64-year-old retired engineer says hes leaning toward
Clinton, in part because of
Trumps statements about Curiel
and the judges familys Mexican
roots.
Hoyt said he would give Trump a
zero for his mannerisms and
added: I cant imagine how all of
the sudden hes going to change.
Part of Trumps challenge is
simple arithmetic.
In Californias June 7 primary,
the billionaire businessman ran
essentially unopposed, pulling in
about 1.5 million votes, or about
75 percent of the total. Ted Cruz
and John Kasich were still on the
ballot, though they earlier
dropped out of the race.
Analysists predict 14 million
people are likely to vote in
November.
To win, Trump would need a
heroic turnout from the states 4.9

million Republicans, while finding 2 million or more swing voters to get near a majority. Indeed,
some of those swing voters could
be lurking in counties where
Republican candidates have outperformed the partys registration
numbers.
But there are more than 8 million Democrats, and the states
4.2 million independents about
1 in 4 voters tilt Democratic.
Trumps state director, Tim
Clark, emphasized that Trumps
supporters are strongly motivated
in a year when many voters are
looking for candidates from
beyond Washington. As an outsider, Trump could appeal to a vast
pool of dormant voters soured on
status quo politics, Clark said.
Elections are won by those
who show up, and those who show
up are those motivated by their
candidate, Clark added.
The last significant push by a
Republican to win California was
in 2000, when Bush was backed
by $15 million, then lost to
Democrat Al Gore by 12 points. In
2004, Bushs campaign vowed to
compete in California, but the
campaign effectively shut down in
early autumn.
McCain, the 2008 GOP nominee
against Barack Obama, boasted
about competing in California,
but he lost by 24 points. Mitt
Romney suffered a 23-point loss
to Obama in 2012.

Rape case echoes sex assault by Stanford swimmer


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NASHVILLE, Tenn. The cases


are tragically similar: Student-athletes at two elite universities
accused of sex crimes against
unconscious women. Yet one is
given six months in a county jail,
while the other is facing at least
15 years in prison.
Some have questioned why 20-

year-old former Stanford swimmer


Brock Turner, who is white,
received a far less severe sentence
for a January 2015 assault than the
one faced by former Vanderbilt
football player Cory Batey, 22,
who is black. The differences took
on added significance this week as
a white former teammate of
Bateys, Brandon Vandenburg,
stood trial again in Nashville for

his role in the dorm room assault,


which took place in June 2013.
Vandenburg was convicted of multiple counts of aggravated rape and
aggravated sexual battery late
Saturday.
But the comparison was never
so simple.
The difference in punishment
reflects the number of alleged perpetrators in one case, the acts

committed, overwhelming evidence documenting one of the


crimes, and variations in how rape
is defined in Tennessee and
California.
It does seem like an extreme
disparity, but I would say this:
With these sex crimes, the facts
are very important, the details are
very important, and the law punishes the conduct differently

depending on what conduct can be


proven, said Dmitry Gorin, a Los
Angeles criminal defense lawyer
and former prosecutor specializing in sex crimes. In the Stanford
case, they did not prove rape.
The two cases have moved to the
forefront of a national debate
about sexual assaults on the
nations college campuses and the
conduct of student athletes.

Mateen investigation moving forward


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ORLANDO, Fla. Although the


killer is known, the investigation
continues into what motivated and
enabled Omar Mateen to carry out the
worst mass shooting in modern U.S.
history.
Attorney General Loretta Lynch said
in interviews Sunday on several news
shows that the FBI would release a partial printed transcript of the conversations between gunman Mateen from
within the Pulse nightclub and Orlando
police negotiators. Armed with a
semi-automatic weapon, Mateen went
on a bloody rampage at the club June

12 that left 49 people dead and 53 others seriously hurt.


Mateen died in a
hail of police gunfire after police
stormed the venue.
Lynch told ABCs
This Week that
Omar Mateen the top goal while
intensifying pressure on IS the extremist group
thought to have inspired Mateen is
to build a complete profile of him in
order to help prevent another massacre
like Orlando.
As you can see from this investiga-

tion, we are going back and learning


everything we can about this killer,
about his contacts, people who may
have known him or seen him. And
were trying to build that profile so
that we can move forward, Lynch said.
Lynch said she would be traveling to
Orlando on Tuesday to meet with
investigators.
Speaking to CBS Face The
Nation, Lynch said that a key goal of
the investigation was to determine
why Mateen targeted the gay community. Investigators are still interviewing witnesses, and looking to learn
more about Mateen and others who
knew him well.

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NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday June 20, 2016

Pride events attract weekend revelers


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DENVER People in wheelchairs, walking on stilts and riding rainbow-decorated motorcycles turned out for gay pride events
over the weekend, including participants in a Denver parade who
carried posters of the names or
faces of the victims who died in
last weekends attack on a nightclub in Florida.
About 2,000 people took part in
Denvers PrideFest parade through
town to Civic Center Park on
Sunday as hundreds lined sidewalks. Crowds estimated at several hundred thousand attended a
two-day festival in front of
Denvers city hall.
Security was tight at events over
the weekend. In Denver, authorities set up security fences, bag
checks, and police rode Segway
scooters and walked with bombsniffing dogs.
Organizer Debra Pollock said in
past years, the festival area was

fenced in overnight, and when


parade-goers arrived, they threw
open the fences and people
swarmed in for dancing and other
performances.
This year, they have to go
through security, Pollock said.
Christi Layne, who helped
organize Denvers gay pride festival 40 years ago, said only seven
people showed up for the original
meeting, and only 2,000 people
showed up for a parade that year.
This year was different.
We insulated ourselves 40
years ago. We had only like-minded people. Now this is open to the
world and understanding is spreading, Layne said.
No serious problems were
reported at gay pride events across
the country, but the mood for
many people was somber. A small
number of anti-gay protesters also
showed up.
Forty-nine people were killed
and more than 50 wounded when
Omar Mateen opened fire inside

REUTERS

Participants march in a gay pride parade in Lisbon, Portugal Saturday.


the Pulse nightclub in Orlando last
weekend.
The motive for his attack is still
unclear. He pledged allegiance to
the Islamic State in a 911 call, his

ex-wife said he was mentally ill


and his father has suggested he
was angry with gays.
Other festivals and parades went
ahead Saturday under increased

Scientists in a battle to
save worlds coral reefs
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

HONOLULU After the most powerful El


Nino on record heated the worlds oceans to
never-before-seen levels, huge swaths of
once vibrant coral reefs that were teeming
with life are now stark white ghost towns
disintegrating into the sea.
And the worlds top marine scientists are
still struggling in the face of global warming and decades of devastating reef destruction to find the political and financial
wherewithal to tackle the loss of these
globally important ecosystems.
What we have to do is to really translate
the urgency, said Ruth Gates, president of
the International Society for Reef Studies
and director of the Hawaii Institute of
Marine Biology.
Gates, who helped organize a conference
this week for more than 2,000 international

reef scientists, policymakers and others,


said the scientific community needs to make
it clear how intimately reef health is intertwined with human health.
The International Coral Reef Symposium
convenes Monday to try to create a more
unified conservation plan for coral reefs.
She said researchers have to find a way to
implement large scale solutions with the
help of governments.
Consecutive years of coral bleaching
have led to some of the most widespread
mortality of reefs on record, leaving scientists in a race to save them. While bleached
coral often recovers, multiple years weakens the organisms and increases the risk of
death.
Researchers have achieved some success
with projects such as creating coral nurseries and growing forms of super coral
that can withstand harsher conditions.

Expires 6/30/16

security in cities such as Chicago,


Columbus, Ohio, and Providence,
Rhode Island.
Parades were also held in New
Orleans and Syracuse, New York,
and a beach party was planned in
California.
Ron Freeny, a Vietnam veteran,
said he drove to Denver from
Albuquerque, New Mexico, for
Sundays parade.
Freeny said he was forced to
resign as a Navy lieutenant commander in 1978 after someone told
military officials that he was gay.
He said he told that he could resign
or be court-martialed.
The country has made a lot of
strides since then, but there are
still some people in the military
that have a dislike for our kind,
Freeny said.
In Rhode Island, extra police
and fire personnel patrolled on
foot. Several people donned capes
made from rainbow flags. Others
carried signs that read: We stand
with Orlando.

WORLD

Monday June 20, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Protest on Okinawa against US military after killing


By Yuri Kageyama
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TOKYO Tens of thousands of


people on the Japanese island of
Okinawa protested Sunday against
the presence of U. S. military
bases there, many wearing black
to mourn the rape and killing of a
local woman in which an
American contractor is a suspect.
The rally called for a review of
the U.S.-Japanese security agreement, which burdens Okinawa
with hosting the bulk of American
troops in Japan. Also contentious
is a plan to relocate a Marine
Corps air station to a less-populated part of the southwestern
island. The relocation plan developed after public anger erupted in
1995 over the rape of a girl by
three American servicemen.
The killing of the local woman,
who had been missing for several
weeks when her body was found
last month, set off outrage on
Okinawa, where tensions periodically run high over crime linked to

REUTERS

Protesters raise placards reading Anger was over the limit during a rally
against the U.S. military presence on the island and a series of crimes and
other incidents involving U.S. soldiers and base workers, at a park in the prefectural capital Naha on Japans southern island of Okinawa, Japan, Sunday.
American troops. The U.S. contractor, a former Marine, was
arrested on May 19 on suspicion
of abandoning the womans body,
but has not yet been charged with

killing her.
Okinawa Gov. Takeshi Onaga
told the crowd at the rally in
Okinawas capital, Naha, that he
wanted to apologize to the woman

for failing to protect her, even


after what happened in 1995.
We had pledged never to repeat
such an incident, he said. I
couldnt change the political system to prevent that. That is my
utmost regret as a politician and as
governor of Okinawa.
About 65,000 people attended
the rally, according to the Kyodo
News agency. Many people held
signs demanding the Marines
leave and the overall military on
Okinawa be scaled back.
Prime Minister Shinzo Abes
government is behind the security
agreement with the U. S. , and
wants Japan to take on a bigger
military role on the international
stage. But those at the rally said
they wanted a more peace-oriented
Japan.
This is not how we want the
country to be, said university student Jinshiro Motoyama. We
want the bases gone.
A rally was also held in front of
the prime ministers residence in
Tokyo, drawing about 10, 000

people, timed to coincide with and


show support for the Okinawa
rally.
The U.S. military has periodically tried to ease tensions on
Okinawa, and says the crime rate
among its ranks is lower than
among the general public.
Earlier this month, the U. S.
Navy imposed a drinking ban after
an American sailor was arrested on
suspicion of drunken driving on
Okinawa, driving the wrong way
on a freeway and crashing into two
vehicles, injuring two people.
The restriction was recently eased.
Last month, Lt. Gen. Lawrence
Nicholson, the commanding general of Marine Forces Japan,
stressed the importance of the
bilateral alliance. Please do not
allow this terrible act of violence
to drive a wedge between our two
communities, he said on
Okinawa, referring to the womans
death. There may be issues we differ on. But we must continue to
talk. Lets keep those lines of
communication open.

Egyptian court sentences two Landslides, floods kill 35


Al-Jazeera employees to death on Indonesias Java island
By Hamza Hendawi

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CAIRO An Egyptian court on


Saturday sentenced six people,
including two Al-Jazeera employees, to death for allegedly passing
documents related to national security to Qatar and the Doha-based TV
network during the rule of Islamist
President Mohammed Morsi.
Morsi, the top defendant, and two
of his aides were sentenced to 25
years in prison for membership in
the
now-banned
Muslim
Brotherhood group but were acquitted of espionage, a capital offense.
Morsi and his secretary, Amin elSirafy, each received an additional
15-year sentence for leaking official documents. El-Sirafys daughter, Karima, was also sentenced to
15 years on the same charge.
Morsi, Egypts first freely elected
leader, was ousted by the military in
July 2013 and has already been sen-

tenced to death in another case. That


death sentence and another two
life and 20 years in prison are
under appeal. The Brotherhood was
banned and declared a terrorist
organization after his ouster.
Khalid Radwan, a producer at a
Brotherhood-linked TV channel,
received a 15-year prison sentence.
All of Saturdays verdicts can be
appealed. Of the cases 11 defendants, seven, including Morsi, are
in custody.
Amnesty International called for
the death sentences to be immediately thrown out and for the ludicrous charges against the journalists to be dropped.
The two Al-Jazeera employees
identified by the judge as news
producer Alaa Omar Mohammed
and
news
editor
Ibrahim
Mohammed Hilal were sentenced to death in absentia along
with Asmaa al-Khateib, who
worked for Rasd, a media network

widely suspected of links to


Morsis Muslim Brotherhood.
Al-Jazeera condemned the verdicts, saying they were part of a
ruthless campaign against freedom of expression, and called on
the international community to
show solidarity with the journalists.
This sentence is only one of
many politicized sentences that target Al Jazeera and its employees,
the networks acting director
Mostefa Souag said in a statement.
They are illogical convictions and
legally baseless. Al Jazeera strongly denounces targeting its journalists and stands by the other journalists who have also been sentenced.
A news story that appeared earlier
on the Al-Jazeera English website
identified Hilal as a former director
of news at Al-Jazeeras Arabic channel and said Alaa Omar Mohammed
was an Al-Jazeera employee until
last year.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) At


least 35 people have been killed
by landslides and floods on
Indonesias Java island and many
others are missing, an official said
Sunday.
Dozens of houses were buried in
the landslides and thousands of
homes were inundated by floods in
16 districts and towns in Central
Java province over the weekend.
The spokesman for the National
Disaster Management Agency,
Sutopo Purwo Nugroho, said that
25 villagers were still missing in
the worst-hit district of Purworejo,
where 19 people died.
He said seven people were killed
in Kebumen district and six in
Banjarnegara district, and one

each in three other districts.


The dead included two 10-yearolds and a pregnant woman.
A total of 31 people were killed
under landslides, while four were
swept away and killed by flooding, Nugroho said in a statement.
Rescue workers including soldiers, police and volunteers were
still searching for victims.
Most of the flooding has receded, but residents in affected areas
were encouraged to remain vigilant because heavy rains were predicted to continue until Monday.
Seasonal rains often cause
flooding and landslides in
Indonesia, an archipelago of
17,000 islands where millions of
people live in mountainous areas
or flood-prone plains close to
rivers.

OPINION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday June 20, 2016

Guest perspective

A Fathers Day reflection


By Dave Pine

esterday, we celebrated
Fathers Day. As a proud dad
of two boys myself, my priority is to help them become caring,
responsible and productive members
of our community.
But many fathers struggle for a wide
range of reasons. That is why San
Mateo County created the newlyformed Dads Workgroup to help
fathers who love their kids, want to
provide for them and be strong role
models, but face challenges due to
unemployment, health issues, incarceration or custodial/visitation limitations.
The importance of fathers in the life
of their children cannot be overstated.
According to the U.S. Census Bureau,
children from fatherless homes are
four times more likely to be poor and
are more frequently involved in the
criminal justice system. The absence
of an involved father also increases
the odds that a child will experience
drug or alcohol abuse and struggle in
school. In fact, seventy-one percent
of high school dropouts are fatherless.

The Dads
Workgroup brings
together staff from
the Health System,
Probation, Child
Support, the Human
Services Agency,
First 5 and the
countys Library
System to foster
collaboration in meeting the needs of
disadvantaged fathers. To this end, the
Dads Workgroup recently launched
SMC DADs, a mobile app designed to
help fathers in need connect to countywide resources. Features include a
playground locator with navigational
support, an event calendar of free or
low-cost community events and upto-date job postings from the countys Job Information Centers. The
SMC DADs mobile app is available
for iPhones through the Apple App
Store and for Android phones through
the Google Play Store.
In addition to the mobile app, the
county is also releasing an automated
phone directory to help fathers. The
phone line is a toll-free number and
the user will be guided through a
series of options to connect them
directly to program staff and services.

The phone directory number is (844)


650-DADS.
Earlier this month, the Board of
Supervisors honored as the 2016 Dad
of the Year a father who had come
from a fatherless home and who had
run into problems with the law. But
after enrolling in the countys Service
Connect program, he received transitional employment at South Bay
Recycling and got back on his feet.
He is now turning his life around and
devoting himself to the care of his 3year old son. His story is a poignant
reminder of what can happen when
you pair excellent supportive services
with an eager client who deserves a
second chance.
Fathers Day is an opportunity to
celebrate dads. But it is also an opportunity to highlight the importance of
fathers to their children. Fatherhood
is a joy, but also a great responsibility. It is the goal of the Dads
Workgroup to provide opportunities
for all fathers to be the best dads they
can be.
Dav e Pine is a member of the San
Mateo County Board of Superv isors.

Letters to the editor


More distracted than ever
Editor,
Anyone else is noticing that distracted driving is on the upswing? In
commuting to work by bike, I am
increasingly terried of drivers
brazen disregard for the hands-free
cellphone law. When a driver is looking at their phone, the cyclist cant
get that eye contact that tells you,
OK, they see me, I wont get hit. I
stress out over whether texting drivers are going to swerve into the bike
lane and take me out.I am encouraging law enforcement to step up for
everyones sake, not just for the benet of cyclists.

Mike Dennis
Foster City

Science Gap: beyond history


Editor,
Kent Lauder is fresh and new to me
as a writer. He displayed his knowledge of history, religion, and politics
in his recent guest perspective,
Science Gap (June 14 edition of the
Daily Journal). As a history teacher, I
was impressed by his grasp of history
and its effects on current events.

Jerry Lee, Publisher


Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
REPORTERS:
Terry Bernal, Bill Silverfarb, Austin Walsh, Samantha
Weigel
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events

Lauder, as retired plumbing contractor, is a refreshing writer who knows


much more than just plumbing. He is
so much better than those political
hacks who usually give us their
unwanted opinions.

Raymond DeMattei
San Carlos

The benefit of less regulation


Editor,
I am writing to express my support
of Gov. Jerry Browns very modest
proposal to increase the supply of
housing in the Bay Area and hopefully lessen housing shortages and
homelessness in the process
(Legislators wary of by right in
the June 15 edition of the Daily
Journal.
A couple of years ago, Imoved from
San Mateoto Houston, Texas, but I
still maintain family and business
ties to the Bay Area where I was born
and raised.
In Houston, I was shocked to nd
that housing is a fraction of the cost
of San Francisco. There is also no
income tax, no Proposition 13 and
much lower gas prices. Perhapsall
these things are related.

