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THE HURT LOCKER

Production Notes
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SYNOPSIS

The Hurt Locker, winner of the 2008 Venice Film Festival SIGNIS Grand Prize, is a riveting,
suspenseful portrait of the courage under fire of the military’s unrecognized heroes: the
technicians of a bomb squad who volunteer to challenge the odds and save lives in one of the
world’s most dangerous places. Three members of the Army’s elite Explosive Ordnance Disposal
(EOD) squad battle insurgents and each other as they search for and disarm a wave of roadside
bombs on the streets of Baghdad—in order to try and make the city a safer place for Iraqis and
Americans alike. Their mission is clear—protect and save—but it’s anything but easy, as the
margin of error when defusing a war-zone bomb is zero. This thrilling and heart-pounding look at
the effects of combat and danger on the human psyche is based on the first-hand observations of
journalist and screenwriter Mark Boal, who was embedded with a special bomb unit in Iraq.
These men spoke of explosions as putting you in “the hurt locker.”

Acclaimed director Kathryn Bigelow brings together groundbreaking realistic action and intimate
human drama in a landmark film starring Jeremy Renner (Dahmer, The Assassination of Jesse
James), Anthony Mackie (Half Nelson, We Are Marshall) and Brian Geraghty (We Are Marshall,
Jarhead), with cameo appearances by Ralph Fiennes (The Reader), David Morse (“John
Adams”), Evangeline Lilly (“Lost”) and Guy Pearce (Memento). The Hurt Locker is produced by
Kathryn Bigelow, Mark Boal, Greg Shapiro and Nicolas Chartier. The screenplay is written by
Mark Boal (In the Valley of Elah, story). Barry Ackroyd, BSC (United 93, The Wind That Shakes
the Barley) is director of photography. Production designer is Karl Juliusson (K19: The
Widowmaker, Breaking the Waves). Editors are Bob Murawski (Spider-Man 2, Spider-Man 3) and
Chris Innis. Costume designer is George Little (Jarhead, Crimson Tide). Music is by Academy
Award Nominee Marco Beltrami (Knowing) and Buck Sanders (3:10 to Yuma), and sound design
by Academy Award Nominee Paul N.J. Ottosson (Spider-Man 2, Spider-Man 3).

In the summer of 2004, Sergeant J.T. Sanborn (Anthony Mackie) and Specialist Owen Eldridge
(Brian Geraghty) of Bravo Company are at the volatile center of the war, part of a small
counterforce specifically trained to handle the homemade bombs, or Improvised Explosive
Devices (IEDs), that account for more than half of American hostile deaths and have killed
thousands of Iraqis. The job, a high-pressure, high-stakes assignment, which soldiers volunteer
for, requires a calm intelligence that leaves no room for mistakes, as they learn when they lose
their team leader on a routine mission.

When Staff Sergeant William James (Jeremy Renner) cheerfully takes over the team, Sanborn
and Eldridge are shocked by what seems like his reckless disregard for military protocol and
basic safety measures. And yet, in the fog of war, appearances are never reliable for long. Is
James really a swaggering cowboy who lives for peak experiences and the moments when the
margin of error is zero – or is he a consummate professional who has honed his esoteric craft to
high-wire precision? As the fiery chaos of Baghdad threatens to engulf them, the men struggle to
understand and contain their mercurial new leader long enough for them to make it home. They
have only 38 days left in their tour, but with each new mission comes another deadly encounter,
and as James blurs the line between bravery and bravado, it seems only a matter of time before
disaster strikes.

With a visual and emotional intensity that makes audiences feel like they have been transported
to Iraq’s dizzying, 24-hour turmoil, The Hurt Locker is both a gripping portrayal of real-life sacrifice
and heroism, and a layered, probing study of the soul-numbing rigors and potent allure of the
modern battlefield.

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TRUE FICTION: THE SCRIPT

In 2004, journalist and screenwriter Mark Boal spent several weeks embedded with a U.S. Army
bomb squad operating in one of the most dangerous sections of Baghdad, following its
movements and getting inside the heads of the men whose skills rival those of surgeons—except
in their case one false move means they lose their own life rather than the life of a patient. His
first-hand observations of their days and nights disarming bombs became the inspiration for The
Hurt Locker and, eventually, a script that simultaneously strips down the classic American war
epic and broadens its concerns to encompass themes as universal as the price of heroism and
the limits of bravery in 21st century combat.

“It [the experience in Iraq] made a deep impression on me. When I got home, I thought ‘people
have no idea how these guys live and what they’re up against,’ and then later I started thinking
about it dramatically and doing a fictional story about men who voluntarily work with bombs,” says
Boal, who also created the story for the drama In the Valley of Elah, for which Tommy Lee Jones
received an Academy Award nomination. “On a character level, I was intrigued by the sort of
mental and psychological framework that a bomb technician develops on the job. What kind of
personality is comfortable with extreme risk and with living so close to death? And in a thematic
sense, the bomb squad seemed like a promising entry-point for a war movie.”

