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SECRETS OF ATM

TROUBLESHOOTING

BY: BrainWaveTech

APPLIED ATM KNOWLEDGE

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED COPYRIGHT 2003


SECRETS OF ATM TROUBLESHOOTING

SECTION 1: INTRODUCTION

SECTION 2: COMMON SENSE TECHNICIAN

SECTION 3: INTRODUCTION TO THE ATM

SECTION 4: OVERVIEW OF ASSEMBLIES

SECTION 5: ELECTRONIC JOURNAL

SECTION 6: COMMUNICATIONS

SECTION 7: ALARMS AND LOCKS

SECTION 8: ATM FAILURE CODES

SECTION 9: ATM FAILURE CONDITION/SOLUTION1

SECTION 10: ATM FAILURE CONDITION/SOLUTION2

SECTION 11: DIEBOLD I-SERIES PROCEDURE

SECTION 12: NCR 5000 SERIES PROCEDURE

SECTION 13: NCR 55/56/5800 SERIES PROCEDURE

SECTION 14: NCR INKJET PROCEDURE

SECTION 1
INTRODUCTION

INTRODUCTION: 1
SECTION2
COMMON SENSE TECHNICIAN PAGE

USING THE SENSES: 1

TOOLS: 2

DRESSING FOR THE JOB: 2

ATM CALLS: 3

THE CUSTOMER: 4

THE TECHNICIAN: 4

USING THE SENSES:


Over the past 20 years you learn how machines tick, they have noises and sounds which tell you if
gears are grinding, or squeaking. Noise is a big part troubleshooting ATM’s. After a while of working
on them, there are certain sequences of operation, as well as, noises that just stick in the mind. The
successful troubleshooter knows how the machine works through sound, and can identify problems
based on the incorrect sounds right away.

Visible sight in troubleshooting is very important in determining components that may be burned,
swelled, or damaged. Fuses may be open, or parts may be missing, using sight in troubleshooting
means knowing what certain assemblies and parts should look like. “ Are all the teeth on that gear”?.
Dirt can be one of the more deadly qualities in servicing ATM’s, the old saying, “a clean machine runs
and looks better than a dirty one!” Keeping the customer happy by what they see on the outside, can
sometimes cover the dirt on the assemblies on the inside of the machine, but this will catch up to you in
time and failures will occur.

Smell is always a good indicator of parts which are burning, or on there way out. There really shouldn’t
be a smell to an ATM unless it has been freshly painted. Smelly ATM’s can point to “rats” getting into
the ATM, or foreign materials leaking into or around ATM.

Touching certain components, can “zap” them into early retirement by the human hand releasing
thousands of volts of charges built up in the body. A good practice, is to always touch a metal surface
of the ATM, before replacing any PCB cards, or assemblies. This action of discharging the body, can
extend the life of certain I.C chips, and assemblies. A good practice, is to treat all assemblies and
components, as if they are static sensitive. Touch, can also show the technician a badly damaged chip
on an assembly in some cases. Touch, aids in determining smooth surfaces, and one’s that are coated or
coarse.

Common sense can be the biggest benefit to the successful technician working on any piece of
electronic equipment. Not sticking one’s hands into the CRT monitor, while it’s plugged in, is one
example. Most times, common sense is just using simple procedures that should be performed when
every assembly is replaced. For example, “turn off power when replacing/removing any assemblies”.
Take notes, or mark connectors, when removing them from assemblies, to assure there proper
placement. Some technician’s get themselves in a “pickle”, because they can’t remember what they
replaced, or disconnected. The good technician, “wrote it down”! Some people can spend all day,
replacing assemblies, when all they needed to do was check the failure log or clear the fitness.

Then there are those problems which have nothing to do with the ATM, but the network keep’s telling
you if your problem. There are simple and easy steps to follow to eliminate the network from “bossing”
you around. The technician should make the “final judgment”.

TOOLS:

One might think that the ATM service guy or gal needs a truck full of tools to service the ATM. The
truth is that most repairs can be made by a leatherman tool kit on your belt. Most machines do not
required special tools to remove screws or assemblies. There are digital volt meters, which can be
obtained for $20 at any Radio Shack, and mini-testers for communication issues. You can make a loop-
back cable for any ATM, and just the use of a small light weight bag of tools should do the trick.
You should carry the basic tools, along with some cleaning supplies; small bottle of 70% alcohol, tooth
brush, small cotton rags (cut up some old dockers), q-tips and canned air. For lubrication, all you need
is some light weight sewing oil, or nye oil. Radio Shack offers some good teflon lubricate in a tube.
The small carry bag should have a flashlight, allen wrench set, nut-driver set, and a couple of precision
screwdrivers.

Talk to some Technicians who have been servicing ATM’s for years and ask them how there knees
are? Carry a small foam pad in your bag to protect your knees! It is better to be safe than sorry, so
protecting the eyes with glasses is a paramount ideal.

It’s always smart to have back-up tools in your service vehicle. This kit should include a soldering iron,
soldering wick, and solder. Also, you may need some bigger tools like a large crescent wrench, socket
wrench set, extender bar, and drill kit.

Cleaning the inside of the ATM by using canned air and rags should work. A small vacuum comes in
handy when there’s allot of dirt. Using STP (yellow bottle) on the fascia’s of the ATM will make them
look new and keep them from fading over the years.

DRESSING FOR THE JOB:

Why would anyone care how one looks when working on the ATM? Experience has shown that
wearing the wrong pants and shirt, can ruin the day, or even the pocketbook. The use of dockers in
dark colors can hide the dirt and grease. Don’t wear a white shirt because it will get dirty, just use
common sense.

Until you get to clean all your machines correctly, you are bound to get dirty. Some guy’s use cover-
alls, which work great. When rebuilding a pump-assembly, consider using plastic gloves. Always carry
some hand cleaner and paper towel to clean hands after finished with the repair if needed. If you want,
carry some Clorox wipes to clean hands after service call.

ATM CALLS:

Most times you are paged by a network which monitors the functionality of the ATM. If the ATM has a
fault, the network is set-up automated to sent out a page message of the fault. The page can be real
time, or be delayed, which could result in more down time on the ATM. 1st line technicians get the first
call to respond and resolve the problem with the ATM, if they cannot resolve the problem, it is then
escalated to the 2nd line technician.

Some ATM repair companies have technician’s that are both 1st and 2nd line which results in quicker
repairs, and less down time for the ATM. The response time for the ATM fault should depend on the
type of call. ATMs which are “hard down” require quicker responses then those who are “wounded”.
For example, the ATM might have only one side down on the dispenser, but the other side is still
depensing cash to the customer.
Contracts determine when the technician responds to the faulted ATM. There are 24/7 contracts, and
some that are only 5 days a weeks from 8 to 5. Depending on the type of machine, and it’s volume,
contracts can be determined by the owner of the machine. In most cases, the bank or owner of the ATM
may want to run there own 1st line calls, and only have a second line contract with a service repair
vendor.

When the technician arrives at the site of the ATM for the repair, he or she may have key’s and access
to the ATM, not requiring a meet with another person. Most cases, the 1st line technician has access to
all the facilities of the ATM, including the vault. He is issued key’s, and combo’s, to the lock. Most
ATM’s have an alarm that need’s to be turned off, before entering the ATM hut, bank or stand-alone
ATM. Some ATM’s do not have any protection at all. These ATM’s can be carted away, and stolen by
the knowledgeable and a well equipped robber. There have been cases of ATM’s being carted off
right in the middle of the day, with no problem’s at all.

When the ATM technician arrives at the ATM, he should let the owner, store or bank know, he or she
is there before starting the service work. Pulling head first into drive-up models, prevents and defers
customer’s away from using the ATM. Most repair companies employ, un-marked vehicles when
servicing the ATM to prevent them from being followed. The most dangerous service work is done on
the Diebold 1074i series drive -up ATM’s after hours, or at nighttime.

Since there is no hut, all access is outside the ATM. A technician can be easily be overtaken by a
robber. If it’s daylight, the ATM technician has less risk to do repair work on the ATM. Most
technicians work alone, and don’t require another representative present to access the ATM. They do
not carry guns, and most do not wear uniforms.

THE CUSTOMER:

If a customer approaches you while you are working on the ATM, it is always important to let them
know nicely that it will be down for quite some time, and it might be better for them to find another
ATM. In some cases, the vault is open and the customer approaches. Depending on the feeling of risk,
announce that you are going to “call the police”, this usually stops them in there tracks. These cases are
remote, and most people are smart enough not to approach, or engage any person while he or she is
working on the ATM.

You wouldn’t believe some of the experiences some technicians have encountered while working on
the ATM. Many technician’s get the common, “door knocking” while they are trying to repair a “hut”
type ATM. The customer want’s know, “what’s going on”, like they own the ATM! They get mad, and
start pounding on the door, at this point inform them that you are working on the ATM, and will call
the police if needed. Some open models in grocery stores, you get the “did you find any extra cash”, or
“I lost $60 dollars in that machine last week”, these are all silly, and should be ignored. Then you
always get the, “ Are you are giving away any free samples”, or “ boy, he’s got a great job”!
Sometimes I wonder why people want to mess with the ATM technician.

The upset owner, or customer is always right when they have lost money in the ATM, or have been
shorted. These people are either “right”, or “wrong”, they are “truthful or not”. It is possible even for
today’s high tech machines to short the customer. The truth lies in the receipt and the balancing of the
ATM. There are a few example’s of people who were shorted $200.00 and the money had been taken
out of there account. The technician should never take money out of the ATM to give to any customer,
until the machine has been properly balance, and checked for an overage of cash. The best line of
defense is to tell the customer to, “call there bank”, then the technician should check the error logs,
counter’s and calibration through testing.

If a customer losses there ATM card, the technician should never assume that the ATM is working
incorrectly and give them there card, unless it happens when you are there. Then the customer’s ID
needs to be checked. The card may have been taken because of the card reader fault. There are cases,
that the card retain bin is completely full with 50 cards when the technician arrives at the ATM.
Damaged cards should be destroyed, and in most cases the retained cards are picked up by the bank or
loading crew, then they are destroyed.

THE TECHNICIAN:

The technician who is honest should ask himself just one question; “Have I ever taken any cash/cards
from any ATM?”, if the answer is “NO”, then you are a good and honest technician. There was a
technician who thought that everytime he visited an ATM and just took $20.00 each time, that it would
never catch up to him. This person is in jail, serving 5 years for his stupidity. These ATM’s are very
reliable, and should balance everytime, with no discrepancies. A trail of deceit can exist for those
technician’s who think they can take from the till. This trail will catch up will them in a short time
ending there careers.
SECTION 3
INTRODUCTION TO THE ATM
PAGE

INTRODUCTION: 1

GENERAL PRACTICE: 1

ATM MACHINES : DIEBOLD 1

ATM MACHINES: NCR 3

ATM MACHINES: Triton______________________________________6


INTRODUCTION:

Knowing how to troubleshoot successfully has taken many years of understanding how the ATM works
and why certain things occur. Using your senses by knowing how a machine should act can help you in
troubleshooting the problem the first time, thus reducing call back’s and customer complaints. Each
type of ATM has presented many different problems and most of them reoccur over and over again.
These will be presented, as well as, some that are most likely to occur in the future. Each device will be
covered and related to the model which the problem occurs along with a list of known cures.

GENERAL PRACTICE:

Many networks don’t describe the failures in detail when the technician is called. Usually a general
failure is created unless the call came in manually placed by the customer or 1st line technician. Time
going to the site, by contacting the network, can be saved if the technician researches the problem by
asking detailed questions. This may not apply to all service calls, but networks can call a technician for
a card reader fault, when it is actually a keyboard issue. It is good practice to check the failure codes or
healthy screen upon arrival prior to servicing the ATM. Sometimes a story-line of the failure is readily
apparent when reviewing the problem or ongoing fault issue.

ATM MACHINES : DIEBOLD

The wide variety of types of ATM machines means we must treat each brand separately. Diebold for
example, requires semi-annual PM’s on there dispenser’s to prevent or replace wear parts. The
dispenser has gone from a 1300 series air type pick system, to a friction type picking system. This
friction system known as the MMD, or multi-media-dispensor is now the main stay used by Diebold.

Unfortunately this type of friction feed system requires that new cash be loaded a certain way and not
mixed with older cash. Most dispenser related pick failures are due to incorrect loading of cash in these
machine’s, or dirty and worn wear parts. Depending on the amount of cash dispensed the MMD
dispenser requires cleaning and replacement of wear parts every six months. The top plate must be
lubricated and the belts must be cleaned. The double detect sensors must be adjusted correctly. The use
of 70% alcohol with a toothbrush and several clean small cotton rag’s, along with Teflon grease (Radio
Shack) is all that is required.

This Machine has evolved from a simple “STP” (micro) type Processor, then a computer “BTP” (386)
and “CTP” (486), to currently a “G” (Pentium) type series processor. As technology evolves in these
processors, the need for programming and proprietary software has arisen. Now the customer must
“buy” the software rights with the machines if they want to be able to load them again in the future.

The easy way to avoid calling Diebold to reprogram your ATM, is by have a copy of the hard drive for
that machine with the machine. As long as you are servicing the machine and not selling there
software, a copy of the hard drive is legal as long as it stays with the machine. Each ATM is set-up
differently and as long as the machine is working you can copy the hard drive. Remember that the extra
hard drive must stay in the machine.

The Diebold ATM, in general, has been built to require service at certain intervals throughout it’s life.
There is a tendency for “rats” to get into there standalone machines and make a home on the CTP
processor PCB’s. Also, they like to hang out in the dispenser area’s. The newer G-series computer’s
have the processor board inverted preventing any rodent invasions. Keep in mine, that the holes under
these machine allow these rats to get in and eventually will cost you allot of money to replace these
boards. By inserting vented covers, this problem will be avoided in the future. Also, since the CTP is
exposed to dust and dirt, it may be wise to construct a cover to keep liquids and dirt from settling on it.

Always find time to clean out the filter inserts on these machines. This cleaning will insure that clean
air will get into the machine keeping the inside cleaner requiring less service.

The Epson Printers used by Diebold are very reliable and for the most part maintenance free until a jam
occurs when loading paper. These printers just require that you keep the home sensors clean and the
printhead shaft clean and lubricated. Use a very thin sewing oil with a q-tip .The use of canned air
keeps dust out of the cutting assembly and solenoid.

Diebold’s newer style thermal printers can present a problem when used with black coupon paper.
When first setting up thermal printers to use black mark paper, some printers miss the mark and require
the sensor be adjusted. Also, black mark coupon paper can jam in the front at the exit transport and
require that the guide plates be widened.

You should be aware that if the ATM loses power, or is sent a load that when coupon paper is used,
two receipt together are allowed to come up out of the thermal printer and then into the trash can. What
this does, is fill the trash can, thus allowing the next receipt to jam and cause a fault. This should not be
as much as an issue if the thermal coupon paper is a small roll, or the older style 1064ix models with
the smaller monitors.

Diebold’s newer style 15” monitors have a overheating issue with there stand alone ATM’S. We have
seen a 75% failure rate due to heat. The small confined spaces of the ATM does not allow enough air
flow to cool off this large monitor. If installing one of these standalone ATM’S, make sure you remove
the back cover for extra ventilation. Even better, modify the bracket to install a fan which would pull
the hot air out of the ATM, thus allowing the large Monitor to stay cooler. The problem is, that the
switching power supply in the C72216 15” monitor is getting too hot and the large capacitor’s and
others are drying up and swelling. The monitor starts’ to degrade after 15 months, then eventually
fails, blowing the fuse and possibly blowing out other components.

On older Diebold model’s, the PTR’s (photo eyes) for the monitors become dirty many times and can
affect the brightness of the ATM. Diebold Card Reader’s are very reliable and solid, as long as, the O-
rings are replaced every two years and rollers kept clean along with the shutter assembly. The Diebold
depository is very reliable and should only require replacement of ribbons. Some machine’s require
you disconnect power before removal or insertion of this assembly.

The use of bubble membrane keyboards in Diebold have presented a problem. The membrane becomes
intermittent and the main keyboard, along with the left and right side keyboards, need to be replaced
after a few years of use.

The power supply is very reliable, but sometimes requires replacement. It is very important when
replacing any PCB (printed circuit board) on a Diebold to insure that the strapping is correct. Also, any
board or assembly replacement must be done with the power off. Using proper static resist techniques,
prevent failures down the road. In general, the Diebold ATM is a ATM that requires PM’s and BI-
annual maintenance. This would place it at the middle of the scale for reliability as compared to the
NCR newer series ATM’S.
ATM MACHINES: NCR

NCR series ATM’S use a similar 1300 air type pick system and are generally more reliable than the
Diebold machines when dealing with new cash. A yearly replacement of pick cups is only required and
simply keeping the pick line clean will extend the life and reduce the possibility of failure in the future.
In the older NCR models, rebuilding of the pumps is only required after two 2-3 years and the gears
should not be lubricated at all. Gear breaking can be a result of dirty pick lines, dirt build-up in the gear
teeth or environmental conditions.

Cold is the worst enemy to this type of dispenser, gears break and case major jams. Make sure the
heater is working correctly in the vault. On the older NCR, if the vault is getting to hot causing Ink jets
to explode, considered moving the second fan under the processor down to the shelf in the left side of
the vault. If this continues, the use of a thermostat can help when tied into the back plane heater
assembly. As a last resort, a fan/heater can be put on the shelf in the vault. Just make sure the heat
setting is low and midway or ink-jet’s may explode, causing problems later.

This type of dispenser has been proven as the best and most reliable when dealing with all kinds of
cash.

NCR has kept the using the inkjet assembly on there Depository system which create overwhelming
problems as compared to ribbon dot matrix systems. The inkjet’s must be kept cool and they have a
shelf life. Also, the law of gravity along with heat will thin the ink causing the inkjet to clog and make
the print quality poor. The older series depositories have more problems than the newer style, but the
Inkjet has been a wide spread problem for the customer. On the older NCR, a fan behind the audit
printer works when the interlock switch is engaged, this fan is very important in keeping the vault cool
during the summer months and reducing the chance for Inkjet issues.

If an explosion of the Inkjet occurs, the circuit card is always covered in ink. It is always best to, either
replace the whole assembly if old (4 years), or take the assembly completely apart on a white cloth.
Each piece must be ink free before the reassemble, or ink may squeeze back onto the connection point.
(Use 70 % alcohol to clean up)

The NCR processor has evolved nicely from a floppy with processor PCB, to a simple computer
system. Software and programming are generally not a problem, while the processor has become very
reliable. Hard drives can be replaced easily along with the processor PCB. The processor needs to have
the same amount of ram (plug in cards 4mb) and can be easily moved from one board to another.

Sometimes these machines lock-up and report conditions like, “ keyboards not attached” or start
loading the program then stop and reset again. A lot of times, this is due to the program being corrupted
or a device is preventing the loading process. Software can be reloaded, but rarely does this cure the
problem. Sometimes the “bape PCB” (DES key encryption board), which is located in the housing
containing the main customer keyboard, can be replaced fixing this problem. Remember, when
replacing the bape PCB the “DES key’s” (Data encryption security keys) must be re-inserted into the
ATM.

The older NCR can lock up causing it to loose it’s memory during a extended power outage. This is
because the battery housed on the mother board, behind the I/O board and processor board, has become
exhausted and requires replacement. The best way to replace the battery is to clip it out, then run a
wire from any chassis ground to your new battery. Attach a wire from the memory retain switch (going
to mother PCB), to the positive side of the battery . Attach the battery on the side of the cage with tie
wraps. Always test this by a power fail or attaching a DVM and measuring the voltage (+5VDC)

On newer NCR ATM’s, the lighting system has presented a problem causing some locked up
machines. The ballast made by Thorn gets to hot because the light is generally on all the time.
Disconnecting this ballast, by removing the red wire from it’s input should cure the problem.

The power supply is very reliable, but should be disconnected every year and taken outside to be
blown out, this will increase it’s life-span. Sometimes, paper from the printers can get into the fans in
front of the computer and make noises.

NCR printers come in a wide variety of configuration’s based on the model you are dealing with. Older
NCR models employ a dot matrix printer in which several different issue’s can occur. These printers
require they be kept very clean and lubricated on the rollers and printhead shaft assembly. The
printhead cable has been a proven problem, it can print upside-down or cause intermittent printing.
Both the audit and receipt printer’s are the same, other then the cutter assembly, strapping and dip
switch settings. The printers are very reliable if kept clean and running with new ribbons.

The NCR older style transports do present problems, if the O-rings are not replaced every two years,
and the assembly lubricated. The white roller wheels can be removed, or even moved, but replacement
assures a even flow distribution of paper through the transport assembly and out to the customer. The
tension springs are very important, causing the correct pressure to be placed on the white rollers. If
your older NCR is resetting when exiting from the diagnostics menu, usually you are getting
interference from the motor on the transport.

This transport motor can cause noise, or load the power supply down causing a reset. PM the transport,
by cleaning and lubrication, check for loose belt tension on the motor main drive, then replace the
motor if needed.

Newer NCR receipt printers are very reliable, and most times only require cleaning, ribbon replacement
and lubrication. When the dot matrix printhead is not printing well, it can be disconnected (power off)
and lubricated through the bottom with 1-2 small drops of nye oil (sewing oil). This usually cures the
print quality, without the need for a printhead replacement. If the ribbon is not turning when the
printhead moves across the shaft, the counter rotation spring can be replaced.

NCR Thermal printers are very reliable, but are sometimes are affected by heat. The exit transport
rubber roller can slip if the ATM gets too hot in the top hat area. Keep this rubber transport feeder belt
clean, and replace every 4 years depending on condition.

The NCR older style card readers can be used in the newer machines, by attaching the side board and
moving the power connector. Sometimes fitting these card reader’s in the newer style ATM’S can
present a problem, but when needed it can be done.

The NCR older style card readers should be blown out, and the O-rings cleaned or replaced every six
months, when considering use. The front shutter assembly can present a problem due to dirt, and the
solenoid/shutter assembly sticking. No lubrication should be put in this shutter area that will attract
dust.

Blowing out and aligning the entry switches may be required. The newer style and older style card
readers both have card entry issues. The magnetic entry detect head requires replacement, sometimes
yearly. This can easily done in the field by soldering in a new detect head.

The black/green wheels of the card reader should be kept clean. Carefully, use a toothbrush with 70%
alcohol and a clean small cotton rag. Also, clean the white entry pressure roller on top of the magnetic
read head. This will prevent card jams, and ongoing card reader issues. Run a cleaning card through
and verify operation.

Newer card reader have belts, but still require cleaning. Sometimes the sensors can become blocked. In
some cases, the sensors can not be cleaned in the field. The card reader must be split open on the bench
and the circuit card or the sensor’s replaced.

Keyboards have always been a problem. The “zero” or “1” key can be hard to press. In most cases,
this requires the replacement of the keyboard membrane. Sometimes, you can get away with the
placement of electrical tape on the affected button, or using a wafer thin disc taped to the membrane.
You must have at least one keyboard attached when testing the keyboards. The left and right side
keyboard, can be damaged very easily when installing or removing them, use care in there removal.

The older NCR monitor’s are fairly solid, but sometimes just go out. There are adjustments and plenty
of room to remove these monitors for adjustment with power on. Brightness levels and contrast are safe
adjustments to make if an adjustment is required.

Newer series green monochrome monitors do present a problem with the light sensing PTR. To achieve
maximum brightness, bypass the outside PTR sensor. Cut both the yellow and orange wire and attach
to each other at PTR input connector. By shorting out this connector, your monitor will achieve
maximum brightness. You can also make the same adjustments as above, just be careful that the
contrast is not set to high. Make sure to tuck the PTR wire, that was cut, out of sight and secure.

For reliability and less service calls , the NCR ATM has been proven a leader of the pack
ATM MACHINES: Triton

The Triton ATM was developed to put into gas station’s and bingo halls. It is not really meant to be a
high volume machine, but they have been used in casino’s and other applications. The major difference
between this machine and the other’s is the part’s issue. In most cases replacement of the block
assembly is required by the technician.

The older Triton ATM’S are “POS” or point of sale dial-up’s. They have there own internal modem
and most operations are run off the main board. Software can be standard, Triton or custom made for
the machine. Programming is a challenge and time consuming. A lap top is usually required to interface
with the ATM via a RS-232 cable. The lap top computer is required, when changing networks to newer
software, and when upgrading software. The Triton main board hold the program and require
replacement on occasion.

The main board handle’s the modem, display driver, processor, keyboard input and card reader input,
as well as, interface to the printer control board and electronics journal module. The dispenser is the
most reliable part of the machine, but it also has wear parts that need replacing, depending on use. The
card reader is a deep pocket swipe type, that is very reliable, as long as, foreign material does not get
into it (i.e. pennies and pieces of small paper).

The older Triton keyboard gets worn out yearly in the casino environment, and requires replacement.
Static electricity has been known to shoot throughout the key board and take out component U-10 on
the main board. The U-10 IC (integrated circuit) 74HC138 should be placed in a socket for future
replacements.