BUSINESS STAFF:
Charlotte Andersen
Paul Moisio
Joel Snyder

Charles Gould
Andrea Sanchez-Lopez

INTERNS, CORRESPONDENTS, CONTRACTORS:


Robert Armstrong
Drew Camard
Jim Clifford
Caroline Denney
William Epstein
Dan Heller
Tom Jung
Jeanita Lyman
Brigitte Parman
Nick Rose
Joe Rudino
Andrew Scheiner
Susan Senning
Emily Shen
Kelly Song
Gary Whitman
Cindy Zhang

Ricci Lam, Production Assistant


Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.
Perspective Columns
Should be no longer than 600 words.
Illegibly handwritten letters and anonymous letters
will not be accepted.
Please include a city of residence and phone
number where we can reach you.

Less regulation in Texas has produced, in short, agreater benet for


all. May I suggest that perhaps the
governor now understands that as
well. Hopefully the state legislators
will follow that lead eventually.

Mark D. Manber
Houston, Texas

Gratitude for the Senior


Showcase events
Editor,
I wanted to thank you and the Daily
Journal staff for all the hard work that
goes on to make the Senior Showcase
events happen. I have met many volunteers through these events. I am
looking forward to the next event in
August in Menlo Park. Thank you for
the difference you make in the community.

Claire Matthews
Burlingame
The letter writer is the outreach
coordinator forRSVPof San Mateo
and Northern Santa Clara counties.

OUR MISSION:
It is the mission of the Daily Journal to be the most
accurate, fair and relevant local news source for
those who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
By combining local news and sports coverage,
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information resource in San Mateo County.
Our pages belong to you, our readers, and we
choose to reflect the diverse character of this
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editorial board and not any one individual.

Becoming a
U.S. citizen
at the library

n unusual naturalization ceremony took place


Friday, June 17. Not the event but the place. The
ceremonies are usually held at Oaklands
Paramount Theatre with hundreds of people taking the
oath to become U.S. citizens. But last Friday, a much
smaller group 20 immigrants from 16 different countries gathered at San Mateos Main Library. And what a
tting place for this to
occur. Here is where new
citizens will nd the help
and resources they need
from job information,
training on new electronics, access to computers,
childrens programs and, of
course, many books on so
many subjects to become
good citizens and members
of the community.
The idea for holding a
naturalization ceremony at
the library came from Liz
De Winter, Library Board
trustee, who had read about
a similar event in Hartford,
Connecticut, and wondered
if we could hold a similar event here. After a call to the
ofce of U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo, and her
ofces coordination with the U.S. Citizenship and
Immigration Services Agency, it all came together.
Congresswoman Speier was the keynote speaker on
Friday. And longtime San Mateo and Foster City resident
T. Jack Foster lead the group in the singing of our national anthem.
***
City Librarian Ben Ocon also announced that the library
will add a new citizenship center where immigrants can
learn how to become a U.S. citizen. Applicants for citizenship must pass a test as part of a required interview.
And answer six out of 10 questions correctly. Heres a
sample of what those questions might be:
1). How many amendments does the Constitution have?
2). Why do some states have more representatives than
other states?
3). Who is the chief justice on the U.S. Supreme Court
now?
4). Under our Constitution, some powers belong to the
states. What is one power of the states?
5). What is the name of the speaker of the House of
Representatives now?
6). When was the Constitution written?
7). The Federalist Papers supported the passage of the
U.S. Constitution. Name one of the writers.
8). What did Susan B. Anthony do?
9). Name one U.S. territory?
10). Who was the president during World War I?
If you dont know the answers you can either Google it
or go to the library and take out a good book on U.S.
History or read the Constitution.
Happily for the people who took the oath at the San
Mateo library, they had already passed the test.
***
Whats up with Foster City? Residents want a new elementary school to accommodate increased enrollment but
for some in the community no site will do. When a park
was rst envisioned as a possible location for a new
school, neighbors of the park rose up in a fury to say no.
When other sites were unobtainable or not feasible, the
school districts Measure X outreach throughout the districts neighborhoods came to a consensus: With the
funds, build a new school at the Charter Square Shopping
Center (negotiations had already started with the owner)
or failing that add classrooms on existing school sites.
That last option would only create more trafc at existing
school sites. So it was a shock to read in the June 10
Daily Journal that Foster City Mayor Herb Perez, who is
supposed to speak for the city as a whole (isnt that the
job of a mayor?) says the Charter Square Shopping Center
is not the right location.
Meanwhile, he is adding a negative tone in the midst of
negotiations for the site. A neighbor of the shopping center is also quoted as saying we dont want a school here.
Too noisy, too much trafc.
Come on Foster City and the mayor. You cant have it
both ways. If you want a new school come up with an
appropriate and feasible site and be supportive of the children in your city. Dont be a hindrance, be a help. Isnt
that the job of the mayor?
Sue Lempert is the former may or of San Mateo. She can be
reached at sue@smdaily journal.com. She can be reached at
sue@smdaily journal.com.

10

BUSINESS

Monday June 20, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Could British EU exit be watershed for global economy?


By David McHugh
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

FRANKFURT, Germany A
British exit from the European
Union could cause global market
swings for a while. But that would
soon pass.
If were lucky, that is.
Much darker scenarios for the
global economy are also being
discussed by economists as they
try to gauge the risks of
Thursdays referendum for the
wider world.
While economists say a British
exit from the EU or Brexit, as it
is known would be painful
mainly for the country itself and
to a lesser extent for rest of the
Europe, the consequences for the
global economy are harder to estimate.
In the gloomier narratives, a
Brexit becomes a turning point,
an event that snowballs and leads
to much larger and nastier problems. It could deal a setback to free
trade and globalization, which
many disgruntled voters around
the world are already cool on. And
it could trigger more defections
from the EU, destabilizing the
region and unsettling companies
and consumers.
So forecasts are ranging from
the benign to the apocalyptic.
Some, like outgoing Finnish
Finance Minister Alexander
Stubb, compare Brexit to the 2008
collapse of U.S. investment bank
Lehman Brothers, which spread

financial ruin across the globe.


Or, it could be more like Y2K, in
which computers worldwide were
supposed to fail on Jan. 1, 2000,
because software was written for
years beginning with 19-. In the
event, not much happened.
Heres a quick run-through of the
global risks from a Brexit.

FLIGHT TO SAFETY
Its reasonable to assume that a
vote to leave would cause global
financial market swings in the
short term, with investors selling
riskier assets such as stocks and
seeking safety in government
bonds, analysts say. The pound
has already fallen in value against
other currencies and would likely
fall more. Gold, seen by some as a
refuge in troubled times, might
rise.
Markets seem to be betting that
remain will win, so if theyre
wrong, there could be some scrambling to adjust.

LOWER FOR LONGER


Faced with churning markets,
central banks could try to steady
things with extra loans for banks
or other ways of making credit
more readily available. Market
swings could help persuade the
U.S. Federal Reserve to postpone
interest rate increases once
thought likely this year and now
in doubt. That could be good news
for mortgage holders but could
prolong savers agony over low
rates and non-existent returns on

deposits.

MANAGEABLE?
The direct impact of a Brexit
would likely not be too bad on
growth if youre not British. A
year after a vote to leave, Britains
economy would be one percent
smaller than it would have been
otherwise, while the 28-country
EU would lose 0.25 percent and
the world 0.1 percent, according
to Moodys Analytics chief economist Mark Zandi.
I think the immediate effect is
modest, he said. Its not cataclysmic in any way. Its corrosive,
certainly. It diminishes the U.K.
economy going forward.
Taking 0.1 percentage point off
global growth might not seem
like much, but the world economy,
though not in crisis, is not in
great shape right now. The
International Monetary Fund predicts 3.2 percent growth this year
and 3.5 percent next year. IMF
head Christine Lagarde says thats
not enough to lift living standards
and get the globes 200 million
unemployed back to work. There
is a risk that middle class families
and the poor actually remain
behind, which would embolden
the voices of protectionism and
fragmentation, she said in April.
The World Trade Organization
says international trade will
remain sluggish this year, growing 2.8 percent, well below the
average of 5 percent since 1990.
And the effects of a Brexit could

be long-lasting: permanently
lower growth in Britain and
Europe. After five years, Britains
economy would be 4 percent
smaller than otherwise; the EU 1
percent and the global economy
0.25 percent, according to Zandi.
So it could add up.

UNCERTAINTY
The U-word is prominent in
most assessments of Brexit.
Thats because it would take years
for Britain to sort out new trade
relationships if it leaves the EU,
whose members trade freely with
each other without charging tariffs. Businesses wouldnt know
where to locate production or how
much it would cost to trade.
The EU and Canada, for
instance, started negotiating a
trade agreement seven years ago,
but it still hasnt been ratified.
And uncertainty can be very hard
on growth. It makes executives
hold off on building new plants or
hiring permanent employees,
while consumers might wait on
buying a new car or kitchen.
Uncertainty is one reason
investment is relatively weak in
the developed world. A Brexit
would only add another reason to
wait.

THE BUTTERFLY EFFECT


Although the direct impact
seems manageable outside Europe
and the U.K., economists cant
help painting darker scenarios.
If other countries decide to leave

Iran aviation official says Boeing sale involves 100 planes


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TEHRAN, Iran Boeing Co. is


negotiating a deal to sell 100 airplanes to Iran, state-run media
reported Sunday, a sale potentially
worth billions that would mark the
first major entry of an American
company into the Islamic
Republic after last years nuclear
deal.
Chicago-based Boeing declined
to discuss details of the talks or
the figure of 100 planes, attributed
to Ali Abedzadeh, the head of
Irans
Civil
Aviation
Organization.

Regulatory hurdles and U. S.


sanctions that remain in place
after the nuclear agreement could
complicate the deal. Despite
efforts by the U. S. State
Department to encourage trade to
Iran, many American firms remain
worried about the legal and political ramifications of any agreements with the country.
The state-run IRAN newspaper
quoted Abedzadeh as saying negotiations took several stages and
final figures and terms had yet to
be reached.
Both sides Iran and Boeing
have reached a written agree-

ment for buying Boeing airplanes, Abedzadeh was quoted as


saying.
Fakher Daghestani, a Boeing
spokesman based in Dubai, United
Arab Emirates, declined to answer
any questions about Abedzadehs
comments.
Any agreements reached will be
contingent on U.S. government
approval, Daghestani said in a
statement.
Iranian airlines have some 60
Boeing airplanes in service, but
most were purchased before the
1979 Islamic Revolution that
ousted Shah Mohammad Reza

Pahlavi and brought Islamists to


power.
Out of Irans 250 commercial
planes, about 150 are flying while
the rest are grounded due to lack of
spare parts. Parts and servicing
remained nearly impossible to get
while the world sanctioned Iran
over its contested nuclear program.
Included in last years nuclear
deal is approval for airline manufacturers to enter the Iranian market. Already, Iran Air has signed
agreements to buy 118 planes
from the European consortium
Airbus.

the EU or if a leave vote energizes populist political forces and


leads to a broader retrenchment in
trade and globalization, a Brexit
would be seen as a turning point
with outsized influence on the
globe.
Polls in France, for instance,
show anti-EU candidate Marine Le
Pen of the National Front will
almost surely make the final round
of next years presidential election.
In the United States, presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has criticized
the North American Free Trade
Agreement, or NAFTA, and talked
about imposing new tariffs.
Economist Zandi invoked the
metaphor of the butterfly that
flaps its wings and triggers a
chain of events that builds into a
hurricane.
Nothing good comes out of
Brexit, he said. Its just different
shades of grey. It has global
implications under the greyest
scenarios, where Brexit sets off,
is a catalyst for, another existential event for the eurozone and the
European Union more broadly,
that it empowers all the political
centrifugal forces that are at work
in Europe and Europe starts to fracture.
That would have serious implications for Europe, and also for
the global economy, he said.
Its quite easy to construct scenarios where this plays out very
badly over time.

On the move
U n i o n
B a n k
announced a
new role for
Assistant Vice
Pres i den t
S i m o n
B o n i l l a.
Bonilla, assistant vice president and branch manager of the
San Carlos banking ofce located
at 799 Laurel St., joined Union
Bank in 2008 as a teller at the La
Jolla Branch. He most recently
served as branch manager of the
Santa Monica ofce.

WELCOME BACK, TIMMY: OAKLAND APPLAUDS FORMER GIANTS GREAT TIM LINCECUM IN HIS RETURN TO THE BIG LEAGUES >> PAGE 13

<<< Page 12, Dragons shut out by BYU


in football clubs first ever home loss
Monday June 20, 2016

A terribly sobering finale


Warriors suffer
historic defeat
in Finals finale
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND Stephen Curry tried to


shake Kevin Love with a dribble and let
loose with one of those long 3-pointers he
seemed to make at every big moment this
season.
Instead of a game-tying splash in the final
minute, the ball rimmed out and so did the
Golden State Warriors chances of adding a
second straight championship to a recordsetting season.
It will haunt me for a while because it
means a lot to me to try to lead my team and
do what I need to do on the court and big
stages, Curry said. Done it before. Didnt
do it tonight.
With Curry and fellow Splash Brother
Klay Thompson off all night, the Warriors
capped the greatest collapse ever in the NBA
Finals instead of the most successful season
in league history with a 93-89 loss to the
Cleveland Cavaliers in Game 7 on Sunday
night.
The record-setting 73 wins in the regular
season, Currys unanimous MVP and the
memorable comeback in the conference
finals will all be a footnote now after the
Warriors became the first team ever to lose
the NBA Finals after taking a 3-1 series lead.
It wasnt easy what we accomplished, and
its not an easy pill to swallow what we didnt accomplish, Curry said.
After blowing two earlier chances to
clinch the title, the Warriors were in position for the win in the closing minutes of a
tense Game 7 that had the boisterous crowd
at Oracle Arena alternating between delirious cheers and nervous energy.

See GAME 7, Page 14

Cavaliers 93, Warriors 89

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND LeBron James is a champion


again, and the NBA Finals MVP again.
By unanimous vote, James was selected as
MVP of the title series, accepting his trophy
from NBA Commissioner Adam Silver after
Cleveland beat Golden State 93-89 in Game 7
on Sunday night.
This is what I came back for, James said.
James was overcome by emotion after the
final horn. Hes the finals MVP for the third
time, also winning in 2012 and 2013 when
he was a member of the Miami Heat.
Best player on the planet, Cavs teammate Kyrie Irving said.
James became the third player to have a
triple-double in Game 7 of the NBA Finals,
joining Jerry West in 1969 and James Worthy
in 1988. He had 27 points, 11 rebounds and
11 assists in the clincher, capping a series
where the Cavaliers became the first team to
successfully overcome a 3-1 deficit in the
finals.
You see his basketball talent, the way he
can control a game, Cavaliers coach Tyronn
Lue said. But the reason why he deserves
this is because he has a great heart ... and
great things happen to great people.
James is now 4-2 all-time in Game 7s,
including 2-0 when those ultimate games
come in the NBA Finals. And the kid from
Akron raised by a single mother, brought
the title home on Fathers Day.
As the final seconds ticked off on the giant
scoreboard inside Quicken Loans Arena,
18,000 fans, some of them strangers when
Sunday night began, cried, hugged, screamed
and shared a moment many of them have
spent a lifetime dreaming of.
At 10:37 p.m., Cleveland became a title
town for the first time since Dec. 27, 1964,
when the Browns won the NFL champiKELLEY L COX/USA TODAY SPORTS onship. There had been so many close calls
Cavaliers guard Kyrie Irving shoots the the game-winning 3-pointer late in the fourth quarter in between, so much heartache.
I cant wait to get back home, James said.
in Game 7 of the NBA Finals at Oracle Arena.

Oklahoma State opens CWS with gem


By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The many baseball locals who


believe in former Serra catcher
Collin Theroux often rave about his
outstanding defense behind the dish.
Saturday, in the opening game
of the College World Series,
Theroux demonstrated what his
believers are talking about.
Now the starting backstop for
Oklahoma State University,
Theroux corralled a gem as sopho-

more right-hander
Thomas
Hatch fired a
five-hit shutout
to lead the
Cowboys to a
1-0 win over
UC
Santa
Barbara. With
win,
Collin Theroux the
Ok l ah o ma
State advances through the winners bracket to face University of
Arizona Monday night at 4 p.m.

The Cowboys have yet to lose


through three rounds of NCAA
postseason
play,
sweeping
through regional and super regional play. In neither bracket did they
hold the top seed, after a disappointing regular season finishing
in second place in the Big 12
Conference, three games behind
conference champion Texas Tech.
We just kept fighting, Theroux
said. And really we didnt play our

See OSU, Page 12

D.J. wins U.S. Open


By Doug Ferguson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKMONT, Pa. Dustin


Johnson had everything going his
way Sunday in the U.S. Open.
He was playing the best golf on
the toughest course. He had a twoshot lead on the back nine at
Oakmont. He even got a huge break
on a ruling allowing him to escape
deep rough, the kind of break that
usually goes to major champions.

LeBron wins Finals


MVP for third time

Thats when he saw two USGA


officials approach him on the 12th
tee. They told him he might get a
one-shot penalty for his ball moving on the fifth green. They wouldnt know until after his round.
Its nothing new at this point,
said Johnson, who has had major
mishaps for the last six years. Its
happened so many times I kind of
expect it now.

See GOLF, Page 16

MICHAEL MADRID/USA TODAY SPORTS

Dustin Johnson is awarded the


championship trophy after winning
the U.S. Open at Oakmont.

Giants 5, Rays 1

Red-hot Giants
win 8th straight
By Fred Goodall
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. The


way the Giants are playing lately,
even a sloppy defensive performance couldnt cool off the NL West
leaders.
Brandon Belt homered and Joe
Panik snapped an eighth-inning
tie with an RBI single, helping
the Giants extend their winning
streak to a season-best eight
games with Sundays 5-1 victory
over the Tampa Bay Rays.
Were just playing the way we
play, pitcher Jake Peavy said.
We just come out and play the
best team game and have the best
team approach. ... Dont get too
high, dont get too low, Peavy
added. Weve found a nice little run
of consistency to be able to pull off
some really tight ballgames.