Coalition bomb squads have played a pivotal but mostly underreported part in the war, and
bringing their work to light was also part of Boal’s motivation for writing the script. The Army relies
on its bomb squads as the first –and last- line of defense against the IEDs that have become the
insurgency’s weapon of choice. The opening scene in the movie depicts the kind of situation that
US soldiers in Baghdad encountered on a daily basis—sometimes 10 or 20 times a day,
according to Boal. “Someone finds an IED, they call in the bomb squad and the bomb squad has
to deal with it while everyone else in the military pulls back.”

“What many people don’t know is that although Baghdad was horrifically dangerous in those
years, it could have been a lot worse,” he adds. “On any given day, for every bomb that exploded
in the city, there were probably ten or fifteen that didn’t detonate because of a few, secretive
bomb squads that were in theater.”

In order to capture the tension of Boal’s intricately detailed, nuts-and-bolts descriptions of bomb
disarmaments, it would clearly take a filmmaker with her own gift for innovative storytelling to
bring all the nuance on the page to life with visceral, poetic imagery and powerful performances.

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When it came to evoking the hair-raising intensity of bomb squad work, there was no better
choice than Kathryn Bigelow, who began her career as an artist, working with the avant guard
conceptual art group Art & Language in New York, before becoming one of cinema’s leading
filmmakers and a director renowned for stylistic innovations, masterful suspense, and ground-
breaking action sequences. Bigelow’s cult following and reputation as one of the most inventive
filmmakers in world cinema began with her vampire noir Near Dark and was cemented by her
influential surfer-heist classic Point Break, the science-fiction thriller Strange Days, and the cold-
war submarine drama, K-19: The Widowmaker.

With The Hurt Locker, Bigelow marries Boal’s screenwriting style – closely-observed characters,
and realistic, intense set pieces - with her own unique vision; the result is incredibly suspenseful
and action-packed cinema that reinvents the war movie for the post-Vietnam era.

Bigelow had met Boal while she was developing a television series from an article he had written
in 2002. They stayed in touch, and Boal contacted the filmmaker when he returned from Iraq.
“Obviously, Kathryn is a brilliant director who has a terrific feel for how physical and psychological
danger effect character, and so I was pretty much fell out of my chair when she said she was
interested.”

“I’d been a fan of Mark’s reporting for some time,” Bigelow says. And Boal’s observations of the
bomb squad seemed like a perfect fit to a filmmaker known for films that put key characters in
extreme situations. “The fact that these men live in mortal danger every day make their lives
inherently tense, iconic and cinematic,” she adds, “and on a metaphorical level, they seemed to
suggest both the heroism and the futility of the war.”

Bigelow and Boal decided to produce an independent movie that would be character-driven,
suspenseful and “intensely experiential,” as Bigelow puts it, by placing audiences on the ground
with the bomb squad. “Everything about this movie—the directing, script, camera work, music,
editing—was conceived from the beginning with the single goal of creating that heightened sense
of realism that underscores the tension, without losing the layering of these complicated
characters.” says Bigelow.

With Bigelow’s guidance, Boal worked on the script on spec for the director, writing in what he
calls a “naturalistic style, a sort of true fiction,” that seeks to replicate the tension and
unpredictability of war itself, and mirror the daily grind of real life bomb squad soldiers who disarm
bombs week after week, year after year.

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They wanted The Hurt Locker to avoid polemics and instead place the audience in the soldiers’
point of view in order to give them a vividly authentic sense of what it was like to walk the high-
wire act of a bomb technician. “The dialogue is meant to feel life-like and spontaneous, as if it
wasn’t written, while at the same time revealing intimate character detail and capturing the
excitement of their work,” he says. “The portrayals of bomb disposal and urban warfare are pretty
faithful to real life incidents that soldiers have faced in Iraq and Afghanistan, although the
characters themselves are composites.”

He worked on 17 drafts with Bigelow before finding a final version, and the pair continued to
tweak the script during filming so that the major set-pieces could be sculpted to fit the available
geography of the shooting locations. In the end, the result was The Hurt Locker, in which Boal
pays tribute to the spirit and dedication of the soldiers in Iraq with his layered story-telling and
sharply delineated, intensely human characters.

Once the script was completed, Bigelow called in favors from her years in the business. “We said
to people, the bad news is we have no money, no studio, and no means of outside support,“
Bigelow recalls. “But that was also the good news, because we had creative freedom and we
could work outside the box.”

Bigelow and Boal approached financier Nicolas Chartier, who raised funds for the production
through his independent company, Voltage Pictures. “It was the best script I’d read since Crash,”
says Chartier, who had helped sell that Academy Award winning film. “And I had wanted to work
with Kathryn for a really long time. She has an incredible eye for action and is one of the top
directors in the world.”

The Hurt Locker caused a sensation when it screened at the Venice Film Festival, receiving a
ten-minute standing ovation, and earning four awards, including the SIGNIS and Human Rights
Film award, as well as a nomination for the Golden Lion, the festival’s highest honor. It was
praised for being a film that “avoids dry ideology,” according to the La Navicella Venenzia, “in a
controlled but complex style.” “An uncompromising approach to the Iraq war and its
consequences seen through the experience of the bomb diffusion specialists for whom war is an
addiction rather than a cause,” stated the SIGNIS committee, “Kathryn Bigelow challenges the
audiences view of war in general and the current war in particular [by] demonstrating the struggle
between violence to the body and psychological alienation.”