Triton printers are not made to run constantly, and can burn up if ran too long during a electronic
journal download. These printers, if well used, can last about a year in a casino environment. They are
not really field repairable, and should be kept as clean as possible with the use of canned air.

The Triton Printer interface PCB is very reliable, along with the electronic journal. The LCD display
backlight goes out on occasion, and can be replaced, without replacing the whole assembly. The LCD
display can get lines in it, and requires replacement. These displays are very susceptible to outside
interference’s, such as neon lights and fluorescence.

The power supply is very reliable and should outlast the life of the ATM

The Triton main board replacement should also include a measurement of the lithium battery, which
holds the master keys. When the master key is corrupted, this battery has reached the end of it’s life.

The Triton dispenser parts, which are mostly replaced, have to do with containment of the cassette. The
rails can break off after a while and the locator clips, left and right side, can get worn out, causing the
cassette to pop-out. Keeping the dispenser clean will insure trouble-free operation. Use canned air and
clean the rollers with a mild solution.

If the cassette locks itself into the ATM, due to the reject bin filling up, a set of side screws can be
taken out and the cassette will be released. More often, the cause of the divert filling is, not fanning the
new cash. This new cash should be fanned, through a counter three or more time, before loading into
the cassette.

The 9500 Triton ATM’s are not triple Des key compliant in 2005. Most will be removed and replaced
before then, unless a modification is announced. This ATM is an example of a low cost affordable
solution for gas station’s and restaurants. It has been found to be reliable but, the newer Triton 9600
models are much better designed and less trouble free.
SECTION 4
OVERVIEW OFASSEMBLIES:
PAGE
CARD READER’S: 1
MONITOR’S/CRTs and LCD’s: 2
FASCIA’S: 3
POWER SUPPLIES: 5
Floppy Drives: 6

DIEBOLD PROCESSOR’S: 6
STP PCB’s: 7
CTP PROCESSOR: 8
G-SERIES Processor’s: 9
NCR PROCESSOR’S:5000 SERIES: 9
NCR 5600/5800 PROCESSORS: 11

TRITON 9500: 11
TRITON PROCESSORS 11
TRITON 9600: 13

HARD DRIVEs: 13
Diebold: 13
DIEBOLD SOFTWARE LOAD 14
NCR HARD DRIVES: 14

THERMAL PRINTERS: 14
DIEBOLD THERMAL PRINTERS: 14
NCR PRINTERS:OLDER 5000: 16
NCR NEWER DOT MATRIX: 17
NCR NEWER THERMAL PRINTERS: 17
NCR TRANSPORT ASSEMBLIES: 17

TRITON PRINTERS: 18
TRITON DOT MATRIX/ THERMAL PRINTERS: 18
TRITON TRANSPORTS 18

DIEBOLD DEPOSITORY: 19
NCR OLDER DEPOSITORY 19
NCR NEWER DEPOSITORIES: 20

OVERVIEW OFASSEMBLIES
DISPENSERS: 21
DIEBOLD DISPENSERS MMD 21
1) PRESENTER: 23
2)The Stacker: 24
3) Pick Modules: 24
DOUBLE DETECT SENSOR ADJUSTMENT: 26
Definition of connectors are as follows; 27

NCR DISPENSER’S:NCR 5000 SERIES: 28


The theory of operations is as follows; Dispense test 29
NCR 5000 Dispenser timing: 30

NCR 56/5800 DISPENSERS: 31


Here’s a list of some of the sensors: Presenter 32
Resetting the Control board: 33
Learning Bill Parameters: 33
Currency Dispenser Test (pick modules and cassettes in use) 34
Clearing NVRAM on the Dispenser Driver Board: 34
Terminal Healthy Screen Faults: 35

TRITON DISPENSER: 35

OVERVIEW OF ASSEMBLIES:
CARD READER’S:

Depending on the model, and type of card reader you are working with, several problems can arise. The
card is inserted into the throat of the card reader, and the shutter may not open. The shutter may
hesitate when opening or be erratic in operation. The read head may be damaged, worn-out or just need
cleaning. The shutter assembly may not fire at the solenoid, due to it being sticky, dirty or damaged.
Just getting the card to be inserted may require replacement of the pre-read head, or just the entry
switch needing adjustment. Sometimes, the white spring loaded roller which pushes on the magnetic
portion of the card is not turning, due to dirt.

Once the card enters past the shutter, it needs to be picked up by the rubber rollers. These rollers should
be kept clean using a mild soap solution. Newer rollers are green in color, and the rollers have been
known to melt and come apart. Using the right cleaning solution is very important. The use of cleaning
cards, can clean the read head once the card enters the reader and is picked up by the rollers. This can
be done manually, power should be removed, and the card reader taken out for a complete cleaning.

Some card readers use belts or o-rings. These o-rings can get old and crack, to test, pull and look for
cracks in the rubber. If any cracks are present, replace the o-ring. Clean the o-ring with a mild soap
solution, also, clean the grooves of the pulleys with a tooth brush. Canned air works well to get any
“dust bunny’s from the front entry switch, and clearing any senses under the circuit cards. Use a light
nye oil to lubricate the solenoid if needed, but never use any silicone on the front solenoid-gate
assembly, as this will attract dust and cause future failures.

Slide card readers are more reliable then there counterpart’s relatives, in that they have less moving
parts and possibility of jams. Although, one can insert a penny into the depths of a slide card reader and
cause all kinds of sensor blockage. Some people put chap stick on the magnetic portion of the card, and
then slide it through. This then, coats the worn read head and can cause all kinds of problems. If a
dummy card is cut in half, and barely taped in the middle it enters the card reader, but then the tape
breaks causing a card reader jam.

Card jams keep the 1st line technician very busy. Most people don’t realize that there club card is
attached to their ATM card, and enter them both into the card reader. You would swear up and down,
“how did they do that”? Teasing the card reader can cause faults at the network, and take the machine
out of service. When the card comes out, you can force it back in, while holding on to it, eventually the
machine shows a fault.

It is a federal offense to damage or vandalize any type of banking equipment, but you know the kid’s
these days! There is a story of a man who tried to glue all the card readers on all the ATM’s in a small
town, because he didn’t want his wife to keep taking money out of there account, he is now in jail.

Card readers will remain to be a problem as the first point of entry to the user of the ATM. Keeping
these devices well maintained, should reduce 2nd line service call, the rest is up to the general public.

MONITOR’S/CRTs and LCD’s:

So many different models, and so many different monitors, provide the customer with a variety of
viewing pleasure. Readability is important, but if you cant read the monitor, you out of business.
Keeping the monitor clean and bright should be important to the owner as well as the customer. Most
times, there is a fan blowing dust up into the front of the monitor, and it needs to be remove and
cleaned every three months, along with the interior of the fascia glass.

Most of the time the CRT/monitor is not bright enough, and needs to be modified or adjusted. The
elimination of the PTR sensor will make the monitor as bright as possible, without the use of more
expensive “Hi-Brite” type monitors. Sticker type “Sun-Screens”, can be added to some monitors, or the
fascia glass can be changed to a “Polarized” type.

This polarized glass acts to defect light away from the sun, thus allowing the customer to the screen
more clearly. Most of the fascia glass is very thick, and should be upgraded to clear or gray, if the
monitor requires an upgrade. The hi-brite and Sun-Pro monitors can create a wonderful viewing screen
for the customer, but are very expensive, costing thousands of dollars.

Monitor’s on ATM’s come in a wide variety of sizes and choices. Some have touch screens and color.
Some are orange, green or gray mono-chrome types, which are the least expensive. When making any
adjustments on any monitor’s, the use of a insulated adjustment wand should be required. Some
adjustments can be made electronically on the front of the monitor. The greater the brightness of the
monitor, the hotter it will run, and the likelihood of an earlier retirement.
LCD type display often employ a backlight, which can sometimes go out. These LCD type screens can
also be affected by outside interference, due to neon lights and electrostatic discharge. The LCD
display can be color or monochrome.

It is a known fact that Diebold’s 15 inch C72216 monitors will most likely all fail after about 15-17
months of operation in the stand-alone 1064 model. The reason is that Kristel, the manufacture of the
monitor, never authorized Diebold to put that monitor in that model. The result is, that when one closes
the lid, it’s like slowly baking a cake in the oven.

The slow decay can be prevented by removing the back plate in the top hat, and increasing the
capacitor thermal sizes, in the switching power supply section of the monitor.

By increasing the capacitor’s from 85 degree c to 105 degree c, in the switching power supply section,
and providing more air flow in the top hat, failures of this monitor can be reduced.

FASCIA’S:

Cash pockets open and the money is presented to you. In the old day’s, a “Jesus love’s you note”, was
left by swell people, after they got there money out of the cash pocket. This, of course, take’s the ATM
out of service. Most machines, don’t employ the cash pocket on the fascia, because of this reason, and
go with a presenter type dispense to customer. A door opens and the cash is taken.

Tampering, could occur in some cases, when the top and bottom note remain after it is presented to the
customer. Some networks will deem this as, “money not taken”, and cause the transaction to be
“reversed”. Some crooks have gotten away with a lot of cash using this method. Most times, you can
not do this when the door open’s, because it can cause “tampering”, which also takes the ATM out of
service, and your account is the transaction is never reversed.

The depository open’s, and the customer inserts an envelope filled with 256 ones with a paper clip
attached. Sometimes, this can cause and jam and shut down the depository so a technician has to come
out and remove it. Envelopes should go into the depository when the shutter opens, but people so how
find crack’s through the front of the ATM, and there deposit gets stuck in front of the card reader or
some other place for months on end.

A big rock will damage the front of any fascia due to an upset customer. For some reason, banks often
have them close-by as you drive up to the ATM to use it. If a rock hits’ a NCR 5600 in the fascia,
where the fake card is under the card reader, access can be made into the “BAPE/ Keyboard” assembly,
thus causing some major damage. Once this is done a hose can be inserted into the front of the ATM,
well you can see the rest. Again, it is important to know any vandalism to the fascia of the ATM is a
Federal offense.

The keyboard is part of the fascia. Many times the one or zero key become very intermittent or don’t
work at all. The use of bubble style membrane’s, which require replacement so much, is to blame.
When removing any of these, take care to tape the front button’s. These contain braille information for
the blind, and can fall out when removing the back keyboards.
On a Diebold machine, if you hold any key down for more that 5 minutes you will take that machine
out of service. The reason is, that there is a 5 minute timer which determines if a key has been held
down for that long. Check the failure logs for “key stuck for more than 5 minutes”. You can get the
call from most networks as a card reader fault , but that ‘s never the problem. You will swear up and
down that some kid is stopping by every other day, and holding that key down, but really one of the
keyboards is to blame.

Most of the time it is the right or left side keyboard. Some ATM’s do not use one side, so reverse these
keyboards and disconnect the side that is not being used. If you still get called for the keyboard fault,
then replace the main keyboard. If still you are receiving the call, check the logs and see if there is any
correlation to times of fault, card number etc. You may want to check the video tapes to see who’s
doing it.

Camera’s at some ATM’s, take a picture at the time of the transaction done by a connector added to
the RS-232 connection, which looks for a signal that a transaction is taking place. Most camera’s at the
ATM, just view the user of the ATM, and not the area around the ATM. You don’t see much security
around the ATM, which would cause less vandalism or hi-jacking of the customer, while a transaction
is done.

Lighting of the fascia is important to the customer using the ATM. Most technicians forget about the
lighting. The florescent bulbs required, are easily gotten and a snap to replace. The NCR 5600/5800
model uses a “thorn” type ballast. If the machine is resetting on it’s own , this ballast is normally the
problem. Since the light is on 24/7, the thorn ballast gets very hot and can fail. It’s best to replace both
ballast’s, even when one is only bad, as the other one will soon fail. To prevent these newer ballast
failure’s, consider drilling holes in the ballast’s top cover to allow air flow through the ballast.

Keep your Fascia’s clean with STP and a cotton cloth. You wouldn’t believe how nice the fascia will
look after spending a few minutes really cleaning the front. You will appreciate it and so will the
customer.

ENVELOPE DISPENSER’S: (NCR)

None of these Envelope Dispensers ever really worked very well. The older models required that you
get on your hands and knees to load envelopes in the vault, most of the time the customer ended up
with a few bump’s on there heads. The newer electronic dispenser’s were never quite right, unless you
had the envelopes perfectly installed, and then they still jammed from the customer taking them.

The solution to this problem is disconnecting the envelope dispenser. This is done by disconnecting the
cables to the dispenser with power off. Nothing else is required, the NCR comes up looking for devices
and this one has been disconnected.

A nice box with a lid is always the way to store and hold the envelopes for the customer.
POWER SUPPLIES:

Most machines, the power supply is the most reliable assembly, and does not required much
maintenance. NCR power supply should be removed (5600/5800 series) and taken outside and blown
out every year. The fan sometimes starts grinding and requires replacement. Most ATM power supplies
offer a range of voltages. These can be measured at either the power supply, or connector depending on
the type of model. (Older) NCR machines, have tests points at the resistors top’s at the edge of the
power supply, the voltages are spelled out and easily measured. The power supply and card cage swivel
around to allow access to these measuring points.

The new style NCR’s have a white 8 pin connector with a LED mounted inside the door, the green
light indicate’s power and red light flashing can show a short. These voltages, can be measured
directly at the connector with a DVM. The voltages present should be; +5VDC, +12VDC, -12VDC,
+24VDC. Remember that a flashing light on this connector, means there is a direct short somewhere in
the ATM, normally the ballast is shorting, due to an internal failure with the part. Disconnect the two
input wires to this assembly to fix this type of problem.

The depositor “black beauty” 20 pin connector on most Diebold ATM’s contains all known voltages
for the power supply, and can be used to determine correct power supply levels.

Floppy Drives:

Older large floppy drives tend top fail due to age on the older NCR models. The drive assemblies just
don’t turn, or wont read the disk. There is a connector where you can check for 5 and 12 volts. Make
sure the floppy is put in with the sticker to the handle, as sometimes the customer flips the disk, and
then it can’t be read. Also, the handle sometimes can be bumped, so double check that. The red light
indicates that the drive is being read from.

Newer floppy drive can also fail due to use and age. Most ATM’s have this smaller disk replaced on a
weekly basis for electronic journal storage. The floppy drives should be blown out periodically. Many
times damaged disks are inserted and get caught in the floppy drive. The floppy drive can be
disassemble to retrieve these disks. Sometimes disks that are full, are used causing write errors, and
potential machine lock-ups. Most times, disks are erased and re-used, these disk’s can start showing
wear and tear after time, and should be replaced with newer fresher ones.

The disk contains the information from transactions conducted and any intervention of the ATM. For
example, when the ATM is put in supply, or the vault is opened, this information is written to the
floppy disk. Most times, the disk can be taken to any computer and the information read by using
“notepad”. Diebold’s use of the OS2 operating system, allows the technician to open the files on the
electronic disk, and view the files to determine transaction and fault times.

Warning’s that cell and Nextel phones, can damage the disk’s and erase all data stored on these disks if
they get too close. Floppy disks should be labeled with the “in” and “out” times, thus tracking there
usage.
If you encounter a Diebold machine that has a full electronic journal, you can go into the Os2
operating system and format the disk. You will lose all information on the disk, but if you don’t have a
new disk to put in, this could save you some time in bringing up the machine into service.

DIEBOLD PROCESSOR’S:

The evolution of the ATM has kept up with the evolution of the computer. The use of computers in
ATM’s is now common place. The older Diebold STP processor boards micro computers, have now
been replaced by computers. These computer’s are the same ones used in the home, for the most part.
Depending on the model, processor boards can fail for a variety of reasons. Most newer processors,
have the driver chips right on the board, thus reducing more boards required.

When any Diebold processor is removed, all the Deskey, Machine Number, Passwords and network
load information is lost, because they are held in temporary ram memory. The Hard drive contains all
other machine operating software. STP boards, use ROM- read only memory chips, for there operating
software.

STP PCB’s:

Diebold STP boards can cause problems for the monitors, and require replacement. The monitor’s will
roll due to the defective board . There are two HC1488, and HC1489 (U-51 and U48 are 1489 and U-
50 is a 1488), RS232 communication line driver chips on this board, that can fail during a lighting
storm. These 16 pin chips can be changed easily since they are in sockets.

Always have printout of the DIT’s information for the ATM while on site or at the ATM, or try to print
out the dits before replacing this STP board. (note: this will save time)

When changing the STP board, strapping is very important. The best thing to do is put the new board
right next to the one being replaced, and strap the board exactly the same way. Different protocols are
used depending on the networks, so the strapping is the first thing to change.
Move all the EEPROM’s (electrically erasable read only devices), (U40-43 and U-7), from the original
board to the new board, one at a time. (Note some boards have a memory expansion board) Prom #3 is
protocol dependent below version 3.2 and prom #4 is dependent above version 3.2. Swapping these
EEPROM’s is the best way to assure correct protocol set-up.

If you are losing memory on these boards, check the battery and replace as needed. The use of a
handheld keypad (KDM) is required for dit insertion and key numbers. Flashing happy lights are
green, and communication lights are red. Depending on model, the following dits will need updating;

CRD,DEP,CRT,KYB,PRT1,PRT2,HCM,FCA,SYS1,2,3,4,

Always reset the processor after any reprogramming to assure memory is secure. There is a red reset
button on the STP processor.

Consult a Dit program guide for information pertaining to dit assignments for the various different
monitors, card readers, keyboards and fascia’s. HCM, is high side communications and contains the
address and poll information, so that communication can occur between the host and network.
After the STP technology evolves to the computer hard drive age, the software and programming
becomes more involved with the help of IBM and Diebold creating the new I-series ATM’s. The
progression to a ATP, (Advanced terminal Processor) 386 processor in 1991, provided the software for
the BTP (Basic Terminal Processor). This new BTP processor didn’t require a KDM (Keyboard
Interface Device)

The Diebold BTP processor, takes a long time to boot, as compared to the instantaneous booting of the
STP processor. The hard drive contains the operating system, while the DIT’s and deskeys are held in
two separate random access area’s. Sometimes, you can lose the DIT’s and deskey’s from a power hit.
Most times, these need to be just reprogrammed to bring the machine back up.

Emulation of the older model Diebold 911 is employed on this processor. This describes the way in
which the cassettes in the dispenser pick the bills. There are normally two cassettes, which are labeled
high (upper cassette) and low (lower cassette). Newer emulation is Diebold 912, which can set the
machine up to dispense coupons.

Each ATM should have a printout of the DIT’s for future reference. The Des Key can be gotten from
the network who drives the ATM. Most times, these key’s are generic and inserted as either 0-9 and A-
F or all 1’s.

CTP PROCESSOR:

The CTP processor uses a hard drive which contains all the program information except for the
Deskey’s, machine number and a password security information. All this information is lost once the
board is removed from the ATM.

When replacing this board, make sure that the strapping , ram and processor match up. Some boards
use a 188Mhz or 233Mhz processor board. These boards are IBM designed boards for the new I-series
ATM’s. Ram is mounted on Simm 72 pin type packages, and can be easily moved from one board to
another.

Failures of this board often occur due to “rat’s” getting on them, and causing chip failure’s. The
processor board seems to be fairly reliable otherwise. Some boards experience communication issues,
preventing them from taking a load. Other’s, can cause display issue’s, since the driver chips are on the
processor board.

When replacing this processor board, it’s best to take the whole computer assembly out of the ATM
and put it on a table top. This assembly is only held in on the front left, and one screw holds the cage
down on the back left corner. Replacing this board at ground level is time consuming, due to the nature
of the cage surrounding the processor board.
The “comm” connector on the serial port is normally not used on some boards, and is found missing on
others, this is used for an upgrade, and should not be required.

Make sure to mark the ribbon connector’s on the processor board before disconnecting for faster
reassemble. There is a riser card, and interface card, which need to be secured in place during
assembly. Most new processors do not require any reprogramming to the BIOS, unless a thermal
printer is being used. If a thermal printer is used, the parallel printer port, in the BIOS, should be
changed to bi-directional for proper printer operation.
Once the CTP processor has been changed the Des-Keys’, machine number, and security group
numbers, can be reprogrammed into the ATM. The hard drive should not be affected by changing the
processor board. Always, reset the ATM after setting dit information, to assure it is stored correctly.

G-SERIES Processor’s:

One engineer, working at Diebold from the aerospace industry, had a great ideal when the new
processor came out. He made it more serviceable for the technician, by using quick release tab’s, and
turned the processor card upside-down, so rats couldn’t do there business”. The newer computers are
great also, because you can access the hard drive and floppy drive’s with-in seconds.

The new Models from Diebold offer CD-drives for programming, which make for quicker installations.
The new G-series processor also uses a driver card for the monitors, which can eliminate the need for a
processor replacement. These newer series processor seem to be very reliable, and smart in design, as
compared to the CTP designed processor.

NCR PROCESSOR’S:

5000 SERIES:

Older NCR processor boards worked in a card cage along with an I/O board. Depending on the
memory requirement, these processor boards did not change for several years. Ram was increased on
many of the boards to support networks and YK2. Some of the processor boards have a series of
LED’s, or even ram adapter board, which mount’s to the top of the board. An example of RAM is the
512k native PCB board

The older NCR processor seems to be very reliable when kept cool. Make sure both fan’s, or at least
one, are working below it. When this card is pulled, the configuration information is lost. This
information can also be erased by a switch on the right side of the card cage. This is the memory erase
switch, and should always be in the “down” position. To erase memory, turn this switch to the “up”
position, then power down the ATM.

If the red led display say’s “Press-1”, then all the configuration information has been erased, and
requires reprogramming at the front of the ATM through the customer keypad. This information
includes hardware, and communication configurations, along with the communication address . Once
this information is inserted, the ATM must be reset.

The processor board can be responsible for communication issues with the network. Always try to
reseat the processor PCB in the card cage, and check for any burned I.C. components.

The I/O board can be distinguished by a lot of device ribbon’s going to it, or the PCB on the left side of
the card cage. This board connects to all the devices with ribbon cables, and is mounted into the card
cage with the processor PCB. In most cases this board is very reliable, but some devices can lock up,
or the whole processor can lock up, due to this board.

On drive up models, the card cage assembly and power supply, can be lifted and then all these
assemblies will spin around allowing easier access. On Walk-up models, the side panel can be easily
taken off to allow the technician access to the card cage.
The most important thing to remember about this board is making sure the connector’s are marked and
seated correctly, when removing or replacing. Pin’s can also be bent very easily when this board is
being replaced, so check for straight pins on all the connector’s prior to replacing the I/O board. Also,
the use of cables and ribbons, can make for a very confusing re-assembly, if not marked properly.

The I/O board is responsible for the communication and driving of the following devices;

Misc. I/F Board, Dispenser, Depository, MCRW (card reader), Loudspeaker, Facia keyboard,
Operator I/F board and the CRT (monitor)

If you are losing memory due to power failures, the battery in the card cage should be changed. This
battery can be clipped-out, and mounted on the right side of the card cage. Use the card cage ground,
and one side of the battery switch. This should save a lot of time when replacing this battery.

NCR 5600/5800 PROCESSORS:

The NCR evolution of the processor to a computer, with a hard drive and floppy, is just like the
Diebold models. The big difference is that the hard drive should never need to be copied and kept with
the ATM, as long as the original software is on-site.

The 6-8 disks that NCR sell’s with each machine, should stay at the ATM if the technician ever needs
them. The software is easy to install, and does require much re-programming once it has been installed.
Each machine should have it’s own set of dedicated software disk packs.

The NCR processor uses ram simm pin packages, to increase the memory requirement, most are 4-8
MB of ram. The processor is very reliable, and rarely requires replacement. The computer is held in by
two screws, and slides out exposing the top lid. This top lid contains the hard drive and floppy disk
drive. The processor can be 386, 486, or Pentium type speeds depending on date and model sold.

After resetting the NCR, during the ‘Power -up” sequence, certain modules and boards are tested, to
determine they are selected. If there are any issues or problems, the program may stop, pause or
indicate what the problem may be. After all the blocks are loaded, the LCD screen on the rear of the
ATM should show the “Select” menu.

For example, “ no keyboards attached”, may lock up the program during the “power-up” sequence.
This may be due to the bape PCB board at the keyboard, or the keyboards themselves. At least one-
keyboard must be attached during the “Power-up” sequence.

The use of SDC (serial data Communications) connectors to each of the device, or (slave nodes), is
done from the processor on one master SDC node. That means that one device can lock up the whole
processor because they are all daisy chained together. Disconnecting one device at a time could isolate
the problem.

The NCR processor has been proven as very reliable and easily serviced .
TRITON PROCESSORS:

TRITON 9500:

The older Triton 9500 uses a combination processor board, which is responsible for handling and
controlling many devices. The modem is mounted on the board, along with drivers, for the display and
keyboard input decoders. The board handle’s the card reader input, as well as, the interface with the
dispenser and electronic journal.

This is a “POS” or (point of sale) only ATM, which means it dial’s up the network on a “POTTS”
(plain old telephone service), conducting the transaction with the network.
The Triton 9500 main board/processor has two revision’s. The older “C” revision can be recognized by
the display driver coil mounted directly on the main board.