Peavy pitched
six
solid
innings
and
Derek Law (2-1)
worked a scoreless seventh in
completing a
three-game
sweep
at
Tr o p i c a n a
Jake Peavy
Field. Belt hit
his team-leading 10th homer off
Rays starter Jake Odorizzi, while
Panik delivered in a key situation
for the second straight day with his
run-scoring single against Xavier
Cedeno (3-2) during a four-run
eighth.
Panik is just 2 for 14 through
three games of a week-long road
trip, but both have broken lateinning ties. His three-run, ninthinning homer was the big blow in

See GIANTS, Page 13

12

SPORTS

Monday June 20, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Dragons denied by BYUs defense


By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

For the onslaught of offensive opportunities featured by the Burlingame Dragons


Saturday, they should have won by a landslide.
While the Dragons outshot the visiting
BYU Cougars 8 shots-on-goal to 1, however,
it was the one early attempt by BYU that
proved the difference as the Cougars held on
for a 1-0 victory.
The loss marks the first the Dragons (4-41) have ever suffered at their Burlingame High
School home in the franchises two years of
existence. It also marks the second time in
two meetings this season BYU (4-4-3) has
prevailed. The Cougars previously won May
29 by a score of 2-1 in Provo, Utah.
It was kind of the same game, BYU goalkeeper Brenden Ottman said. We got up early
and just bunkered down on defense when we
played in Provo. Credit to them for always
giving us a good game. They really tested our
defense today.
After Burlingame set an early offensive
tempo, BYU wrestled its first possession in
the back ranks and advanced the ball quickly
with two long passes, out to the right sideline
for midfielder Pedro Vasconcelos, who looked
towards a striker surging into the box.
Vasconcelos sent a long pass towards the
far post, but instead of finding the left-side
striker, the kick sailed towards corner goal.
And with Burlingame goalkeeper Nico Corti
reacting to the ball as it began its downward
decent, the arcing trajectory found its way
just over his outstretched leap and into the
back top corner of the net to give BYU a 1-0
lead in the fourth minute.
It was a lucky cross shot that got caught in
the wind, Dragons head coach Eric Bucchere
said.
Corti wasnt nearly as cavalier regarding
BYUs only shot-on-goal of the match.
Stanfords backup keeper during the colle-

College World Series


Coastal Carolina 2, Florida 1
OMAHA, Neb. Andrew Beckwith
matched his career high with seven strikeouts,
Zach Remillard doubled and tripled in runs, and
Coastal Carolina upset No. 1 national seed
Florida 2-1 on Sunday night in the programs
first College World Series game.
The Chanticleers of the Big South
Conference pulled the stunner against the
vaunted Florida pitching staff that sent to
the mound two first-round picks, a secondrounder, third-rounder and 10th-rounder.
Beckwith (13-1), never drafted, put on a dazzling and efficient performance mixing
sidearm and overhand deliveries. The Gators
only run came on Jeremy Vasquezs pinch single in the fifth. Beckwith allowed two singles
the rest of the way and retired the last 10 batters in the first complete game of his career.

TCU 5, Texas Tech 3

TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL

BYU goalkeeper Brenden Ottman deflects an attempt by Burlingames Josh Smith late in
the second half Saturday at Burlingame High School.
giate season, he has started three games for
the Dragons, including a shutout June 10 in a
4-0 win over San Francisco City FC.
It doesnt really matter, Corti said of the
lucky shot. I just have to do my job and
keep it out. Regardless of what it looked like,
wind or no wind, you just have to do better
with it.
At the other side of the field, Ottman put on
a show with eight saves in the contest, many
of which came on close-proximity attempts
by the Dragons.
After the Dragons totaled five shots-ongoal in the first half, they again came out the
aggressors in the second half. In the 51st
minute, they got their best chance of the
game when defender Brock Messenger sent a
deep pass for a pair of well-placed headers.
Midfielder Parker Holland took the ball just
inside the penalty box with a perfect header to

LARGEST SELECTION
Every day discount prices
Outstanding quality

forward Khalid Arramdani, who in turn placed


a header on goal that was denied only by the
good anticipation of Ottman.
Once that ball goes in the box, you never
know where its going to go, Ottman said.
You just have to stay focused and be ready for
any deflection you might get.
Burlingames two outside defenders,
Messenger and Nile Walwyn, consistently
forced the action, using their big frames to
wall out the BYU attack and use the turnovers
to push the offense from the back row.
I think our back four did really well to
defend hard and together and tight the whole
game long, Bucchere said. And were a bit
unlucky to give up a silly goal like that. And
they were pretty tidy for the rest of the game."
In the 60th minute, Ottman had another

See DRAGONS, Page 14

OSU
Continued from page 11
best ball until the regional. ... Then we started clicking on all cylinders and started playing to our potential.
Oklahoma State has now outscored opponents 36-6 through six postseason games.
And as it turns out, taking second place in
the Big 12 Conference was no easy feat.
Three teams from the conference along
with Texas Tech and Texas Christian
University qualified for the eight-team
College of World Series field.
The collegiate odyssey of Theroux has
seen the San Mateo native play at three
schools in the past four years. He started his
career as a redshirt at the University of
Nevada in 2013, but a turnover in the
Wolfpacks coaching staff saw him seek a
transfer to the community college ranks at
San Joaquin Delta College.
So, as Theroux made his way from the
bullpen to the dugout just before the start of
Saturdays opening game looking up at
the 20,956 fans in attendance at Omaha,
Nebraskas TD Ameritrade Park he couldnt help but be overcome by emotion.
When we were walking out of the bullpen
as the game was about to start ... I looked up
at the crowd and I was getting emotional,
Theroux said. I was getting teary eyed
about my personal road to get here and the
teams battle to get here.
Once Theroux got into the squad though,
the 32nd round draft pick of the Oakland As
was all business, handling Oklahoma States
second shutout of the postseason. Both have
come in Hatch starts. But the sophomore
right-hander who improved his record to
9-2 had to overcome some early jitters
before settling in with excellent command
of his sinker in the middle innings.
Through the first three, almost four
innings, he was not himself, Theroux said.
I think his adrenaline was getting to him a
little bit. He's a sinkerballer ... and he was

Luken Baker hit a go-ahead three-run


homer in the top of the ninth and TCU beat
No. 5 national seed Texas Tech 5-3 on
Sunday in a College World Series meeting of
Big 12 rivals.
The Horned Frogs (48-16) trailed by a run
after Hunter Hargroves tiebreaking double in
the bottom of the eighth. But after reliever
Robert Dugger issued a walk to start the ninth
and gave up a single to Evan Skoug, Baker
sent a towering shot just inside the left-field
foul pole into the seats above the bullpen.

Arizona 5, Miami 1
Nathan Bannister matched his career high
with 11 strikeouts in seven innings and
Arizona capitalized on Miami starter Michael
Mediavillas rocky first inning a 5-1 victory
Saturday night in the College World Series.
The Wildcats (45-21), in the CWS for the
first time since winning the 2012 national
title, will play Oklahoma State on Monday
night in a Bracket 1 winners game. The No.
3 national seed Hurricanes (50-13) will face
UC Santa Barbara in an elimination game
that afternoon.
fighting that adrenaline a little bit.
UCSB saw runners reach in each of the
first four frames. But Theroux wiped out a
first-inning walk to Clay Fisher by gunning
down the sophomores steal attempt. In the
second inning, Hatch escaped a jam with
runners at first and third, and one out.
Then after yielding a one-out single in the
fourth, Hatch set down the next 12 batters
he faced, cranking up the tempo as Theroux
and pitching coach Rob Walton locked into
a rhythm of calling pitches. And Hatch executed all 112 of them with sterling results.
We like to set a tempo and not let them
feel comfortable, Theroux said. When
you're attacking the strike zone and not letting hitters get comfortable, it's usually a
good recipe.
UCSB didnt go quietly in the ninth
though. With two outs, Devin Gradford singled to set the table for cleanup hitter Austin
Bush, who led the Big West Conference with
11 home runs this season. Hatch attacked
the power-wielding left-handed hitter with
turbo sliders in the dirt, including the decisive swing and miss for the strikeout, which
Theroux gloved seamlessly to tag out Bush
for the final out of the game.
I like to think they trust me to bury those
pitches and be able to block them, Theroux
said. I know what their ball is going to do.
So its just a combination of confidence and
repetition of us knowing each other really
well.
Mondays matchup with Arizona will
present Theroux with another range of emotions altogether. Wildcats manager Jay
Johnson and pitching coach Dave Lawn are
in their first year on staff at Arizona, after
previously coaching at Nevada for two seasons.
It was the duos hiring at Nevada after
Therouxs redshirt freshman season there
that caused to usher Theroux into community college baseball, as the then incoming
staff of the Wolfpack didnt see a fit for the
former Serra catcher, Theroux said.
A lot of people thought I'd have hard feeling against them but I dont, Theroux said.
The road I took being able to go to Delta
and play was the best thing for me.

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Lincecum gets warm welcome in return


By Michael Wagaman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND The uniform is different.


The flowing locks of shaggy brown hair
that once protruded from his cap are gone.
Hes lost a little zip off his fastball, too.
Even so, The Freak came back as a
force.
Tim Lincecum made a winning return to
the majors, restarting his career after nearly
a year away with six sharp innings and several ovations to lead the Angels over the
Oakland Athletics 7-1 Saturday.
It just kind of felt like riding a bike
again, Lincecum said. After that first
inning, everything kind of went away and I
could just get back to work and making my
pitches.
Sporting a bright red hat and Angels jersey that was in stark contrast to the black
and orange he wore across the Bay Bridge
for nine seasons with the San Francisco
Giants, Lincecum gave up one run and four
hits.
The four-time All-Star struck out two and
walked two before leaving to a raucous ovation from the crowd of 25,078.
The 32-year-old righty hadnt pitched in
the majors since last June 27. He had hip
surgery in September, signed with the
Angels in May and made three starts in the
minors.

GIANTS
Continued from page 11
Saturdays 6-4 win over Tampa Bay, which
has lost four straight.
The Giants matched their longest winning streak of the season. The NL West leaders are a major league-leading 27-8 since
May 11, the day they began their other
eight-game run.
But Sunday wasnt all pretty.
The Giants looked like a team playing a
game that started a little after 10 a.m. San
Francisco time committing three errors
in the first two innings, with one of the
miscues Peavys errant pickoff throw
allowing Tampa Bays only run to score.
The Rays werent able to fully take advantage of the sloppy play, however, going 0
for 8 with runners in scoring position
through three innings. Belts second homer
in three days wiped out a 1-0 deficit in the
fourth, and Peavy kept the game close by
retiring 12 of the last 13 batters he faced
after giving up a leadoff single to Evan
Longoria in the third.

USA TODAY SPORTS

Angels right-hander Tim Lincecum worked


six innings Saturday in Oakland to earn the
win in his first big league outing since 2015.
Lincecum didnt quite have the blazing
fastball that he used to win back-to-back NL
Cy Young Awards, but he was still strong in
his debut with the Angels.
It felt like my mechanics were a little
erratic, Lincecum said. Got into some
deep counts but I made pitches when I needed to and my defense made plays when we
needed them to. Definitely an area when I
can improve on, but happy with it.
Lincecum retired seven straight during
one stretch and got As slugger Khris Davis
to ground into a double play after walking
the leadoff batter in the fifth.
He pitched backwards, Oakland manager
Bob Melvin said. He threw fastballs in
We made Jake work pretty hard the first
three innings, Giants manager Bruce
Bochy said. For him the one run was really
impressive considering all that happened
behind him.
A nine-game homestand that saw the Rays
go 4-5 couldnt end quick enough for them.
Its good to be getting out of here,
Tampa Bay manager Kevin Cash said. That
was kind of a series of us just not getting it
done. The big hit eluded us. We had baserunners all over the place the first two innings.
To come out of that with one run, especially
in the first, weve got to be able to capitalize on that.

Trainers room
RHP Sergio Romo (right flexor strain),
whos on a rehab assignment with Class A
San Jose, could return during a five-game
homestand that begins next Friday. . C
Buster Posey was given a break from defensive play for the second consecutive game
and was the designated hitter.

New ironman
With Baltimores Manny Machado beginning a four-game suspension Sunday, Giants
3B Matt Duffy now has baseballs longest

breaking ball counts and breaking balls in


fastball counts. We couldnt solve him.
Lincecum was followed by television
cameras and received a standing ovation
from fans of both teams and a few wearing Giants No. 55 jerseys as he walked to
the bullpen for his pregame warmups.
A second, louder ovation greeted
Lincecum when he took the mound.
It was pretty incredible, I wasnt expecting that, Lincecum said. Its nice being
here close to where I started and having my
Bay Area fans here. Definitely made it feel
like a home game to me.
Lincecum breezed through the first two
innings, then struggled with his command
in the third when Danny Valencias two-out,
broken-bat single on a 3-0 pitch drove in
Billy Burns.
That was about the only blemish on
Lincecums day.
After getting Davis to hit into the double
play in the sixth, Lincecum retired Jed
Lowrie on a fly ball to end his afternoon.
Angels manager Mike Scioscia stood on
the top steps of the dugout and greeted
Lincecum with a handshake as he came off
the field to another big cheer.
His command got a little fuzzy in the
sixth ... but after the first couple of pitches
you could see his stuff was there, Scioscia
said. When he needed to get into the zone,
he did.
active streak for consecutive games played. Duffy
appeared in his 188th
straight game, which is
about 15 years short of
the record of 2,632 set by
Cal Ripken Jr. That
blows my mind. Thats a
long time, Duffy said of
streaks compiled by
Matt Duffy
Ripken and Lou Gehrig
(2,130). For me, it kind of drives home how
good those two guys were for so long.

Up next
Madison Bumgarner (8-2, 1.91 ERA) faces
Jeff Locke (5-5, 5.92) in the opener of a fourgame series at Pittsburgh. San Francisco
hasnt lost a game Bumgarner started since
April 20, a string of 10 appearances. The
left-hander is 7-0 with a 1.27 ERA, 78
strikeouts and 18 walks during that span.

Monday June 20, 2016

13

Angels 2, As 0

Weaver outduels
As duo as Angels
win series finale
By Rick Eymer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND Eric Surkamp and Liam


Hendriks gave the Athletics bullpen a welldeserved day off. On a day the Oakland
offense was virtually non-existent, a couple
of pitchers with ballooned-sized
ERAs
pitched like aces.
Jered Weaver bounced
back from two rough
starts to pitch a three-hitter, and the Angels held on
to beat the As 2-0 Sunday.
Weaver (6-6) had given
Eric Surkamp up 11 earned runs over his
last 11 1/3 innings before
helping the Angels to their fifth win in six
games against the As this season. The righthander had only one strikeout but faced just
two over the minimum on the way to his first
shutout since May 8, 2015.
Surkamp (0-5) pitched a season-high six
innings, giving up a pair of runs on six hits
in his best effort of the year. He had allowed
20 runs in his previous 15 innings.
I feel a lot better after this one, Surkamp
said. I just tried to go out, not think about
anything and throw with conviction. I had to
get out of my own way.
Weaver was stellar all afternoon and got
plenty of help from his defense. The Angels
turned a double play in the second after
Yonder Alonsos one-out single, and center
fielder Mike Trout threw out Billy Butler at
second base in the fifth when the slugger
tried to extend a single into a double.
He throws a three-hit shutout, give him
some credit, As manager Bob Melvin said.
But I thought we had pretty poor at-bats. Our
at-bats were consistently disappointing.
Henriks came off the disabled list and
gave the As two perfect innings, striking
out a pair.
The As lost for the fifth time in six
games and dropped to 2-5 on this ninegame homestand.

14

SPORTS

Monday June 20, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

But the Warriors did not score after


Thompson tied the game with a driving layup
with 4:39 to play. Golden State missed its
final nine shots with LeBron James coming
out of nowhere to block what seemed like an
uncontested go-ahead layup by Andre
Iguodala with less than two minutes left and
Curry missing his final four 3-point attempts
as part of a 4-for-14 night from long range.
We really just kind of settled too much,
Curry said. Thats something that is tough
to kind of swallow with the opportunity we
had in front of us.
Kyrie Irving gave Cleveland the lead for
good with his 3-pointer over Curry with 53

seconds left before Curry missed at the other


end. After a free throw by James made it a twopossession game, Curry missed again and
trudged back toward the Warriors bench as the
Cavaliers celebrated the title on Golden
States home floor.
Curry sat on the bench for a few minutes as
the stage was assembled for Clevelands trophy celebration before he congratulated the
victorious Cavs. He then returned to the locker room where he was still sitting in full uniform with his head in his hands nearly 30
minutes later after a disappointing ending to
a season that featured a record 402 3-pointers
and the first unanimous NBA MVP for Curry.
By falling short of the title, the Warriors
will now be part of a debate they hoped to
avoid: the best teams that failed to win a
championship.
Golden State joins the 18-0 New England
Patriots that lost the Super Bowl in 2008, the
116-win Seattle Mariners that fell in the

2001 AL championship series and the 68-win


Boston Celtics that lost in the Eastern
Conference finals in 1973 as great regular
season teams that couldnt get it done in the
postseason.
We had a goal at the beginning of the year
to repeat, and that goal we failed, forward
Draymond Green said. But I dont look at
this entire season as a failure because theres
been too many great things that happened.
After winning a record 24 straight games to
start the season and pushing hard to break
Chicagos record of 72 wins set in 1995-96
on the final day of the regular season, few
things came easy for the Warriors in the playoffs when their nine losses matched their
entire total from the regular season.
Curry missed six games in the first two
rounds with injuries to his ankle and knee.
Golden State then rallied from 3-1 down to
beat Oklahoma City in the Western
Conference finals before blowing the same
lead to Cleveland a round later.
The collapse started when Green was suspended for hitting James in the groin late in
Game 4. James and Irving each scored 41
points in the Game 5 win and Cleveland followed it with two more, handing the Warriors
their first three-game losing streak in two
seasons under coach Steve Kerr.
This is why you cant mess around, Kerr
said. Not that we messed around, but this is
why every game counts. Game 5 was really
the key. That was the turning point of the
whole series.
Green tried to redeem himself with 32
points, 15 rebounds and nine assists in Game
7. But with Curry and Thompson shooting 6
for 24 from 3-point range, the Warriors fell
short.
Its going to be a long three months over
the summer thinking about it, Curry said.
But that doesnt mean we cant put this as
another little unfortunate notch in the belt
and move forward and come back stronger
next year.

enth save.
Musovski who hadnt yet joined the
team for the first matchup with BYU has
been a big reason the Dragons had not been
shut out through eight games previous to
Saturday. He had been unstoppable in previous weeks, scoring five goals over
Burlingames two previous wins.
I had my chances, I just didn't put them
away, Musovski said. I hit top post ... off
my head. Then I had a shot up top of the box
that I hit right to the goalkeeper. I don't think

it was anything that they did. Just a little off


by me.
In the first matchup between the two teams
this season, BYU also jumped out to an early
lead. The consensus among the Dragons was
the second matchup played out much the same
way.
I think after they got their first goal they
just sat back the entire game, Musovski
said. I think that was their game plan was to
get a goal and then sit back and defend. It was
frustrating. We had good chances; they just

didn't go in.
The outcome had big implications on the
standings in the Central Pacific Division
standings. Having played two more games
than the Dragons, the Cougars move into second place with 15 points, bumping the
Dragons with 13 points into third place
with five games to go.
BYU returns to Burlingame July 2 for the
third of three matchups between the two
clubs. Next up for the Dragons, they host SF
City FC Friday at 7 p.m.