Shortly after Venice, the film screened to widespread critical acclaim at the Toronto International
Film festival, winning The Screen Jury competition for the best reviewed film of the festival, based

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on an international slate of newspaper and magazine critics. Shortly thereafter, Summit
Entertainment purchased the domestic distribution rights to The Hurt Locker, insuring that the film
would reach audiences in America.

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IN THE KILL ZONE: CHARACTERS AND CAST

At the heart of The Hurt Locker are its characters – men who risk their lives daily in one of the
most dangerous places on earth – fighting the odds to stop bombs from detonating in a city
overrun with IEDs and insurgent snipers. Against this deadly backdrop, Sergeant James
becomes the heart of the story – a mercurial, swaggering, expert bomb technician with a
cheerfully anarchical approach to combat and, paradoxically, a masterfully controlled skill-set,
who shocks his new team members with his enthusiastic disregard for established procedures.
Despite his teammate’s vocal misgivings, James refuses to modify his mood or change his
behavior, representing the kind of all American hubris and spirited independence that can spark
great sacrifice – and also dangerously misfire.

“James really anchors the movie, he’s the galvanizing center of the team in that he instills both
fear and admiration, ” says Kathryn Bigelow. “a lot of what happens in terms of character
development is about how the other guys react to this almost elemental force that comes whirling
into their already on-edge lives.”

When it came to casting the film’s three leads, Bigelow wanted to find breakout, young actors in
order to heighten the film’s authenticity and boost its surprise factor—avoiding the calming
familiarity of an established movie star. “There’s a convention that the movie star doesn’t die until
the end of a film, and I think that in our case having that certainty would undermine the naturally
suspenseful, unpredictable quality of being in a war where death can happen anytime, to
anyone,” explains Bigelow. “With The Hurt Locker, I wanted it to be as tense and real as possible,
and that mean having actors who were relatively fresh faces so the audience wouldn’t know who
among the three main characters was going to live or die by virtue of their public profile.”

In considering who might play Staff Sergeant James, Bigelow conducted an exhaustive search of
up and coming young talent before finding an actor with the range to realize the role of the wild,
alluring, good ‘old boy with a surprisingly rich interior life. The search ended when Jeremy Renner
came to her attention via his turn playing the notorious title character in the film Dahmer. “Jeremy
gave an incredibly nuanced performance in that movie, eliciting compassion and revulsion in
almost equal measure,” says Bigelow. “I found it an arresting display of major talent, and from
that moment forward was determined to work with him.”

“It takes an incredibly skillful and intelligent actor to embody James’ bravado and allure in a
nuanced way that doesn’t seem artificial, and Jeremy is as skillful as an actor gets,” Bigelow
adds.

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“The role calls for the ability to command authority while also seeming to be totally reckless,” she
continues, “that’s a very difficult but seductive combination which Jeremy can inhabit with
seemingly natural ease.”

James is the catalyst for much of the film’s conflict. “His solitary focus is on the bomb,” says Boal.
“That’s where he gets his engagement and his sense of being alive. He’s most at home when
he’s working on a bomb and most out of place when he’s just with other people. So in a sense,
the price of his heroism is his isolation, or loneliness. It’s a recipe for disaster to have these three
men working together in the same unit.”

Jeremy Renner, who grew up in rural California, identified with the character’s salt-of-the-earth
background, and he was also drawn to a universal quality in the script that transcends its
immediate setting. “What attracted me was that it’s not simply about the Iraq war,” he says. “It
could be about bull riders instead of EOD. It’s a backdrop for these three guys and how they
approach life.”

The actor sees some similarities between his hotshot character and himself. “James’ philosophies
are a big part of me. He’s a man of few words and a lot of action. I’m not a big talker. I’d much
rather get something done.”

Like many people, Renner was unaware of the existence of the Army’s EOD squads until he read
the script. “I could never do what they do. Just the thought of laying there next to a 155 [artillery
round] and my heart starts pounding. They’ve got to have a switch in their head that they can turn
on and off.”

Casting the role of Sergeant J.T. Sanborn—the proud, affable, level-headed intelligence specialist
who has the toughness to go toe-to-toe with James—posed it’s own special challenges, recalls
Bigelow. “Sanborn needed to be James’ equal in terms of being a strong presence, and he has to
adhere to protocol in a way that seems thoughtful rather than rote,” the director explains. “It was a
very difficult part to cast because we needed someone who projected real solidity and reliability
while at the same time having the capacity for great sensitivity, which as it turns out it is not that
common.”

Anthony Mackie caught Bigelow’s eye during his performances in She’s Gotta Have It, We Are
Marshall, Million Dollar Baby, and especially in his role as a menacing drug dealer in Half Nelson
opposite Ryan Gosling. “He completely controlled the screen in a relatively small part,” she

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remembers. “You couldn’t take your eyes off him. Anthony has that cunning magnetism that has
true star quality.”