This coil provides the step-up voltage to the backlight on the LCD display, and was found to be a
problem on these boards.

In some cases the revision “C” board went up in flames, due to this high voltage component on the
main board. The newer revision “D”, moved this component off the main board, and mounted it behind
the LCD display in a box.

The processor board is difficult to remove, and all wires and connectors should be marked before
removal. Most of the problems are software related and require the processor be re-programmed. The
lithium battery holds the master keys, which can be lost once this battery becomes a problem.

Protection of the software is done by the EEPROM access code. This code allows the user to erase
software, and input new software, via the phone line, or interface of a laptop computer. The access
code should be known, but changing or swapping the EEPROM ,U-1 to an earlier version (before
CD03.00), can allow the user to use the 1-6 code to access the menu of options. Challenge numbers
mean you don’t have the right code and either, need to replace the EEPROM, or call Triton.

Depending on the network, standard Triton or dedicated software is programmed into the processor
board. To reload this software, the “1” and the reset button need to be pressed, and then the “1-6”
access code need to be entered. All memory needs to be cleared by pressing “2455” in the clear
menu’s. Software then can be loaded by Triton over the phone line, or using a laptop computer
interface.

Once the software is loaded, more programming is required. This programming is very difficult, since
it can only be done through the front flat customer buttons. Everything needs to be entered from the
terminal number, customer passwords, welcome screens and phone numbers to the master keys. Before
replacing any main board, always try to get a copy of the receipt printout used in the diagnostics mode.
This printout will help in reprogramming the new board.

Always leave a copy of the printout in the ATM for future reference.
TRITON 9600:

More reliable and easier to replace Triton made some major strides in the improvement of there
processor system from the 9500 to the 9600 ATM. The programming method is mostly the same, but
what has changed is the hardware in the ATM. The processor is now part of three cards, individually
mounted and easily removable. The readability of these cards, makes Triton more widely accepted
among the technical community.

Most of the display issues on the 9600 are found at the SSM-3 card in the processor cage. This card is a
modem and display driver for the monochrome or color LCD display’s. You need to know what kind of
display is in the Triton before you order the card replacement. The common issue are dead screen, or
lines through the screen. The card can be ordered without the modem, which can be plugged in during
the swap.

HARD DRIVES:

Diebold:

More often a “internal kernel “ error, during a boot up is a corrupted program due to the hard drive. A
re-format of the drive, and reprogram does not guarantee that the drive with be a problem in the future.
Many times, hard drives fail due to them running 24/7 and they take a power failure. The drive could
be replaced at this point, if a back up was put in the ATM. It is very important consideration to keep a
extra or back-up drive in a Diebold ATM, due to the cost of reprogramming and proprietary software.
Many times, service institutions are forced to call Diebold when ever a hard drive needs replacement.
The procedure used by Diebold is time consuming and very expensive.

The requirements for copying the hard drive are the Following:
1) Diebold recovery boot disk 1 and 2.
2) Same size or larger hard drive.
3) Diebold ATM with keyboard

As you can see, there is little required to copy the existing hard drive on the Diebold ATM. When
Diebold comes out to program your ATM, they use a laptop and image CD disks which contain the
confidential programs required to program the ATM. This can take over an several hours in some
cases. This is an example of what Diebold might perform if they came out to reprogram your ATM:

DIEBOLD SOFTWARE LOAD

1) Use recovery boot disks and format drive


2) Use recovery boot disks and partition the drive (500/309)
3) Link laptop with CD to parallel port
4) Clone CD to hard drive using extraction programs (20-30 min)
5) Load SXA in application files
6) Adjust hardware configuration
7) Set virtual devices through consumer screen
8) Set-up TCS for each device
9) Set CSSEDT for poll address and protocol
10) Reboot and set-up SXA device parameters
11) Set DesKeys and passwords with machine number
12) Verify operation.

After all this, you still need to get a load and verify operation. In some cases, the customer has bought
the rights of the software when the ATM was purchased through Diebold. The use of a ZIP drive or CD
could be a alternative to leaving a hard drive in every machine.

NCR HARD DRIVES:

There is nothing special required when replacing the NCR hard drive if it crashes. You just need to
duplicate the existing size of the hard drive, or put a lager one in the computer. A software package,
which should be with the ATM, will program the new hard drive.

THERMAL PRINTERS:

DIEBOLD THERMAL PRINTERS:

The thermal printer used by Diebold is made by the Axiohm company. They have signed at least a 7
year agreement with Diebold, not to sell parts or provide information on there thermal printers. These
printers can have all kinds of issue’s depending on the model and type of paper being used in them. The
use of 5 thousands of an inch thick non-black mark paper is the best for good performance. The use of
coupon thin .003” paper can cause black mark problem’s, and jams at the exit transport of the
printer’s.

There are two layouts of the thermal printers, depending on which side the printer is on. For stand-
alone 1064 Models, the printer could be on the left or right side. The 1064 Model that uses the large
15” monitor, has the thermal printer on the right side. When using coupon paper, the black mark sensor
may become intermittent, or fail showing a “top of form stuck white”. This means that the black mark
sensor requires adjustment.

It has been found that turning the sensor counterclockwise, at an angle looking at the edge of the black
mark on the paper should fix this problem. A small screw driver can turn the angle of the black mark
sensor, without having to take the blue assembly apart. Using the keyboard, with the consumer printer
diagnostics, you can monitor the changing states of the sensor while moving the paper through the feed
path. When testing this device, exit out and use the “white rocker” button on-screen diagnostics for the
consumer printer.

This same right side printer also can jam in the trash can paper holder when black-mark coupon paper
is being used. If the Diebold ATM losses power, the receipt printer generates two coupon receipts,
then dumps them in the trash. This causes the trash can to be full, and not allow the next receipt to be
dumped, thus causing a transport jam. The use of smaller rolls of paper, make this problem a little
better, but it is the size of the trash can which is to blame.

Unlike the right side thermal printer, the left side printer has a large trash can, allowing the two
coupons to be dumped, with-out any disruption to it’s operation. This printer has another jam issue
when coupon paper is being used. The jam’s occur at the front exit plastic guides. The thin coupon
paper bumps up in the middle, and the edges flip up like wings, causing the paper to get caught every
few times at the exit.

This problem can be fixed by removing the both black guide plates and making the hole bigger
uniformly across the exit part of the plastic. Use a flat file to remove a few layer’s of the black plastic,
making the exit hole three times the size of the original. Both pieces of the exit guide need to be filed
down and the appearance should look straight and professional when mounted back into machine.
Then, run 30-40 receipts through, if it is still jamming, adjust the four screws under the paper holder.
This will adjust the printer to be more flat then at an angle.

When replacing the Axiohm printed circuit card, always mark the connectors, or check for marking’s,
avoiding incorrect connections. The paper out switch and black mark sensor, look identical and are not
marked. Isolation of the defective part of the Axiohm thermal printer can save time and money.
Sometimes, just the top blue assembly, containing the black mark and paper out sensor’s, can be
replaced. The thermal print head can also be easily replaced, if there are error’s found for that portion
of the printer.

DIEBOLD DOT MATRIX PRINTER:

The Epson dot-matrix printers are very reliable and should not pose to much trouble for the technician.
Keep this assembly free of small pieces of paper that can get inside the circuit card, and block the left
and right side home detector sensors. Also, when inserting paper, never use torn or ripped paper, this
will just cause a paper jam under the cutter and will require disassembly.

Frequent replacement every two or three months of the ribbon cartridges, keeps the printhead clean and
lubricated. Keep this assembly clean and lubricated, and it should be a good workhorse in the ATM.

NCR PRINTERS:

OLDER 5000:

The older NCR 5000 printers have a number of problems associated with them. As they get older, the
bearings on the shaft build up grease, and cause the printers to “not go busy”. They may require
cleaning, and be lubricated many time’s, but taking them apart off the shaft and cleaning them is the
best solution. Remove any felt, and clean the inside of the shaft bearings, use a light sewing oil or nye
oil on the shaft.

When the printer is printing “up-side down”, this is usually the print head ribbon. The proper
replacement of this ribbon will extend the life of the printer. This ribbon is also responsible for “miss-
prints”, or “erratic prints”. You can make your own cable’s easily.

The print head can be replaced very quickly by two retaining screws. This printhead is hard to
lubricate, and better to replace. When the printer is not pressing down into position, check the rubber
bearing on the right and left side, replace as needed. The paper out switch lever can break off, and the
paper low sensor assembly has been an issue on the audit printer. In most cases, this paper low sensor
can be disconnected, or adjusted depending on preference.

The receipt and audit circuit cards are the same. Make sure the strapping and dip switch assignments
are correct for each printer. The cutter assembly on the receipt printer is the only difference from the
audit printer. This cutter assembly can need adjustment and sharpening, as well as needing a new o-
ring’s. To adjust the cutter along the platen assembly, loosen the left and right lock down screws, then
adjust the up and down pilot screws, while engaging the cutter along the platen from left to right side.
Make sure it cut’s the paper clean, then use the Diagnostic “FE” test while the printhead is in either the
right or left side home position.

Keep the power connector to the printer clean, by connecting and disconnecting several times with
power off. Corrosion build up is likely on this connector. If the paper hesitates and causes a constant
stretch, the black rollers need to be taken off, cleaned and lubricated. There should be slack in the paper
leader after the paper is pulled through the receipt printer. Sometimes that paper gets tight, due to the
roll not turning smoothly.

NCR NEWER DOT MATRIX:

The newer dot matrix printer is better , but can pose some problems for the technician from time to
time. Keep the rollers and print cartridges clean and replaced. Squeaking on the paper holder can be
eliminated by using a dot of Teflon grease.
The printhead’s print quality can be improved by removal and lubrication. A couple of drops of nye oil,
after removal, should improve the print quality and prevent replacement.

The counter-rotation spring for the ribbon advance, can break and cause the ribbon not to turn. This
component can be replaced, without the need for a block replacement part. Keep the printhead transport
guide clean and lubricated. Always, blow out the sensors at the cutter solenoid, and remove the cutter
assembly for cleaning. Sometimes, the cutter pressure clip can become dis-attached, and require re-
attachment. This can cause the cutter to be become intermittent in operation failing every other day.

Just like most of the NCR printers, it is important to keep the top hat at 70 degree’s F. The use of a
small space heater could reduce failure’s if negative pressure cold air is flowing into the ATM, or there
is ice buildup at the exit chute of the receipt printer.

NCR NEWER THERMAL PRINTERS:

NCR’s thermal printers are fairly reliable a simple in design. To change to black mark on these printers
there is a switch pack and reset button located on the PCB assembly. Switch 1 turns the black mark on
or off.

NCR TRANSPORT ASSEMBLIES:


OLDER 5000 SERIES:

NCR likes to use transport’s in there ATM’s, allowing them to position there printers in various places.
The 5088 drive has a long transport that can present many issues to the technician. This transport is
dependent on the drive motor. In properly working ATM’s this drive motor and assembly turns very
fast, if the springs are correct, bearing lubricated and wheels clean. It is very important to keep this
assembly clean and lubricated to assure that the receipt will flow evenly down the chute out to the
customer.

Moving the white transport wheels around sometimes works, but most of the time the whole assembly
has never been properly taken apart and cleaned. Most times just lifting the spring loaded wheel
assemblies, and gently cleaning the wheels and shafts with a toothbrush and alcohol make a difference.
The whole assembly should be disconnected and put on each side to lubricate the bearings. The belts
should be checked, and gears cleaned, along with proper adjustment of the main gear motor belt.

The main motor is doing the work to turn the whole assembly, so the less resistance you can get from
the assembly, the better and faster the performance. Never use oil or silicone on the white transport
shafts, and keep any lubricant off any plastic parts. The motor may require replacement, and be causing
the processor to reset. This may be due to the MOV components soldered to the motor.

The 5085 walk-up ATM transports are also a issue if not kept clean and lubricated. The biggest
problem is the belts get dirty, old and cracked. Even after replacement, it is a good ideal to clean these
belts regularly to avoid problems. The motor can be taken apart and repaired by moving or replacing
the motor contacts, but replacement of the motor is always the best consideration.

TRITON PRINTERS:
TRITON DOT MATRIX/ THERMAL PRINTERS:

This printer will work better and have a longer life if it is blown out, and ribbons replaced every couple
of months. It is not field repairable, and should be replaced. The printer can cause jam’s with the cutter
assembly. This cutter assembly can be taken apart, and the paper cutting’s removed for better
performance . The Triton 9600 thermal printers are very reliable and easy to take apart. Two large
spring loaded clip’s allows the technician access to blow out paper jams.

TRITON TRANSPORTS:

The Triton 9500 transport was improved and beefed up to withstand the abuse of knocking when the
front panel was opened. The use of flimsily thin metal causes the transport to bend and lose it’s original
position, thus not mating up to the exit of the printer as the hood is closed.

Eyeing the position of the transport up is just trial and error. Wet ink can help, if you leave a little paper
hanging out of the printer, then put some wet ink on the metal housing of the entry point on the printer.
When you close the lid you can get an approximate location and the need for adjustment of this
transport assembly.

DEPOSITORY:
DIEBOLD DEPOSITORY:

The Diebold stand-alone ATM’s do not have a depository. The 1073 and 1074I series walk-up and
drive up ATM’ have very reliable depository. The depositor is either screwed in to position on some
ATM’s, or can be accesses and rolled out on others. The screwed down Depositories require that power
be removed, before the assembly be taken out for any cleaning or ribbon adjustment.

When the can is inserted, there is a button on the back plate which engages. Sometimes this button may
need adjustment, or the can does not lock into position. The use of a fish gauge on the depositor can
determine if the belts are in tolerance (<36 ounces). There are strapping jumpers E-1 through E-4 on
the side the jumper E-6 should be present. Clean the belts, blow out this assembly and you should have
many problems.

NCR DEPOSITORY:

Older NCR depositories have a major problem with the Hewlett Packard HP92261A ink jet assembly.
This inkjet tends to clog , leak and is hard to put in. The ink jet has a shelf life and should be kept in
the refrigerator till needed. If exposed to anything over 80 degree’s F, it tends to thin the ink, and cause
problems there after. The law gravity does not help when this ink jet is installed. It can leak ink all
over the circuit card, and cause intermittent operation and poor quality printing.

There are shelf life restrictions labeled on the each ink-jet box, always check before installing the ink
jet. If someone other than you has installed the ink jet, you should assume it was done incorrectly, and
you may save a lot of time by putting a new one in. What happen is that the bladder is punctured, and
air gets into it causing dispensing problems. Always, use a blunt tool to prep a small amount of ink
from the new ink jet, then wipe clean. Make sure both surfaces of the ink jet and the holder are ink free.

Most times the vault is getting to hot, causing the ink-jets to explode and saturate the holder, causing a
bad connection. Make sure the vault fan is blowing air in, and consider hooking up another fan in the
vault on the shelf for better air circulation. Use the second fan and ac wire under the processor, and
move the fan to the shelf in the vault. On 5085 machines, mount a fan to couple of small pieces of
wood blowing the air up into the depository assembly.

In some cases, the heater needs to be disconnected to cool the vault down in the winter time.
Sometimes, the ATM hut heater in the floor is to blame, it heats up the vault too hot even with the
heater disconnected. The incorrect use of space heaters in the vault to protect the dispenser from
breaking gears, can also cause the inkjets to explode if set too hot.

When the inkjet assembly is saturated with ink, it is always best to replace if old, or carefully
disassemble, and clean each part. Make sure there is no ink under the circuit card or the same problem
will occur.

The solenoid shutter assembly requires cleaning and lubrication or it may lock up or not respond fast
enough for the sensors. Keep the sensors clean by using long q-tips. Sometimes the circuit cards need
to be replaced, but they are very reliable. Large deposits tend to jam on this assembly, or stacking
deposits prevent the envelopes from continuing into the depository can.

The state of heath “clear fitness” must be done after any repair. The fault is held at the machine even
after the repair has been made. For a detailed account of depository faults a current list with dates,
ATM device failures, can be generated. This list can point out specific problem areas with the
depository, and may provide a story-line of failures.

Make sure the interlock switch is pulled out, or the vault door is closed when testing the depository
functionality.
NCR NEWER DEPOSITORIES:

NCR kept using the same Inkjet on the newer 56/5800 series ATM’s, but they turned the ink jet up-side
down. This helps the ink jet not leak as much, and the addition of the blotter pad helps in absorbing the
excess ink. Unfortunately, the ink jet has the same heat issues, and can be a problem on some ATM’s.

This depository should just require some minor cleaning. The ATM keeps track of the deposits and
reminds the customer when the ink-jet should be replaced. The CSOH (clear state of heath) screen
should always be cleared after replacement of the ink jet assembly.

Make sure the interlock switch is pulled out or the vault door is closed when testing the depository
functionality.

Triton Machines do not have depositories on them.

DISPENSERS:
DIEBOLD DISPENSERS MMD:

Diebold’s friction feed MMD (Multi-Media-Dispensor) is very reliable , but requires continued
cleaning, service support and replacement of wear parts throughout it’s lifespan. This type dispenser
has problems with newer cash when picking, due to the natural curvature of the bill, when it arrives
from the federal government. The new bills should be placed in the cassette’s as, “heads to handles”, to
avoid pick issues, and severe wearing of parts. The newer style bills should be, “fanned” through a
money counter at least three times, before being used.

Never use ‘dividers” in a MMD dispenser, theses are also called “currency separators”. The cassette’s
used are coded to each denomination required, and can be inserted at any feed module position in the
dispenser. The cassette’s have black buttons, which attach to the existing rubber tabs, to identify the
currency being used. When these tab’s are inserted into the feed module, another set of buttons are then
pressed, which define type of cassette being used. For example, a $20’s cassette is set as a “D” code
when a dispense test is performed.

Depending on the network, set-up the picking could be “C” and “D” cassettes or “hi” then “low’. This
means that two cassette’s of 20’s can be used and the cash will be evenly dispensed from each cassette.
When $40.00 is requested, a $20.00 dollar bill comes out from the top and bottom cassette. When
$20.00 dollars is requested, it only comes out of the top cassette.

Three “beeps” should be heard if any of the cassette’s are inserted into the feed modules. The divert
cassette also causes a “beep” when inserted. Always push the button on the front of the cassette’s when
removing, this will reduce the wear on the plastic locking knob inside the feed module. The lock in
hole on the cassette can become worn out and cause the cassette to “pop” out during a dispense. The
plastic knob can get worn down, and require replacement if the cassette’s are “popping out” during
any dispense operation.

The cassettes can get worn down and start to create problems. New cash can cause the push belt to stick
inside the cassette. The coding buttons can fall off, there should always be an odd set of button’s on
every correct cassette, regardless of the denomination. The currency low switch assembly can stick or
engaged causing the a “low” cassette during testing in the dispense test area under “supply. The push
plate can become detached from the mount, causing mis-picks.

Basically different denomination’s of money are loaded into coded cassette’s and inserted into the feed
modules. Depending on the cash needed by the customer, each bill is friction fed from the cassette. The
bills go through a double detect sensor, up the belts and counted again at the presenter, before hitting
the push plate guide and settling into the stacker tray area. Then, when all the cash needed from each
cassette is in the stacker tray, it is brought up level with the presenter, then pushed by the push plate, to
the exit sensor where the shutter door (gate) open’s out to the customer.

This happens very fast about 5 bills per second. The stacker and the push plate change positions, and
are set-up for a delivery to the stacker tray area or to divert any cash. These positions of the stacker
and push plate are determined by cam motors, which can identify there position based on the reference
sensors.

During this operation, if the double detect sensor determines that a bill is not correct, or two bills have
been picked, the stacker and push plate change position on the presenter, allowing the cash to be
counted, and then dumped into the divert can. The term stacker is used because, the tray has cash
stacked into it until the correct amount is counted. The divert can is a cassette, and can be removed
from the dispenser. If the divert can is more than 5%-10% of the bills dispensed, or if the can is full,
this is indication of a problem will the dispenser.

These dispenser’s can be either front load, or rear load in design. The presenter assembly is the part that
changes to suite each type. The location of the push plate changes from front load to rear load. All of
the above operations can be separately operated by using the diagnostic menu for troubleshooting. Each
command operation can also be monitored by watching the LED’s on the dispenser circuit control
board.

These LED’s are as follows;

1) Transport Sensor “on”=blocked, “off”=unblocked


2) Exit Sensor “on”=blocked, “off”=unblocked
3) Front Gate Switch “on”=Closed gate switch actuated, “off”=Open gate switch
4)Cam Upper Position (see below)
5)Cam Lower Position(see below)
6)Timing wheel “on” or “off” depending on if the sensor is blocked

CAM UPPER CAM LOWER DEFINITION


“OFF” “OFF” GATE OPEN
“ON” “OFF” DIVERT POSITION
“OFF” “ON” TRAY DOWN (stack position)
“ON” “OFF” PRESENT
The MMD dispenser can be broken down into three section’s. The presenter, stacker and feed module’s

1) PRESENTER:
The top presenter contains the push plate, at which money is either dumped into the reject bin, or
forced out to the customer. If the customer does not take the cash, it is then pulled back on the presenter
assembly, and dumped into the reject bin.

The use of a exit sensor and count sensor, determine the home position of the push plate. The motor,
which drives the pushplate, is encoded and with the use of the sensor’s, two other positions in mid
section of the presenter can be located. The various location’s for a front load dispenser are ;
Push>Stack>Divert>Retract>Present. The location’s of the push plate for a rear load dispenser are;
Divert>Push>Stack>Retract>Present.

This presenter contains two sensors which identify the location of the push plate as it slides along the
frame of the unit. This means plastic is riding on metal, and lubrication along the path of the push plate
is required. Use Teflon grease (Radio Shack) on this friction area to decrease on wear for the top plate
and motor.
The count sensor or exit sensor could become intermittent and require replacement. Theses sensor are
not adjustable, but can be swapped or use at either location. There is no adjustment on the exit or count
sensor. When replacing theses components, make sure they are put in correctly, take care to look for
the hole location facing to the middle of the presenter assembly. If not inserted correctly bills may
spray out of the dispenser.

The push plate can break and require replacement if not lubricated correctly. The plastic bearing at the
front of the shutter (gate) can break or become loose and pull-out. These bearings can be updated to
newer sealed bearings with a much longer life. The shutter (gate) switch can need adjustment or
replacement.

The front load presenter is much longer than the rear load presenter. Belts don’t normally need to be
replaced, but in extreme cases they can be. The presenter easily snaps to the stacker by clips and is
removed fairly easily depending on the model.

The belts and top assembly plastic guide should be kept clean using a mild soap solution and cotton
rag. The belts can be cleaned by using the “motor” feature in the list of section’s in the diagnostic
menu.

2)The Stacker:

The stacker control all the motions of the presenter and belts on the MMD dispenser assembly. Three
motors are dedicated to certain tasks. The stacker cam motor has 1.8 degree rotation, which represents
a step of movement. It uses notes and check point’s to count it’s position over a range of steps. This is
how it can move the pushplate into the various position’s once a range of steps has been determined.

The next stacker stepper motor controls the movement of the large black cam wheel. This cam wheel
moves the tray up and down, while moving the divert door open or closed. The cam wheel also open’s
the shutter (gate) at it’s fully extended position. There is a sensor behind the black cam that should be
kept clean, and the cam gear wheel should be kept lubricated, as it position’s itself on the Teflon tab
while turning.

The positions of the stacker cam are as follows;

1)Fully down- stack position- Bills are stacked for delivery


2)Middle up- Divert position- Bills are allowed to dump into divert cassette
3)Fully up-Present position- Shutter (gate) is opened allowing bills to be presented.

The final motor controls the belts movement either forward for picking bills, or backwards for dumping
bills into the divert cassette. The speed sensor monitor’s the belts, by using a timing wheel. This timing
wheel produces a series of evenly spread pulses, used to maintain a constant and predictable speed of
the belts.

The stacker also has another count sensor which can monitor each bill as it passed before it enters the
divert, or the holding tray. This assembly is very reliable and should not pose to much problem. This
second stage of the MMD dispenser also snaps into position, allowing it to be changed readily. Any
motor or sensor changes are not recommended in field on this stacker assembly

3) Pick Modules:

The most common failures occur inside the pick modules where the bills are picked. The high friction
rubber becomes dirty, or worn down from excessive pick attempts. These attempts at picking newer
style bills, if not correctly installed, can wear down the shafts quickly. If proper cleaning of these shafts
are done on a quarterly basis, the wearing of theses shafts is greatly reduced, extending there life two
to three years.

The green take away wheel on the right side, almost never requires replacement, but it should be
cleaned with a toothbrush when the shaft is cleaned. Diebold has been installing these as black wheels.

The quality of the black take-up wheel is badly constructed, and can be identified by separation from
it’s bearing housing. These rubber outside’s become loose and will eventually be a problem. It’s best to
replace any of these cheap take-up wheels with a good black stripper or the preferred green take-up
wheel.

The plastic black fender attaches as an assembly with the black stripper wheel on a one way clutch
shaft. This fender can get broken, or worn down and require replacement. The black stripper wheel is
the worst wear part on the dispenser, and can become very worn down requiring replacement. The hole
is notched, and can be time consuming to replace. If uneven wear is seen on these wheels, they should
be replaced.