Appeals dismissed,
Jones and Wood to
miss Copasemifinal
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

HOUSTON The U. S. Soccer


Federations appeals of a red card given to
midfielder Jermaine Jones and a yellow card
assessed to forward
Bobby Wood have been
dismissed.
The decision Sunday
will leave the U.S. without both players Tuesday
night for the Copa
America
semifinal
against Argentina in
Houston.
Jermaine Jones Jones was given the red
card Thursday night in
the quarterfinals by
Colombian
referee
Wilmar Roldan during a
52nd-minute confrontation that also saw
Ecuador winger Antonio
Valencia sent off after a
second yellow card for a
tackle
on
Bobby Wood harsh
Alejandro Bedoya. U.S.
players immediately rushed to the scrum
after Valencias tackle, and Jones raised an
arm at Michael Arroyo.
U. S.
team
spokesman
Michael
Kammarman said the Jones appeal was
based on Law 12 of the revised Laws of the
Game, which states a player who deliberately strikes an opponent or any other person on the head or face with the hand or arm
is guilty of violent conduct unless the force
used was negligible.

DRAGONS
Continued from page 12
clutch save. Dragons midfielder Jamael Cox
sent a long pass into the box for Danny
Musovski, who redirected it with a header
right on goal. But Ottman produced another
good first step to get to the spot for his sev-

KELLEY L COX/USA TODAY SPORTS

Draymond Green reacts while speaking to media following the 93-89 loss against the
Cleveland Cavaliers in Game 7 of the NBA Finals at Oracle Arena.

GAME 7
Continued from page 11

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Monday June 20, 2016

15

Cleveland rocks as title drought ends in NBA Finals


By Tom Withers
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

STEPHEN LAM/REUTERS

Fans celebrate after the Cleveland Cavaliers beat the Golden State Warriors in Game 7 of the
NBA Finals to win the championship in Oakland.
Ive seen The Drive and Ive seen The
Fumble and Ive seen Michael Jordan kill
us with The Shot.
As Lovell spoke, his 18-year-old daughter, Marisa, wiped tears from her eyes.
This is history, she said. I cried real
tears. It was overwhelming and breathtaking to be here.
Following the game, fans poured out of
The Q onto Huron Road for a party that
could last for days. A few climbed aboard a
fire truck and a bus and up trees and light
poles. Police reported a few arrests and a car
with its windshield smashed, but there were
no major problems just unbridled happiness 52 years of frustration released in
one cathartic crescendo.
And on Wednesday, Cleveland will host a
parade, one thats been planned for a life-

time.
Our fans, they ride or die, no matter
whats been going on, no matter the
Browns, the Indians, the Cavs, and all
other sports teams, James said. They
continue to support us. And for us to be able
to end this, end this drought, our fans
deserve it. They deserve it. And it was for
them.
Its going to be the biggest party
Cleveland has ever seen.
True to the teams postseason motto,
Cleveland was All In for Game 7. Fans
packed the bars, restaurants and even parking garages around the Q. It got so congested that Ohio Highway Patrol blocked
several on ramps into downtown hoping to
keep the crowd contained.
There was no holding Cleveland back

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CLEVELAND More tears. Only this


time, tears of joy.
Clevelands championship drought,
crossing 52 years, generations and noted
by a long list of near misses, is over at last.
On Fathers Day, LeBron James, the kid
from nearby Akron raised by a single mother, brought the title home.
As the final seconds of Clevelands 93-89
victory at Golden State in Game 7 ticked off
on the giant scoreboard inside Quicken
Loans Arena, 18,000 fans, some of them
strangers when Sunday night began, cried,
hugged, screamed and shared a moment
many of them have spent a lifetime dreaming of.
They then linked arms and shouted the
words to Queens We Are The Champions,
a song that only seemed reserved for others.
For the first time since 1964, when the
Browns ruled the NFL, Cleveland is a title
town again.
With James leading the way and winning
MVP honors, the Cavs became the first
team in NBA Finals history to overcome a
3-1 deficit.
Call it The Comeback.
At 10:37 p.m., Cleveland finally exorcised decades of sports demons the
painful losses given nicknames like The
Drive and The Fumble and The Shot
and became a title town for the first time
since Dec. 27, 1964, when the Browns won
the NFL championship. There had been so
many close calls in between, so much
heartache, so much torture.
Like the Warriors, those days are history.
I never ever thought I would see this
would happen, said Tim Lovell from
Canfield, Ohio, who sat on the 50-yard line
when Denver quarterback John Elway broke
Clevelands heart with The Drive in the
1986 AFC Championship game. I tell you
what with about two minutes to go I
thought I was going to have a heart attack.

though, and at the watch party fans roared


with every converted pass, every made
shot. They groaned when Kevin Love
missed an easy layup and agonized when
Draymond Green, who has become Public
Enemy No. 1, was left unguarded for wideopen 3-pointers throughout the first half.
And during the final nerve-wracking minutes as the Cavaliers and Warriors traded
baskets in an epic struggle, some fans
couldnt bear to watch. They buried their
heads in their hands or paced. There were
even a few huddled in prayer, looking for
some divine help to bring a Cleveland team
to the finish line.
Charlie Wilson and his 18-year-old son,
Alec, spent the last moments in each
others arms.
Transplanted Texans, they understand
what this means to Cleveland.
More than basketball, the younger
Wilson said as tears rolled down his cheeks.
This is the most unbelievable night of my
life.
In the hours leading up to tip-off, fans
braced themselves for a night to remember.
This was as close as any Cleveland had
been to a title since the Indians lost Game 7
of the 1997 World Series and there was a
strange boldness sweeping through the
streets of a city that has endured economic
and social ills for decades. Nothing unifies
like sports, and decked out in wine-andgold, Northeast Ohioans came to witness
history.
As his wife, Jennelle, kept an eye on
their 4-year-old daughter, Lyla, Ed
Twardziak of Broadview Heights expressed
confidence the drought would end.
We had that attitude for a long time,
Woe is me. Only in Cleveland kind of
deal, he said. I think a lot of that has
been put behind us and everyone is more
optimistic. Its going to happen, right? Its
bound to happen. Why not now?
In Cleveland, theres no more waiting til
next year.
Next year arrived.

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16

SPORTS

Monday June 20, 2016

AMERICAN LEAGUE
EAST DIVISION

NATIONAL LEAGUE
EAST DIVISION

W
40
39
39
34
31

L
28
29
33
35
36

Pct
.588
.574
.542
.493
.463

GB

1
3
6 1/2
8 1/2

Washington
Miami
New York
Philadelphia
Atlanta

W
43
37
36
30
23

L
27
32
32
40
46

Pct
.614
.536
.529
.429
.333

GB

5 1/2
6
13
19 1/2

CENTRAL DIVISION
Cleveland
38
Kansas City
38
Detroit
34
Chicago
33
Minnesota
21

30
31
35
36
48

.559
.551
.493
.478
.304

1/2
4 1/2
5 1/2
17 1/2

CENTRAL DIVISION
Chicago
47
St. Louis
35
Pittsburgh
33
Milwaukee
31
Cincinnati
27

20
33
36
39
43

.701
.515
.478
.443
.386

12 1/2
15
17 1/2
21 1/2

WEST DIVISION
Texas
Seattle
Houston
Angels
As

25
33
36
38
41

.643
.522
.486
.449
.406

8 1/2
11
13 1/2
16 1/2

WEST DIVISION
Giants
Los Angeles
Colorado
Arizona
San Diego

26
33
36
39
42

.629
.535
.471
.451
.408

6 1/2
11
12 1/2
15 1/2

Baltimore
Boston
Toronto
New York
Tampa Bay

45
36
34
31
28

Saturdays Games
N.Y. Yankees 7, Minnesota 6
Baltimore 4, Toronto 2
Boston 6, Seattle 2
Angels 7, Oakland 1
Houston 5, Cincinnati 4, 11 innings
San Francisco 6, Tampa Bay 4
Texas 4, St. Louis 3
Cleveland 13, Chicago White Sox 2
Kansas City 16, Detroit 5
Sundays Games
Cleveland 3, Chicago White Sox 2, 10 innings
San Francisco 5, Tampa Bay 1
Boston 2, Seattle 1
Baltimore 11, Toronto 6
Houston 6, Cincinnati 0
Minnesota 7, N.Y. Yankees 4
Kansas City 2, Detroit 1, 13 innings
Texas 5, St. Louis 4
Angels 2, Oakland 0
Mondays Games
ChiSox (Gonzalez 1-2) at Boston (Wright 8-4),4:10 p.m.
Seattle (Karns 5-2) at Detroit (Pelfrey 1-7), 4:10 p.m.
Rays (Smyly 2-7) at Cleveland (Tomlin 8-1), 4:10 p.m.
Os (Gausman 0-4) at Texas (Holland 5-5), 5:05 p.m.
Angels (Chacin 3-4) at Houston (Fister 7-3), 5:10 p.m.

44
38
32
32
29

Saturdays Games
Arizona 4, Philadelphia 1
Houston 5, Cincinnati 4, 11 innings
Miami 9, Colorado 6
San Francisco 6,Tampa Bay 4
Texas 4, St. Louis 3
Atlanta 4, N.Y. Mets 3
Chicago Cubs 4, Pittsburgh 3
L.A. Dodgers 10, Milwaukee 6
San Diego 7,Washington 3
Sundays Games
Atlanta 6, N.Y. Mets 0
Miami 3, Colorado 0
San Francisco 5, Tampa Bay 1
Arizona 5, Philadelphia 1
Houston 6, Cincinnati 0
Texas 5, St. Louis 4
L.A. Dodgers 2, Milwaukee 1
San Diego 6, Washington 3
Chicago Cubs 10, Pittsburgh 5
Mondays Games
DBacks (Miller 1-6) at Phils (Hellickson 4-5), 10:05 a.m.
SF (Bumgarner 8-2) at Bucs (Locke 5-5), 4:05 p.m.
Colorado (Bettis 5-5) at Miami, 4:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Garcia 4-6) at Cubs (Lackey 7-2), 5:05 p.m.
Nats (Strasburg 10-0) at L.A.(Kershaw 10-1), 7:10 p.m.

GOLF
Continued from page 11
The difference was the outcome.
Johnson showed the mettle
and yes, the wits to finally win a
major championship.
For it to not affect the outcome
is fantastic, he said. It just shows
how well I played.
No one knew if he was leading,
tied or one shot behind, and neither
did Johnson. He didnt look at a
board the rest of the day, taking on
each shot regardless of the score
and coming up with all the right
shots the 10-foot par save on
the 16th, a cautious bunker shot on
the 17th, and a 6-iron that settled
the score. It dropped down 5 feet
from the hole for a birdie that
wrapped up a U.S. Open that was
overdue.
The USGA wound up giving him
the penalty shot after it was over,
so Johnson closed with a 1-under
69 for a three-shot victory over
Shane Lowry, Scott Piercy and Jim
Furyk, a runner-up at Oakmont for
the second straight U.S. Open.
I still didnt want the penalty. I
didnt think that I did anything to
cause the ball to move, Johnson
said. But at the end of the day, it
didnt affect what happened. So it
doesnt bother me at all.
Finally, hes a major champion.
Johnson scooped up 18-month

THE DAILY JOURNAL


son Tatum into his arms on
Fathers Day and raised the silver
trophy for all to see.
He saluted a Pittsburgh crowd that
was on his side even amid all the
uncertainty. The grandstands were
raucous, with one fan shouting,
Whats the call, USGA? At the trophy presentation, when Fox Sports
announcer Joe Buck brought up the
penalty situation, the crowd booed.
Johnson finished at 4-under 276,
the lowest winning score in nine
U.S. Opens at Oakmont.
The lingering question was
whether the toughest test in golf
was tougher than it needed to be.
Johnson had a short par putt on
the fifth hole, took a few practice
strokes and as he placed the putter
behind the ball, it moved slightly
backward. Johnson stepped
back and called over the rules official, told him he didnt cause it to
move. He tapped in for par.
Jeff Hall, senior director of rules
and open championships for the
USGA, said a staff member said on
the radio that it might be worth
another look. The USGA thought
Johnson should know that his
score might be one shot worse than
it was, so it told him on the 12th
tee.
After looking at video, the
actions he took could have caused
the ball to move, Hall said. We
asked if there was some other reason the ball could have moved. He
didnt state a reason.
But it led to confusion over the

entire back nine for Johnson


and for the guys trying to catch
him.
Lowry, who began the final
round with a four-shot lead that he
lost on the front nine, tied him
when Johnson made bogey on the
14th.
Were they tied? Was Johnson
trailing by one?
Jack Nicklaus, who won the first
of his 18 majors at Oakmont in
1962, said if the USGA thought it
might be a one-shot penalty, it
should have done it right there and
let him get on with the job.
Thats what he did, scrambling
for pars, keeping his cool, thinking only the major that kept eluding him.
Lowry became the first player
since Payne Stewart at Olympic
Club in 1998 to lose a four-shot
lead in the final round of the U.S.
Open. He made birdie after being
told of the potential Johnson
penalty, but the Irishman lost his
putting touch with three-putt
bogeys on three straight holes. He
closed with a 76.
Lowry and all the other players
on the course were informed that
Johnson might get penalized after
his round.
It didnt affect the way I played,
Lowry said. If anything, I credit
Dustin for playing the way he
played on the way in, having that
hanging over him, because I probably would have wanted to know
straightaway if it was me.

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday June 20, 2016

17

Finding Dory blows animation record out of the water


By Lindsey Bahr
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES The forgetful


blue fish of Finding Dory is box
office gold.
The Pixar sequel far surpassed its
already ocean-sized expectations
to take in $136.2 million in North
American theaters, making it the
highest-grossing animated debut
of all time, not adjusting for inflation, according to comScore estimates Sunday.
The 2007 film Shrek the Third
was the previous record-holder,
with a $121.6 million debut.
Finding Dory, which comes
13 years after Finding Nemo, is
also the second-largest June opening of all time, with Jurassic
World at No. 1. The wellreviewed film features the voices

of Ellen DeGeneres and Albert


Brooks.
Going into the weekend, analysts expected Finding Dory to
draw big, $100 million-plus numbers, but never this big.
The thought was: Could this
be the movie to eclipse Toy Story
3s opening? not, Could it
become the biggest animated
opening of all time? said Paul
Dergarabedian, comScores senior
media analyst. Thats the power
of the Pixar brand.
Until now, Toy Story 3 was
Pixars biggest opening ever,
with $110.3 million.
Disney Executive Vice President
of Distribution Dave Hollis was
particularly heartened that the
film did such robust late-night
business on Friday and Saturday.
Thats really a testament to

Ken WHITE

ince this is the first of my


weekly Living With
Animals columns (with
thanks to Jon Mays here at the San
Mateo Daily Journal), lets start
with an introduction. As some may
already know, Ive served as
Peninsula Humane Society &
SPCAs president since 2002, but
thats only the current chapter of a
long and wonderful career working
with animals.
My first job in animal welfare
career was as a humane educator,
teaching school children about animals, way back in 1978 with San

this being a picture for everyone


not just for families, Hollis
said.
Finding Dory has the animated seas to itself until The Secret
Life of Pets opens July 8.
The Kevin Hart and Dwayne
Johnson buddy comedy Central
Intelligence also had a relatively
muscular weekend, with a betterthan-expected $34.5 million, putting it in second place.
Its a real home run, said Jeff
Goldstein, Warner Bros. executive vice president of domestic
distribution. These two comedians are just stars. They connect
with their audience and each other
in such a strong way. You just
laugh when you watch them.
Central Intelligence cost a
reported $50 million to make and
scored especially well with

Francisco SPCA. I left that position to head up day-to-day operations at San Francisco Department
of Animal Care and Control, left
there in the early 90s to become
vice president of Humane Society
of the United States, and moved on
again in 1995 to lead Arizona
Humane Society.
On the personal front, my wife
and I met when we were both working at that shelter in the 1980s
which means neither of us knows
how to say no to animals in
need. Weve shared our home with
many dogs, cats, guinea pigs,

younger audiences, who the studio


hopes will propel word-of-mouth
business in weeks to come. The
next major comedy releases dont
come until mid-July, with Mike
and Dave Need Wedding Dates and
Ghostbusters.
In third place, the James Wan
horror pic The Conjuring 2 fell
62 percent in its second weekend
in theaters, earning $15.6 million
and bringing its domestic total to
$71.7 million.
Rounding out the top five were
Now You See Me 2, with $9.7
million, and Warcraft, with $6.5
million.
Overall, the weekend is down
nearly 5 percent from last year,
when Inside Out launched with
$90. 4 million and Jurassic
World earned $106.6 million in
its second weekend in theaters.

cockatiels, leopard geckos, box


turtles, one ornery potbellied pig
named Hamlet, and others. With
the loss of two much loved animals
last year, a dog and a cat, todays
home census is kind of low: Frida
(a beagle-collie mix, or a bialy)
and three cats (Isabelle, Puccini and
Stinky Louise). I share my office at
PHS/SPCA with Clovis the
Hermanns tortoise and Didgeridoo
the bearded dragon.
My mom often said she regretted
not allowing me pets as a kid, suggesting that if she had she too
could have claimed my son the

COYOTE POINT
A

R Y

Monday - Friday: 9:30 am to 6:30 pm


Saturday & Sunday: 9:30 am to 4 pm
Specializing in
new rearms
ammo
scopes
accessories
hunting accessories, knives.
We also buy and consign rearms.
341 Beach Road, burlingame

650-315-2210

Top 10 movies
1.Finding Dory, $136.2 million
($50 million international).
2.Central Intelligence, $34.5
million
3.The Conjuring 2, $15.6 million ($41.9 million international).
4.Now You See Me 2, $9.7 million ($15.8 million international).
5.Warcraft, $6.5 million
6.X-Men: Apocalypse,$5.2 million ($12.8 million international).
7.Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles:
Out of Shadows, $5.2 million.
8.Me Before You, $4.2 million
($13.5 million international).
9.Alice Through the Looking
Glass, $3.6 million
10.Captain America: Civil War,
$2.3 million.

doctor like the other ladies. I


think its fair to say Ive more than
made up for that animal-less childhood.
Together, with the help of many
of the wonderful staff and volunteers here at PHS/SPCA and the
inspiration of those animals I care
so much about, next week Ill start
Living With Animals with you.
Ken White is the president of the
Peninsula Humane Society &
SPCA.