For his part, Mackie was attracted to the depth he saw in Sanborn’s character, which allowed him
to find many levels on which to play. “Sanborn hides behind his machismo,” says Mackie. “There
has to be a kind of superhero aspect to these soldiers. If they wake up every day in fear that
every minute is the last, they’ll drive themselves crazy. Down deep though, he’s very humble.”
In contrast to James’ consuming passion for his work, Sergeant J.T. Sanborn is the film’s
Everyman. “He spent seven years in intelligence before joining EOD,” says Boal. “He’s a smart,
capable, reliable, charismatic guy who has never encountered a whirlwind like James before.
There’s an alpha male component to his personality that runs up pretty hard against James,
who’s also an alpha male but of a much different stripe, so you have these two versions of
masculinity dueling each other as they fight in these really tricky circumstances in Baghdad.”

Providing the third side of the film’s inter-personal triangle is Specialist Owen Eldridge, the
youthful, junior member of the team who is in search of a mentor, and who tries but ultimately
fails to find solace in either Sanborn’s stoicism or in James’ indifference to danger. As the pain of
the war creeps up on the young soldier, darkening his innocence, “Eldridge has to be every
mother’s son,” explains Bigelow, “there’s a frankness, and earnestness to him that allows him to
wear his fear on his sleeve.”

Bigelow had been impressed with Brian Geraghty’s performances in Jarhead, We Are Marshall,
and Bobby before she cast him as Eldridge in this film. “Brian exhibited the fierce and the
vulnerable in perfect measure,” she says. “He’s natural, totally fluid.”

Of the three men, Eldridge is the youngest in both age and his experience in the military. “He’s
triangulated between Sanborn and James,” says Boal. “He’s looking to see which of these two
older, more experienced men holds the answer to how to survive. He’s willing to throw his lot in
with either, and he flip-flops back and forth, and eventually becomes seduced by James'
decisiveness – and then he comes to regret that choice.

By the end, he’s disenchanted with James for very good reason, but there is a point in the movie
when Eldridge feels that James’ way is the way to go and that he needs to just ‘man up’ and
follow James’ example.”

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“I feel like he’s the emotional heart of the film,” Geraghty says. “I think Eldridge is over it and he’s
just trying to get by and get home. Sanborn and James are more lifers and army guys. Eldridge
reacts completely different under gunfire than they do.”

“I have three tremendously strong actors at the core of the piece,” adds Bigelow. “I felt they would
meld together into a seamless ensemble, as well as retain their strength individually.” Bigelow
has earned a reputation for casting newcomers ever since her first film, The Loveless, in which
she gave Willem Dafoe his first screen credit, and then later in Point Break, when she cast Keanu
Reeves as a rugged FBI agent at a time when the young actor was known for stoner comedy.

With the three leads in place, the next role to cast was Sergeant Matt Thompson, the square-
jawed, team leader beloved by his teammates, who opens the movie. “We needed an actor who
could immediately convey the ease of command and warmth with his men that good sergeants
possess,” explains Bigelow. The directors first choice was Guy Pearce: one of the most widely
admired actors of his generation for his performances in L.A. Confidential, Momento, and The
Proposition.

“Having Guy open the film sets up a sense of credible reality from the very start,” says Bigelow.
“You need that because the world is so exotic, but Guy just seems like he belongs in it.”

“I’ve wanted to work with Kathryn for years,” says Pearce. “And ultimately the material has to be
the reason why I go and do any film. This film is packed with action, but it’s about people and
emotions. It’s about people trying to connect with each other. The way in which the script was
written is really fascinating and Mark and Kathryn have both done a beautiful job of capturing and
realizing these characters.”

Director Bigelow’s reputation for making exhilarating, original films and eliciting strong
performances from her actors attracted some big Hollywood guns who were willing to take on
some of the film’s more intriguing cameo roles, including David Morse, Ralph Fiennes and
Evangeline Lilly.

Morse was electrified by the script’s picture of a world that is completely unpredictable and
dangerous. “It doesn’t care who you are,” he says. “Anybody can go at any time. There’s a
surreal quality to it. I think that says what the experience in Iraq is about.”

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A REALIST EYE: THE PRODUCTION

Director Kathryn Bigelow is renowned for pushing the filmmaking experience to its limits in order
to create vivid, arresting images and powerfully emotional stories. For The Hurt Locker, she took
her cast and crew into the Jordanian desert to work under some of the most rigorous conditions
possible. With director of photography Barry Ackroyd, she devised an unconventional and
remarkably effective technique for filming that simulates the spontaneous feeling of a
documentary, while immersing viewers in the nonstop tension of its characters’ world.

“Barry is a master of evoking the ‘you are there’ immediacy that the story demanded,” says
Bigelow. “At the same time, he’s one tough Englishman who put up with ridiculously long hours in
the Middle East, in summer—not to mention sand storms and food poisoning.”