The black stripper wheel should last at least 1-2 years depending on the volume of the ATM. The feed
shaft can last 2-3 years depending on the volume. This is only if the correct cleaning procedure is done
on a quarterly to BI- yearly basis.

Proper cleaning of the wear parts inside the feed module include, removing the spring loaded shaft, and
cleaning the small wheels on the left and right side. The shaft has a red led, which shines light through
it’s center, to determine it’s position. Make sure this light is being picked up by the sensor. Sometimes,
this sensor PCB keyboard can get bent, and cause the sensor not to see the light. When removing the
shaft make sure you are in the “double detect” mode in the diagnostics menu. This will keep the shaft
from moving when you are removing it.

A cotton cloth saturated with 70% alcohol will clean the feed shafts well when there are removed. Use
a tooth brush to clean the small wheels inside under the shaft assembly. There is a coating that occurs
on these small wheels, sometimes a fine wire brush will remove it. Canned air sprayed into the double
detect fork area keeps the proximity sensor clean and free of “money dust”. Clean the belts with a mild
soap solution and rag, check that the guide plates on the backside belts are preset and locked into
position.

The feed module, which contains the pick, use a double detect fork and fork block to determine how
many bills have been picked. The black clutched stripper wheel forces a bill under the fork proximity
sensor. This sensor can require adjustment every three months depending on volume and the quality of
the cash being used.

The fork can get worn down over many years of use and require replacement if the double detect sensor
will not stay adjusted correctly. If the fork block is worn down too much, typically the whole pick
module assembly must be replaced. Diebold uses a shaft simulation measurement tool to measure the
depth of wear on the fork block to determine it requires replacement.

Double detect adjustments are done on through a hole on the back of the feed module assembly. This
hole accesses the double detect proximity sensor fork, and can be turned in reference to a flashing light
on the control circuit card. The happy light is used for a 50% on and off setting, flashing very rapidly.
The adjustment should be performed after the presenter and feed modules have been cleaned. When
turning this adjustment, an allen wrench is used. The screw should be turned a quarter turn in each
direction to loosen the set point.

Follow this procedure which setting the double detect sensors:


Note: Outside interference light such as sun or certain florescence can cause the push plate to ram into
the shutter (gate)- Cover the sensors from the light when calibration is performed (You may want to
push the dispenser into the machine)

DOUBLE DETECT SENSOR ADJUSTMENT:

1) Go to the Diagnostics menu using the key board


2) Select the “Purge” function and verify correct operation
3) Select the “Divert” function and verify one bill is picked from each cassette and put into the
divert cassette.
4) Select the “Double Detect “ adjustment and enter “yes” (verify that the bottom jumper is
connected for adjustment of the top feed module)
5) Observe the green happy light, it should be flashing at a 50% on and off rapidly
6) Adjust the top feed module at the rear of the feed module to achieve a 50% on and off rapidly
flashing green led
7) Select the “Divert” function and verify one bill is picked from each cassette and put into the
divert cassette.
8) Select the “Double Detect “ adjustment and enter “yes” (verify that the bottom jumper is
connected for adjustment of the top feed module) This is done twice to determine if the
adjustment has moved or is not set correctly.
9) Repeat step’s 1-8 for feed module #2 but remove the bottom jumper (E37-38)
10) Select the “Dispense” test and verify smooth picking from both cassette’s 5 bill at a time, if no
errors you are done with the calibration.

Note: When adjusting the third feed module- remove only E35-36 jumper.

Note: When adjusting the fourth feed module- remove only E35-36 and E37-38 jumper.

Error’s, such as mis-picks and long bills, can be an indication of a problem with the wear parts in the
feed modules, or a cassette issue. If the problem only occurs on one side, swap the cassettes to isolate
the problem, then start with replacement of the stripper wheel in the feed module.

The feed module picker motors are fairly reliable. Check spring roller tensions on the upper belts of the
feed module for proper tension, if bills are not moving evenly up to the presenter assembly. The circuit
board has some fuse that can be checked if motors are not running.

Some lights can be viewed during operation as previously discuss ;

DS-1 TRANSMIT- RED LIGHT SHOWS COMMUNICATIONS


DS-3 STACKER /TRANSPORT SENSOR
DS-4 TRANSPORT AND CAM SENSOR

When replacing the dispenser control board, J-9 can be put on backwards. Depending on the type of
presenter being used E8-9 is taken out. (OUT FOR REAR LOAD) Always check strapping when
replacing this board.

Definition of connectors are as follows;

J-1 CAM MOTOR


J-3 CAM SENSOR
J-6 EXIT SENSOR
J-23 PUSH PLATE MOTOR
J-11 GATE SENSOR
J-9 TRANSPORT MOTOR

Remember that “new cash” is one of the biggest’s problem’s with this dispenser. Always fan cash three
times, and make sure that “new cash” is inserted by “heads to the handle” to avoid mispicks and
wearing of the dispenser.

NCR DISPENSER’S:
NCR 5000 SERIES:

NCR dispenser’s have been proven to be more reliable and maintenance free than the Diebold MMD
type dispenser’s. The introduction of DeLaRue’s air picking technique, formally used by Diebold, was
adopted by NCR. The Diebold 1300 air picking dispenser which is currently being used by Triton, has
many similarity’s to the NCR dispenser. There are some concern’s, but this dispenser has proven to be
a major workhorse in providing dependability in a high volume environment.

Unlike the Diebold cassette button identification, the use of magnets coded into the wall of the cassette
identifies the denomination. Each cassette is identified when inserted into the feed modules by sensors,
which pick up what magnets are installed in the wall of the cassette. The older metal cassette’s can be a
problem, as they tend to lose pushing power at the push plate. The new plastic cassettes tend to have
the plastic lock down tab’s break off. This should not present an issue to the operation of the dispenser.

When ordering new cassette’s, they must be set-up correctly to use United States currency in them.
Cash type is normally not an issue, as long as the push plate is not forced into the cash, or the cassette
is overloaded. The air type picking system, does not like “crumble” bills with bump’s on them. Also,
any half folded bills can not be picked and can cause a jam.

All NCR’s feature a stored “fitness” log, that must be cleared after the repair has been made. This is
called “clear fitness”, and must be done on any NCR 5000 after the fault has been resolved. Also all
NCR machines require that the vault be closed, or the interlock switch be pulled out during any
dispense test, or before it is brought into service. This prevents the dispenser from operation, while the
vault door is open, preventing any customer injury.

Environment and proper maintenance, is the most important consideration in extending the life of this
dispenser, and avoiding costly repair bills. Cold weather tends to crack gears, if there is no heat in the
vault. This requires replacement of the broken gear, then a complete re-timing of the machine. A small
ceramic heater can be installed on the shelf inside the vault to keep the temperature around 70 degree’s
F.

Proper maintenance of the dispenser includes; re-building the pumps and cleaning the pick line to a
correct timing of the dispenser. The pumps may only need rebuilding every two years, but the pick
cups should be replaced every 8 months. Never used any type of lubrication on the gears if at all
possible, lubrication tends to pick up dirt and dust causing the gear teeth to fill up and causing broken
gears. If you must use any lubrication on the gear, use a clear dry silicone spray.

Most problem’s with the dispenser are cash related. Sometimes, the front shutter assembly may get
cold causing the linkage to slow down and cause a fault. Keep this assembly clean and use a light nye
oil on the linkage to avoid any issues. The NCR dispenser uses light sensors that determine the counts
and double detects. There is a “low” cash reed sensor in the feed module that tends to fail, requiring
replacement. The lights for the sensors can become intermittent, gently tap these light during operation
to determine if they are a problem. Lights that fade in and out generally need replacement.

The rubber on the solenoid pick module tends to get hard and crack, make sure the rubber is soft and
flexible. Replace the rubber as needed, or apply a small amount of Teflon grease on rubber to extend
the life. Squeaking can occur at many area’s in the dispenser, try to keep the outside bearings, and wear
point lubricated yearly to avoid this problem.
The wheels of the dispenser can be cleaned with a toothbrush and 70% alcohol by entering the
“Diagnostics” “motor test”. Try not to run the motor for extended period’s of time by using the “AUX”
key for repeated operation. The big rubber roller near the pick wheel in the presenter should be cleaned
every six months. Canned air in and around the dispenser keeps it free of dust and dirt.

The NCR dispenser can be broken down into two parts, the Presenter and the Feed Module section.
Normally, this dispenser or it’s section’s are not broken down in the field and replaced. Most repairs
can be done without a total replacement of the dispenser. This dispenser is very heavy and often
requires two people to remove.

The theory of operations is as follows; Dispense test

1) Motor runs dispenser to verify all sensors are clear and cassettes are present
2) Motor runs and feed module #1 solenoid engages causing air to be pumped from the pick line
to the suction cups.
3) The pick line assembly “sucks” the bill over the double detect sensor and into the “D” roller
causing it to be picked up by the rollers and up to the presenter.
4) The bill passes by a count sensor into top of the presenter and passes through the big roller to
the stacker wheel and then rests at the presenter arm.
5) The presenter arm then comes down over the bill holding in the belts and then carries it up to
the exit shutter and sensor.
6) The solenoid for the shutter engages and the bill passes over the exit sensor and stay’s at the
exit waiting to be pulled.
7) If the bill is not pulled the Presenter belts reverse direction pulling the bills back down to the
rest area and the shutter closes.
8) The divert arm assembly open’s up and the presenter belts engage moving the bill down
passed a divert count sensor and then into the divert bin.

There is a cash “on” switch located on the dispenser control board, moving this switch while in the
“Diagnostic” menu will give a “Cash on” selection in the menu. Selection of this “cash on”, can only
be done with the vault door open. This selection allows the technician to select the number of bill’s to
be sent directly out to the exit shutter. The bills are dumped into the reject bin if the switch is not used.

A history of dispenser failure can be located by pressing “0” while in the “Report” menu. This can be
used to determine how many faults are occurring in which section of the dispenser. Certain area’s can
be isolated and looked at. Breaking down the codes is sometimes a waste of time, compared to just
looking at the history tallies of failure on the dispenser device report. Codes can be broken down by
using the diagnostics status code notebook if required. A lot of times, it’s a simple repair, so don’t
waste too much time with the codes.

The dispenser control PCB can be a problem if you have a intermittent issue with picking from the
cassette’s. One example, is when the top cassette is out of cash , it does not go to the bottom cassette.
The NCR dispenser can be set-up as a “high/Low” pick if supported by the network. When using $20’s
in both cassette’s, some networks only look at one total. The pick of bills starts at the top cassette, then
once this cassette is empty, it goes to the bottom cassette. This is only if the same cash is being used in
both cassette’s.

The NCR dispenser requires calibration checking or re-calibration after any broken gears. This
calibration is done by removing the two screws on the vault door (5088) and swiveling the dispenser.
The presenter requires timing and the feed module must be calibrated correctly to assure correct and
proper picking of bills.

NCR 5000 Dispenser timing: Use this procedure to adjust timing

1) Turn Presenter gear until any arrow points to Timing Hole


2) Check the Drive Segment at the Vacuum Line Segment, Drive segment must be one tooth
above the Vacuum line Segment. Adjust if needed
3) Remove the Top Idler Gear and rotate the Top Drive Cluster to line up with the “U” printed
on the gear (Note: the idler gear is right below the Vacuum line segment)
4) Remove the Bottom Idler Gear and rotate the Bottom Drive Cluster to line up with the “L”
printed on the gear (Note: the idler gear is right below the Vacuum line segment)
5) Replace gears to there original position.
6) Rotate the Top cluster gear to line up with the “D” marking , Remove the upper module
“Divert gear” (D roller wheel) on the right side of frame.
7) Rotate the “Divert gear” clockwise by looking inside the dispenser so that the top of the D-
roller touches the pressure wheel.
8) Replace the “Divert Gear”. ( The top section of the feed mule “D” roller is now set)
9) Rotate the Bottom cluster gear to line up with the “D” marking , Remove the lower module
“Divert gear” (D roller wheel) on the right side of frame.
10) Rotate the “Divert gear” clockwise by looking inside the dispenser so that the top of the D-
roller touches the pressure wheel.
11) Replace the “Divert Gear”. ( The bottom section of the feed mule “D” roller is now set)

The pick lines need to be clear for correct suction. Cracks can cause pick problems in the pick line. A
leak check can determine if they need to be replaced. Rebuilding of the pumps requires Teflon grease
and may require new o-rings and piston. Verify that the stacker wheel does not have too many broken
fingers, this may require replacement. Replace the pick cups at every PM. Wires and connection points
can become fractured over time, inspect wiring and harnesses. The shutter sensor may require
replacement if you are getting errors.

Plastic guides can snap out of position and cause jams, visually check these guide’s to determine if they
are not snapped into position. Always do a visual inspection of the gears to determine if any teeth are
missing . The Timing wheel can get bent or lose it’s marking, a black marker sometimes works, but it is
better to replace them with new one’s. Although it may appear there are many issues with this
dispenser, it is more reliable then the Diebold MMD dispenser.

NCR 56/5800 DISPENSERS:

NCR really made some major improvements on there newer series dispenser which gives it more
reliability and less maintenance issues. The use of belts, instead of rubber rollers, increased the
coverage of transport during a dispense operation. The introduction of a primary, and back-up filter
keeps the pick lines clean. The use of a electric pump eliminates the need for a pump assembly. The
use of electronic air solenoid reduces any rubber cracking parts. This dispenser still uses a lot of gears,
try not use any grease or lubrication on them and they will stay looking new and clean.

The theory of operation on this dispenser is almost identical to the previous type. Some differences
make it easier to calibrate, and the use of photo-optic solid state sensors on the cluster gear make it
more reliable. Kept the filter clean, by removing it and blowing out. Money dust can clogged this filter,
and cause many issues. There are two filters, the top filter rarely needs cleaning if the main pick line
filter is kept blown out very 3-6 months.
There are brass filters which should be changed to the newer see-through filter type. Keep sensor’s
clear, by using a long cotton swap and remove dust . There are some “bugs” with the dispenser, it can
require a hard clear if a problem in the fitness log cannot be eliminated. Gears can get broken, but not
nearly as bad as the 5000 series.

“Sensor 5 requires calibration”, is a bug which shows up on just about every 5600 ATM. You can do a
hard clear of the NVRAM on the dispenser control board, but a month later the problem still shows up.
In all cases, the sensor fault is created when the shutter open’s and the sensor gets a handful of sunlight.
NCR does have a software upgrade for this bug, but in most cases it can be ignored.

There are a lot of sensors on this dispenser depending on which type of presenter you are working on
the locations change. There are Front access transports, Rear access transports and Through the wall
transports. There is a LVDT sensor which determines if there is a double detect.

Here’s a list of some of the sensors: Presenter

Front Access Transport: Sensor 3-7 are located at the 2 PCB’s at the exit
Sensor 2 is the stack sensor
Sensor 1 is the purge transport
There is a Pre LVDT sensor and a purge overfill sensor

Rear Access Transport:: Sensor 3, 4 and 5 are located at the PCB at the exit
Sensor 2 is the stack sensor
Sensor 1 is the purge transport
There is a Pre LVDT sensor and a purge overfill sensor

Through Wall Transport: Sensor 8 to 3 are located at the 2 PCB’s at the exit
Sensor 2 is the stack sensor
Sensor 1 is the purge transport
There is a Pre LVDT sensor and a purge overfill sensor

The use of a “FE” (Field Disk) disk can help the technician test the various functionality of the
dispenser. The disk needs to be inserted into the disk drive before entering the “Diagnostic’s” menu.
The disk can “loop” the selected function of the dispenser.

For example, the shutter may be sticking or loose. The round elliptical cam becomes loose or the
shutter can jam open and stick. The use of Teflon lubricate at the outer edge of the cam wheel should
prevent this jam. The “FE” disk can be used to test the shutter, over and over, to assure the repair has
corrected the problem.
Sometimes the 3rd or 4th pick modules need to be disabled if they are not being used. By disconnecting
the modules small ribbon cable on the top of the dispenser driver circuit card, the pick module will be
disabled. All pick modules below this ribbon cable will be disabled. The switches on the control board
should then be set to reset the system.

Resetting the Control board:


1) Turn on the switches 3 & 8 on both switch packs
(Switches are numbered from the top of the control board to the bottom)
2) Press the “reset button” until the ATM “beeps”
3) Return switches 3 & 8 to there normal position on both switch packs
4) Press the “reset button” , allow the ATM to complete the full reset, now the 3rd and 4th pick
modules are disabled.

After this procedure the NCR requires that it “learn” the bill parameters and the current pick modules
being used. Follow this procedure to set the bill and learn the parameters.

Learning Bill Parameters:

1) Enter the “diagnostic” menu by pressing “7” then “ enter”


2) Select the “configuration” menu by pressing “1” then “enter”
3) Select the “Configuration of Dispenser” by pressing “6” then “enter”
4) Select “Change Parameters” by pressing “66”enter, “66” enter, “66” enter, “66” enter
(This is the bill width size in mm)
5) Then by pressing “101”enter, “101” enter, “101” enter, “101” enter you will set the length of
the bill
6) Select the pick modules then by pressing “1”, “2”, “3”, “4”
7) Select the “config Menu”
8) Answer “yes” by pressing “1” to save configuration values
9) Exit menu by selecting “Utilities” then “Exit”

These changes should be verified by performing the following test procedure:


(NOTE: Make sure vault is closed or interlock switch is pulled out)

Currency Dispenser Test (pick modules and cassettes in use)

1) Select the “Clear State of Health” (CSOH 20) by pressing “20” then enter
2) Press “1” to enter the “Currency Dispenser”- (The screen should show the current pick
modules in use)
3) Test the dispenser by pressing “1” enter, “1” enter then answering “yes” by pressing “1” enter
4) Select the bottom left side button labeled “Device” then the “SME” button.
5) This is a currency bill dispenser confidence test and will pick one bill from each cassette then
put them into the reject bin.

NCR newer dispensers can hold faults that can not be cleared in the “CSOH” menu, or by going into
the “Fitness log” and clearing them. The faults tend to keep staying on the LCD screen, even after they
look like they have been cleared. When this happens, and you know the dispenser is working correctly .
The “NVRAM” may need to be cleared on the dispenser driver circuit card. Follow this procedure for
clearing NVRAM.
Clearing NVRAM on the Dispenser Driver Board:

1) Turn on the switch 1 on the upper switch pack


(Switches are numbered from the top of the control board to the bottom)
1) Turn on the switch 5 on the lower switch pack
2) Press the “reset button” until the ATM “beeps”
3) Return switches 1 and 5 to there normal position on both switch packs
4) Press the “reset button”, allow the ATM to complete the full reset.
5) Test the dispenser by selecting the CSOH menu (Note: select every option in this menu to
assure that the fixed fault is cleared, also clear the fitness log)
6) Press the 2nd key on the left side to check the “Terminal Healthly “ screen
7) Verify that fault has been erased

All NCR ATM’s have a “Fitness Log” that must be erased, or cleared prior to the device being tested,
or the ATM will continue to show the fault at the network. The “terminal Healthly” screen can be
looked at from any main menu, by pressing the 2nd key down on the left side of the LCD screen. The
faults are listed as “1” of the number of faults that are present. You need to wait for the screen to
change, and scroll to the next fault. For example, there may be “1” of “4” faults present with the
machine. These may be classified as a “warning”, “routine”, “fatal” or just information of current
status of the machine.

A breakdown of common faults that may be present on the “terminal healthy screen” are as follows:

Terminal Healthy Screen Faults:

“Sensor 5 requires cleaning”- This is a warning and is a NCR bug- does not require attention
“Inkjet has reached end of life”- This is a warning, the inkjet may be full and the counter was not
cleared by reporting the Inkjet change in the CSOH menu. This does not require immediate attention.
“ Suction Cups need replacing” This is a warning and does not require immediate attention, the
technician should report the change of suction cups to the CSOH menu when replaced, this is a timer
only.
“Interlock Switch disabled”-This is a “fatal” fault and requires that the vault door be closed and the
dispenser and depository be tested in the CSOH menu. This can happen if the ATM is brought into
service with the vault door “open”.
“Cassette 2 Too Many Picks”- This could be a fatal fault if cassette 1 is also listed in the menu as “out
of cash” and there are no other cassettes.

The reliability of the NCR 56/5800 series ATM makes it the best choice for a high volume
location.

TRITON DISPENSER:

DelaRue supplied the 1700 dispenser for the Triton Model 9500/9600. This is a single cassette
dispenser. This friction feed dispenser has very few parts or adjustments that can be made in the field.
Most times the locator guides get worn out, causing the cassette to “pop” out o the dispenser. The rails
may need to be replaced from wear.

The cassette could get stuck in this dispenser due to the divert being to full. New cash which is un-
fanned can cause a problem in this dispenser. Make sure the new cash is fanned through a counter three
times. By removing the side plastic guide screws on both sides of the housing of the dispenser the
cassette can be removed.

Sometimes the timing wheel gets broken, or may require a adjustment. Red blinking LED’s can be
observed at the control panel when the front exit sensors are blocked. The use of canned air is the best
way to keep this dispenser reliable. There is a double detect adjustment tool, but field calibration is not
recommended.

This dispenser is very reliable and should only require a cleaning of the pick wheels, by using a mild
soap solution. When performing a dispense test, check for the bill to be delivered straight, as it moves
from the bottom to the top along the guides. If skewing occurs, one of the pick wheels may have lost
it’s outer coating. Cleaning all the back of the dispenser wheels may help in fixing this problem.

Triton also employ’s the use of the 1300 dispenser, this is a dual cassette dispenser which was used by
Diebold in there MDS model.
SECTION 5
ELECTRONIC JOURNAL: EDC
PAGE

Diebold: I-Series 1

DIEBOLD CHANGING EDC DISK: 2

NCR 56/5800 SERIES EDC: 2

NCR Electronic Journal to Floppy Procedure: 2

TRITON ELECTRONIC JOURNAL: (9500/9600) 3

Triton Electronic Security Module Dump Procedure: 3


ELECTRONIC JOURNAL: EDC
Diebold: I-Series

EDC (Electronic Data Capture) is used by Diebold to store journal information electronically on the
hard drive, or the floppy diskette. The use of formatted IBM 1.44 MD floppy disks is critical for this
function to work correctly when writing to the floppy disk.

The ATM stores any journal information to the hard drive or disk, then requires the disk be replace, or
the hard drive be downloaded to the disk. ATM status, any transactions, and diagnostic information are
considered journal information. If the ATM is put into “supply”, it writes to the disk or hard drive. If
the vault is opened, this is also written to the disk or hard drive.

As the disk or hard drive fills up, it can get to a point where the ATM lock’s up. The disk and hard
drive should be cleared weekly, depending on the volume of the ATM. Weekly clearing of the disk, by
replacement or a download, to a fresh clean disk will prevent any lock-up’s or “journal full” faults from
occurring.

Some Diebold ATM’s have a monitor and keyboard in the bank and don’t offer a direct write to the
disk. The bank must get into the “supply” menu option, and select the “EDC utility” and “archive the
“EDC files”. Once these files are archived, they can be downloaded and erased to the outside ATM
floppy. To determine how the machine writes to the floppy, the vault can be open to see the light on the
disk drive during the write process. This can be done with the vault door open and the ATM in
service.

Other Diebold’s offer batch files in start menu after the password has been installed. These files are set-
up to automatically write and clear the electronic journal upon request by the user. The audit files on
the disk can be taken to any Window’s based PC and checked by using “notepad”. Depending on how
the machine is set-up, these files can be accessed remotely by authorized users, by them dialing into
the ATM. Advanced programming information for this type of set-up can be obtained by referring to
the Diebold “PC-Based Data Capture Software Operating Guide”.

Weekly replacement of the disks or downloading to the disk from the hard drive will assure the
functionality of the ATM, and lessen the faults. Clearing the “lock-up” fault, may include a ATM
complete reset once the disk is replaced. The proper method to assure that the disk has been properly
changed is as follows;

DIEBOLD CHANGING EDC DISK:

1. Using keyboard put ATM log into menu options using Group 0 password
2. Select “supply” then open Vault
3. Select “unload/load media supplies” -EDC function
3. Remove and Replace floppy disk- (Label ongoing and outgoing disk with dates)
4. Follow menu options for replacement then close vault
5. Select “Attention message” then “logoff”, wait to hear for message “beeps”
6. Acknowledge the “beeps” with the“fix” key and the machine should cycle through the logoff
procedure again, retesting and come into service.
7. Run a transaction through the ATM (balance inquiry) to determine the ATM will remain in
service

NCR 56/5800 SERIES EDC:

The NCR has a journal floppy drive outside the vault. The same lock-up problems can also occur if the
disk is not changed on a weekly basis. The machine can lock-up, or cause other device errors at the
network. These errors do no show up in the fitness logs or the terminal healthly screens.