18

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday June 20, 2016

ROSIES ROCK THE FAIR

PANCAKE FUNDRAISER
TOM JUNG/DAILY
JOURNAL

Young Nolan
Molloy pours
syrup on his
pancakes during the San
Bruno Firefighters
pancake breakfast fundraiser
held at Fire Station #51 on
Sunday, June 5,
2016. Guests
had a chance to
tour the fire station and
examine actual
firefighting
equipment.

Five Rosies who worked in the Bay Area Kaiser Shipyards during World War II shared their stories at the San Mateo County Fair Tuesday June 14. From left to right, Yvonee Ryzak, member
San Mateo County Event CenterBoard of Directors; Shelley Kessler, executive secretary-treasurer, San Mateo County Central Labor Council; Rosie Mary Torres, journeyman welder
1942-1945, Moores Shipyard, Oakland; Rosie Marian Wynn, pipe welder 1944-1945, Richmond Kaiser Shipyard #3; Rosie Agnes Moore, journeyman welder 1942-1945, Richmond
Kaiser Shipyard #3; Rosie Kay Morrison, journeyman welder 1943-1945, Richmond Kaiser
Shipyard #2;Rosie Marian Sousa, draftsman 1943-1944, Richmond Kaiser Shipyard #3; and Dana
Stoehr, chief operating ifficer, San Mateo County Fair.

HAPPY GRADS
TOM JUNG/DAILY JOURNAL

Friends and study-buddies Andrea


Pea-Alvarez (left) and Adriana Esquivias (right) celebrate after
receiving their GED Certificates at
the San Mateo Adult School's
graduation ceremony at the College of San Mateo on June 15.
More than 70 students were
awarded their GED Certificates or
high school diplomas through the
Adult School this year, and many
of them were students in the
School's GED Test Preparation
Classes. Call 558-2100 for information about the program.

Birth announcements:
Al ex ander and Di ana Starns , of
Menlo Park, gave birth to a baby girl at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City June 7,
2016.
Dav i d and Marg aret Wei r, of San
Carlos, gave birth to a baby girl at Sequoia

Hospital in Redwood City June 7, 2016.


Chri s to pher and My rel l a
Hei mbuck, of Campbell, gave birth to a
baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood
City June 7, 2016.
Kri s to pher and Bri anne OHare, of
Redwood City, gave birth to a baby boy at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City June 10,
2016.
Parmeet Aro ra and Gurl een Kaur, of
Foster City, gave birth to a baby boy at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City June 10,
2016.
Andrew and Amy Matag rano , of San
Mateo, gave birth to a baby boy at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City June 13, 2016.
Al v i n and Es ther Chy an, of Redwood
City, gave birth to a baby boy at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City June 15, 2016.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday June 20, 2016

THE SCOUTING EXPERIENCE

19

COFFEE AT THE LIBRARY

TOM JUNG/DAILY JOURNAL

TOM JUNG/DAILY JOURNA;

On June 11, Boy Scout Troop 175 from Foster City celebrated 50 years of the Scouting Experience at a barbeque and picnic for scouts, alumni and their families held at Coyote Point
in San Mateo. Here, David Yang (center) is passed over a rope barrier by Nicholas Wang (left)
and Albert Zheng (right) during an exercise that requires both trust and teamwork.

webcomm3beesFans of Downtown San Mateos 3 Bees Coffee can now get their coffee and
snacks at its second location, on the third floor of the Main San Mateo Public Library on Third
Avenue. Here, Angela Bonanni stands ready to pour coffee or dish up a sweet treat. Theres
balcony seating outside, through the door to her right.

ROXY
NEEDS A
HOME

INTERNATIONAL DAY

NICOLE WALLACE/DAILY JOURNAL.

Peninsula Humane Society Volunteer


Brigitte Roay kneels with Roxy, one
of the dogs looking for a home during the Mobile Pet Adoption event
at Hillsdale Shopping Center in San
Mateo on June 4. These meet-andgreets serve to introduce many
people to their new best friends.

TOM JUNG/DAILY JOURNA;

San Mateo Adult School students, along with their children, sampled food and enjoyed traditional music during International Day, which took place on the school's main campus June
10. Here, in a special finale, the children broke a student-created piata.

20

LOCAL

Monday June 20, 2016

BUDGET
Continued from page 1
year, and $18 million in property tax,
an expected roughly $310, 000
increase from the amount received last
year.
Though the city has enjoyed steady
growth over the past three fiscal years,
to the tune of nearly $10 million in
the general fund, some skepticism lies
on the horizon as officials predict a
drop in sales tax revenue for the coming year.
Burlingame collected $13.2 million
in sales tax last year, up $2.1 million
from the year prior, but expects to
draw in $11.9 million in the upcoming
fiscal year, according to the budget
document.
A letter from City Manger Lisa
Goldman noted the expected sales tax
dip should be attributed to the fiscal
conservatism of officials looking to
protect the city against the threat of a
potential economic downturn.
Even with the positive economic
trends of the last three years, the fiscal
year 2016-17 budget has been developed with a relatively conservative
approach, according to the report.
The recession brought home the realization that some of the citys largest
sources of revenue are highly volatile,
inexorably linked to the health of the
general economy and events that cannot be anticipated in the short term.
Beyond projected growth in tax
streams feeding to the general fund,
the citys overall budget is expected to
grow by 8.1 percent from the year

LABOR
Continued from page 1
employed, Rupp said.
The problem, however, is the areas
high housing costs that prevent individuals from living where they work,
she said.
Its daunting to live here, she said.
Rents soaring above $2,500 for a
one-bedroom apartment makes living
in the county inaccessible for a large
portion of the workforce, Rupp said.
The upcoming presidential election
has also spawned an attack from the
right against unionizing public sector
jobs, she said.
The attacks, however, only reenergizes the labor movement to organize
and recruit, she said.
Locally, an effort to unionize custodians at large tech firms such as

prior, up to $108 million, about $8


million more than the 2015-2016 fiscal year.
The growth marks significant
progress made since the hard times suffered during the Great Recession,
according to the letter.
Nearly six years after the official
end of a severe recession, Burlingame
finds itself in a relatively healthy fiscal position, with many of the citys
revenues meeting or exceeding levels
experienced prior to the downturn,
according to the letter. The past year
has shown a healthy gain in the citys
largest revenue sources, a sign that the
economy is continuing to expand.
In the years since the downturn
ended, the citys transient occupancy
tax, or money collected when a visitor
stays overnight in a Burlingame
hotel, has more than doubled from
floating near the $10 million mark
between 2007 and 2010 and jumping
to the neighborhood of $25 million
last year.
General fund revenue streams have
mirrored such growth, though not
quite as precipitously, increasing from
about $36.7 million in the depths of
the downturn.
The economic boom is not without
its consequences though, according to
the letter, as San Mateo County and
the Bay Area generally is suffering an
affordability crisis which seeps into
the Burlingame community.
Consumer spending is increasing,
and a higher level of tourism is driving
traffic through SFO and hotels located
within the city. Auto sales and activity
at local restaurants have been strong,
according to the report. These very
positive trends are tempered by rising

housing and commercial lease costs.


Managing the effects of strong economic growth along with constrained
resources will be an ongoing challenge for the city.
Addressing liabilities in employee
benefit plans are another challenge
identified in the report, as the citys
staff has also grown over the years
with the budget. More than half of the
general fund is allocated to costs associated with employees, an indicator
officials must remain cognizant of
staff spending, according to the letter.
It is prudent for the city to be ever
vigilant in controlling personnel
costs going forward, according to the
letter.
Burlingame has also identified a
variety of unfunded capital improvements, such as construction of a new
community center, which officials are
seeking to address. The council has
considered placing a tax measure on an
upcoming ballot, granting voters a
chance to authorize a funding source
for the projects.
Beyond the big ticket items, also
including improvements to city parks,
that could be financed through the tax
measure, officials have identified millions of dollars of infrastructure and
road fixes that need to be addressed as
well.
In all, the city is projecting spending $59.7 million in the upcoming
fiscal year, and $15.8 million will be
held in reserves stashed in case of an
economic downturn, plus $18.3 million in other assigned reserves and
$11.5 million in unassigned reserves.
The total reserve fund for the upcoming year grew to $29.8 million, up
from $26.7 million.

Google have been successful.


In May, the Service Employees
International Union-United Service
Workers West brokered a new labor
agreement that covers 23 janitorial
service contractors and 8,000 workers
in the region.
Under the old contract, most union
janitors made $14.24 an hour. The new
deal boosted that rate to $15 and is
scheduled to rise to $16.50 by 2019.
The San Mateo County Central
Labor Council represents approximately 110 affiliated local unions with
70,000 members.
Kessler started her work at the council 31 years ago as its political director.
Shes been active in the labor movement since 1977 when she worked for
General Motors in Fremont.
The union helped Kessler find a
voice in a male-dominated industry.
She later worked at Westinghouse
Electric in Sunnyvale and joined the

International
Association
of
Machinists Local 565, according to
the California Labor Federation.
One of the councils top objectives
is to encourage all workers regardless
of race, creed, color, age, sex, national origin, sexual orientation, disability or ancestry to share equally in the
full benefits of union organization and
to promulgate the principles enunciated by the American Federation of
Labor and Congress of Industrial
Organizations that the concern of one
is the concern of all and to uphold the
constitution of the AFL-CIO.
Rupp worked in the offices of both
Assemblywoman Rebecca Cohn, DSaratoga, and state Sen. Ellen Corbett,
D-Fremont. She is also the former
political director for California Young
Democrats.
She has also volunteered for the
Make-A-Wish Foundation locally
since 2014.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Calendar
MONDAY, JUNE 20
2016 Youth/Kids Tennis Summer
Camp San Mateo Foster CityBurlingame. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. San
Mateo High School Tennis Courts,
506 N. Delaware St., San Mateo. The
2016 camps runs every week
(Monday to Friday) until Aug. 5 at
San Mateo High School Tennis
Courts. For more information contact eurotennis15@gmail.com.
Maturing Gracefully: Basic Sk in
Care Tips for Every Age. Noon.
Belmont Library, Belmont. Learn to
protect your skin with these simple
tips to prevent skin cancer, infection, dry skin, sun damage and
wrinkles! For more information call
591-8286 ext. 233.
Crafts with the A Team. 2 p.m. to 3
p.m. San Mateo Main Library, 55 W.
Third Ave., San Mateo (Oak Room).
Stop by to do a fun craft. For
grades 5 to 8. For more information
or to register call 522-7838.
Knit and Crochet. 6 p.m. 840 W.
Orange Ave., South San Francisco.
Knitters of all levels are welcome
for an informal knitting and crocheting circle. For more information email valle@plsinfo.org.
Dance Connection with Music by
DJ Geri Foley. Free dance lessons
6:30 p.m.-7 p.m. with Open Dance
from 7 p.m.-9:30 p.m. A variety of
ballroom dance. Enjoy great music
and lively friendship. Members,
bring a new first-time male friend
and earn free entry for yourself
(only one free entry per new
dancer). Free entry for new men.
Light refreshments. Burlingame
Womans Club, 241 Park Road,
Burlingame. Admission is $8 members, $10 guests. For more information call 342-2221.
Dena, Freud and Me: A one-man
show by Rick Gilbert. 7:30 p.m.
Dragon Theatre, 2120 Broadway,
Redwood City. Join Rick for a
comedic, serious, insightful romp
through 77 years of growing up.
Doors open at 7 p.m. Pay what you
will in cash at the door. For more
information visit dragonproductions.net/activities/mondaynight.h
tml.
TUESDAY, JUNE 21
International Day of Yoga. 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Central Park, San Mateo.
Check-in starts at 8:30 a.m. Please
bring your own yoga mat and
come 10 minutes before the start
of each class. There is an Ashtanga
Inspired Vinyasa class at 9 a.m., a
Jivamukti class at 10:30 a.m., Kirtan
at noon and Yin Yoga at 1:15 p.m.
For more information email
wendy@nandiyoga.com.
B ook Club: Persepolis by
Marjane Satrapi. 6 p.m. 840 W.
Orange Ave., South San Francisco.
Come for a group discussion on
the book. For more information
email valle@plsinfo.org.
Girls in Trouble Concer t
Featuring Alicia Jo Rabins. 6:30
p.m. Peninsula Jewish Community
Center, 800 Foster City Blvd., Foster
City. In this free outdoor concert,
the indie folk song artist performs
original compositions addressing
the complicated lives of Biblical
women. For more information call
378-2703.
Captain Jack Spareribs. 6:30 p.m.
San Mateo Main Library (Oak
Room), 55 W. Third Ave., San Mateo.
Captain Jack Spareribs will be performing his pirate variety show
with magic, juggling and ventriloquism. For more information call
522-7838.
Mary Roach: Author of Pack ing
for Mars. 7 p.m. Oshman Family
JCC, 3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto. For
more information or to register call
408-280-5530.
Kundalini Yoga at Little House. 7
p.m. to 8:45 p.m. Little House, The
Roslyn G. Morris Activity Center,
800 Middle Ave., Menlo Park.
Kundalini Yoga is proven to bring
balance and unleash bountiful
energy through the reduction of
stress, anxiety and depression. $8
per class. For more information
and to register go to www.penvol.org/littlehouse.
Peninsula Rose Society Meeting.
7:30 p.m. Redwood City Veterans
Memorial Senior Center, 1455
Madison Ave., Redwood City.
Barbara Gordon will discuss the
wonders of prickles and how to
best enjoy them. For more information visit peninsularosesociety.org or call 465-3967.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22
June Coffee Club. 9 a.m. to 10 a.m.
1201 Howard Ave., Suite 201,

Burlingame. June coffee club


meeting. Erin Sinclair will discuss
current updates to the market and
economy in a relaxed and informal
setting. Pastries and coffee will be
provided. Feel free to bring a
friend. For more information and to
RSVP, call 343-0700.
Disinheriting the IRS From Your
Retirement Accounts. 10:30 a.m.
San Carlos Library, 610 Elm Street,
San Carlos. John Lau will advise
retires on various financial and tax
issues. For more information or to
register
visit
lfsfinance.com/events/rnor or call
401-4663.
History Class: Every Four Years
The Great American Circus. 1:30
p.m. to 3:30 p.m. 800 Middle Ave.,
Menlo Park. Wednesdays until
August 10. For more information or
to register call 326-2025.
Film Screening: Clueless. 3 p.m. to
5 p.m. San Mateo Public Library, 55
West 3rd Ave., San Mateo. Free. PG13. Popcorn provided. For more
information,
contact
aspanbock@cityofsanmateo.org
Music in the Park. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
2100 Hopkins Ave., Redwood City.
Come weekly for a concert in
Stafford Park. For more information
go
to
redwoodcity.org/musicinthepark.
Lifetree Cafe: Tell Me the Real
Story The Amazing Power of
Honesty. 6:30 p.m. 1095 Cloud
Ave., Menlo Park. For more information, contact william@bethanymp.org.
Fermented Foods: Kombucha.
6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. New Leaf
Community Market, 150 San Mateo
Road, Half Moon Bay. For more
information, contact patti@bondmarcom.com.
Off the Beaten Path: Travel Talk.
7 p.m. Burlingame Library, 480
Primrose Road, Burlingame. For
more information, call 558-7400.
Janna Levin: Author of B lack
Hole B lues and Other Songs
from Outer Space. 7 p.m.
Cubberley
Theatre,
4000
Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. Levin
shares the story of the scientists
who embarked on an arduous,
fifty-year endeavor to capture
Einstein's elusive gravitational
waves. For more information or to
register call 408-280-5530.
Julia and Jacques: Cook ing at
Home with Laura Stec. 7 p.m.
Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave.,
Millbrae. French cuisine demo with
special emphasis on sauce-making. No signups needed. For more
information call 697-7607.
THURSDAY, JUNE 23
Career and Resources Fair. 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. 350 Twin Dolphin
Drive, Redwood Shores. Meet with
over 30 Bay Are employers. There
will also be resume critique and
career workshops. For more information call 574-1766.
Rethink Waste
Public
Open
House Day. 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.
333 Shoreway Road, San Carlos.
The free tours include visiting the
Transfer Station, where garbage,
food scraps and yard trimmings
are handled; outdoor education
area, with a demonstration garden
and composting system, rainwater
harvest tank and solar panel display; the Environmental Education
Center, which includes museumquality exhibits, reuse art and a
talking robot, and more. For more
information call 802-3500.
Rethink Waste
Public
Open
House Day. 11:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. 333 Shoreway Road, San
Carlos. The free tours include visiting the Transfer Station, where
garbage, food scraps and yard
trimmings are handled; outdoor
education area, with a demonstration garden and composting system, rainwater harvest tank and
solar
panel
display;
the
Environmental Education Center,
which includes museum-quality
exhibits, reuse art and a talking
robot, and more. For more information call 802-3500.
Distinguished Speak er Series:
Dr. Eric Shapira on the Eight
Sacred Principles of Healthy
Aging. 1:30 p.m. 800 Middle Ave.,
Menlo Park. He will inform you
about the latest neuroscience
research in gerontology while
using his unique style of wit and
humor to help you live your "golden years" to the fullest. For more
information call 326-2025.
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.