Since his early days in documentary filmmaking, Ackroyd has refined his in-the-moment style in
award-winning feature films including United 93. “Making a feature film is not a documentary and
it’s not docudrama,” he says. “The essence is not to think about it too much, but to try to be
surprised in the way that a documentary would surprise you. Yes, we can set things up and we
can redo it, but it’s still possible to be surprised when the performance happens.”

Bigelow made the choice to film The Hurt Locker with four handheld cameras simultaneously.
She has shot with multiple cameras on each of her films, using as many as 12 at a time. “When I
storyboard the entire film, every scene is broken down to its essential elements,” she says. “I look
at the boards shot by shot. It’s at this point that I realize what the technical needs of the shoot
are. I can determine the camera needs, as well as the blocking of each scene. Even before we’ve
chosen locations, I have basically ‘shot’ the entire film in my head.”

To meet the ambitious schedule of shooting The Hurt Locker’s many extended action sequences
in only 44 days, the crew worked six-day weeks and blitzed through complicated, highly
choreographed blocking that Bigelow would outline in her head well in advance. “I look at each
sequence like a three-dimensional puzzle that has to be translated to a two-dimensional surface,”
she says.

It all starts with the script, she says. “In this case, it was the logic of bomb disarmament. Early on,
I realized geography would be central to the audience’s understanding of what the bomb squad
does on a daily basis. Military protocol for a bomb disarm in the field is approximately a 300-
meter containment. That’s a big set.”

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On The Hurt Locker, the filmmakers used multiple points of view and constantly moving cameras
to create the kind of immediacy that places the viewer in the center of the fog of war. “We were
always asking ourselves, “'What can you do with the camera that can make you feel like you’re a
participant?’” says Ackroyd. “How do you put yourself in the middle of the scene or put yourself
right on the edge of the scene and participate in what goes on? You can give the actors the
space to do long takes with continuous action. The art department gave us big sets for the
explosions. People were doing their stunts as big long takes and the camera was just
participating in it. You don’t ever stop; you just keep going with it. Kathryn gave us the space to
do that. She said go ahead and keep shooting, keep shooting, keep shooting, We would be
waiting for ‘cut’ sometimes and it wouldn’t be coming, so we knew the shot was working well.”

At times, the set seemed as chaotic as the film’s Baghdad setting. “With four units covering a
particular scene, an actor might not realize that a camera was suddenly 40 degrees off his left
shoulder,” says Bigelow. “The crew sometimes didn’t know where the actor was going to go. It
created this tremendous situation that heightened the realism and the authenticity.”

“We had cameras everywhere,” says Renner. “We called them Ninja cameras, just hiding all over
the place. We never knew where anything was. Barry was out there himself running around. It
was absolutely amazing seeing him run as fast as we did, carrying his camera down these dirty
alleys full of syringes and kids throwing rocks and he always had a big smile on his face. That
inspired me.”

Shooting in this way required flexibility on the part of the actors. “There was only so much you
could prepare for,” says Geraghty. “But if you’ve done your homework and you know your
character, all that stuff falls into place and you can just put your trust in it. There are so many
technical things outside of your performance. Lights, camera, heat, camels, goats—you have to
just keep going.”

Ackroyd also used the camerawork to punctuate the often frenzied activity with moments of quiet.
“Kathryn encouraged the cameras to be active,” he says. “I was always thinking about the
moments of stillness that you have as well and how those things go together. If those things
come together in the right way, motion is one dimension, and silence and lack of motion add
another element. If you get those things right, the whole film will have balance.”

In order to simulate the troubled landscape of war-torn Baghdad, Bigelow decided to film in
Jordan, which borders Iraq to the west. Some of the locations were just a few hours drive from
the combat areas. “It adds a certain x-factor that just permeates every aspect of the performance

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and the production to be that close,” says Bigelow, “and it becomes part of your reference points
if you actually spend time off set within an Arabic culture.”

The production took place in and around the poorer neighborhoods in the city of Amman, which
had architecture similar to Baghdad’s. The climate and geography of the two countries are also
comparable, with the added bonus of the presence of ethnic Iraqis who could fill small parts and
work as background and bit players, further heightening the realism of the film.

“There are about one million Iraqi refugees living in Jordan who have fled the war, and as it turns
out among them is a pretty big pool of professional actors, and it was great to be able to cast
them – it was good for the movie, and it was good for the set,” explains Bigelow.

“I remember speaking to the two men who play Iraqi POWs in the desert sequence—and asking
them what they did in Iraq. They said, we were prisoners of the Americans. I thought maybe there
was a problem with the translation because they played prisoners in the movie. Then I realized
that no, they actually were prisoners in Iraq, and now they are playing prisoners. It was surreal,
and a little uncomfortable, but then they laughed and said they were happy to have the work—but
I thought ‘maybe we are taking this authenticity thing a little too far.”

Nevertheless, the desire for authenticity extended to the actor’s living arrangements as well. In
order to instill the military’s close camaraderie, Bigelow housed all the actors on set in a basic
communal tent with a dirt floor, rather than in air-conditioned trailers. “You could meet them for a
coffee on the weekends, and they’d still be in character,” recalls Boal. “They’d be in a café talking
military jargon to the waiter, “we need three cappuccinos by oh-six-hundred. Roger that.”