For example, if the ATM is constantly showing card reader faults at the network and there are no faults
represented at the ATM, this can be a sign that the EDC disk is getting full. The NCR ATM does not
automatically write journal information to the floppy drive and requires a fresh clean formatted IBM
1.44 MD, be inserted, when the electronic journal is recovered weekly. If the NCR has a problem with
the electronic journal it does not show up in the terminal healthy screen , but may be in the fitness log.

By getting into the menu options, on the LCD screen, the ATM can dump and clear the EJ information.
Follow this procedure when downloading the EJ to a floppy;

NCR Electronic Journal to Floppy Procedure:

1. Put ATM into “supervisor” mode by moving toggle switch down


2. Press the 2nd key down on the left side of the LCD screen, this is the “SOH” key
3. The “select” screen should be displayed , If not press the “cancel” button once.
4. Select “supply” in the “select” screen
5. Press “99” then “enter” for more option’s
6. Insert a fresh, clean, formatted IBM 1.44 MD into the floppy disk drive
7. Select “40”, then “enter”, to write the electronic journal information to the disk
Note: The light should come one, if you get a EC03 error the disk may be full or defective
8. The screen should say “EJ LOG COPIED OK”
9. Remove disk and back out of menu, Label disk with dates

TRITON ELECTRONIC JOURNAL: (9500/9600)

A electronic security module is employed by Triton to store up to 1000 records before a lock up can
occur on the machine. The module is located below the top hat, at the top of the vault, mounted out of
sight. This electronic module require’s that it be periodically cleared, and dumped to the printer,
depending on the volume of the machine.

The device may require replacement, if the clearing operation is not done correctly, or before it fills up
to it’s maximum capacity. Follow this procedure regularly to avoid this from happening. “Electronic
Journal Full” error will occur if this fault is present.
Triton Electronic Security Module Dump Procedure:

1. Reset error, if present, by pressing the “reset error” button.


2. Press the “ Blue” and “1” key, and enter your “master six digit password”
3. In the “Management Menu”, select “Journal” key
4. Select “clear journal”, or “print journal “ key
Note: All records should be printing to the thermal printer, or older dot matrix printer. The
older dot matrix type printers should not run more then 5 minutes when doing this operation.
This puts stress on the device, and will shorten it’s life.
5. After all records have been cleared, press the “exit” key
6. Perform a cash dispenser test to assure that the Electronic module is working correctly.
SECTION 6
COMMUNICATIONS PAGE

NETWORKS: 1

Dial Up’s (POS): 1

Confirmation of Phone Line 2

Leased Lines: 2

NETWORK Question’s: 3

Examples of Good Mini-Tester operation: 4

Diebold Communication Scope: 5

Communication Loads: 5

Diebold- I SERIES Communication Configuration: Non SXA 6

1063 High side communications 6

Diebold- I SERIES Communication Configuration:SXA 6


(with key board)

NCR 5000 series Communication Configuration 6

NCR 5600/5800 series Communication Configuration: 7

LOOP-BACK TESTERS: 7
NCR 5000 SERIES

NCR Model 5085:Walk-up


NCR Model 5088:Drive-up

ATM HOLDS SYSTEM FAULTS

ANY SYSTEM FAULTS REQUIRE


CORRECTION, THEN THE FITNESS LOG
MUST BE CLEARED

THE ATM MUST BE PUT INTO


SUPERVISOR DURING ANY
REPLENISHMENT OR REPAIR ACTIVITY

THE ATM VAULT DOOR MUST BE CLOSED


DURING ANY DISPENSER OR
DEPOSITORY TEST AND MUST BE
CLOSED WHEN BROUGHT BACK INTO
SERVICE
THE FOLLOWING MENU’S ON THE ATM WILL BE
COVERED:

“SEL”- SELECT MENU-Start and ending menu

“REP”- REPLENISHMENT MENU-Used for testing Cash and


Receipt Transport testing, should also be used when
replenishment of Audit printer, Receipt printer, Cash and
Retrieving Deposits

“DIAG”- DIAGNOSTIC MENU- Used to Clear Fitness Log and


Test Depository

PRINTING OF MENU’S FOR THE SELECT MENU(“SEL”)


AND REPLENISHMENT MENU (“REP”) ARE AT THE
AUDIT PRINTER- PRESSING THE ENTER KEY WILL
PRINT THE CURRENT HEADER AND LOCATION IN THE
MENU

PRINTING OF THE MENU’S FOR THE DIAGNOSTIC


(“DIAG”) ARE AT THE RECEIPT PRINTER- PRESSING
THE ENTER KEY IN THIS MENU HEADER WILL PRINT
THE CURRENT LOCATION IN THE MENU.

TO EXIT ANY MENU “9” ENTER MAY BE PRESSED TO


GET BACK TO THE PREVIOUS MENU SELECTIONS

AFTER FIXING ANY DEVICE,THE DEVICE SHOULD BE


TESTED AND THE FITNESS LOG CLEARED

AFTER REPLENISHMENT OF ANY DEVICE THE DEVICE


SHOULD BE TESTED

ALL OPERATIONS REQUIRE THE USER TO PUT SWITCH


ON THE MAINTENANCE KEYPAD (MP) IN THE
SUPERVISOR POSITION- THE STARTING POINT FOR
ALL THE FOLLOWING MENU’S STARTS WITH THE
SELECT MENU “SEL”

TO TEST CASH

1)MAKE SURE VAULT DOOR IS CLOSED

2)From “SEL”on maintenance panel (MP) press “4” then the


“Enter” key

3)Press the “Enter” key again to print the menu on the audit
printer

4)Press Test Cash selection “10” then the “Enter Key”

During this time the dispenser will kick on and test itself. One
bill from each cassette will be picked and put into the divert
cassette.

5)”c12--” should appear on the maintenance panel. This means


that both cassette’s tested good. If only “c1---” appeared that
would mean that only cassette 1 passed the test and so on.

6)PRESS THE “ENT” KEY TO GET BACK TO THE “REP”


REPLENISHMENT MENU.

7)PRESS THE “CNL” CANCEL KEY TO GET BACK TO


STEP 1 OR THE “SEL” MENU- YOU ARE DONE TESTING
THE CASH

NOTE: IF THE TEST DID NOT WORK MAKE SURE THE


VAULT DOOR IS CLOSED THEN GO TO THE
INSTRUCTIONS ON HOW TO CLEAR THE FITNESS LOG.
THEN YOU MAY TRY TESTING THE CASH AGAIN

TO CLEAR FITNESS LOG

1)From the “ SEL” MENU PRESS “7”


THEN THE “ENTER” KEY
note: The diagnostic program will take about 10 seconds to
load

2)”DIAG” SHOULD BE DISPLAYED ON THE MP, PRESS


THE ENTER KEY TO PRINT THE MENU TO THE RECEIPT
PRINTER, TEAR OFF TO READ.

3)PRESS “1” (REPORT) AND PRESS “ENTER”, “RPT”


SHOULD BE DISPLAYED ON THE MP, PRESS ENTER
AGAIN TO PRINT THE MENU TO THE RECEIPT
PRINTER, TEAR OFF TO READ.

4)PRESS THE “7” (CLEAR FITNESS) THEN THE “ENTER”


KEY.

Both printers will engage during this operation and the receipt
printer will print out “cleared”

5)Press the “9” (exit) key then the “Enter” key to get to the
previous “DIAG” menu.
6)Press the “9” (exit) key to get back to the “SEL” start menu

note that the receipt printer will advance and cut the receipt
paper from the printer allowing the transport bridge to be put
into it’s normal position once the paper is removed.

NCR QUICK LIST STEPS

NCR Model 5085: Walk-up


NCR Model 5088: Drive-up

TO CLEAR FITNESS- Select Menu

1)7 ENTER (DIAG)


2)1 ENTER (RPT)
3)7 ENTER (CLEARS FITNESS)
4)9 ENTER (RPT)EXIT
5)9 ENTER (DIAG)EXIT
6) (SEL)MENU

TO TEST CASH- Select Menu

1)4 ENTER (REP)


2)10 ENTER (TEST CASH)
3)SHOULD DISPLAY C12--
4)ENTER KEY IS PRESSED (SEL)
5)CANCEL KEY TO “SEL” MENU

TO TEST DEPOSITORY
1)MAKE SURE VAULT IS CLOSED

2)FROM “SEL” PRESS THE ENTER KEY AND READ THE


MENU PRINTED ON THE AUDIT PRINTER.

3)SELECT “TRANSFER BY PRESSING “8” THEN THE


ENTER KEY (Xfer can also be accessed in the Diagnostics
menus)

THE SCREEN CAN NOW BE OPERATED AT THE FRONT


OF THE ATM, GO TO THE FRONT OF THE ATM WITH A
DEPOSIT ENVELOPE

4)ENTER PASSWORD- “2-4-6-8” THEN PRESS THE ENTER


KEY

THE SELECT MENU THAT WAS PRINTED ON THE AUDIT


PRINTER SHOULD NOW BE DISPLAYED ON THE
SCREEN

5)SELECT DIAGNOSTIC BY PRESSING “7” THEN THE


ENTER KEY

6)IN THE DIAGNOSTIC MENU SELECT TESTS BY


PRESSING “0” THEN ENTER

7)IN THE TESTS MENU SELECT DEPOSITORY BY


PRESSING “7” THEN THE ENTER KEY

THE SHUTTER FOR THE DEPOSITORY WILL OPEN


THEN CLOSE, WHEN IT OPEN’S AGAIN INSERT THE
ENVELOPE
THE SCREEN SHOULD COME BACK AND SAY DEPOSIT
PASS TEST

8)EXIT THE TEST’S MENU BY PRESSING THE “9” KEY


THEN ENTER.

9)EXIT THE DIAGNOSTIC MENU BY PRESSING THE “9”


KEY THEN ENTER.

10) IN THE SELECT MENU TO TRANSFER BACK INTO


THE ATM PRESS “8” THEN THE ENTER BUTTON.

GO BACK INTO THE ATM, OPEN THE VAULT DOOR AND


CHECK THE QUALITY OF THE TEST DEPOSIT

IF THE QUALITY IS ACCEPTABLE, CLOSED THE VAULT


AND LOCK IT.
SECTION 7 PAGE

Alarms and Locks


DIEBOLD I-SERIES: ALARMS 1

NCR 5000 SERIES: ALARMS 1

NCR 55/56/5800 SERIES: ALARMS 2

TRITON SERIES ATMS: ALARMS 2

LOCKS: MAS Hamilton 2

Activation of Lock from Factory Mode: Mas Hamilton 3

Service Call opening Mas Hamilton Locks: 3

Service call closing Mas Hamilton Locks: 4

Basic Combination Locks 4

DIAL LOCK COMBO CHANGE: 5


Alarms and Locks:
DIEBOLD I-SERIES: ALARMS

Diebold has built there ATM’s to insure that they are not broken into by thieves. The safes are at least
TL-15 (Time Lapse 15 Minutes) for the most seasoned professional to get into them. The use of
vibration and heat sensors, along with door contacts, the ATM typically can weight between 1000 and
1500 pounds. Any alarms that occur are copied to the electronic journal. The dial locks employ a
“ambush” feature, that allows the user to dial 10 digits over the 1st number, engaging a silent alarm.
The doors all have a “re-locker” feature, that insures that the bolts will spring lock into position, if the
lock is attempted to be “pounded” from the front of the safe.

Diebold ATMs make use of an alarm interface circuit board which interface’s with the processor. It is
up to the owner of the machine to get the alarm hooked up which should be taken into consideration.
Some stand-alone machines have been “rolled away” by thieves using a dolly, because alarms are not
hooked up.

When testing these alarms, the use of a DVM comes in handy to determine, a “ normally open”, or “
normally short “ condition. Depending on the set-up, the lock can disable the alarm, if the combination
is dialed correctly. Testing of the heat sensor can be done by rubbing on the outside of the can, causing
friction and heat. Testing of the vibration sensor can be done by lit tapping on it’s body. Door contacts
can be installed, or the lock can give off the signal for this function.

Camera’s can be mounted inside the ATM to view the consumer as they use the ATM. A small hole is
normally provided for this function. Some owners of ATM’s do not use camera’s, which could show a
person causing vandalism to there machine.

NCR 5000 SERIES: ALARMS

NCR have also built there ATM’s to insure that they are not broken into by thieves. The safes are at
least TL-15. The use of vibration and heat sensors along with door contacts, keep the ATM secure. Any
alarms that occur, are copied to the electronic journal. The Dial locks employ a “ambush” feature that
allows the user to dial 10 digits over the 1st number engaging a silent alarm. The doors all have a “re-
locker” feature that insures that the bolts will spring lock into position if the lock is attempted to be
pounded in from the front of the safe.

When testing these alarms the use of a DVM comes in handy to determine a, “ normally open”, or “
normally short “ condition. Testing of the heat sensor can be done by rubbing on the outside of the can
causing friction and heat. Testing of the vibration sensor can be done by lit tapping on it’s body. Door
contacts can be employed or the lock can give off the signal for this function.
NCR 55/56/5800 SERIES: ALARMS

The major difference between the older models and the newer series is, the use of a 25 pin RS232
connector at the processor of the machine. The alarm requires that, +12 VDC be provide to power up
the alarm through this connector. Typically, the alarm panel provides this voltage along with battery
back-up’s in some cases.

NCR also has an alarm tester which takes power from the power connector, and plugs into the RS-232
connector to monitor the functionality of the alarm. LED’s show the current state of each of the alarms
types; door contact, heat/ vibration and silent. The use of this tester can be helpful in troubleshooting
problems with the alarm on the ATM.

TRITON SERIES ATMS: ALARMS

Triton only includes alarm functionality on there TL15 vault style units. All other Tritons have a thin
walled vault style door and lock. The elimination of the thick walled vault reduces the cost of the ATM
, but increases the risk of break-in or removal.

LOCKS: MAS Hamilton

Most ATM’s these days employ the use of the “Mas Hamilton” lock system. This lock can store each
user of the lock for retrieval at a future date. The lock uses special keys that, look like batteries, and
contain the user identification. Each user is issued a key that contains there name. Only one lock can be
opened at a time, and each lock must be called in to the Mas Hamilton computer to determine the
combination.

If a user has another lock open, he or she cannot open that lock until the current open lock has been
closed. This provides an extra measure of security, and eliminates any user to open as many locks as
they want. These controls allow the supplier of cash to have a key, the services to have a key, and the
bank or owner to have one. The route supplier of cash must call into a computer to get the electronic
combination for any given lock.

All Mas Hamilton lock’s require that a close seal be obtained after the lock has been secured. This
close seal is then, called into the Mas Hamilton computer, and the lock is then closed. If a technician
forgets to get the close seal, they must return to that lock to obtain a close seal, or the lock remains
open on the Mas Hamilton computer . Sometimes, the opened lock can be shuffled to another
technician causing a series of problems.
Once shuffling of locks become a problem, there are locks open all over the place and it gets hard to
control. Make sure the close seal is obtained when these locks are encountered. The Mas Hamilton
lock must be activated to work with certain keys. A lock comes set in the “FLM”, or Factory Mode,
with a “preset combination”. A series of steps and certain keys are required to activate the lock from
factory mode;

Activation of Lock from Factory Mode: MAS Hamilton

Required Items: F Key (Field key Blue), SA Key (Change key Red), Change Key and Activation
Combination
1) Power up (Turn CCW until EC is displayed)
2) Enter Factory Combination- 50-25-50 (OPr is displayed)
3) Turn dial CW to open lock and door
4) Insert Change key into socket
5) Turn dial CCW and close lock (Not the door) “EC” is displayed
6) Enter Factory Combination- 50-25-50 (ISA displayed)
7) Insert and hold “SA” key until “POC” is displayed
8) Pull out change key “OPr” is displayed
9) Turn dial CW to open lock
10) Turn dial CCW to close lock until “EC” is displayed
11) Enter “Activation Combination’ “IP1 is displayed”
12) Insert and hold “F” key in key reader until “OPr” is displayed
13) Turn dial CW to open lock and close door
14) Turn dial CCW to close lock until “IP1” is displayed
15) Insert and hold “F” key until “close seal” is displayed- “Record Close Seal”
16) Call Mas Hamilton computer and report the “close seal”

The procedure used a new factory lock and a activated field (blue) key. This key can now be used by
the technician to open this lock. The field key had been preprogrammed at the Mas Hamilton computer
before it was sent to activate this lock. When installing these Mas Hamilton lock’s, the shaft length can
differ from one ATM type to another. The shaft can be cut to length to fit correctly.

When the technician requires entry to the ATM vault, he or she, must call the Mas Hamilton computer
operator to get a combination for a lock. The technician’s key will only open the lock after the
combination has been given. The procedure for this is as follows;

Service Call opening MAS Hamilton Locks:

1) Power up (Turn CCW until EC is displayed)


2) Enter “Combination’ “IP1 is displayed”
3) Insert and hold “F” blue key in key reader until “OPr” is displayed
4) Turn dial CW to open lock

Service call closing MAS Hamilton Locks:

1) Turn dial CCW to close lock until “IP1” is displayed


2) Insert and hold “F” key until “close seal” is displayed- “Record Close Seal”
3) Call Mas Hamilton computer and report the “close seal”

Write down the close seal when you get it or you may be heading back to that location again.
Sometimes the Mas Hamilton knob’s can fall off the lock. When this happens the knob can easily be
remounted back into position.

If the Mas Hamilton lock is damaged at the keyboard, a new keyboard can be installed giving the
technician access . As long as, the flexible circuit board is still present, the lock face can be replaced
and the fixed. Once the circuit board has been pulled from the rear, it is almost impossible to access
the lock for repair without drilling.
Slow reaction of the “EC” when spinning the knob lock could mean the electric generation part of the
lock is going. Try slow and fast movements when trying to power up a faulty lock. This slow response
should not be ignored, and consideration should be made for the replacement of the back plane. Each
Mas Hamilton lock “back plane” has the ATM information and coding stored in it and it can be
shuffled from one ATM to another without a complete disassembly of the lock face.

Basic Combination Locks:

Two main styles of combination locks are employed in ATM’s. Two types of change keys are required
to set the combinations on these locks. When changing the combination on any lock, the new
combination should be verified at least three times before the door is closed. A “lock Out” is a fear of
all technicians, especially during a simple combination lock change procedure. The technician should
always take there time during this critical adjustment.

Each lock style has three set’s of numbers that need to be entered to open the lock. First, the lock is
always cleared by turning the dial to the “left” at least four times completely from 0-100. Then, the first
number is stopped at, the dial is then turned past the second number to the right twice, stopping on that
number the third time. Next, the dial is turned to the left past the third number once and stopping on it
the third time. Finally, the dial is turned to the right stopping at 90. Now the lock is open, the vault
handle can be turned to open the vault.

If the lock does not stop on the dial at 90, the spline key may not be set-up correctly. The spline key
can be set up in four different configurations, depending on how the door opens. Standing in front of
the door, determines how the spline key is set. If the door opens to the left, the spline is set at “LH” or
left hand. If the door opens to the right, it should be set-up for “RH or right hand.

To set the lock up for entering the new combination, the old combination must be entered first in the
“Change Index” markings. The change key cannot be inserted until this is completed. The fascia of the
lock has a hash mark to left of the zero key mark, this is known as the “Change Index”. To set the
combination of the lock s, simply dial the known combination of the lock, on the change index mark,
instead of the zero key.

When determining any combination of a lock, the last number should never be below 20.
Use your thumb to cover the zero key mark, if you need to assure the location of the change index,
follow this procedure; Note(Have the new combination ready);

DIAL LOCK COMBO CHANGE: USE CHANGE INDEX

1) Open lock and door -remove back cover if change key hole is not available
2) With door open- Dial combination of lock on “change index” stopping on the “third
number”
3) Insert the “Change key” and turn locking it into position
4) Turn Dial to the left clearing it at least 4 complete times
5) Stop on the first number at the change index
6) Turn the Dial to the right past the second number twice stopping on it the third time
7) Turn the Dial to the left past the third number stopping on it the second time
8) Remove the change key (replace any covers to there original position)
9) Test lock with door open at least three times

If this procedure is done incorrectly or the lock will not open, the lock back cover can be taken apart
and the gates lined up to accept the change key. This procedure can be repeated after the back cover is
put back on. The cams of each wheel get locked into position when the change key is inserted, in the
remote possibility that the cam wheel is not engaging the lock should be replaced.
SECTION 8
ATM FAILURE CODES PAGE
GENERAL: 1

Diebold Device Status Codes: 1

1ST Byte Definitions: DEVICE FAULTS 2

EXAMPLE STATUS MESSAGES BY DEVICE: 3

Dispenser 3

Fascia or Presenter Faults: DR01 4

Electronic Data Capture Status Message: 4

Consumer Keypad Status Message: 4

NCR FAILURE CODES: 5

NCR 5000: 5

NCR 55/56/5800 5

TRITON 9500/9600 Failure Codes: 6

Triton Sample codes: 7

Selected Dispenser Error codes: 7

Communication faults: System Unavailable 7


ATM FAILURE CODES:

GENERAL:

Depending on the type and model of your ATM failure, codes can be used to determine specific details
of the fault with the machine. These details, as outlined by the codes, can become a story-line, leading
up the nature of the problem within a certain device on the ATM. These devices have unique codes
which either can be looked up in a code book, or placed into a computer program to be broken down
and read.

Diebold Device Status Codes:

Diebold I-series ATM’s failure codes show up in a list and are printed to the electronic journal or
journal printer. These codes state a fault message that can be looked up in the “Interbold Device Status
Reference Manual”. If the keyboard is used, you can view the status list, which defines the code. This
can save much time in trying to look up the codes.

The Diebold status code fault messages appear on the “DAL” (Device Activity Log) and Status list
using the “KDM” (Keyboard Display Module), or keyboard. The device type is given a number, for
example “PR01” would mean device “printer” and device #1. This printer is the “consumer printer” as
device stored as , #1. Using “TCS” means you are using the “Terminal Control Software”, and you
can view the status list without referring to the handbook. This is done using the keyboard instead of
the “white rocker” button.

Status list faults can be defined by first the type of device (DEV), then the device type and number
(PR01), next the transaction number (SN-0001) on the first line. The second line shows the status code
(34:30:29) then the number of consecutive times the fault code has occurred (#-070). This means that
the device can be isolated by fault, time and ongoing issues with the device.

The following Devices are listed as important: General devices

CRD- Card Reader


DSP- Dispenser
DEP- Depositor
FCA- Facia
PRT- Printer (up to three devices)
KYB- Keyboard

The device’s are broken down by Device Number and Type:

CR01/ CRD- Card Reader


D101 or D901/ DSP- Dispenser
DP01/ DEP- Depositor
DR01/ FCA- Fascia
PR01/ PRT- Printer (up to three devices)
KE01/ KYB-Keyboard

In the main menu, you can view the status list, then print it out to find out about certain faults or
ongoing problems. The list should be cleared once the faults have been corrected to maintain a fresh
shorten list of faults. Everytime the machine is put in supply, or the vault door is opened, a code is
written to this log. These codes should be ignored unless you are having alarm issues. These alarm
codes are the following;

NET ALO1 3F:80:OO, NET ALO1 3F:80:81

The date and time of the fault along with the device code is documented on the list. If a swipe card
reader is used, you may be getting a lot of “CRO1” faults. This is because many customers run there
card through incorrectly. These faults should be ignored unless you are having a large number of them
(i.e. >50), or you have a card reader fault. These codes are the following;

DEV CRO1 3F:42:40

The breakdown of the code above shows that the card reader device (DEV CRO1) has a warning. The
next byte of the message is called the “Status Handler Byte” (3F) this can be looked up in the Status
Handler Definitions as a warning. This first byte of the status code is defined by the following;

1ST Byte Definitions: DEVICE FAULTS

21- Operation Complete- No Problem


23- Time Out- Device is not responding to terminal
2D- Attention Required- Supplies low
30- Reject- Device problem
31- Idle- Device problem
38- Communication - No response
39- Fault- Operation did not start on device
3A- Fault- Device may have started
3B- Fault- Try operation again
3C- Warning- Degraded performance
3D- Fault- Supplies out
3E- Fault- Requires Repair
3F- Warning- Device problem
EXAMPLE STATUS MESSAGES BY DEVICE:

Dispenser:

D101: 3D:31:37
D101: 3D:31:38

Breakdown of codes shows that the Dispenser (D101) has a fault (3D) which is defined by (31:38) in
the code book.
This code shows a common feed failure error. The code can occur when new cash is being used and is
having trouble being picked, or if the stripper wheels are damaged and require replacement. A visual
inspection of the cash and stripper wheels is required. if new cash is being used, make sure the “heads
are to the handles”.

D101:3E:33:33
D101:3E:33:34
D101:3E:36:30

Breakdown of codes shows that the Dispenser (D101) has a fault (3E) which is defined by (33:34 and
36:30) in the code book.

This code can show up if there is a jam somewhere between the double detect and the exit sensor.
Check for pieces of bills, which may be blocking the sensors a jam in the belts on the back of the
dispenser.

D101:3F:31:38

Breakdown of codes shows that the Dispenser (D101) has a Warning (3F) which is defined by (31:38)
in the code book.

This code can show up if there is an empty cassette because no bills can be picked from feed module
#2. This code is just a warning, and the machine should still stay in service.