COMICS/GAMES

THE DAILY JOURNAL

DILBERT

Monday June 20, 2016

21

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

HOLY MOLE

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

ACROSS
1 Whats- -name
4 Passable
8 Apprehend a suspect
11 PDQ
13 Warrior princess
14 Tax shelter
15 Minimum amount
16 If need be (3 wds.)
18 Moved on ice
20 Honcho
21 been had!
22 Hindu Mr.
24 Major artery
27 Boston team (2 wds.)
30 Stamp backing
31 Robert E. and Spike
32 Menacing sound
34 Pixie
35 Yacht wood
36 Scheme
37 Romance
39 Poker pair
40 Mesozoic, for one
41 Itty-bitty

GET FUZZY

42
45
49
53
54
55
56
57
58
59

Kind of jerk
Bug
Hung in the sun (hyph.)
Greenhorn
DJs platters
Throng
Out loud
Approx.
Toe-stubbers cry
Cote dweller

DOWN
1 Hems and
2 Baroness Karen
3 Iliad, e.g.
4 Rust, for one
5 Understanding
6 Wheel buy (2 wds.)
7 Bark or yelp
8 Baja boy
9 Curved lines
10 Words from Scrooge
12 Diminutive
17 Nile wader
19 The Loco-Motion girl

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
31
33
35
36
38
39
41
42
43
44
46
47
48
50
51
52

Hunt for
Rural rtes.
Mellow
Earthen jar
Lionesss lack
Broncos do it
Gawk at
Cavity detector (hyph.)
Han Solos love
ER staffers
Mammoth entrapper
Magic word
Graze
Countdown start
Broadness
Leafy vegetable
Playful bites
Prex for while
Brontes Jane
Gullet
Painted tinware
Greek letter
Debt memo
PC button

6-20-16

PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS

MONDAY, JUNE 20, 2016


GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Financial
improvements will come through a partnership or
changes on the home front. You will find a way to
cut your overhead and get the most for your dollar.
Romance is encouraged.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) Preparation is critical
before you start new projects at home or work. An
interesting offer will grab your attention. Adapt your
schedule to take advantage of whats being offered.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) If you show off, someone will
be quick to put you down. Make subtle changes that
will help you get ahead. Dont let uncertainty lead to a

KenKen is a registered trademark of Nextoy, LLC. 2016 KenKen Puzzle LLC. All rights reserved.
Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS, Inc. www.kenken.com

WEEKENDS PUZZLE SOLVED

Each row and each column must contain the


numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.
The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.
Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.

costly mistake. Gather the facts.


VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Physical activity will help
you blow off steam. If you feel someone isnt being
sincere, give yourself time and space to assess the
situation. Build condence and boost your morale.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Someone with talents
similar to yours will recognize your potential. Share
ideas, form a partnership and set a budget. Dont let
your emotions get in the way of a good deal.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Pump up your energy
and enthusiasm, and put your plans into motion. Your
imagination and drive will ensure that you come up
with a great moneymaking plan. Romance is featured.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Bide your time,
listen carefully to whats being said and weed out any

6-20-16
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook

information you feel is inconsistent or based on false


data. Dont divulge your nancial situation.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Emotions will
surface if someone disrupts your plans. Move
forward swiftly, with or without the person causing
you grief. Success will be yours if you follow through
on your ideas.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Carefully decide
where you want to spend your time and money. Making
changes at home or to your professional goals will be
rewarding, but not likely to please everyone.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) Dont dwell on the
past. Put more emphasis on your personal and
financial well-being. Helping others will keep you
too busy to worry about situations you have no

control over.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) Learn, gather
experience and be a participant. The input you
offer will make an impression and help you gain
ground professionally as well as bring about positive
change personally.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Experience is the
greatest way to learn. Get involved in cultural events,
different philosophies or an entertaining social group in
order to make new friends and learn something new.
COPYRIGHT 2016 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

22

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday June 20, 2016

104 Training

110 Employment

TERMS & CONDITIONS


The San Mateo Daily Journal Classifieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its liability shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be submitted within 30 days. For full advertising conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.

DUMP TRUCK DRIVER, SM, good pay,


benefits. Must have a Class A or B
License. (650)343-5946 M-F, 8-5.

110 Employment

CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.

Call
(650)777-9000

110 Employment

NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM

The Daily Journal is looking for interns to do entry level reporting, research, updates of our ongoing features and interviews. Photo interns also welcome.

HIRING NOW
for Caregivers!
Newly opening RCFE in

San Mateo. Full time and part time


shifts and schedules available.

We expect a commitment of four to


eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented interns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time reporters.

Send resume to:


kimochikai@kimochi-inc.org
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273

HOUSE CLEANERS NEEDED


Up to $15 per hour. Company Car.
Call Molly Maid at (650)837-9788.
1700 S. Amphlett, #218, San Mateo.
PT COOK NEED and CAREGIVERS,
San Carlos (650)596-3489

AMERICA'S BEST VALUE


INN & SUITES
Housekeeping Positions Open

110 Employment

College students or recent graduates


are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not necessarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you apply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
NETSPEND CORP seeks Director of
Business Development for its San Mateo, CA office to own a pipeline of partner prospects, execute on a sales strategy and take the lead in securing new
partnerships that grow and diversify
NetSpend's lines of business. Requires
at least Bachelors degree in Business or
rel. field & 6 yrs of payments industry solution selling experience. Up to 20% domestic travel is required. Candidates
may be subject to drug, criminal history,
and credit checks. EOE/Minorities/Females/Vet/Disability. Email resumes to
resumes@tsys.com. Ref. job # 95477.

Send your information via e-mail to


news@smdailyjournal.com or by regular mail to 1900 Alameda de las Pulgas #112, San Mateo CA 94403

SALES - Telemarketing and Inside Sales


Representative needed to sell newspaper print and web advertising and event
marketing solutions. To apply, pleasecall
650-344-5200 and send resume to
info@smdailyjournal.com

Located at 3020 N. Cabrillo Hwy,


Half Moon Bay
Now hiring for housekeeping ASAP
Starting at $14/hour

MULTIPLE POSITIONS
AVAILABLE

245 S. Airport Blvd,


South San Francisco

GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.

We welcome applicants for

110 Employment

SAN CARLOS
RESTAURANT

PM Pastry Chef
Assistant
Wanted
Johnston's Saltbox
Contact Chef at
650 592-7258 or
1 541 848-0038

For more details & application, go to


http://personalprotective.com/
employment

SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com

SAN CARLOS
RESTAURANT
AM Dishwasher
Required,
Tuesdays, Saturdays,
Sundays.
Contact Chef
(650) 592-7258 or
(541) 848-0038
GUIDEWIRE in Foster City, CA seeks
Architect: Prtnr w/ client bus teams in insurance industry to undrstnd bus objs,
identify customer bus reqs & config
Guidewire app to meet reqs & integ app
to int/ext enterprise systms. Req BS in
CS, IT, Engg or rel & 3 yrs exp w/ multitier web apps. To apply refer to job code
SKP085 & email resume to candidateapplications@guidewire.com.

HOTEL -

Please apply in person, at the front desk:

Minimum Qualifications at the time of


Employment:
Valid California Guard Card(s) (BSIS).
Valid Baton and Chemical Agent Permits -- at the time of hire.
Valid California Driver's License -- at
the time of hire.
Completion of BSIS's required 40-hours
of training -- (completed by the first day
of work).
Pass a criminal history and background
check
Pre-employment drug screening --Medical marijuana is not accepted.

TECHNOLOGY

Please stop by or call Suni or Bob


415-819-7153 / 415-225-6715

CitiGarden Hotel is now hiring in


all departments, starting between
$11 - $14 per hour.

110 Employment
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE Services,
Inc. (PPS) is hiring for Unarmed Security
Officers in Foster City.

TECHNOLOGY
HELP build the next generation of systems behind Facebook's products. Facebook, Inc. currently has the following
openings in Menlo Park, CA (various levels/types):
Systems Engineer (3396N) Integration of
new hardware products into Facebook
software & datacenter infrastructure.
UX Research Manager (3432N) Be an
expert user experience researcher with a
proven track record of doing research
that impacts a complex & diverse product. Position requires occasional travel to
unanticipated locations. Data Engineer
(DE616N) Design & build data reporting
& visualization needs for a product or a
group of products. Systems Developer
(1308N) Build, test, debug, & make code
changes to tools & systems. UX Researcher (5085N) Responsible for the
design of studies that address both user
behavior & attitudes. Developer Operations Manager (5732N) Serve as the
voice of the user, working directly with

Caregivers, come grow with us!

Dishwasher, Part Time


Evenings
Call us at 650-678-8886
1230 Hopkins Ave, Redwood City (Hopkins & Birch)

No Experience Required
Paid Training Provided
FT/PT excellent FT benets
Evenings/weekends/vehicle/driving required
($250.00 Sign-on Bonus)
Dont wait come in TODAY Ask for Carol

mrsherwin@yahoo.com

(650) 458-2200

EOE, Division of Labor Standard Wage Order 5.


Lic. # 415600900

www.homebridgeca.org
1660 S. Amphlett Blvd. #115 in San Mateo

DRIVERS
WANTED

San Mateo Daily Journal

The Daily Journals readership covers a wide


range of qualifications for all types of positions.

Newspaper Delivery Routes to businesses and newsracks,


and some apartment buildings. (No residential houses.)

For the best value and the best results,


recruit from the Daily Journal...

Early mornings, six days per week, Monday through Saturday.


2 to 4 hour routes. Must have own vehicle, valid license and
insurance.

Contact us for a free consultation

Pick up papers between 3:30 a.m. and 4:30 a.m.

Call (650) 344-5200 or


Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com

Pay dependent on route size.


Call 650-344-5200
or email resume to info@smdailyjournal.com

We welcome experienced applicants for

Caregivers p/t, f/t


Flexible Shifts
Call us at 650-224-8853
completeseniorliving@yahoo.com
FBI/DOJ clearance, EOE, Division of Labor Standard Wage Order 5.
Lic. # 415600900

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday June 20, 2016

110 Employment

210 Lost & Found

297 Bicycles

product, engineering, global policy & other partners responsible for solving these
challenges, playing an integral role in improving the user experience on Facebook. Product Manager (411N) Plan
business objectives, develop product
strategies & establish responsibilities
across product area. Software Engineer
(5828N) Help build the next generation of
systems behind Facebook's products,
create web &/or mobile applications that
reach over one billion people, & build
high volume servers to support our content. Partner Engineer (2572N) Handle
technical integrations with partners to optimize Facebook user experience. Position requires international business travel
to unanticipated sites. Production Engineer (PE616N) Participate in the design,
implementation & ongoing management
of major site applications & subsystems.
Data Center Construction Cost Estimator (6874N) Manage cost estimating efforts for new & retrofit Data Center projects. Prepare conceptual cost estimates
with planning, engineering, sourcing, energy & site selection team during early
concept stage. Position requires 20% national & international travel to unanticipated worksites. Product Designer
(7345N) Design, prototype, & build new
features for Facebooks website or mobile
applications.
UX
Researcher
(6450N) Oversee & design the user experience component to generate actionable insights.

FOUND: LADIES watch outside Safeway Millbrae 11/10/14 call Matt,


(415)378-3634

ADULT BIKES 1 regular and 2 with balloon tires $30 Each (650) 347-2356

Mail resume to: Facebook, Inc. Attn: SBGIM, 1 Hacker Way, Menlo Park, CA
94025. Must reference job title & job#
shown above, when applying.

FOUND: RING Silver color ring found


on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301
LOST - MY COLLAPSIBLE music stand,
clip lights, and music in black bags were
taken from my car in Foster City and may
have been thrown out by disappointed
thieves. Please call (650)704-3595
LOST - Womans diamond ring. Lost
12/18. Broadway, Redwood City.
REWARD! (650)339-2410
LOST CAT Our Felicity, weighs 7 lbs,
she has a white nose, mouth, chin, all
four legs, chest stomach, around her
neck. Black mask/ears, back, tail. Nice
REWARD.
Please
email
us
at
joandbill@msn.com or call 650-5768745. She drinks water out of her paws.
LOST: PLATINUM mens wedding band.
Simple, no design. (650)274-9892

Books
NICHOLAS SPARKS Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each - (650)341-1861
QUALITY BOOKS used and rare. World
& US History and classic American novels. $5 each obo (650)345-5502
STEPHEN KING Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each - (650)341-1861

203 Public Notices


FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #269563
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Orion Prep 2) Orion Learn 3) Orion Learning, 28 Amy Drive, SAN MATEO, CA 94403. Registered Owner: Peter Krause, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A
/s/Peter L. Krause/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 6/07/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
6/13/16, 6/20/16, 6/27/16, 7/4/16.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME


STATEMENT #269602
The following person is doing business
as: S & W Properties, 3671 San Benito
Street, SAN MATEO, CA 94403. Registered Owner: 1) Amber Wright, same address 2) Graham John Wright, same address. 3) Justin Skuce, 1220 Martin Ave,
PALO ALTO, CA 94301. The business is
conducted by a General Partnership. The
registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on 6/10/16
/s/Amber Wright/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 6/10/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
6/13/16, 6/20/16, 6/27/16, 7/4/16.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME


STATEMENT #269595
The following person is doing business
as: J E Ritchie Law, 1017 El Camino
Real #398, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063.
Registered Owner: John E. Ritchie, 27
Lowell Street, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94063. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN onN/A
/s/John E. Ritchie/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 6/09/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
6/13/16, 6/20/16, 6/27/16, 7/4/16.

294 Baby Stuff


CHILD CRAFT convertible Crib/ Toddler
Bed. Dark wood, very good condition,
$99/offer 650-218-4254

MILLER LITE Neon sign , work good


$59 call 650-218-6528

RENO SILVER LEGACY Casino four


rare memorabilia items, casino key, two
coins, small charm. $95. (650)676-0974
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
SF GIANTS Messenger Bag - Stadium
giveaway. New. Great for laptop/business or school papers. $10 650-6549252
STAR WARS C-3PO mint pair, green tint
(Japan), gold (U.S.) 4 action figures.
$24 650-518-6614
STAR WARS Hong Kong exclusive, mint
Pote Snitkin 4 green card action figure.
$15 650-518-6614
STAR WARS Lando Calrissian 4 orange card action figure, autographed by
Billy Dee Williams. $38 Steve 650-5186614

299 Computers

300 Toys
3-STORY BARBIE Dollhouse with spiral
staircase and elevator. $60. (650)5588142

CLASSIC LAMBORGHINI Countach


Print, Perfect for garage, Size medium
framed, Good condition, $25. 510-6840187

AMERICAN GIRL 18 doll, Jessica,


blond/blue. new in box, $65 (505)-2281480 local.

COOL HOT Rod Print "Eddies Market "


Perfect for Garage, SExcellent Condition
$50. 510-684-0187

STAR WARS one 4 orange card action figure, Luke Skywalker (Ceremonial) $6 Steve 650-518-6614

HONDA 750 Poster, Rare History of


Honda 750 by Cycle World, mounted on
Foam Board, $50. 510-684-0187

STAR WARS one 4 orange card action figure, Momaw Nadon (Hammerhead). $8 Steve 650-518-6614
STAR WARS SDCC Stormtrooper
Commander $29 OBO Dan,
650-303-3568 lv msg

302 Antiques

BLACK & Decker Car Vac, Gd. Condition $8 650-952-3500

ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70


(650)387-4002

CHEFMATE TOASTER oven, brand


new, bakes, broils, toasts, adjustable
temperature. $25 OBO. (650)580-4763

BEAUTIFUL AND UNIQUE Victorian


Side Sewing Table, All original. Rosewood. Carved. EXCELLENT CONDITION! $350. (650)815-8999.

CIRRUS STEAM mop model SM212B 4


new extra cleaning pads,user manual.
$45. 650-5885487
ELEGANT ELECTRIC Fireplace on
wheels in white casing can see flames,
like new. $99 (650)771-6324
SANITAIRE QUICK Kleen Vacuum and
Host Dry Extractor Carpet Cleaning System Machine. $50. 650-871-1778.

210 Lost & Found

TOASTER OVEN, Black & Decker, 4Slice, 1200W, Toast, Bake, Broil;
TRO480BS - $12 (650) 952-3500

LOST SMALL gray and green Parrot.


Redwood Shores. (650)207-2303.

UPRIGHT VACUUM Cleaner, $10. Call


Ed, (415)298-0645 South San Francisco

Over the Hedge

LENNOX RED Rose, Unused, hand


painted, porcelain, authenticity papers,
$12.00. (650) 578 9208.

BOB TALBOT Marine Lithograph (Signed Framed 24x31 Like New. $99.
(650)572-8895

AIR CONDITIONER 10000 BTU w/remote. Slider model fits all windows. LG
brand $199 runs like new. (650)2350898

Over the Hedge

CIGAR BANDS, 100 years old $99


(415)867-6444

VIEW SONIC Monitor, 17 inch Good


Condition $25.00 650-218-4254

296 Appliances

Over the Hedge

1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple


antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833

295 Art
$99.

Tundra

298 Collectibles

MONITOR FOR computer. Kogi - 15".


Model L5QX. $25. (650)592-5864.

Painting

Tundra

1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper


Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048

FISHER-PRICE HEALTHY Care booster


seat - $5 (650)592-5864.