Before the shoot, Renner, Geraghty and the other principals spent time learning from Army EOD
teams at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin. Located near Barstow, California, the NTC is
the army’s premier training camp. Its Mojave Desert location makes it perfect for instructing
troops headed for the Middle East. “It’s just crazy,” says Geraghty. “When there’s a bomb, most
people want get as far away from it as possible. These guys are trained to do the opposite. Their
job is to go in as close as they can get.”

But what cast and filmmakers remember most about shooting in Jordan was the summer heat.
“There was something incredibly immediate about shooting in an environment that was
unforgivably hot and putting the actors in a very arduous situation on a day to day basis,” says
Bigelow. “Just sand, wind, sand, heat, sun and sand.”

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Not surprisingly, the actors found the conditions challenging. “It would be 130, 135 degrees,” says
Mackie. “It was so hot you could feel your brain cooking in your head. Everything was magnified
by the level of body armor we had to wear.”

Renner adds: “Working in Jordan was extremely difficult in the sense that conditions were very
hard. But it made my job as an actor easier. That sweat is real sweat. Those tears are real tears
of pain, so I’m glad we weren’t on some soundstage. I feel like I got just a sliver of an idea of what
an EOD or anybody in the military might go through every day. It’s unbelievable how tortuous it
can be.

“It was the hardest thing I’ve had to do physically as an actor,” he continues. “I love to be
challenged and I was really, really challenged on this. I think we all had a nervous breakdown or
two or three—I kept telling my mom to FedEx my dignity back to me. But the most awful days I
had were the most memorable. I look back and I know it was the most spectacular experience
that I’ve had as a man, not even just as an actor.”

Boal’s on-the-ground experiences as a journalist in Iraq familiarized him with the specifics of EOD
operations, like the protective suit worn by the team leader when he needs to gets up close and
personal with a bomb. “There is a whole ritual to unpacking the suit,” says Boal. “Getting into the
suit signifies the moment when the war becomes a solitary encounter between one man and a
deadly device that’s been created with the express intention of causing harm. Once the team
leader is in it, there’s no going back. He faces that lonely walk down to the bomb and it’s just him
and this suit.”

Made of Kevlar fabric with ceramic plates, the suit is designed to protect the wearer from the
impact of a blast, but it cannot withstand the largest explosions. “We thought of it like a suit of
armor that a knight would wear in medieval times,” says Boal. “They have to put on, because it’s
the only thing they have, but it certainly doesn’t offer foolproof protection from the enemy.”

Renner spent significant time wearing the suit for his role. “My feelings about the bomb suit are
mixed,” he says. “You’re definitely alone once you get into it, but there’s something really
peaceful about that. I felt like that was a womb for James. That’s the only time when he really felt
safe, as a human being, not just as a soldier.”

Still, the actor says he had a love-hate relationship with the protective outfit. “It’s heavy, it’s hot,
it’s hard to move in, but it put me right in the moment. Just the idea of getting into it—I wanted to

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dry heave whenever they said it was time to get suited up. I started sweating instantly and I knew
I wasn’t going to get any hotter than I was in the first 30 seconds.”

For Guy Pearce, who plays the doomed Sgt. Matt Thompson, the bomb unit’s first leader,
wearing the suit intensified his admiration for the members of the real EOD squad. “Our suit
weighed about 70 pounds and I think the ones they actually wear are about 140 pounds. The
heat was pretty intense, so you’re always on that edge of feeling faint. Maybe the adrenaline
actually enables them to get through it, because it’s a life or death situation. I don’t know how
they manage to be so dexterous in the fine work they have to do.”

Once the movie moved into post-production, renowned sound designer Paul Ottoson, who was
nominated for an Academy Award for his work on Spiderman 2, went to work layering in the
thousands of sounds that sound mixer Ray Beckett had recorded in Jordan. “From a sound
perspective, this movie was incredibly difficult and unusual, definitely the hardest I ever worked
on, because the score was very spare and ambient and there was so much detail in the sound.
Practically every frame of the movie has a sound attached to it—it’s wall to wall sound—to give
you that feeling that you are in a real war,” says Ottoson. “Every single sound of the movie is an
organic base to it. We didn’t use any synthetic sounds because they are kind of unnatural, thin,
slicing sounds. It is easier to get synthetic sounds to be loud. Staying organic the entire movie
was difficult but we did it, because in the end it helped tell the story best.”

In the end, Boal hopes audiences will come to appreciate the sacrifices made daily by American
troops. “If there is a message to the movie, it is that there’s a high price to heroism,” says Boal.
“We see men who do these extraordinary things on TV and read about them in the newspaper.
They get a medal pinned on their chests, but what we don’t often know is the interior life of these
men. It’s not to say that everybody who’s a hero gets lost to war, but it’s a high price to pay to be
a hero. James is a genuine hero, but his heroism doesn’t translate into personal happiness. He’s
so damaged that he can’t see any outcome for himself other than disarming bombs.”