There are so many faults that can be listed that the best way to determine the problem is to start running
test’s in the diagnostic menu. Also, check for any repeat failures that may have occurred. The dispense
test should pick 5 bills from each cassette and put them in the money tray.

Experience is the key when repairing these dispenser’s. For example, the dispenser may also have
Fascia faults, as well, that could be overlooked. These are listed as, DR01 codes, and should be given
as much attention as the D101or D901 codes.

Fascia or Presenter Faults: DR01

DR01:3A:31:41

This fault (3A) is defined as a Presenter problem (DR01) in which the money tray will not move during
a present operation. Sometimes the stacker can be to blame for this problem, or the cam sensor can get
dirty causing the tray not to move.

DR01:3A:33:41

This fault (3A) is defined as a Presenter problem (DR01) in which the Exit shutter will not open during
a present operation. The exit switch should be checked for intermittent operation, and adjusted
correctly to prevent this type of fault.

DR01:3A:37:41
This fault (3A) is defined as a Presenter problem (DR01) in which the forward drive will not engage
during a present operation. The stacker could be the blame for this condition.

The presenter can show all kinds of faults, make sure a complete test of the fascia diagnostics is
performed after repair of the device.

Electronic Data Capture Status Message:

PR03:3D:60:40

The breakdown of this code shows that the Printer #3 (PR03) ,which is the EDC, has a fault (3D),
which can be looked up in the device handbook as EDC full. This means the disk is full and requires
replacement. The ATM will remain out of service until the disk is changed and attention message is
sent to the network.

Consumer Keypad Status Message:

KE01:3E:41:40

The breakdown of this code shows that one of three keyboard’s (KE01) has a fault (3E) which can be
looked up in the handbook as key is closed more than 5 minutes. This means one of the 3 keyboards is
possibly intermittent if the keyboard passes all it’s test. Try reversing the left and right keyboard .
Replacement of the smaller keyboards is common. Most network’s will pick this fault up as a card
reader fault, the machine is taken out of service, but a load sent will bring it back up till the fault occurs
again.

Diebold machines do not require that the fault codes be cleared. Sending a load to the machine
sometimes can clear the faults. Dispenser faults and jams can be cleared by a load, there is a 50- 50
chance that a load will temporally clear the fault.
NCR FAILURE CODES:

NCR machines hold the fault codes until a technician shows up on site, fixes the problem and clears the
fitness log. Depending on what series NCR ATM you are servicing the faults show up on both the front
panel and in the fitness log. For the NCR 5000, a “Diagnostic Status Code Handbook” can be used to
obtain a breakdown of status codes. On the newer NCR 55/56/5800 models a disk ,containing a fault
code translator, can be used to analyze any given fault.

NCR 5000:

The breakdown of codes using this book can be time consuming and should only be used after
analyzing the fitness log report. The fitness log report can be printed out and showing each failure
status code with date and time. In most cases, the faults can be seen at the device. For example,
dispenser pick problems are stated as a number for each module, instead of having to breakdown the
code, this report can most times show the problem with the device based on the number of failures.

By printing a copy of this report, each device assembly can be looked at and faults can be determined
based on the last clearing of the report. This fitness log report should be cleared after a major repair, or
ongoing issues have been resolved as to keep a current log of failures on each device. If a resolution
can not be determined by looking at the report, than the top of the report shows the status codes for the
device in question and will require it be broken down and analyzed.

This reference guide will not review the breaking down of these codes based on it being a waste of time
and not beneficial to the technician in the field. Repeated failures may require these codes to be broken
down for a more accurate account of the failure. Most good technicians rarely, if ever, break these
codes down.

NCR 55/56/5800

On the Newer 55/56/5800 series NCR ATM’s a CD is available containing the “ATM Status Code
Translator” program in which the code can be typed in and the problem is presented. This CD should
only be used if the fault cannot be determined by the fitness log, or testing of the device. Much time
and energy is wasted by the technician looking up theses codes on the CD program when common
sense and general basic troubleshooting methods are used.

The fact that most problems do not require that a status codes be broken down in the attempt to repair
the NCR ATM, proves that it should only be used in extreme cases where the technician is having to
keep going out to resolve the same issue. Basic knowledge of the first “Terminal Healthly” screen on
the LCD display should point the technician, or user in the right direction on curing the fault with the
ATM.
The terminal healthy screen can have any number of faults from 1 of 1, to 1 of 10 faults. The screen is
present when the ATM is in service by pressing the 2nd key down on the left side of the LCD display.
This button can be pressed in any main menu to look at the “SOH” (State of Heath). The screen either
shows terminal healthy, or scrolls through a list of faults with the ATM.

The screen scrolls across showing the faults every 2-3 seconds. These faults should be noted. Some
machines have faults all the time which can be overlooked. Some of these could be; “cassette 2
missing” or “sensor 5 requires cleaning”. The cassette missing may be normal, and the sensor 5 is a
known bug with the NCR ATM which should be overlooked.

These faults can also be found in the “Display Fitness” report area. The display fitness information is
broken down into three types of failures; Warning messages, Routine Faults and Fatal Faults. Warning
messages may not show up on the terminal healthy screen and may not require any attention. These
faults should not take the ATM out of service. An example of this type of fault is; “card reader-
Warning”. This could mean that a card was not taken, or a “tease” may have occurred on the card
reader.

Warning messages can be cleared out without having to test the device. By “clearing fitness” the log of
faults are cleared but not tested. These faults may come back on the terminal healthily screen if the
devices are not tested by using the “CSOH” (Clear State of Heath) screen tests. Routine faults can show
up in both the terminal healthy screen and the fitness log.

These faults do not require immediate attention and should be cleared by clearing the fitness. These
faults can monitor the inkjet with a counter and show “inkjet has reached the end of it’s life”, or
“suction cups require replacing”. The inkjet may be fine and the suction cups are most likely fine as
well.
Fatal faults require attention immediately, and the device in question should be tested in the CSOH
menu after repair to clear the fault. These faults will keep the ATM out of service, even after the device
has been fixed. The fitness log must be cleared by testing the device in order for the ATM to get into
service. An example of a fatal fault might be read on the terminal healthy screen as; “ Dispenser Fatal”
or “Card Reader Shutter Failure”.

The NCR newer series ATM’s require a fitness clear after a fatal fault has occurred. The technician, or
network cannot resolve a problem on this type of ATM with a load. The technician must go to the
ATM site to fix the problem and clear the fitness.

TRITON 9500/9600 Failure Codes:

Triton series ATM’s use failure codes which show up flashing on the screen after a fault has occurred.
These faults are reported to the network and the machine stays out of the service, until the fault is
resolved by the technician.

The codes flashing on the front panel are the general codes and when entering diagnostic a more
advanced code can be broken down by the technician. The 3 digit codes can be looked up in any Triton
manual to determine where the fault is located on what device. Here’s a list of some common ones;

Triton Sample codes:

182-Currency Cassette Low


190-Master Key not Configured
183-Receipt Paper Low
184-Journal Paper Low
141- Paper jam reported by controller
138- Print failure to Receipt printer

The dispenser can supply a more advanced code by showing 4 bytes after the two test’s; “purge” and
“dispense”. The dispense test shows a string of 3 bytes after the test is performed. The first byte is the
error code, which should be (20H) if the dispenser is working properly.

The second byte is the number of bills sent out of the exit, plus 20 which should be (20H). The third
byte is the number of bills sent to the reject tray, plus 20 which should be (21H). If any of these codes
don’t look like this, there is a dispenser problem.

These codes can be broken down by referring to the service manual. Any faults must be reset before the
ATM will go back into service. Here’s some error codes listed;

Selected Dispenser Error codes: Hex 1st device byte after dispense test

20H- Good Dispense


21H- Feed Failure
26H- Blocked Exit Sensor
2AH- Timing wheel error

Communication faults can be checked on the electronic journal after printing, or on the journal printer.
These fault codes can determine why the ATM is always showing “system unavailable”. These fault
codes are listed here;

Communication faults: System Unavailable

Code:1, 11- Modem time-out for 65 seconds


Code:3- No communication at all
Code:4- Modem error -no dial tone
Code:7- Phone line busy
Code 8- No answer
Code 29- Reversal of transaction- No dispense after approval, machine calls back network after
transaction.
SECTION 9
ATM FAILURE
CONDITION/SOLUTION CHECKS PAGE
1ST LINE BASIS Checks: 1
DIEBOLD ATM I-SERIES:COMMUNICATION 1
NCR ATM-SERIESCOMMUNICATION 1
TRITON 9500/9600 SERIESCOMMUNICATION 2

DIEBOLD I-SERIESCRT 2
NCR 5000 SERIESCRT: 3
NCR 55/56/5800 SERIESCRT: 3
TRITON 9500: LCD w/ Backlight 4
TRITON 9600 Color/ Mono Chrome LCD Display 5

DIEBOLD I-SERIES: Card Reader MCRW 5


NCR SERIES: Card Reader MCRW 6
Note: Check Bulletins for MCRW 6
TRITON SERIES- “All Slide Card Readers 6

DIEBOLD I-SERIES- KEYBOARDS 7


NCR SERIES- KEYBOARDS 7
Note: Check Electronic Bulletin - Key boards - NCR Peach 8
TRITON 9500 SERIES 8

DIEBOLD I-SERIES: PRINTERS DOT MATRIX (Epson) 9


DIEBOLD I-SERIES: PRINTERS THERMAL (Axiohm) 9
NCR 5000 SERIES: DOT MATRIX PRINTERS 10
NCR 5600 SERIES: DOT MATRIX PRINTERS 12
NCR 55/56/5800 SERIES:Thermal Printers 12
ATM FAILURE CONDITION/SOLUTION CHECKS
This section should help and aid the technician when a certain condition is at the ATM. The condition
is presented along with a list of possible solutions. Common sense plays an important role in
determining any problem with the ATM. Before consulting this guide the technician should have
performed basis 1st line procedures which include the following;

1ST LINE BASIS Checks:

1) Verify failure by checking failure codes, logs and network


2) Visible inspection of device in question
3) Reset or clearing of fitness along with testing of device
4) Cleaning, blowing out , lubrication of device (i.e. Preventative Maintenance)
5) Duplication of device related failure
6) Identification of failed device or subassembly and loss of memory or configuration
7) Verification that network is up, load has been sent and lines are O.K.

DIEBOLD ATM I-SERIES:

COMMUNICATION: “Unable to Communication with Host”

1) Install loopback RS232 plug and test


2) Verify “DTR” on mini tester device , If none processor may be bad
3) If STP board consider replacing MC1488 and MC1489 I.C. chips- comm chips
4) Use “communication subsystem” program to determine status
5) Replace processor board- STP, CTP, G-series

COMMUNICATION: “ATM Not Answering Poll”

1) Verification of correct poll/ select address and protocol


2) Check for “on-line” status, Reset ATM and modem, Attempt load, Attn. messages
3) Verify “DTR” on mini tester device , If none processor may be bad
4) Check all connections on RS-232 cable, cable to host modem should be less than 50 FT
5) Use “communication subsystem” program to determine status or scope
6) Check power supply +5VDC
7) Modem, router, black boxes, cabling may be bad if ATM is showing good “DTR”

NCR ATM-SERIES

COMMUNICATION: “Unable to Communication with Host”

1) Install loopback RS232 plug and test, check for flashing comm light
2) Verify “DTR” on mini tester device , If none processor may be bad
3) Check power supply +5VDC
4) Replace Terminal Communication/ Processor board and reprogram
COMMUNICATION: “ATM Not Answering Poll”
1) Check ATM “communication light”- should be flashing
2) If not flashing check for “DTR” with mini tester- If present ATM should be ok
3) Check Modem for “CD” carrier detect, If none contact network to make sure they are polling ATM,
Reset modem , router or black box and ATM
4) If DTR is not present change the terminal processor and run a “loop back 3” Test

TRITON 9500/9600 SERIES

COMMUNICATION: “Unable to Communication with Host”

1) Verify correct phone numbers and terminal ID


2) Attempt to download comms key
3) Monitor phone line at ATM to assure dialing out and connection
4) Check for Static on phone line- Ferrite bead may help
5) Replace main board or modem card and reprogram

DIEBOLD I-SERIES

CRT: “Low Intensity on Monitor”

1) Check for dirty PTR’s and clean


2) Short out PTR at CRT to maximum brightness
3) Adjust brightness level’s on CRT
4) Adjust electronic brightness levels on CRT
5) Replace CRT monitor

CRT: “Sun Glare On Monitor”

1) Install “Polarized” glass to monitor to reduce glare


2) Short out PTR to increase intensity
3) Install “Sun-Pro” or better monitor

CRT: “Lines through Picture”

1) Adjust “contrast” and or “brightness” levels at CRT


2) Replace CRT or STP/CTP Board

CRT: “No Picture on CRT”

1) Check main fuse in CRT- Replace, if blows again-replace CRT


2) Check for connections and power on CRT
3) Replace CRT or STP board
NCR 5000 SERIES

CRT: “Low Intensity on Monitor”

1) Adjust brightness level’s on CRT


2) Replace CRT monitor
CRT: “Sun Glare On Monitor”

1) Install “Polarized” glass to monitor to reduce glare


3) Install better monitor

CRT: “Lines through Picture”

1) Adjust “contrast” and or “brightness” levels at CRT


2) Check CRT Driver PCB

CRT: “No Picture on CRT”

1) Check main fuse in CRT- Replace, if blows again-replace CRT


2) Check C-507 and C-508 on CRT driver PCB- replace if needed
3) Replace CRT Driver PCB
4) Replace CRT

Notes: Black conductive dust from receipt transport can damage the CRT driver PCB
Notes: NCR5070 and NCR5085 CRT’s are not the same

NCR 55/56/5800 SERIES

CRT: “Low Intensity on Monitor”

1) Check for dirty PTR’s and clean


2) Short out PTR at CRT to maximum brightness
3) Clean inside dust from glass and CRT
4) Adjust brightness level’s on CRT
5) Replace CRT monitor

CRT: “Sun Glare On Monitor”

1) Install “Polarized” glass to monitor to reduce glare


2) Install “Hi-Brite”, “Sun-Pro” or better Monitor
3) Short out PTR at CRT to maximum brightness
4) Clean inside dust from glass and CRT
5) Adjust brightness level’s on CRT

CRT: “Lines through Picture”

1) Adjust “contrast” and or “brightness” levels at CRT


2) Check for dispenser interference causing lines, Reference to 94-0039 on NCR Peach
3) Replace CRT

CRT: “No Picture on CRT”

1) Check main fuse in CRT- Replace, if blows again-replace CRT


2) Check cabling and related connections
3) Replace CRT
2) Check for CRT arcing- Refer to 92-0144 on NCR peach
3) Refer to Monitor and current display bulletins on NCR peach

TRITON 9500: LCD w/ Backlight

LCD: “Low Intensity”

1) Adjust back panel brightness/ contrast knob


2) Replace Backlight assembly

LCD: “Lines through Picture”

1) Adjust “contrast” and or “brightness” levels at CRT


2) Check for interference from ballast’s, neon lights etc., grounding, power..
3) Replace LCD display PCB assembly

LCD: “No Picture on LCD”

1) Adjust brightness levels


2) Check connections and high voltage to Backlight
3) Look at display “up close” to determine if any characters are present
4) Check power at U-12 pin 14 for +12 VDC and pin -1 for -12VDC
5) Check power at U-15 pin 14 for +5.1VDC and pin 5 of U-24 for -13VDC
6) Check Fuse at power supply if voltages are not present
7) Check flat display cable is inserted correctly
8) Check/ Replace main PCB
9) Check/ Replace LCD Display assembly

Note: LCD and Backlight work and can fail independently of each other.

TRITON 9600 Color/ Mono Chrome LCD Display

LCD: “Low Intensity”

1) Adjust back panel brightness/ contrast in programming


2) Replace Modem /Video card- monochrome or color version
3) Replace LCD Display-monochrome or color version

LCD: “Lines through Picture”

1) Adjust “brightness” levels in programming


2) Check for interference from ballast’s, neon lights etc., grounding, power..
3) Replace Modem Video card- monochrome or color version
4) Replace LCD Display- monochrome or color version

LCD: “No Picture on LCD”

1) Adjust brightness levels in programming


2) Check connections at display
4) Check power at back plane VLCD for -24VDC
5) Check power at back plane VADJ for -19VDC
6) If voltages are not present or not correct replace Modem/ Video card
7) If voltages are present replace LCD assembly

DIEBOLD I-SERIES: Card Reader MCRW

MCRW- “Will not accept card”

1) Check for “dust bunnies” at entry micro switch -clean by blowing out
2) Check for card stuck in reader or foreign materials- Clean
3) Check ,clean and adjust shutter solenoid assembly- Check if sticking
4) Check Clean white roller and pre read head, check wiring
5) Run cleaner test card through card reader
6) Adjust Microswitch so it engages as card enters reader
7) Run tests in Diagnostic to verify operation
8) Replace Card Reader as last resort

MCRW- “Will not eject card”

1) Check for “dust bunnies” at entry micro switch -clean by blowing out
2) Check for card stuck in reader or foreign materials- Clean
3) Clean rollers and blow sensors out with canned air
4) Check, clean and adjust shutter solenoid assembly- Check if sticking
5) Check belts (Mylar and rubber) and clean, check for cracking
6) Run cleaner test card through card reader
7) Run tests in Diagnostic to verify operation
8) Replace Card Reader as last resort

NCR SERIES: Card Reader MCRW

MCRW- “Will not accept/eject card”- Fatal MCRW Error

1) Check for “dust bunnies” at entry micro switch -clean by blowing out
2) Check for card stuck in reader or foreign materials- Clean
3) Check ,clean and adjust shutter solenoid assembly- Check if sticking
4) Check Clean white roller and pre read head, check wiring
5) Replace Pre-read head (Especially if intermittent operation)
6) Run cleaner test card through card reader
7) Check sensor voltages for 4.5VDC
8) Verify MCRW Alignment with Fascia
9) Adjust Microswitch so it engages as card enters reader
10) Run tests in Diagnostic to verify operation/ Clear Fitness CSOH
11) Replace Card Reader as last resort

Note: Check Bulletins for MCRW

1) MCRW Short Eject - 93-0113


2) DIP Reader pushed out of Fascia- 93-0126
3) DIP Reader Failure Caused by Ingress of Debris -95-0096
4) Short Circuit Risk on 5685’s fitted with smart card reader/writer -97-0069

TRITON SERIES- “All Slide Card Readers”

1) Check for foreign materials like pennies at bottom of card reader assembly-Clear
2) Clean out with canned air and test card with alcohol
3) Adjust card insertion button switch tab slightly if card shows “inserted or in”
4) Most slide card readers have a switch and sensor- check both
5) Replace slide card reader

DIEBOLD I-SERIES- KEYBOARDS

KEYBOARDS- “ Key held down more than 5 minutes”

1) One of the three keyboards is causing the problem


2) Isolate by removing one at a time to duplicate problem
3) Left and Right side keyboard give the most problem and can be intermittent
4) Swap left and right side keyboards, keep only one plugged in that is needed
5) Clean dirt and dust from all keyboard assemblies, check for bubble wear on keys
6) Replace Customer left, right 4 keyboard- one at a time
7) Replace Customer 16 Keyboard
Note: Tape keys when removing so not to lose Braille orientation.

KEYBOARDS- “ Customer 16 keyboard inoperable”

1) Clean dirt and dust from all keyboard assemblies, check for bubble wear on keys
2) Replace Customer 16 Keyboard

KEYBOARDS- “ Customer 4 keyboard inoperable left or right side”

1) Clean dirt and dust from all keyboard assemblies, check for bubble wear on keys
2) Replace Customer 4 Keyboard
Note: Tape keys when removing so not to lose Braille orientation.

KEYBOARDS- “ Customer keyboard number not working” (ANY)

1) Clean dirt and dust from all keyboard assemblies, check for bubble wear on keys
2) Replace Customer Keyboard

Note: Tape keys when removing so not to lose Braille orientation.

NCR SERIES- KEYBOARDS

KEYBOARDS- “ NO KEYBOARDS ATTACHED”

1) One of the three keyboards must be attached


2) Replace the “BAPE PCB board”

KEYBOARDS- “ Customer 16 keyboard inoperable”

1) Clean dirt and dust from all keyboard assemblies, check for bubble wear on keys
2) Replace Customer 16 Keyboard
3) Replace the “BAPE PCB board”
KEYBOARDS- “ Customer 4 keyboard inoperable left or right side”

1) Clean dirt and dust from all keyboard assemblies, check for bubble wear on keys
2) Replace Customer 4 Keyboard

KEYBOARDS- “ Customer keyboard number “0” not working” (ANY)

1) Clean dirt and dust from all keyboard assemblies, check for bubble wear on keys
2) Replace Customer Keyboard

KEYBOARDS- “ Customer keyboard frozen-no heat”

1) Check for power to two regulators at the 16 pin Keyboard assembly


2) Check indicators in programming for heat turned on
3) Replace heating keypad element

Note: Check Electronic Bulletin - Key boards - NCR Peach

1) 95-0060 “Hi-BAPE Keystore is intermittently Corrupted”


2) 97-0001 “Failure of 16 Key Tactile Keyboards”
3) 97-0002 “Failure of FDK Tactile Keyboards”
4) 97-0003 “ Failure of Braille FDK Tactile Keyboards”

TRITON 9500 SERIES


KEYBOARDS- “ KEYBOARD IS INTERMITTENT”

1) Replace keyboard

KEYBOARDS- “Keyboard does not work”

1) Check if keyboard is the issue by plugging in test keyboard


2) Change U-10 a 74HC138 I.C chip on the main board- (Put in socket)

DIEBOLD I-SERIES: PRINTERS DOT MATRIX (Epson)

PRINTERS- “ Poor Print Quality”

1) Replace Ribbons- These will also keep the print head lubricated
2) Clean printhead, PM printer assembly
3) Replace assembly (rare) -Printhead

PRINTERS- “ Printhead Locks at Home Position”

1) Check and blow out the two home sensor’s check for paper in them
2) Clean and lubricate the printhead rail
3) Check and clean gears, manually run printhead assembly back and forth
4) Replace Epson printer

PRINTERS- “ Bad Paper Cut or no Paper Cut”

1) Check solenoid cutter assembly for freedom of movement- Lubricate


2) Remove cutter assembly and blow out any paper dust or pieces
3) Replace solenoid assembly
4) Replace Epson printer

PRINTERS- “ Paper jammed after New Roll Inserted”

1) Remove top plate and move spring loaded roller away from pressure plate
2) Remove stuck pieces of paper in guide assembly
3) Insert folded paper through entry assembly to assure all paper has been removed
4) Use diagnostics menu to test printer operation and verify “21 00 00”

DIEBOLD I-SERIES: PRINTERS THERMAL (Axiohm)


PRINTERS- “ Will not see black mark or stuck white”

1) Adjust black mark sensor so it angles to the right by turning slightly in a clockwise position. This
will enable the black mark to be seen and focused better.
2) Use the real time monitoring in the diagnostics and manually run the paper through the guide
transport while observing the black mark indicator on the monitor.
3) Adjust the sensor as needed, you shouldn’t have to take the assembly apart to make the adjustment.
4) Back out and use the white rocker button tests to run 30-40 receipts to confirm the correct
adjustment has been made.

Note: Black mark sensors can be adjusted from 1mm to 4mm depending on the brightness and focus of
the black ink on the coupon paper. Thinner paper seems to have more problems than thicker black mark
paper.
PRINTERS- “ Keeps Jamming at Exit guide”

1) Thick white paper should not pose a problem with this condition, thinner paper requires modification
to the exit guide assemble.
2) Remove two exit guide and make opening wider by filing down plastic.
3) Opening should expand from 1mm to 3mm to prevent thin paper from jamming.
4) Use the white rocker button tests to run 30-40 receipts to confirm the correct adjustment has been
made.

PRINTERS- “ Printhead is running to hot”

1) Replace thermal printhead assembly


2) Replace PCB controller card
3) Replace Axiohm Thermal printer assembly

PRINTERS- “ Paper shows out when full”

1) Check for proper setting of the distance of the paper out switch in the DITS.
2) Turn the paper holder around so that the paper is closer to the sensor
3) Adjust or replace the paper proximity sensor
4) Replace the Printer control board
5) Replace the whole printer assembly

PRINTERS- “ Printer not working after the processor PCB has been replaced”

1) Check the BIOS for “Bi-directional” setting in the Parallel port communication
2) Check that the DIT’s are turn on and adjusted right.
3) Check the TCS Device files had been set-up with a thermal printer
4) Check for the cable connection at the computer on the processor

NCR 5000 SERIES: DOT MATRIX PRINTERS:

PRINTERS- “Receipt will not Feed Paper”


1) Check for missing O-ring at top assembly and replace
2) Check paper holder guides for sticking as paper goes into receipt printer-Clean
3) Clean pressure roller
4) Check for the two rubber holddown’s on the black clamshell push down assembly-add
5) Clean and lubricate the transport guide- use a thin sewing oil after cleaning

PRINTERS- “Receipt Printer Jams”

1) Check for correct threading of paper at holder assembly


2) Verify Black push down clamshell is locked in the down position
3) Check paper cutter for correct adjustment or missing small o-ring
4) Clean guide and black roller’s to grip paper better
5) Check for binding paper guides at paper holder assembly- clean/lube
6) Check history for black mark failures

PRINTERS- “Receipt Printer Bad Print Quality”

1) Replace print head assembly


2) Replace print head cable
3) Replace ribbons
4) Make sure paper is under fishing line and tub is locked down
5) Adjust the platen too darken print quality from impact of printhead
6) Replace whole assembly

PRINTERS- “Receipt Printer Bad Cut or no Paper Cut”

1) Hold down the knife so it is engaged as you move the carriage from left to right.
2) Check that the cutter is not hitting the platen guide- adjust up or down as needed
3) Check the sharpness of the cutter blade- replace if needed
4) Run tests in diagnostic verifying correct and clean cutting in both left and right directions.