AWARD
WINNING
(415)867-6444

Tundra

23

BMW FORMULA 1 Diecast Model, Excellent Condition, 1:43 Scale 2007 Race
Team $80. 510-684-0187
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72 x 40 , 3 drawers, Display case, bevelled glass, $700. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden Sea Captains
Tool Chest 35 x 16 x 16, $65
(650)591-3313
STORE FRONT display cabinet, From
1930, marble base. 72 long x 40 tallx
21 deep. Asking $500. (650)341-1306

303 Electronics

304 Furniture

304 Furniture

46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great


condition. $400. (650)261-1541.

BROWN RECLINER, $75 Excellent Condition. (650) 315-2319

ROCKING CHAIR fine light, oak condition with pads, $85/OBO. 650 369 9762

AUDIOVOX BOOMBOX Radio, cassette & CD player. AC/DC. Brand new in box. $20. 650-654-9252

BROWN WOODEN bookshelf H 3'4"X W


3'6"X D 10" with 3 shelves $25.00 call
650-592-2648

TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for stereo equipment $25. (650)726-6429

BLAUPUNKT AM/FM/CD Radio and Receiver with Detachable Face asking


$100. (650)593-4490

CHAIR Designer gray, beige, white.


Excellent condition. $59. 650-573-6895

COMPLETE COLOR photo developer


Besler Enlarger, Color Head, trays, photo
tools $50/ 650-921-1996
DECK STEREO receiver with deck CD
player with 2 spkrs. Exc/co. $45.
(650)992-4544
FIRST ALERT CO600 Carbon Monoxide
Plug-In Alarm. Simple to use, New in
pkg. $18 (650) 952-3500
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
MOTOROLA BRAVO MB 520 (android
4.1 upgrade) smart phone 35$ 8GB SD
card Belmont (650)595-8855
MULTITESTER KIT, 20.000 OHMS/volt
DC. never used in box $20.00
650-9924544
NEW AC/DC adapter, output DC 4.5v,
$5, 650-595-3933
ONKYO AV Receiver HT-R570 .Digital
Surround, HDMI, Dolby, Sirius Ready,
Cinema Filter.$95/ Offer 650-591-2393
OPTIMUS H36 ST5800 Tower Speaker
36x10x11 $30. (650)580-6324
ORIGINAL AM/FM 1967/68 Honda Radio for $50. (650)593-4490
PIONEER HOUSE Speakers, pair. 15
inch 3-way, black with screens. Work
great. $99.(650)243-8198
SONY DHG-HDD250 DVR and programable remote.
Record OTA. Clock set issues $99 650595-8855
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with remote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
VINTAGE G.E. radio, model c-430-a
$60. (650)421-5469
VINTAGE G.E. radio, model c-442c $60.
(650)421-5469
VINTAGE G.E. radio, model c1470 $60.
(650)421-5469
VINTAGE ZENITH radio, model L516b
$75. (650)421-5469
VINTAGE ZENITH radio, model yrb-791 1948, $ 70. (650)421-5469

CHAIR WITH rollers, Sturdy chair, blue


seat, black rollers, $10.00 (650) 578
9208
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHILDS TABLE (Fisher Price) and Two
Chairs. Like New. **SOLD**
COAT/HAT STAND, solid wood, for your
mountain cabin/house. $50. (650)5207045
COFFEE TABLE Woven bamboo with
glass top. $99. 650-573-6895
COMPUTER DESK $25 , drawer for keyboard, 40" x 19.5" (619)417-0465
COMPUTER SWIVEL CHAIR. Padded
Leather. $80. (650) 455-3409
COUCH Designer gray, beige, white.
Excellent condition. $99. 650-573-6895
COUCH, CREAM IKEA, great condition,
$89, light-weight, compact, sturdy loveseat (415)775-0141
CUSTOM MADE wood sewing storage
cabinet perfect condition $75. (650)4831222
DINETTE TABLE with Chrome Legs: 36"
x58" (with one leaf 11 1/2") - $50.
(650)341-5347
DINING ROOM table Good Condition
$90.00 or best offer ( 650)-780-0193
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condition, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES Woven bamboo, offwhite. $89. 650-573-6895. (650)573-689

CHRISTMAS TREE China, Fairfield


Peace on Earth. Complete Set of 12 (48
pieces) $75. 650-493-5026
COMPLETE SET OF CHINA - Windsor
Garden, Noritake. Four place-settings,
20-pieces in original box, never used.
$250 per box
(3 boxes available).
(650)342-5630
DECORATIVE LAMP & 8"x8" mirror, exc
cond $30 (650)756-9516.Daly City.
FREEZER, KENMORE Chest Type
20 cubic feet $50.00 650 368 0748
PLASTIC DUAL-LID Underbed Storage
Container with wheels, 31"x15"x5-1/2",
$7 (650) 952-3500.
PRE-LIT 7 ft Christmas tree. Three sections, easy to assemble. $50. 650 349
2963.
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483

308 Tools

CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"


dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402

LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.


each, (415)346-6038

CRAFTSMAN JIG Saw - 1/4 HP. Variable speed. Extra blades. Saw edge
guide. $25 650-654-9252

LIGHT OAK Cabinet, 6 ft tall, 3 ft wide, 2


ft deep, door at the bottom. * SOLD *

NEW TWIN Mattress set plus frame


$30.00 (650) 347-2356

BEIGE SOFA $99. Excellent Condition


(650) 315-2319

306 Housewares
BED SPREAD (queen size), flower design, never used. $22. Pls call
650-345-9036

INFINITY FLOOR speakers H 38" x W


11 1/2" x D 10" good $50. (650)756-9516

3-TIER
WIRE
shelves,
light
weight, wood top for writing $25.00 (650)
578 9208)

BEIGE CARPET. 12 1/2'x11 1/2'. Good


condition. Good for bedroom.$95.
(650)595-4617

WOOD FURNITURE- one end table and


coffee table. In good condition. $30
OBO. (760)996-0767.

BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model


SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269

LOVESEAT Designer gray, beige,


white. Excellent condition. $89. 650-5736895

BEAUTIFUL QUEENSIZE BED/orthopedic/Paid $1500.Like New. $500 or b/o.


Must go fast! 650-952-3063

WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x


17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311

ESPRESSO TABLE 30 square, 40 tall,


$95 (650)375-8021

2 TWIN MAPLE bed frames, Cannon


Ball construction **SOLD **

ANTIQUE MOHAGANY Bookcase. Four


feet tall. $75. (415) 282-0966.

WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with


upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429

ALUMINUM LADDERS 40ft, $99 for two,


Call (650)481-5296

LOVE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow


floral $99. (650)574-4021

ANTIQUE MAHOGONY double bed with


adjustable steelframe $225.00. OBO.
(650)592-4529

VINTAGE LARGE Marble Coffee Table,


round. $75.(650)458-8280

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER in roller4'wx5'h glass door, shelf /drawers


ex/co $45. (650)992-4544

304 Furniture

ANTIQUE DINING table for six people


with chairs $99. (650)580-6324

TEAK-VENEER COMPUTER desk with


single drawer and stacked shelves. $30
obo. 650-465-2344

OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.


(650)726-6429
OAK SIX SHELF Book Case 6FT 4FT
$55 (650)458-8280
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - new $80
obo Retail $130 (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
QUEEN SIZE Sofa bed and love seat,
dark brown
and
beige.
$99
for
both obo 650-279-4948
RECLINER CHAIR blue tweed clean
good $75 Call 650 583-3515
RECLINING SWIVEL chair almost new
$99 650-766-4858

LEGAL NOTICES

Fictitious Business Name Statements,


Trustee Sale Notice, Name Change, Probate,
Notice of Adoption, Divorce Summons,
Notice of Public Sales and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.

Fax your request to: 650-344-5290


Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com

CRAFTSMAN JIGSAW 3.9 amp. with


variable speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTSMAN RADIAL Arm Saw Stand.
In box. $30. (650)245-7517
CRAFTSMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)8511045
DELTA CABINET SAW with overrun table. $1,500/obo. ((650)342-6993
DYNAGLOPRO
HEATER.
Phone: 650-591-8062

$40.00

ELECTRONIC COMMERCIAL AIRLESS


PAINT SPRAYER, used only once. Graco model 395ST Pro. Hose & gun included. $500. (Paid $1000). 650-869-3548
HAND TRUCK PNEUMATIC TIRES.
Heavy duty 10.5" tires. 50.5" tall. P handle. $45 650-654-9252
HEAVY DUTY Mattock/Pick, Less Handle $5. (650)368-0748
OXYGEN ACETYLENE Heavy Duty
Complete
Welding
Set
$325.00
(650)873-6304
PAINTING TOOLS - hooks, stirrups 110
ropes, poles, 20 plank, 440 Graco Spary
Machine, $500, Asking (650)-483-8048
POWERMATIC TABLE SAW, heavy duty, excellent condition, perfect for contractor or carpenter. $750 or best offer.
Call anytime, (650)713-6272
PRUNING SAW - Great condition. 24"
blade. Great for all your pruning needs.
$10 650-654-9252
SHOPSMITH MARK V 50th Anniversary
most
attachments.
$1,500/OBO.
(650)504-0585
VINTAGE CRAFTSMAN Jig Saw. Circa
1947. $60. (650)245-7517
WILLIAMS #1191 CHROME 2 1/16"
Combination "SuperRrench". Mint. $89.
650-218-7059.

24

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday June 20, 2016

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle


Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
ACROSS
1 Birthstone
between
sapphire and
topaz
5 Frees (of)
9 Russian ruler
until 1917
13 Get a better
mtge.
14 Take by force
16 Germanys von
Bismarck
17 Biting remark
18 Divine Comedy
poet
19 Auntie of
Broadway
20 Lena Horne
classic that
begins Dont
know why theres
no sun up in the
sky ...
23 Historic time
24 Earth tremor
26 Measure of a
stores visitors
32 Tic-tac-toe win
34 Dryer screen
buildup
35 German-born sex
therapist,
familiarly
36 Neither here __
there
37 Choir members
39 John, in Scotland
40 All My Children
vixen
42 Not so hot
43 Tangerine kin
46 Subj. for nature
lovers
47 Before, to Byron
48 Bright spot in
tough times
50 Sales talk
52 U.N. advocate for
workers rights
53 What a Geiger
counter
measures ... or,
as two words,
what the ends of
20-, 26- and 48Across are
60 Tiny smashing
target
62 Gem measure
63 __ of expertise
64 Works on the
lawn
65 Subway entrance

66 Fish home, at
home
67 Game on
horseback
68 Piped up
69 Grinds to a halt
DOWN
1 Planets, to poets
2 Gardening moss
3 Oversize coif
4 Opera text
5 Poet Kipling
6 __ Mommy
kissing ...
7 Sandy hill
8 Madrid miss: Abbr.
9 Marisa of My
Cousin Vinny
10 Touring figure
skating show
11 Emer. cash
source
12 Caviar
15 Feed the
neighbors cat,
say
21 The A-Team
muscleman
22 Actress Anne
25 Milked animal, in
kiddie-speak
26 Olympic stadium
centerpiece
27 Mideast ships

28 Hunting, catlike
29 Common
typeface
30 Old French
money
31 Practice fly ball,
e.g.
33 Postgrad tests
38 Spread, as seed
41 Do over, as a
kitchen
44 Theyre dug up at
digs

45 Gave off
49 Yalie
51 You are not!
rebuttal
54 Cheerios grain
55 Opera
showpiece
56 Colombian city
57 Persia, now
58 See to
59 Jabbers
60 Rock band need
61 As well

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:

308 Tools

311 Musical Instruments

VINTAGE SHOPSMITH and BAND


SAW, good shape. $1,000/obo. Call
(650)342-6993

PIANO BLACK YAMAHA U3 Upright


Piano and Bench for Sale $3200. Great
Condition! Buyer pays moving fee.
(510)610-9403.

WILLIAMS #40251, 4 PC. Tool Set


(Hose Remover, Cotter Puller, Awl, Scraper). Mint. $29. 650-218-7059.

309 Office Equipment


ELECTRIC
TYPEWRITER
$40.00
Good condition
(650)367-1508
HP DESKJET 5800 series Printer - wireless. Manuals included. $25. (650)5925864
NEAT RECEIPTS Mobile Scanner new
in box $79, call 650-324-8416

PET CARRIER, brown ,Very good condition, $15.00 medium zize leave txt or call
650 773-7201

8 TRACKS, billy Joel, Zeppelin, Eagles


,Commodores, more.40 @ $4 each , call
650-393-9908
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, perfect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
INCUBATOR, $99, (650)678-5133

LIONEL WESTERN Union Pass car and


dining car. New OB $99 650-368-7537
RMT CHRISTMAS Diesel train and Caboose. Rare. New OB $99 650-368-7537
SAMSONITE 26" tan hard-sided suit
case, lt. wt., wheels, used once/like new.
$60. 650-328-6709
SILK SAREE 6 yards new nice color.for
$35 only. C all(650)515-2605 for more information.
TASCO LUMINOVA Telescope.with tripod stand, And extra Lenses. Good condition.$90. call 650-591-2393
TWO OUTDOOR large Christmas
wreaths. One 41 inches and one 30 inches across. $25. (415)517-2909
ULTRASONIC JEWELRY Cleaning Machine Cleans jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures, keys. Concentrate included. $30
OBO. (650)580-4763
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$30. (650)873-8167

311 Musical Instruments


BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, excellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO Appraised @ $5450., want $1800 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. private owner, (650)349-1172
HARMONICA.
HOHNER Pocket Pal.
Key of C. Original box. Never used.
$10. (650)588-0842

06/20/16

ONE KENNEL Cab ll one Pet Taxi animal carriers 26x16. Excellent cond. $60..
650-593-2066

"MOTHER-IN-LAW TONGUES" plants,


3 in 5-gal cans. $10.00 each. 650/5937408.

LIONEL ENGINE #221 Rio Grande diesel, runs good ex-condition


$90.
(650)867-7433

By Don Gagliardo and C.C. Burnikel


2016 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate design - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402

PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large - approx


4 ft by 4 ft, Excellent condition $300 best
offer. (650)245-4084

LIONEL CHRISTMAS Holiday expansion Set. New OB $99 650-368-7537

xwordeditor@aol.com

312 Pets & Animals


AIRLINE CARRIER for cats, pur. from
Southwest Airlines, $25, 2 available. Call
(505-228-1480) local.

310 Misc. For Sale

LIONEL CHRISTMAS Boxcars 2005,


2006, 2007 New OB $90 lot 650-3687537

06/20/16

YAMAHA PIANO, Upright, Model M-305,


$750. Call (650)572-2337

316 Clothes
100% WOOL brown dress pants, 42X30
$8 650-595-3933
BOY SCOUT canvas belt with Boy Scout
Buckle. Vintage. Fair condition. $5.
(650)588-0842
FAUX FUR Coat Woman's brown multi
color
in
excellent
condition
3/4
length $50 650-692-8012
HATS, BRAND New, Nascar Racing,
San Francisco 49ers and Giants, excellent condition, $10. 510-684-0187
LADIES BOOTS size 8 , 3 pairs different
styles , $20/ pair. call 650-592-2648
LEATHER JACKET, New Black Italian
style, size M Ladies $45 (650) 875-1708
MEN'S ASICS Kayano used very good
condition size 10.5 new $159 ONLY $15
650 520-7045
MEN'S NIKE shoe in like new condition
Grey color size 11. $35. 650 520-7045
MEN'S SKI boots size 10, $75.
(650)520-1338
MEN'S VINTAGE Pendleton,100% virgin
wool, red tartan plaid, large,like
new,$25,650-591-9769, San Carlos
NEW JOCKEY Men's Classic Crew
white tshirts (L) 3pk $15/each (5 available) 650.952.3466
NEW WITH tags Wool or cotton Men's
pullover
sweaters
(XL)
$15/each
(650)952-3466
PARIS HILTON purse white & silver unused, about 12" long x 9" high $23. 650592-2648
PARIS HILTON purse white & silver unused, about 12" long x 9" high $23. 650592-2648
PERRY ELLIS tan cotton pants 42X30,
$9 650-595-3933
PRADA DAYPACK / Purse, Sturdy black
nylon canvas, like new, made in Italy,
$35 (650)591-6596
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian made dress,
size 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167

317 Building Materials


32 PAVING/EDGING bricks, 12 x 5x1
Brown, smooth surface, good clean condition. $32. (650)588-1946 San Bruno

MONARCH UPRIGHT player piano $99


(650) 583-4549

CULTURED MARBLE 2 tone BR vanity


counter top. New toe skin/ scribe. 29 x
19 $300 (408)744-1041

UPRIGHT PIANO. In tune. Fair condition. $300 OBO (650) 533-4886.

INTERIOR DOORS, 8, Free. Call 5737381.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday June 20, 2016

317 Building Materials

345 Medical Equipment

NEW PRE-HUNG EXTERIOR Door, Fiberglass Panelled with Windows, Left


Hand open $160.00 Call (650)595-3831

BATH CHAIR LIFT. Peterman battery


operated bath chair lift. Stainless steel
frame. Accepts up to 350lbs. Easily inserted I/O tub.$250 OBO.
(650) 739-6489.

SHUTTERS 2 wooden shutters 32x72


like new $50.00 ea.call 650 368-7891
WHITE DOUBLE pane window for $29
or Best offer. Call Halim @ (650) 6785133.

318 Sports Equipment


ADIDAS ENGLISH Olympics sports bag
(very good condition) - $25, (650)3418342
LADIES MCGREGOR Golf Clubs
Right handed with covers and pull cart
$150 o.b.o. (650)344-3104
MEN'S ROSSIGNOL Skis.
good condition, 650-341-0282.