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US ARMY EXPLOSIVE ORDNANCE DISPOSAL: FAST FACTS

• In 2004, there were only about 150 trained Army EOD techs in Iraq.

• The job was so dangerous that EOD techs were five times more likely to die than all other
soldiers in the theater. That same year, the insurgency reportedly placed a $25,000
bounty on the heads of EOD techs.

• Bomb shrapnel travels at 2,700 feet per second. Overpressure, the deadly wave of
supercompressed gases that expands from the center of a blast, travels at 13,000 miles
an hour-at a force equal to 700 tons per square inch.

• Separations and relationship troubles are so common among EOD teams that soldiers
sometimes joke that EOD stands for ‘every one divorced.”

• Bomb-disposal teams were first created in World War II. Starting in 1942, when Germany
blitzed London with time-delayed bombs, specially trained U.S. soldiers joined British
officers who diagrammed the devices using pencil sketches before they attempted to
defuse them with common tools.

• Bomb techs are trained at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida. The Army looks for volunteers
who are confident, forthright, comfortable under extreme pressure and emotionally stable.
To get into the training program, a prospective tech first needs a high score on the
mechanical-aptitude portion of the armed forces exam. Once the school begins,
candidates are gradually winnowed out over six months of training, and only 40 percent
will graduate.

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ABOUT THE CAST

JEREMY RENNER (Staff Sergeant William James) recently starred in 28 Weeks Later, the
highly anticipated sequel to 28 Days Later, for director Juan Carlos Fresnadillo and costarring
Rose Byrne and Robert Carlyle. He played the heroic soldier Doyle, who goes against military
orders to save a group of survivors. Renner also starred in The Assassination of Jesse James by
the Coward Robert Ford, directed by Andrew Dominik. In the film, Renner stars alongside Brad
Pitt and Casey Affleck in the role of a key member of James’ gang, Wood Hide. He also co-
starred opposite Minnie Driver in the independent film Take, scheduled for release later this year.
In North Country, Renner starred opposite Academy Award winner Charlize Theron in a
fictionalized account of the first major, successful sexual harassment case in the U.S. Renner is
at the center of the unfolding drama as miner Bobby Sharp. Renner also starred in the acclaimed
independent film 12 and Holding, which was nominated for the Independent Spirit Awards’ John
Cassavetes Award.

Other recent credits include the independent film Neo Ned, in which Renner starred opposite
Gabrielle Union. Neo Ned was screened at the 2005 Tribeca Film Festival and swept the feature
film category at the 11th Annual Palm Beach International Film Festival in 2006. Neo Ned was
awarded Best Feature Film and Best Director while Renner won the Best Actor prize. The film
also was awarded the Outstanding Achievement in Filmmaking/Best Feature Film Award at the
Newport Beach Film Festival in April 2006, in addition to the audience awards at the Slamdance,
Sarasota and Ashland film festivals.

Renner’s other credits include A Little Trip to Heaven, in which he starred opposite Julia Stiles;
The Heart is Deceitful Above All Things, directed by Asia Argento as adapted from the critically
acclaimed novel by J.T. Leroy; Lords of Dogtown, for director Catherine Hardwicke; and the
independent film Love of the Executioner, written and directed by Kyle Bergersen.

In 2003, Renner was seen in the action hit S.W.A.T. opposite Colin Farrell and Samuel L.
Jackson. But the role that put Renner on the map and earned the actor an Independent Spirit
Award nomination was his unforgettable portrayal of a real-life serial killer in the indie film
Dahmer.

With a background in theater, Renner keeps his acting chops in shape by performing in plays
throughout the Los Angeles area. Recent credits have included the critically acclaimed “Search
and Destroy,” which he not only starred in but also co-directed.

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Between film and theater, Renner finds the time to write, record, and perform his own brand of
contemporary rock. He has written songs for Warner Chapel Publishing and Universal Publishing.

ANTHONY MACKIE (Sergeant J.T. Sanborn) who was classically trained at the Julliard School
of Drama, is a great and talented young actor who is able to capture a plethora of characters.
Mackie was discovered after receiving rave reviews while playing Tupac Shakur in the off
Broadway “Up Against the Wind”. Immediately following, Mackie made an auspicious film debut
as Eminem’s nemesis, Papa Doc, in Curtis Hanson’s 8 Mile. His performance caught the
attention of Spike Lee, who subsequently cast Mackie in the 2004 Toronto Film Festival Masters
Program selection Sucker Free City and She Hate Me. He also appeared in Clint Eastwood’s
Academy Award-winning Million Dollar Baby, opposite Hilary Swank, Morgan Freeman and
Eastwood, as well as in Jonathan Demme’s The Manchurian Candidate, alongside Denzel
Washington and Liev Schreiber, and the comedy The Man, starring Samuel L. Jackson.

Mackie earned IFP Spirit and Gotham Award nominations for his performance in Rodney Evans’
Brother to Brother, which won the 2004 Special Dramatic Jury Prize at the Sundance Film
Festival and Best First Feature at the Independent Spirit Awards. In 2005, he appeared opposite
David Strathairn, Timothy Hutton and Leelee Sobieski in Heavens Fall, based on the historic
Scottsboro Boys’ trials, an independent feature that premiered at the 2006 SXSW Film Festival in
Austin.