PRINTERS- “Journal Printer Bad Print Quality”

1) Replace print head assembly


2) Replace print head cable
3) Replace ribbons
4) Replace whole assembly

PRINTERS- “Journal Printer will not feed Paper”

1) Clean Pressure roller and lubricate shaft


2) Verify Black push down clamshell is locked in the down position
3) Clear the fitness and run tests in diagnostic if you are getting “EC03” errors
4) Replace Journal printer
PRINTERS- “Printer is printing up-sidedown”

1) The +5VDC on the Printer Control Driver PCB may be to low


2) Remove the main ribbon and power connector to the Driver PCB and clean
3) Check and or replace the printhead ribbon also
NCR 5600 SERIES: DOT MATRIX PRINTERS:

PRINTERS: “Cutter Failure Occur Every Other day”

1) Check for pressure guide plate in correct position by removing cutter assembly.
2) Clean and lubricate cutter assembly
3) Clean and blow out sensor at solenoid
4) Clean rollers and check for any blockage on printer assembly

PRINTERS: “Ribbon does not Advance During Print”

1) Check for a broken counter-rotation spring at the ribbon advance gear


2) Replace counter rotation spring and test

PRINTERS: “Printer not working due to cold weather”

1) Install a small portable ceramic heater set on low heat at the top hat to control the temperature.

PRINTERS: “Printer print quality Bad”

1. With power off, Remove the print head and lubricate by using nye oil
2. Clean the printhead face with a toothbrush and alcohol and lubricate
3. Clean and lubricate the printhead transport guides
4. Replace Printhead

PRINTERS: “Printer Interface PCB Errors will not Clear”

1. Select all the tests in both “SOH” menu’s after a good PM on printer
2. Acknowledge all tests and repairs forcing the error to go away
3. Clear the NVRAM on the printer assembly and test (3 and 8 DIP & press reset)
4. Replace the printer controller PCB’s and test

NCR 55/56/5800 SERIES:Thermal Printers

PRINTERS: “Printer Transport Jams Occur”

1) Clean the rubber belt on the top and bottom to assure that the belt is pushing receipts out correctly.
2) If the printer is too hot the rubber belt will slip- Get the A/C fixed
3) Replace the rubber belt if needed

Note; Make sure that any paper is taken out of the receipt printer before it is pushed into position. This
can happen during balancing by the customer and should be mentioned.
SECTION 10
ATM FAILURE
CONDITION/SOLUTION CHECKS:2PAGE
DIEBOLD I -SERIES:RECEIPT TRANSPORTS 1
NCR 5000 SERIES:RECEIPT TRANSPORTS 1
NCR 55/56/5800 SERIES: Dot Matrix 1
NCR 55/56/5800 SERIES: Thermal 2
NOTE: NCR BULLETINS PRINTERS 2
TRITON 9500 SERIES:RECEIPT TRANSPORTS 2
TRITON 9600 SERIES:RECEIPT TRANSPORTS 2

DIEBOLD I-SERIES: FLOPPY DISK 3


NCR 5000 SERIES: FLOPPY DRIVE 3
NCR 55/56/5800 SERIES: FLOPPY DRIVE 4

DIEBOLD I-SERIES: LOCK UP 4


NCR 5000 SERIES: LOCK UP 5
NCR 55/56/5800 SERIES: LOCK UP 5
TRITON 9500 SERIES: LOCK -UP 6
TRITON 9500 SERIES: LOCK -UP 6

DIEBOLD I-SERIES: DEPOSITORY 7


NCR 5000 SERIES: DEPOSITORY 7
NCR 55/56/5800 DEPOSITORY: 8
NCR 55/56/58 DEPOSITORY/ DISPENSER SHUTTER: 9

DIEBOLD I-SERIES: DISPENSER MMD 9


DISPENSER: “ Cassette 11
NCR 5000 SERIES: DISPENSER 11
NCR 55/56/5800 SERIES: DISPENSERS 13
DISPENSER BULLETINS:NCR 55/56/5800 SERIES 14
TRITON-9500/9600 :DISPENSER-SINGLE 14

DIEBOLD I-SERIES: POWER SUPPLY 15


NCR 5000 SERIES :POWER SUPPLY 15
NCR 55/56/5800 SERIES :POWER SUPPLY 16
TRITON SERIES :POWER SUPPLY 16
ATM FAILURE CONDITION/SOLUTION CHECKS:2

DIEBOLD I -SERIES:

RECEIPT TRANSPORTS: “Belts Keep Coming off”

1) Check spring which keeps tension on belts, make sure transport is locked into position.
2) Clean black rollers making sure they are free of dirt and dust
3) Clean the top and bottom of belts
4) Clean the plastic center guide’s from any sticky substances
5) Replace the belts

RECEIPT TRANSPORTS: “Belts Won’t Turn”

1) Check all gears to make sure Allen screws are tight and not slipping
2) Check transport motor and wiring- check VDC to motor
3) Replace transport motor
4) Check for binding bearing or plastic bearings locked-up
5) Replace worn or broken and missing bearings

NCR 5000 SERIES:

RECEIPT TRANSPORTS: “Not Feeding Paper”

1) Check transport main drive O-ring- Clean or replace if needed


2) Check transport motor- Motor should be moving transport fast- Replace or rebuild
3) Verify that all white roller are present with correct springs in position
4) Verify that all white wheels are turning and not binding- Clean only
5) Verify springs have correct tension on white rollers- replace as needed
6) Verify that all bearings have been oiled and all gears have been cleaned to obtain the least amount of
resistance when the motor turns.
7) Verify that transport is mounted in correct position with printer and or fascia

Note; If ATM reset’s when exiting the “DIAG” menu most likely the transport motor is defective due
to noise. Check the MOV’s soldered to the motor housing for solid connections.

NCR 55/56/5800 SERIES: Dot Matrix

RECEIPT TRANSPORTS: “Not Feeding Paper”

1) Check for paper at sensor or broken clip on switch sensor in transport


2) Clean belt and blow out any small pieces of paper
3) Make sure transport cover is locked into position to engage sensor

NCR 55/56/5800 SERIES: Thermal

RECEIPT TRANSPORTS: “Not Feeding Paper”

1) Check for slipping on the wide black rubber belt- clean or replace
2) Check for sensor damage or paper jams and clear with canned air

NOTE: NCR BULLETINS PRINTERS

92-0099 Insert reformed mylar to prevent jams


92-0162 Reformed knife guide to prevent jams
93-0049 Journal printer fouls logic harness
93-0057 Receipt jams >maximum lines
93-0111 Blackmark and Receipt printer alignment procedures
94-0087 Receipt printer Reinforcing block
97-0052 80 Column Bunch Presenter
97-0084 TECH 40 Column Receipt Printer Black Mark Adjustment Procedure
97-0082A 80 Column printer problems/memory/communication/spring tension
98-0008 40 Column Graphics Thermal Receipt Printer/Modes/Prom upgrade
99-0003 80 Column Bunching Thermal Printer used in 5663 and 5683 products

TRITON 9500 SERIES:

RECEIPT TRANSPORTS: “Jamming in Transport Tube”

1) Adjust transport tube by bending to aligned it-self with printer output- Tighten Screws
2) Make sure modification is complete to larger transport guide
3) Remove plastic on new keyboard at receipt exit- cut with knife

TRITON 9600 SERIES:

RECEIPT TRANSPORTS: “Jamming in Transport Tube”

1) Check for loose paper pieces inside printer assembly by releasing mount hinge clip
2) Remove any loose paper at exit of thermal receipt printer with canned air
3) Reset failure and test by pressing paper advance and cut by diagnostic.
DIEBOLD I-SERIES: FLOPPY DISK

FLOPPY DISK: “Will Not Read Floppy Disk”

1) Make sure that disk are IBM formatted 1.44 MD


2) Make sure disk is formatted and empty- Use OS/2 a:
3) Replace Disk-Examine under lid while spinning check for scrape marks-Manually
4) Clean Floppy Drive- Blow out
5) Check connection’s to floppy and processor PCB
6) Replace Floppy Drive
7) Replace processor PCB/ Check for BIOS Setup to floppy device

FLOPPY DISK: “Floppy caught in Drive”

1) Remove floppy drive and dis-assemble to retrieve disk


2) Throw away diskette and check for damage to floppy drive
3) Replace floppy Drive

FLOPPY DISK: “Will not Disk Drive Intermittently” (every 1-2 days)

1) Replace Floppy Drive


2) Replace Processor PCB

FLOPPY DISK: “Showing Electronic Journal Full Even After Replacement of Disk”

1) Go to Diagnostic and verify that “21 00 00” on testing


2) Send “Attn Message” then Logoff
3) Acknowledge “beeps” that you have “fixed” the problem
4) Allow ATM to “Retest” the journal functionality and go into service.

NCR 5000 SERIES: FLOPPY DRIVE

FLOPPY DISK: “Will Not Read Floppy Disk”

1) Check to make sure 4 1/2” disk is loaded correctly- (label to handle)


2) Make sure Door latch is enabled
3) Check for floppy drive assembly spinning
4) Check +5VDC and +12VDC on connector, If low Replace floppy drive
5) Check for Frayed data and control cables
6) Check for proper version of diskette
7) Replace Floppy Drive- This can happen after year’s of usage-very common

NCR 55/56/5800 SERIES: FLOPPY DRIVE


FLOPPY DISK: “Will Not Read Floppy Disk”

1) Make sure that disk are IBM formatted 1.44 MD


2) Make sure disk is formatted and empty
3) Replace Disk-Examine under lid while spinning check for scrape marks-Manually
4) Clean Floppy Drive- Blow out
5) Check connection’s to floppy and processor PCB
6) Replace Floppy Drive
7) Replace processor PCB

FLOPPY DISK: “Floppy caught in Drive”

1) Remove floppy drive and dis-assemble to retrieve disk


2) Throw away diskette and check for damage to floppy drive
3) Replace floppy Drive

FLOPPY DISK: “Network Showing Card Reader Faults, but not on ATM”

1) ATM has a near full or full Floppy disk and requires replacement
2) Go to supply menu then select 99 more
3) Put new floppy in drive and select 40 enter to dump files to disk
4) Clear fitness and bring into service, call network for current status

FLOPPY DISK: “Full Disk Caused Lock up on ATM”

1) Reset ATM and determine if it will come back to the select menu
2) Follow disk replacement procedures and clear fitness
3) Reload software, this will also format the hard drive eliminating the issue

DIEBOLD I-SERIES: LOCK UP

LOCK UP: “ ATM is showing Internal Kernel Errors”

1) Reset machine to verify that problem continues


2) Replace hard drive with another pre-programmed one
3) Reload the software and consider replacing the hard drive
4) Always check processor board for nesting of “rats” or “pissing”-CTP

LOCK UP: “ ATM is showing Line Errors after reboot”

1) Allow line errors to recover on own


2) If line errors do not recover the hard drive may need to be replaced
3) Reload the software and consider replacing the hard drive

LOCK UP: “ ATM has a black screen”

1) Check for green flashing light at card reader assembly


2) If flashing, Monitor may be bad check fuse in CRT
3) If not flashing, may be power issue, check for power to ATM
4) Always check processor board for nesting of “rats” or “pissing”-CTP

NCR 5000 SERIES: LOCK UP

LOCK UP: “ Red LED screen is showing Press 1”

1) Configuration information has been lost and needs to be reloaded


2) Check for correct battery voltage at memory switch- check for up position
3) Replace battery- refer to earlier procedure
4) Reprogram information at front panel and reset
5) Power down ATM for 5 minutes and verify information is not lost upon power up

LOCK UP: “ Red LED screen is showing PO2, PO1”

1) Processor may be damaged and require replacement


2) Reset ATM to get to select menu
3) Replace Processor PCB

NCR 55/56/5800 SERIES: LOCK UP

LOCK UP: “ Stars on LCD panel “

1) Try to reset ATM


2) Software on hard drive may be corrupted
3) Re-install software on the hard drive
4) Re-test reset after loading software to determine no other problems exist

LOCK UP: “ Counter Stops as Program is loaded after Reset”

1) Tests are run at power up to each device Slave Node by showing there results and progress on the
leds on the boards.
2) Determine If a certain device is causing the lock-up after reset by disconnecting the
daisy chain SDC connector from each device.
3) This SDC connect can be disconnected at the rear back mother board plane of the computer structure
to isolate to the processor.
4) Consider trying to reload software also.

LOCK UP: “ LCD screen shows -No keyboards Attached”

1) Replace the “BAPE” PCB board at the consumer keypad assembly


2) Reprogram the master keys through the Access Menu
Note: Vault must be open to program Master Keys
LOCK UP: “ ATM is flashing Red and Green on Power Connector” (inside door below)

1) One or both of the light Ballast is defective


2) Disconnect the positive input to the Thorn light ballast and reset ATM
3) Replace light ballast

TRITON 9500 SERIES: LOCK -UP

LOCK -UP: “ LCD screen is showing Master Key Corrupted”

1) Battery on main board should be changed- (Measuring is no guarantee +3VDC)


2) Reload 2 parts of 16 digit codes Via PC or through front panel in terminal config
3) Reset and power down for 5 minutes to determine if key’s are still lost
4) Replace Main PCB board and reprogram
Note: Before replacing PC board always have a copy of the Receipt printer Diag

LOCK -UP: “ LCD screen is showing Incorrect Characters”

1) Software has been corrupted and needs to be re-loaded


2) Load software VIA PC or over phones lines
3) Press reset and the 1 key to access the programming menu-Clear memory 2455
4) Try 1-6 first as the access code, change EEPROM to below CD.03 to access menu
5) Call triton for challegene code verification (They require signed documents faxed and charge for this
service)

LOCK -UP: “ Keys are double beeping as entered”

1) Replace keyboard

TRITON 9500 SERIES: LOCK -UP

LOCK UP: “ Cannot dump Electronic Journal or Access”

1) Replace the EJ Security module in vault below top hat

DIEBOLD I-SERIES: DEPOSITORY

DEPOSITORY: “Keeps showing Deposit Can not Installed”

1) Disable switch at back of deposit can or fix- can get loose


2) Check that can slides all the way back and locks into position
3) Vibrate can during test to verify concrete conditions
DEPOSITORY: “Poor Print Quality on Envelopes”

1) Some Earlier Depositories require that the machine be powered down before removal of the
depository assembly.
2) Replace Ribbon cartridge on the depository
3) Test print quality in the Diagnostics menu

NCR 5000 SERIES: DEPOSITORY

DEPOSITORY: “Poor Print Quality on Envelopes”

1) Ink jet requires replacement - Follow ink jet replacement procedure


2) Always clean all ink from assembly holder using alcohol and cotton rag
3) Ink jet assembly needs to be replaced- If plugged in backwards you will get a thin line on the
envelope.
4) Test the print quality by entering diagnostics and testing

Note: Heat affect Ink Jets assemblies performance and can be damaged, consider keeping these new
assemblies in the refrigerator until needed, take out 1 hour prior to replacement.
Note: Interlock switch must be pulled out or vault closed during testing

DEPOSITORY: “No Print on Envelopes”

1) Ink jet may require replacement check for clogging- Follow ink jet replacement procedure
2) Always clean all ink from assembly holder using alcohol and cotton rag
3) Ink jet assembly may need to be replaced- If plugged in backwards you will get a thin line on the
envelope.
3) Check Fuse on PPD driver circuit board
4) Check for +5VDC on PPD and Driver board
5) Replace PPD Driver PCB
6) Replace PCB Control Board
7) Test the print quality by entering diagnostics and testing

DEPOSITORY: “Depository Failure”

1) Clear any jams present in depository track


2) Check shutter assembly for binding, clean and lubricate as needed
3) Check Fitness log for the depository to determine repeated faults
4) Clear fitness and test device with vault door open and interlock switch pulled out

DEPOSITORY: “Envelope Stops in Track”

1) Clean entry, middle and exit sensors with long q-tip and alcohol-Top and bottom
2) Check motor assembly for correct operation
3) Replace any suspect sensors
4) Replace motor assembly if suspect

DEPOSITORY: “Shutter Fails to Open”

1) Clean and lubricate insuring a non-binding shutter operation


2) Check for 28 VDC from the PD Interface PCB to solenoid
3) Clean and lubricate solenoid- Replace if needed
4) Clear fitness and test depository

DEPOSITORY: “Inkjet Explode Every Two Weeks”

1) Check for an overheat condition in the vault


2) Check for operation of the vault Fan blowing air into vault
3) Check for heater getting to hot/ install temperature controller on heater
4) Check for A/C system working correctly
5) Install a separate fan in vault to circulate air

Note: Heat affect Ink Jets assemblies performance and can be damaged, consider keeping these new
assemblies in the refrigerator until needed, take out 1 hour prior to replacement.
Note: Interlock switch must be pulled out or vault closed during testing

NCR 55/56/5800 DEPOSITORY:

DEPOSITORY: “Inkjet Explode Every Two Weeks”

1) Check for an overheat condition in the vault


2) Replace or turn over Kotex pad
3) Check for operation of the vault Fan blowing air into vault
4) Check for heater getting to hot/ install temperature controller on heater
5) Check for A/C system working correctly
6) Install a separate fan in vault to circulate air

Note: Heat affect Ink Jets assemblies performance and can be damaged, consider keeping these new
assemblies in the refrigerator until needed, take out 1 hour prior to replacement.
Note: Interlock switch must be pulled out or vault closed during testing

DEPOSITORY: “Poor Print Quality on Envelopes”

1) Ink jet requires replacement - Follow ink jet replacement procedure


2) Always clean all ink from assembly holder using alcohol and cotton rag
3) Ink jet assembly needs to be replaced- If plugged in backwards you will get a thin line on the
envelope.
4) Test the print quality by entering diagnostics and testing

DEPOSITORY: “No Print on Envelopes”

1) Ink jet may require replacement check for clogging- Follow ink jet replacement procedure- This
can be a heat related problem
2) Always clean all ink from assembly holder using alcohol and cotton rag
3) Ink jet assembly may need to be replaced- If plugged in backwards you will get a thin line on the
envelope.

NCR 55/56/58 DEPOSITORY/ DISPENSER SHUTTER:

SHUTTER: “ Elliptical Cam Keeps Door Open”

1) Lubricate outside edge of cam with a small amount of Teflon Gel to avoid sticking
2) Tighten screw using lock tite- This screw can become loose
3) Replace motor assembly

DIEBOLD I-SERIES: DISPENSER MMD

DISPENSER: “ No Motor Drive”

1) Check Fuse F-1 on control board and replace


2) Test in Diagnostics test mode- “motor”

DISPENSER: “ Will Not Dispense”

1) Check that cassette’s are seated in dispenser and have buttons in correct position
2) Check /Replace count sensors on presenter- May be blocked
3) Test in Diagnostics test mode- “motor”
4) Visual inspection works best!

DISPENSER: “ Feed Failure’s and Constant Pick Attempts”

1) Check for new cash- Heads to the handles and fan


2) Check for correct pressure on push plate in cassette
Note: “New cash should always push old or fit cash”- “Brick pushing a pillow”
Note: “ Mixed Cash new and fit can cause push pressure problems”- Separate
3) Check for damaged or worn stripper or fender assembly and replace
4) Check for worn and damaged shaft assembly- clean or replace
5) Calibrate double detect as shown in this manual- Refer to calibration procedure

DISPENSER: “ Skewing of bills to Presenter”

1) Check all belts are secure in back of dispenser


2) Check pressure rollers for damage or adjustment
3) Check cash and pressure in cassette for correct operation
4) Clean and perform PM per procedures- Replace any wear parts

DISPENSER: “ Double Detect Wont Stay Adjusted”

1) Check and blow out proximity sensor and fork, check for spring movement
2) Check for tightness of double detect screw, turn in and out while calibrating to determine if
intermittent in nature, it may be moving on own
3) Check/ Replace double detect fork
4) Check /Replace Proximity sensor assembly

DISPENSER: “ Shutter Open Before Dispense”

1) Check for switch operation at shutter


2) Adjust shutter switch as needed
3) Check Cam wheel - Remove and clean sensor, lubricate with Molycote 22 Grease
4) Replace Stacker Assembly

DISPENSER: “ Too Many Diverts”

1) Check for even distribution of 5 picks per cassette in diagnostic


2) Perform visual inspection and PM procedure
3) Clear out High divert counts in “counters”
4) Check for correct cash and cassette pressure as reference previously

DISPENSER: “ Cassette does not beep when inserted”

1) Check for button in correct position on cassette


2) Check for operation of button keyboard inside feed modules
3) Take apart button keyboard and clean/ reinstall and test
4) Move cassette to another module and test to isolate problem
5) Replace defective cassette
6) Replace defective button keypad

DISPENSER: “ Cassette showing low when it is full”

1) Check black button on outside of cassette to be “pushed in”


2) If not open cassette and locate switch assembly on left side front
3) Remove cash and make sure switch is disengaged with cash is re-inserted
4) Replace cassette
DISPENSER: “ Cassette keeps popping out showing not inserted”

1) Isolate the problem to the cassette by moving to another feed module location
2) Replace cassette if it does it at a different location
3) Check small lock in black plastic bulb located in the middle of the button keypad
4) Replace bulb piece- This can be broken out without removing the button keypad

DISPENSER: “ Network showing cash door not opened after dispense”

1) Check the strapping of the dispenser control board to be set-up as a rear load machine

NCR 5000 SERIES: DISPENSER

DISPENSER: “ Cassette’s not going low before running out”

1) Check for the magnet in the proper position and present in the cassette
2) Check the “reed” sensor on the small circuit card inside the feed modules
3) Replace the broken glass reed sensor in the feed module

DISPENSER: “ Gears breaking on pick line assembly drive”

1) Clean pick line completely to remove any friction during movement


2) Blow out lines and perform a leak check on pick lines
3) Re-build pumps and re-time dispenser using procedure outlined
4) Check for correct heater operation in vault- Cold breaks gears
5) Do not use grease on gears, only use a dry silicone if needed.

DISPENSER: “ Cash jams”

1) Inspect money path, check for guides out of position or broken parts
2) Check pick module and presenter timing
3) Verify cash quality and push plate, make sure the push plate is not locked in too hard against the
bills.
Note: “New cash should always push old or fit cash”- “Brick pushing a pillow”
Note: “ Mixed Cash new and fit can cause push pressure problems”- Separate
4) Check belts and gears for wear or missing teeth- Check timing
5) Check for intermittent Lamps- tap on them gently to determine if they are solid
6) Clear fitness and run test’s with vault door open, make sure the interlock switch is pulled out during
test.
7) Engage the “cash on” switch in the “Diag” menu and select 10 bills to be presented
8) Check error log to isolate problem- Perform PM replace pick cups

DISPENSER: “ False Bill Jams”

1) Check for intermittent Lamps- tap on them gently to determine if they are solid
2) Visually check for brightness of lamps, replace any weak or blackened bulbs
3) Run diagnostics and clear fitness

DISPENSER: “ Pick Failures”

1) Check fitness log for explanation of pick failures and location


2) Verify money condition as listed in these procedures
3) Replace pick cups and consider re-building pumps- new o-ring
4) Leak check pick line
5) Clean sensors inside pick modules
6) Check replace pick solenoid rubber- Use Teflon to cure dry condition/test
7) Check vacuum line for cracking and replace
8) Check Timing is set correctly
9) Check stacker fingers do not have too many fingers broken
10) Verify divert solenoid is operating correctly
11) Check that the capacity sensors change light intensity
12) Clear fitness and print log and clear
13) Run tests with “cash on” with vault open- check for any abnormalities

DISPENSER: “ Not Dispensing”

1) Test the relays for proper operation when engaging dispenser


2) Check interlock switch is pulled out or vault is closed
3) Check the present motor for damage
4) Clear the fitness and test the dispenser
5) Check fuse F8 located on the front of the power supply

NCR 55/56/5800 SERIES: DISPENSERS

DISPENSER: “ Cassette’s not going low before running out”

1) Check for the magnet in the proper position and present in the cassette
2) Check the “reed” sensor on the small circuit card inside the feed modules
3) Replace the broken glass reed sensor in the feed module

DISPENSER: “ Gears breaking on pick line assembly drive”

1) Clean pick line completely to remove any friction during movement


2) Blow out lines and perform a leak check on pick lines
3) Re-time dispenser using procedure outlined
4) Check for correct heater operation in vault- Cold breaks gears
5) Do not use grease on gears, only use a dry silicone if needed.