$95.00,

MENS NORDICA ski boots for sale, size


10, $60.00, 650-341-0282.
NEW 8" tactical knife, one hand open
$19 650-595-3933
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine
(650)368-3037

$99

SET OF Used Golf Clubs with Cart for


$50. (650)593-4490
SOCCER BALLS - $8.00 each (like new)
4 available. (650)341-5347
TENNIS PRINCE Pro rackets (2) with
cover - $40. ea. (650)341-8342
TENNIS PRINCE Pro rackets (2) with
cover - $40. ea. (650)341-8342
TREADMILL BY PRO-FORM. (Hardly
Used). 10% incline, 2.5 HP motor, 300lb
weight capacity. $329 (650)598-9804
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
VINTAGE NASH Cruisers Mens/ Womens Roller Skates Blue indoor/outdoor sz
6-8. $60 B/O. (650)574-4439

BEDSIDE COMMODE like new $15


650.952.3466
ELECTRIC WHEELCHAIR, great shape,
only 5 years old, $500 or best offer. Call
anytime, (650)713-6272
MEDLINE MEDSOFT Vinyl Pillows,
20"x26"
(15
available)
$5/each.
650.952.3466
NOVA WALKER with storage box &
seat; never used; already assembled;
$70.00 cash only. 415-298-4545

Garage Sales

GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!

List your upcoming


garage sale,
moving sale,
estate sale,
yard sale,
rummage sale,
clearance sale, or
whatever sale you
have...

WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for


info (650)851-0878

Reach over 84,450 readers


from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.

WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set


set - $25. (650)348-6955

Call (650)344-5200

WOMEN'S NORDICA ski boots, size 8


1/2. $50 650-592-2047

Cabinetry

379 Open Houses

OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200

380 Real Estate Services


HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journals
weekly Real Estate Section.

Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.

440 Apartments
BELMONT 1 BRs, large, clean and quiet, great neighborhood, no smoking, pets
or vouchers. $1,895 and up. Call
(650)592-1271

470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660

620 Automobiles
1993 CHEVY Station Wagon, 1 owner
64,000 miles $3,900 (650)342-0852.
CHEVY 10 HHR . 68K. EXCELLENT
CONDITION. $8888. (650)274-8284.

Contractors

Cleaning

25

620 Automobiles

620 Automobiles

645 Boats

2007 BMW X-5, One Owner, Excel. Condition Sports package 3rd row seats
$21,995 obo Call (650)520-4650

MERCEDES BENZ 02 SL500, both


tops, 50K miles, brilliant silver, Cherry
condition! Always garaged. $19,500.
(650)726-8623

2003 P-15 West Wight Potter sailboat,


excellend
condition.
$7,200.
Call
(650)347-2559

2012 MAZDA CX-7 SUV Excellent


condition One owner Fully loaded Low
miles $19,950 obo (650)520-4650

Dont lose money


on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $45
Well run it
til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CADILLAC 99 DeVille Concours,
98,500 miles, $3,500 or best offer.
(650)270-6637
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
DODGE
99 Van, Good Condition,
$5,500, childs play three, call
(650)481-5296

GOT AN OLDER
CAR, BOAT, OR RV?
Do the humane thing.
Donate it to the
Humane Society.
Call 1- 800-943-8412

MERCURY 09 Marquis. 4 Door 11,000


miles. White. Like new. $16,000.
(650) 726-9610.

Construction

VOLKSWAGEN 93 Fox, 5 speed, power brakes, air cond., 21K miles, runs
great! $2,700. Call (650)369-8013

625 Classic Cars


1955 CHEVY BEL AIR 2 door, Standard
Transmission V8 Motor, non-op $22,000
obo. (650)952-4036.
86 CHEVY CORVETTE. Automatic.
93,000 miles. Sports Package.$6,800
obo. (650) 952-4036.

670 Auto Service

AA SMOG

Complete Repair & Service


$29.75 plus certificate fee
(most cars)

869 California Drive .


Burlingame

(650) 340-0492

CHEVY 65 Impala 2DR Coupe. 113K


miles. 4 BL Carb. $8,500.
(415) 412-1292.

MENLO ATHERTON
AUTO REPAIR
WE SMOG ALL CARS

CHEVY 69 CORVETTE 350 V/8 4speed


Flared Fenders-Retro Mod $16,500 obo
Call (650)369-8013

650 -273-5120

FORD 63 thunderbird Hardtop, 390 engine, Leather Interior. Will consider


$4,500 /OBO (650)364-1374
FORD 64 Falcon. 4DR Sedan. 6 cyl.
auto/trans $3,500.00. (650) 570-5780.

630 Trucks & SUVs


CHEVROLET 2014 express 2500 cargo
van 31,000 miles excellent cond.
$24,000 or trade class B or smaller
camper (650)591-8062
DODGE 01 DURANGO, V-8 SUV, 1
owner, dark blue, CLEAN! $3,500/obo.
Call (650)492-1298
MAZDA 04 Tribute, Limited, 175K miles,
$4,400. (650)342-6342

640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS, with
mounting hardware and other parts $35.
Call (650)670-2888

1279 El Camino Real

Menlo Park

www.MenloAthertonAutoRepair

670 Auto Parts


BRIDGESTONE TURANZA RFT (Run
Flat) 205/55/16 EL 42 All Season Like
New $100. (650)483-1222
BRIDGESTONE TURANZA RFT (Run
Flat) 205/55/16 EL42 used 70% left $80.
(650)483-1222
FRONT END for 1956 Chevy 210 car,
complete! Rusty but trusty. $1,200. Call
(650)341-1306
NEW CONTINENTAL Temporary tire
mounted on 5 lug rim Size T125/70/R1798M $100. (650)483-1222
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912

680 Autos Wanted

NEW M/C tire Metzeler Z6 120/70ZR-18


$50 650-595-3933

Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets


Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483

Construction

Decks & Fences

MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.

CALEDONIAN
MASONRY INC

State License #377047


Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500

BBQ Season Coming!


We can design your
outdoor living
experience.
*BBQs *Pizza Ovens
*Patios *Flagstone
*Concrete/Foundation

Electricians

Call For Free Estimate:

ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE

(650) 525-9154

650-322-9288

for all your electrical needs


ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP

ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!

Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

Concrete

INSIDE OUT
ELECTRIC, INC

LEMUS CONSTRUCTION
(650)271-3955
Dry-rot & Termite Repair

Deck Repair & New Construction


Staircase Repair & New Construction

Siding Installation
Bathroom Remodel & Painting
Free Estimates Fully Insured
Lic. #913461

Mena Plastering

Residential/Commercial Service
Electrical Panel Upgrades
Remodels / New Construction
Trusted Owner Operated
since 2002.
Lic #808182

(650)515-1123
Gardening

LAWN MAINTENANCE

Drywall and Plaster


Interior and Exterior
Window & Patchwork Repair

Drought Tolerant Planting


Drip Systems, Rock Gardens
Pressure Washing,
and lots more!

(415) 420-6362

Call Robert
STERLING GARDENS
650-703-3831
Lic #751832

Free Estimates

Lic#625577 Bonded & Insured

26

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday June 20, 2016

Housecleaning
CONSUELOS HOUSE
CLEANING
Bi-Weekly/Once a Month,
Moving In & Out
28 yrs. in Business

Free Estimates, 15% off First Visit

(650)219-4066
Lic#1211534

Hauling

Hauling

AAA RATED!

JONS HAULING

INDEPENDENT
HAULERS

$40 & UP
HAUL

PENINSULA
CLEANING

Since 1988/Licensed & Insured


Monthly Specials
Fast, Dependable Service

BONDED
FREE ESTIMATES

A+ BBB Rating

RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERICAL

1-800-344-7771
Gutters

Serving the peninsula since 1976

FREE ESTIMATES

Junk and debris removal, yard/int


clearing, furniture, appliance hauling
www.jonshauling.com

(650)393-4233

Free Estimates

Landscaping

Plumbing

Tree Service

SEASONAL LAWN

MEYER
PLUMBING
SUPPLY

Hillside Tree

MAINTENANCE
Drought Tolerant Planting
Drip Systems, Rock Gardens
Pressure Washing,
and lots more!

Painting

CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up

Furniture / Appliance / Disposal


Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo

Interior & Exterior


Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates

Call for Free Estimate

(650)368-8861

CHEAP
HAULING!

Fences Tree Trimming


Decks Concrete Work
Kitchen and Bathroom
remodeling
Free Estimates

(650)288-9225
(650)350-9968

contrerashandy12@yahoo.com

SENIOR HANDYMAN

Specializing in any size project

Painting Electrical
Carpentry Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience

Retired Licensed Contractor

650-201-6854
THE VILLAGE
CONTRACTOR

Licensed General and


Painting Contractor
Int/Ext Painting Carpentry
Sheetrock, Tile, Stucco & Remodels
Lic#979435
CALL FOR GREAT RATES!

(650)701-6072

MICHAELS
PAINTING

Serving the Peninsula


since 1989
Landscaping

NATE LANDSCAPING
* Tree Service * Fence
* Deck * Pavers
* Pruning & Removal
* New Lawn * Irrigation
* All Concrete * Ret. Wall
* Sprinkler System
* Stamp Concrete
* Yard Clean-Up,
Haul & Maintenance

Free Estimate

650.353.6554
Lic. #973081

REED
ROOFERS

JON LA MOTTE

Lic #514269

CONTRERAS HANDYMAN
SERVICES

650-350-1960

Serving the entire Bay Area


Residential & Commercial

PAINTING

Starting at $40 & Up


www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592

Handy Help

2030 S Delaware St
San Mateo

Roofing

(650)341-7482

Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700

Toilets, Sinks, Vanities,


Faucets, Water heaters,
Whirlpools and more!
Wholesale Pricing &
Closeout Specials.

License #931457

(650) 591-8291

Service

LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
Trimming

Pruning

Shaping
Large

Removal
Grinding

Stump

Free
Estimates
Mention

The Daily Journal


to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Window Washing

WINDOW
WASHING

(650) 574-0203
lic#628633

NICK MEJIA PAINTING

A+ Member BBB Since 1975


Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Staining, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!

(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564

Plumbing
BELMONT PLUMBING
Complete Local Plumbing Svc
Water Heaters, Drain Clearing
Faucets, Sinks, Bathtubs
Showers, Toilets, Gas Repair
Bonded & Insured
Lic #836489 C-36

650-766-1244

Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contractors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their license number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday June 20, 2016

Cemetery

Dental Services

Furniture

LASTING
IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST
PRIORITY

Implant & Orthodontict Center


1702 Miramonte Ave. Suite B
Mountain View

I - SMILE

STOOLS*BAR*DINETTES

Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Clothing
FOOTWEAR ETC.
Offering 30 years of comfort
and exemplary service
Mephisto
Clarks
Vionic
Dansko
Naot
UGG
800-720-0572
www.footwearetc.com/locations

Exceptional.
Reliable. Innovative
650-282-5555
RUSSO DENTAL CARE
Dental Implants
Free Consultation& Panoramic
Digital Survey
1101 El Camino RL ,San Bruno

(650)583-2273

www.russodentalcare.com

COMPUTER
PROBLEMS?

Viruses, lost data, hardware or


software issues? Contact Geeks
On Site! 24/7 Service. Friendly
Repair Experts. Macs and PCs
Call for FREE diagnosis.
1-800-715-9068

Dental Services
COMPLETE IMPLANT
Dentistry Under One Roof

(650)591-3900

Tons of Furniture to match


your lifestyle

Peninsula Showroom:
930 El Camino Real, San Carlos
Ask us about our
FREE DELIVERY

Health & Medical


EYE EXAMINATIONS

579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net

Food

PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA

Because Flavor Still Matters


365 B Street
San Mateo
(650) 343-4123

Computer

CALIFORNIA

SKIN TASTIC
MEDICAL LASER
Cosmetic Spa Cool Sculpting
Laser&Cosmetic Dermatology
1838 El Camino Rl#130
Burlingame. 650 542-7055
www.skintasticmedicalspa.com

www.smpanchovilla.com

Insurance
RED HOT CHILLI PEPPER

The most authentic SoutheastAsian/Indo-Chinese cuisine in the Bay


Area, served family style!
Our dynamic menu offers
plenty of options to carnivorous,
vegetarian or vegan diners!
1125 San Carlos Ave, San Carlos

650-453-3055

AFFORDABLE

LIFE INSURANCE

Eric L. Barrett,

CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF


President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226

Same day treatment


Evening & Saturday appts available
Peninsula Dental Implant Center
1201 St Francisco Way, San Carlos
650.232.7650

LARGEST SELECTION
Every day discount prices
Outstanding quality

27

Insurance

Music

Travel

TURNING 65 this year?

Music Lessons
Sales Repairs Rentals

FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP

363 Grand Ave, So. San Francisco

www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10

Medicare Supplement Insurance


Low cost-guaranteed coverage

Collins Insurance
650-701-9700

Bronstein Music
(650)588-2502

www.collinscoversyou.com

bronsteinmusic.com

Legal Services

Real Estate Loans

LEGAL

REFINANCE
HARD MONEY
AT LOWER RATE

DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded

DIRECT PRIVATE LENDER


ALL CREDIT ACCEPTED
Since 1979

WACHTER

INVESTMENTS, INC.

legaldocumentsplus.com

348-7191

Moving

Real Estate Services

RJ MOVING SERVICES

*SALES * LEASING
* PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Sales: 1.49% commission
Property Management: 4% fee
Personalized service

(650)574-2087

"I am not an attorney. I can only


provide self help services at your
specific direction."

Do you need Packing,


Unpacking, Loading,
Unloading, Movers, Cleaning
Give us a call Free Estimate.
www.rjms.goodbarber.com
we can help.
209-587-3150

Real Estate Broker


CA BRE#746683
NMLS #348288

Peninsula Prime Realty


650-591-0119

info@peninsulaprimerealty.com

Marketing

SALES LEASING
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT

GROW

Serving the Bay Area


since 1980

YOUR SMALL BUSINESS


Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter

Massage Therapy

BEST ASIAN
BODY MASSAGE
$39.99/hr
Call (650) 787-9969
Free Parking Behind Building
Mon-Fri, 10am-9pm
Wknds-Holidays Call Ahead

1838 El Camino #103,


Burlingame

First 2 callers get special


2.99% sales commission
both sides of transaction
Real Estate Unlimted
(415)585-2233
luckyaltman@aol.com
CA BRE Lic# 00621471

(650) 595-7750

28

LOCAL

Monday June 20, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

CAVS
Continued from page 1

REUTERS

Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James (23) handles the ball against Golden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry (30) during the third quarter in game seven of the NBA Finals at Oracle Arena Sunday.

Exhibitor space and sponsorships available!


Call 650-344-5200

take-all Game 7 providing the thrilling finale with James


as the finals MVP disarming two-time reigning MVP
Stephen Curry and his record-setting Warriors.
James almost single-handedly carried the Cavs back into
this series and finished with 27 points, 11 assists and 11
rebounds as the Cavs captured their first championship in
franchise history and gave their city its first major sports
winner since the Browns won the NFL title in 1964. He also
had three blocked shots and two steals, overcoming five
turnovers.
CLEVELAND! This is for you! James bellowed in his
postgame interview before being announced as finals MVP.
An emotional James fell to the floor when this one ended
with a second win in six days on Golden States imposing
home floor, surrounded by his teammates. Only seconds
earlier, he went down in pain with 10.6 seconds left after
being fouled by Draymond Green while going for a dunk,
then came back out to make the second of two free throws.
After four successful seasons in Miami, James came back
to the Cavs and vowed to win the title this franchise and
championship-starved city so coveted.
Cleveland did it after a coaching change, with Tyronn Lue
taking over in January for the fired David Blatt.
We made history tonight, Lue said. Cleveland, Ohio,
were coming back, baby!
Kyrie Irving scored 26 points to cap his brilliant finals,
including a 3-pointer over Curry with 53 seconds left.
Curry sat briefly on the bench to take in the scene after
the Warriors made their last basket with 4:39 left.
Green had 32 points, 15 rebounds and nine assists, but
the Warriors record-setting season ended without the only
prize this close-knit Strength In Numbers crew cared
about from way back in the beginning through the record
24-0 start as Coach of the Year Steve Kerr was out, Currys
second consecutive MVP campaign, and the 73 regular-season wins to break the 1995-96 Chicago Bulls mark.
They might always be remembered as one of the best
teams ever that couldnt close it out.
The Cavs staved off elimination twice to force Game 7
back at Oracle Arena, where the Warriors went up 2-0 with a
pair of lopsided wins to start this series.

DRUGS
Continued from page 1

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For information call the Daily Journal (650) 344-5200


$PNQMFUFTDIFEVMFBUTNEBJMZKPVSOBMDPNGBNJMZGVOt&WFOUTTVCKFDUUPDIBOHF

grams for the publics benefit.


The state board spent several hours at its June 8 meeting
considering new regulations including whether to prohibit
certain medications from take-back bins at pharmacies.
It is expected to prepare new draft language of the regulations for public comment leading up to its next board meeting late next month.
Supervisor Adrienne Tissier pushed for San Mateo
Countys passage of the ordinance last year.
The ordinance calls for any producer of a prescription or
non-prescription drug offered for sale in the county to participate in an approved drug stewardship program for its
collection and disposal.
Its an effort to broaden the countys effort to keep the
drugs from being flushed down the toilet or taken by mistake by seniors or children.
Some police stations in the county have take-back bins
but pharmacies are currently not required.
Unused medicines that are not disposed of safely can hurt
people and our environment. Nearly 17 percent of San
Mateo County suicides are due to drug poisoning. We have
a responsibility to help prevent more deaths and environmental damage, Tissier previously told the Daily Journal.
San Mateo Countys ordinance calls for any producer of
a prescription or non-prescription drug offered for sale in
the county to participate in an approved drug stewardship
program for its collection and disposal.
The California Healthcare Institute, which advocates on
behalf of the biomedical community, opposes the ordinances.
Manufacturers are also opposed to it and was recently able
to get Los Angeles County to stop moving forward with a
similar ordinance, said Guillermo Rodriguez, policy and
communications director of the San Francisco Department
of the Environment.
So far, he said, seven counties have passed similar ordinances.
But San Francisco and San Mateo counties ordinances
require the manufacturer to pay for the stewardship programs, Rodriguez said.
The hope is that the pharmacy board drafts regulations
consistent with what the counties want to do, he said.
In 2006, San Mateo County started its first-in-the-nation
medicine collection program at police stations. Since that
time, 143,000 pounds of medicine have been safely disposed through 14 collection sites. But just 36 percent of
nearly 2,000 residents surveyed said they took their
unwanted medicine to the collection sites, according to the
county Health System.