DISPENSER: “ Cash jams”

1) Inspect money path, check for guides out of position or broken parts
2) Check pick module and presenter timing
3) Verify cash quality and push plate, make sure the push plate is not locked in too hard against the
bills.
Note: “New cash should always push old or fit cash”- “Brick pushing a pillow”
Note: “ Mixed Cash new and fit can cause push pressure problems”- Separate
4) Check belts and gears for wear or missing teeth- Check timing
5) Clear fitness and run test’s with vault door open, make sure the interlock switch is pulled out during
test.
6) Check M-Status error log to isolate problem- Perform PM replace pick cups

DISPENSER: “ Pick Failures”

1) Check Terminal Healthy screen for explanation of pick failures and location
2) Verify money condition in cassettes as listed in these procedures
3) Replace pick cups
4) Clean all sensors
5) Clean filter, blow out -Replace if needed
6) Check vacuum line for bad connections or leak
7) Check Timing is set correctly
8) Clean LVDT sensor and wheel
9) Clear fitness and Test Cash
10) Run tests with “cash on” with vault open- check for any abnormalities

DISPENSER: “Sensor 5 requires cleaning”

1) “Bug” with software, sensor does not require cleaning- Consult Bulletins or Ignore fault, Fault can
remain on the Terminal Healthily Screen

DISPENSER: “Will only pick from one cassette-New or Change in Cassettes”

1) Verify ATM is seeing cassette in Cash Test- Check magnets in each cassette
2) Determine if network is set-up to see High/Low or denominations (911 or 912)
3) Learn Bill Parameters for each cassette
DISPENSER BULLETINS:NCR 55/56/5800 SERIES

92-0116-Sunlight shield on exit sensor


92-0080-Superseded by 603-5007250 firmware
93-0014-Twin Track cam follower wear
93-0016-Replace stack sensor bracket
93-0001-Addition of note flicker to shaft
93-0009-Dispensor stepper motor PCB short
93-0075-Improved error handling
93-0087-Lower notes in stack sticks to fascia when presented
93-0114-IE Dispenser description and 445-0611235 Cam and 445-0611236 Idler Stud repair kits
93-0111-Notes skimming the top of fascia
93-0153-IE Dispenser-Mstat 18 errors
93-0158-Pick fails with poor quality notes
94-0014-M09 Errors, Bill Learn and bug fixes STD dispenser
94-0015-M09 Errors, Bill Learn and bug fixes I.E. dispenser
94-0120-Improved Currency dispenser vacuum air filter
95-0048-Currency notes clipping the dispenser interface bracket
96-0044-56XX Currency dispenser- General change information
97-0062-ATM Currency cassette- Wider Ploy carbonate Cassette

TRITON-9500/9600 :DISPENSER-SINGLE

DISPENSER: “ Cassette will not come out”

1) Remove 8-10 screws on the left and right side guide plate- Figure eight
2) If cassette still wont come out- Remove two spring clips at rear of dispenser
3) Check for new cash- New cash must be fanned three times through counter

DISPENSER: “ Notes are skewing at top of transport”

1) Clean sponge feed wheels-check for roundness


2) Check that pick wheel may have lost outer coating- Replace wheels if needed
3) Replace dispenser

DISPENSER: “ Cassette keeps coming out”

1) Replace the left and right side white locator clips inside the feed module
2) Check and replace the rails as needed

DIEBOLD I-SERIES: POWER SUPPLY

POWER SUPPLY: “NO POWER”

1) Check for power at black beauty connector


2) Check for any happy lights
3) Check for hard drive operation
4) Check fuse input on power supply and replace
5) Replace power supply

NCR 5000 SERIES :POWER SUPPLY

POWER SUPPLY: “NOISY”

1) Check for any receipt paper in any fans on ATM

POWER SUPPLY: “NO PPD PRINT”

1) Check power supply for +5VDC


2) Replace Power Supply

POWER SUPPLY: “NO ALARM”

1) Replace power supply

POWER SUPPLY: “ATM shows no lights, motors running or fans”

1) Replace power supply


NCR 55/56/5800 SERIES :POWER SUPPLY

POWER SUPPLY: “NO POWER- no green light”

1) Check for power at connector


2) Check for any happy lights
3) Check for hard drive operation
4) Check fuse input on power supply and replace
5) Replace power supply

POWER SUPPLY: “Flashing green/ red light”

1) There is a short somewhere on the ATM


2) Check the light Ballast by disconnecting the positive input
3) Disconnect one power input to each device at a time to isolate faulty device

TRITON SERIES :POWER SUPPLY

POWER SUPPLY: “NO POWER”

1) Check fuse input at A/C switch


2) Check fuses on power supply
3) Replace power supply
SECTION 11
DIEBOLD 1063IX PAGE

DIEBOLD 1063IX IST LINE PROCEDURES 1

DIEBOLD 1063IX TROUBLESHOOTING 1

Clear List 2

Counters 2

DISPENSE TEST 2

CASH TYPES 3

DIAGNOSTICS 3

ATTN Message 3

LOGOFF 3
DIEBOLD 1063IX

DIEBOLD 1063IX IST LINE PROCEDURES

RECEIPT AND AUDIT REPLENISHMENT


RECEIPT AND AUDIT INK CARTRIDGE ‘S
CASH LOADING, CLEARING JAMS
NETWORK ATM LOADS/ POWER FAILURES
DEVICE TESTING FOR 2ND LINE SERVICE
ADMINISTRATION PASSWORD 0,0,0,0,0,0,

KEY= B121, TOP HAT, BOTTOM COVER DOOR


PROCESSOR= DIEBOLD STP PROCESSOR PCB
POLL ADDRESS= ________
DESKEYS= ___________A KEY, ___________B KEY
NETWORK=_____________

DIEBOLD 1063IX TROUBLESHOOTING

POWER FAILURES:
1. “OFFLINE”-NOT TAKING LOAD
2. “OUT OF SERVICE”-TAKING LOAD
(LOAD SHOULD TAKE NO MORE THAN 5 MINUTES)
CALL NETWORK IF MACHINE DOES NOT TAKE
LOAD

Notes:
ANY POWER failure will result in a network load being lost, most times the ATM will come
back up on own and take load from network.

Ribbon replacement on Receipt and Audit printers on a regular basis will improve reliability

Canned Air should be used weekly, blowing out all assemblies, clean machines result in less down
time.
A Dispense test should always be performed after replenishment or service of dispenser.

DIEBOLD 1063IX IST LINE PROCEDURES

SERVICE:
1>PRESS AND HOLD WHITE ROCKER BUTTON
2>ENTER 0,0,0,0,0,0, (6 ZEROS)
3>SELECT SUPPLY ON MENU

NOTE: BLUE ADVANCE BUTTONS ON RECEIPT AND AUDIT PRINTERS WORK WHEN
IN THIS MENU.

Clear List: Clears and prints all failure codes on receipt printer, these codes can be
looked up in the DIEBOLD ATM Failure Code Handbook.
CRD- card reader faults are common due the cards not being swiped correctly.

Counters: Used for balancing, displays and prints counters of diverts, and
dispensed bills from cassettes

DISPENSE TEST: (press button when removing cassette’s)


TEST’S BOTH CASSETTES BY SELECTING A BILL FROM EACH AND
THEN PUTTING INTO DIVERT

EXAMPLE:

CASS C: pass (This means 20’s are ok)


CASS B: pass ( 50’s are ok)
CASS D: pass ( 20’s are ok)
Each cassette is “coded” and can go into either location on dispenser.

CASS C: low (This means the cassette is low, or the switch in the cassette is
engaged and requires reset)

Divert Pass (This means the divert is pushed and locked into position)

CASS C: not tested ( This means the cassette may not be pushed in or the divert
cassette is not pushed in)

CASH TYPES:
Friction feed cash systems require correct cash loading

NEW CASH: Should be put through cash counter 3 times and loaded into cassettes
“Head to Handle”

FIT CASH: can be loaded any direction, bills should not be ripped, folded or
wrinkled. New cash should always push Fit cash “Brick Pushing Pillow”

4>MAIN MENU:

DIAGNOSTICS:
RPT=
Press 01 for Receipt printer
prints receipts and cut’s them press “cancel” to stop
Press 02 for Audit printer
prints on audit printer, press “cancel” to stop
CRD= tests card reader , swipe card for count

ATTN Message:
After any Logoff, replenishment or repair, Press “ATTN- MESSAGE before
“LOGOFF”
Reports to network status of ATM

LOGOFF:
Tests all devices then takes a short load from network and goes into service, if
beeping occurs, a failure has occurred, fix problem and resume by following
“FIXED” command.

Types of problems:
Low Receipt paper, out of paper
Low Dispenser, low on cash

If “Ignore” command is selected the device will not be retested, but ATM may
came back into service. This device will the not work until repaired.
SECTION 12
NCR 5000 SERIES Page

TO TEST CASH 3

TO CLEAR FITNESS LOG 4

NCR QUICK LIST STEPS 5

TO TEST DEPOSITORY 6
NCR 5000 SERIES

NCR Model 5085:Walk-up


NCR Model 5088:Drive-up

ATM HOLDS SYSTEM FAULTS

ANY SYSTEM FAULTS REQUIRE


CORRECTION, THEN THE FITNESS LOG
MUST BE CLEARED

THE ATM MUST BE PUT INTO


SUPERVISOR DURING ANY
REPLENISHMENT OR REPAIR ACTIVITY

THE ATM VAULT DOOR MUST BE CLOSED


DURING ANY DISPENSER OR
DEPOSITORY TEST AND MUST BE
CLOSED WHEN BROUGHT BACK INTO
SERVICE
THE FOLLOWING MENU’S ON THE ATM WILL BE
COVERED:

“SEL”- SELECT MENU-Start and ending menu

“REP”- REPLENISHMENT MENU-Used for testing Cash and


Receipt Transport testing, should also be used when
replenishment of Audit printer, Receipt printer, Cash and
Retrieving Deposits

“DIAG”- DIAGNOSTIC MENU- Used to Clear Fitness Log and


Test Depository

PRINTING OF MENU’S FOR THE SELECT MENU(“SEL”)


AND REPLENISHMENT MENU (“REP”) ARE AT THE
AUDIT PRINTER- PRESSING THE ENTER KEY WILL
PRINT THE CURRENT HEADER AND LOCATION IN THE
MENU

PRINTING OF THE MENU’S FOR THE DIAGNOSTIC


(“DIAG”) ARE AT THE RECEIPT PRINTER- PRESSING
THE ENTER KEY IN THIS MENU HEADER WILL PRINT
THE CURRENT LOCATION IN THE MENU.

TO EXIT ANY MENU “9” ENTER MAY BE PRESSED TO


GET BACK TO THE PREVIOUS MENU SELECTIONS

AFTER FIXING ANY DEVICE,THE DEVICE SHOULD BE


TESTED AND THE FITNESS LOG CLEARED
AFTER REPLENISHMENT OF ANY DEVICE THE DEVICE
SHOULD BE TESTED

ALL OPERATIONS REQUIRE THE USER TO PUT SWITCH


ON THE MAINTENANCE KEYPAD (MP) IN THE
SUPERVISOR POSITION- THE STARTING POINT FOR
ALL THE FOLLOWING MENU’S STARTS WITH THE
SELECT MENU “SEL”

TO TEST CASH

1)MAKE SURE VAULT DOOR IS CLOSED

2)From “SEL”on maintenance panel (MP) press “4” then the


“Enter” key

3)Press the “Enter” key again to print the menu on the audit
printer

4)Press Test Cash selection “10” then the “Enter Key”

During this time the dispenser will kick on and test itself. One
bill from each cassette will be picked and put into the divert
cassette.

5)”c12--” should appear on the maintenance panel. This means


that both cassette’s tested good. If only “c1---” appeared that
would mean that only cassette 1 passed the test and so on.

6)PRESS THE “ENT” KEY TO GET BACK TO THE “REP”


REPLENISHMENT MENU.
7)PRESS THE “CNL” CANCEL KEY TO GET BACK TO
STEP 1 OR THE “SEL” MENU- YOU ARE DONE TESTING
THE CASH

NOTE: IF THE TEST DID NOT WORK MAKE SURE THE


VAULT DOOR IS CLOSED THEN GO TO THE
INSTRUCTIONS ON HOW TO CLEAR THE FITNESS LOG.
THEN YOU MAY TRY TESTING THE CASH AGAIN

TO CLEAR FITNESS LOG

1)From the “ SEL” MENU PRESS “7”


THEN THE “ENTER” KEY
note: The diagnostic program will take about 10 seconds to
load

2)”DIAG” SHOULD BE DISPLAYED ON THE MP, PRESS


THE ENTER KEY TO PRINT THE MENU TO THE RECEIPT
PRINTER, TEAR OFF TO READ.

3)PRESS “1” (REPORT) AND PRESS “ENTER”, “RPT”


SHOULD BE DISPLAYED ON THE MP, PRESS ENTER
AGAIN TO PRINT THE MENU TO THE RECEIPT
PRINTER, TEAR OFF TO READ.

4)PRESS THE “7” (CLEAR FITNESS) THEN THE “ENTER”


KEY.

Both printers will engage during this operation and the receipt
printer will print out “cleared”

5)Press the “9” (exit) key then the “Enter” key to get to the
previous “DIAG” menu.

6)Press the “9” (exit) key to get back to the “SEL” start menu

note that the receipt printer will advance and cut the receipt
paper from the printer allowing the transport bridge to be put
into it’s normal position once the paper is removed.

NCR QUICK LIST STEPS

NCR Model 5085: Walk-up


NCR Model 5088: Drive-up

TO CLEAR FITNESS- Select Menu

1)7 ENTER (DIAG)


2)1 ENTER (RPT)
3)7 ENTER (CLEARS FITNESS)
4)9 ENTER (RPT)EXIT
5)9 ENTER (DIAG)EXIT
6) (SEL)MENU

TO TEST CASH- Select Menu

1)4 ENTER (REP)


2)10 ENTER (TEST CASH)
3)SHOULD DISPLAY C12--
4)ENTER KEY IS PRESSED (SEL)
5)CANCEL KEY TO “SEL” MENU

TO TEST DEPOSITORY
1)MAKE SURE VAULT IS CLOSED

2)FROM “SEL” PRESS THE ENTER KEY AND READ THE


MENU PRINTED ON THE AUDIT PRINTER.

3)SELECT “TRANSFER BY PRESSING “8” THEN THE


ENTER KEY (Xfer can also be accessed in the Diagnostics
menus)

THE SCREEN CAN NOW BE OPERATED AT THE FRONT


OF THE ATM, GO TO THE FRONT OF THE ATM WITH A
DEPOSIT ENVELOPE

4)ENTER PASSWORD- “2-4-6-8” THEN PRESS THE ENTER


KEY

THE SELECT MENU THAT WAS PRINTED ON THE AUDIT


PRINTER SHOULD NOW BE DISPLAYED ON THE
SCREEN

5)SELECT DIAGNOSTIC BY PRESSING “7” THEN THE


ENTER KEY

6)IN THE DIAGNOSTIC MENU SELECT TESTS BY


PRESSING “0” THEN ENTER

7)IN THE TESTS MENU SELECT DEPOSITORY BY


PRESSING “7” THEN THE ENTER KEY

THE SHUTTER FOR THE DEPOSITORY WILL OPEN


THEN CLOSE, WHEN IT OPEN’S AGAIN INSERT THE
ENVELOPE

THE SCREEN SHOULD COME BACK AND SAY DEPOSIT


PASS TEST

8)EXIT THE TEST’S MENU BY PRESSING THE “9” KEY


THEN ENTER.

9)EXIT THE DIAGNOSTIC MENU BY PRESSING THE “9”


KEY THEN ENTER.

10) IN THE SELECT MENU TO TRANSFER BACK INTO


THE ATM PRESS “8” THEN THE ENTER BUTTON.

GO BACK INTO THE ATM, OPEN THE VAULT DOOR AND


CHECK THE QUALITY OF THE TEST DEPOSIT

IF THE QUALITY IS ACCEPTABLE, CLOSED THE VAULT


AND LOCK IT.
SECTION 13
NCR55/56/5800 SERIES PAGE

SOH”- “STATE OF HEALTH” 2


GENERAL 3

SELECT MENU 3

REPLENISHMENT MENU 3

DIAGNOSTIC MENU 4

Transfer 4

CSOH2 4
TO TEST CASH 5

TO CLEAR FITNESS LOG 5

NCR QUICK LIST STEPS 7

TO TEST DEPOSITORY 7
NCR 55/56/5800 SERIES

NCR Model 5685:Walk-up


NCR Model 5688:Drive-up
NCR Model 5585:Walk-up
NCR Model 5588:Drive-up

ATM HOLDS SYSTEM FAULTS

ANY SYSTEM FAULTS REQUIRE


CORRECTION, THEN THE FITNESS LOG
MUST BE CLEARED OR DEVICE TESTED
IN THE REPLENISHMENT MENU

THE ATM MUST BE PUT INTO


SUPERVISOR DURING ANY
REPLENISHMENT OR REPAIR ACTIVITY

THE ATM VAULT DOOR MUST BE CLOSED


DURING ANY DISPENSER OR
DEPOSITORY TEST AND MUST BE
CLOSED WHEN BROUGHT BACK INTO
SERVICE

“SOH”- “STATE OF HEALTH” IS THE FIRST LCD SCREEN.


Pressing the second key down on the left side of the maintenance
panel (MP)will bring this screen up. This is the “SOH” key

This screen describes the current state of the ATM. Any faults
are listed as 1/1 (Fault listed) which is 1 fault or many faults 1/2
(Faults listed).
Note: If more than one fault, wait till screen changes every two
to three seconds.

Note: Three kinds of faults can be listed; Fatal faults Warnings and Routine faults.
Fatal fault require immediate attention, Warnings can wait and Routine faults do
not.

Example of Fatal Fault- Vault interlock switch. The vault has been left open while
the ATM was brought into service. This caused a Fatal Fault on the Dispenser and
Depository. The Fitness log must be cleared.

Example of Warning Fault-Card capture or a tease on the card reader gave a


warning message in the fitness log. The ATM stays in service and the fitness just
requires clearing. Ongoing warning’s should be serviced.

Example of Routine Fault- Sensor 5 requires cleaning or pick cups need replacing.
These faults do not require immediate attention. The sensor 5 requires attention
has been proven as a NCR bug which shows up. This fault should be ignored.

GENRAL
1)Always put “Supervisor” switch on before proceeding with any repairs
or replenishment

2)To access the Select menu or Replenishment menu press the “SOH”
button.

3)To access the “Terminal Heathly Screen” at any time press the second
key down on the left side of the LCD panel.

SELECT MENU

THE SELECT MENU IS THE STARTING POSITION AND


THE EXIT POSITION. THE HIGHLIGHTED MENUS ARE
USED MOST FREQUENTLY AND WILL BE COVERED.

SELECT

0 SET SWO/SUPVSR ON 1 SET SW 1/SUPVSR OFF


2 SET SW2/SUPPLY ON 3 SET SW3/SUPPLY OFF
4 REPLENISH 5 CONFIGURE
6 ACCESS 7 DIAGNOSTIC
8 TRANSFER 9 EXIT
20 CSOH 21 CSOH3

(4)REPLENISHMENT MENU-Used for testing Cash and


Receipt Transport testing, should also be used when
replenishment of Audit printer, Receipt printer, Cash and
Retrieving Deposits
THE “SOH” “STATE OF HEALTH” WILL BE CLEARED
AFTER TESTING A DEVICE IN THE REPLENISHMENT
MENU
(7)DIAGNOSTIC MENU- Used to Display fitness log and Clear
Fitness Log
Note: log shows Fatal faults and Routine faults, Fatal faults require repair of
device and testing before the fitness is cleared.
Routine faults normally do not require attention

(9)EXIT is used to exit the select menu to bring the ATM


into service. The supervisor switch must be pushed up to the
“Normal” position after this selection is made.

WARNING:VAULT DOOR MUST BE CLOSED

(8)Transfer is used to transfer the LCD screen to the front of the


ATM. The code”2-4-6-8-Enter” must be used.
All menu’s are accessed and the Depository and Card reader can be tested.

(20)CSOH2 is used to test each device and clear the fitness. This
menu selection is normally used for testing the print quality on
the envelopes.
Note: Everytime a deposit print head is replaced the CSOH2 should be used to tell
the system that “printhead replaced”. This will zero the counters and keep track of
the life of the printhead. When the printhead needs replacement the “SOH” screen
will show this Warning.
TO TEST CASH

1)MAKE SURE VAULT DOOR IS CLOSED

2)From “SELECT” on maintenance panel (MP) press “4”


(Replenish) then the “Enter” key

3)Press Test Cash selection “10” then the “Enter Key”

During this time the dispenser will kick on and test itself. One bill from each
cassette will be picked and put into the divert cassette.
4)”Top cassette good” and “Bottom cassette good” should
appear on the panel.

5)PRESS THE “Cancel” key to GET BACK TO THE


“REPLENISHMENT” MENU.

6)YOU ARE DONE TESTING THE CASH


NOTE: IF THE TEST DID NOT WORK MAKE SURE THE VAULT DOOR IS
CLOSED THEN GO TO THE INSTRUCTIONS ON HOW TO CLEAR THE
FITNESS LOG. THEN YOU MAY TRY TESTING THE CASH AGAIN

TO CLEAR FITNESS LOG

1)From the “SELECT” MENU PRESS “7” (Diagnostics)THEN


THE “ENTER” KEY
Note: The diagnostic program will take about 3 seconds to load

2)”DIAGNOSTICS” SHOULD BE DISPLAYED ON THE MP,


PRESS THE “3”BUTTON(LEVEL 3 DIAGNOSTICS) THEN
THE “ENTER” KEY

3)PRESS THE “3” (DISPLAY FITNESS) THEN THE “ENTER”


KEY.

The current faults will be displayed on the panel, Fatal Faults require attention or
the fitness log cleared.

4)Press the “bottom left” key of the panel to exit to the previous
menu.

5)Press “6” (Clear Fitness) then the “Enter Key” to clear the
fitness log.

Note: All faults are now cleared on the ATM


6)Press the “Bottom left key” on the panel several times to get
back to the Select Menu.

NCR QUICK LIST STEPS

NCR Model 5685: Walk-up


NCR Model 5688: Drive-up

TO CLEAR FITNESS- SELECT Menu

1)7 ENTER (DIAGNOSTICS)


2)3 ENTER(LEVEL 3 DIAGNOSTICS)
3)6 ENTER(CLEARS FITNESS)
4) BOTTOM LEFT KEY
5) BOTTOM LEFT KEY
6) (SELECT)MENU

TO TEST CASH- SELECT Menu

1)4 ENTER (REPLENISH)


2)10 ENTER (TEST CASH)
3)SHOWS TOP/BOTTOM CASSETTE GOOD
4)CANCEL KEY TO(REPLENISH)
5)CANCEL KEY TO (SELECT) MENU

TO TEST DEPOSITORY

1)MAKE SURE VAULT DOOR IS CLOSED

2)FROM “SELECT” MENU PRESS


“8” (TRANSFER) THEN THE ENTER KEY
NOTE:THE SCREEN CAN NOW BE OPERATED AT THE FRONT OF THE
ATM, GO TO THE FRONT OF THE ATM WITH A DEPOSIT ENVELOPE

3)ENTER PASSWORD- “2-4-6-8” THEN PRESS THE ENTER


KEY

THE SELECT MENU SHOULD BE DISPLAYED ON THE


SCREEN

4)SELECT “20” (CSOH) THEN THE ENTER KEY

5)Select “4” Depository


6)Select “5” (Printhead)

7)Select “2” (Replaced printhead)

8)Press “1” (Selection correct)

9)Press the “Device” (Bottom left button)

Note: Have Envelope Ready


10)Press the “SME” (Bottom left button)

THE SHUTTER FOR THE DEPOSITORY WILL OPEN THEN CLOSE, WHEN
IT OPEN’S AGAIN INSERT THE ENVELOPE

THE SCREEN SHOULD go to the “SOH” OR SELECT screen and clear message-
VERIFY

11)ENTER THE “SELECT” MENU BY PRESSING THE


“SOH” (SECOND BUTTON DOWN ON LEFT SIDE)

12)PRESS “8” (TRANSFER) TO TRANSFER THE SCREEN


TO THE BACK OF THE ATM.

13)GO BACK TO THE ATM, OPEN THE VAULT DOOR


AND CHECK THE QUALITY OF THE TEST DEPOSIT

Note: A String of the Characters should print on the envelope, If not follow the
NCR Inkjet Prep and installation procedures.

IF THE QUALITY IS ACCEPTABLE, CLOSED THE VAULT


AND LOCK IT.
SECTION 14

NCR INKJET PROCEDURE Page

INKJET PREP AND INSTALLATION 1

NCR INKJET INSTALLATION 2