Mackie also had five features on movie screens in 2006. In addition to We Are Marshall, he
starred in Half Nelson, with Ryan Gosling, adapted from director Ryan Fleck’s Sundance-winning
short Gowanus Brooklyn; in Preston Whitmore’s Crossover; in Frank E. Flowers ensemble crime
drama Haven, opposite Orlando Bloom and Bill Paxton; and in the film adaptation of Richard
Price’s Freedomland, starring Samuel L. Jackson.

Intertwined throughout his film career, Mackie was seen in several theatrical performances both
on and off Broadway. Mackie made his Broadway debut as the stuttering nephew, Sylvester,
alongside Whoopi Goldberg in August Wilson’s “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom”. Next he was seen
as the lead in Regina King’s modern retelling of Chekov’s “The Seagull,” starred in Stephen
Belber’s “McReele” for the Rounabout Theatre Company, and starred in the Pulitzer Prize
winning play “Soldier’s Play” as a character made famous by Denzel Washington 20 years prior.
Most recently, Mackie was part of the production of August Wilson’s 20th Century at the
esteemed Kennedy Center where they performed stage readings of all 10 plays in August
Wilson’s cycle. Mackie participated in 3 of the 10 shows and hopes to return to the stage soon.

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Most recently, Mackie was seen in Dreamworks film Eagle Eye, starring Shia LaBeouf, Michelle
Monaghan, and Billy Bob Thornton and revised his role as Tupac Shakur in Notorious, a biopic of
slain rapper Notorious B.I.G directed by George Tillman Jr. and starring Jamal Woolard in the title
role. Mackie will tackle a couple more biopics with Bolden!, an account of the great New Orleans
cornet player Buddy Bolden and Jesse Owens, a feature based on the late-great Olympic star.

BRIAN GERAGHTY (Specialist Owen Eldridge) was last seen starring opposite Shia LeBeouf
in the Emilio Estevez-directed film Bobby, a story that revolves around the 1968 assassination of
Robert F. Kennedy. Co-stars included Anthony Hopkins, Sharon Stone, Demi Moore, Lindsay
Lohan and Elijah Wood, among many others. Geraghty also completed work on the independent
dramas Easier with Practice and Krews.

Recent film credits include roles in We Are Marshall, directed by McG and starring Matthew
McConaughey and Matthew Fox; The Guardian, directed by Andrew Davis and starring Kevin
Costner and Ashton Kutcher; and Jarhead, directed by Sam Mendes and starring Jake
Gyllenhaal, Jamie Foxx and Peter Sarsgaard. Additional film credits include Terry Zwigoff’s Art
School Confidential, with John Malkovich and Max Minghella; When a Stranger Calls, with
Camilla Belle; Love Lies Bleeding, with Christian Slater and Jenna Dewan; Conversations with
Other Women, with Aaron Eckhart and Helena Bonham Carter; The Optimist, with Leelee
Sobieski; Stateside, with Val Kilmer and Jonathan Tucker; and Cruel World, with Edward Furlong.
Prior to launching his film career, Geraghty had guest-starring roles on several top television
series including “The Sopranos,” “Law & Order” and “Ed.” Originally from New Jersey, Geraghty
graduated from The Neighborhood Playhouse School of Theatre in New York City. His stage
credits include roles in productions of “Berlin,” “Midnight Moonlight,” “Snipers” and “Romeo and
Juliet.”

Geraghty began his professional career in New York before re-locating to Los Angeles. An ardent
surfer, he has been a surf instructor and is an ongoing, active supporter of the Surfrider
Foundation, a nonprofit environmental organization working to preserve our oceans, waves and
beaches.

RALPH FIENNES (Contractor Team Leader) was born in Suffolk and grew up in England and
Ireland. He attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts (RADA), after which he began his
professional acting career on stage. He performed at London’s Regents Park in both The Theater
Clwyd and the Oldman Coliseum. Two years after graduating from RADA, he joined Michael
Rudman’s company at the Royal National Theatre. He later joined the Royal Shakespeare

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Company, where for two seasons he appeared in such plays as “Henry VI,” “King Lear” and
“Love’s Labour’s Lost.”

In 1991, Fiennes landed his first television appearance in a small but telling role in the award-
winning series “Prime Suspect.” Fiennes was then cast by David Puttnam as T.E. Lawrence in
the telefilm “A Dangerous Man: Lawrence After Arabia.”

Fiennes made his feature film debut starring opposite Juliette Binoche as Heathcliff in Peter
Kosminsky’s Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights. Steven Spielberg was so impressed by his
performance that he cast Fiennes as the sinister Nazi Aman Goeth in Schindler’s List, opposite
Liam Neeson. This performance earned Fiennes an Academy Award nomination and awards
from BAFTA, the New York Film Critics Circle, National Society of Film Critics, Boston Society of
Film Critics, Chicago Film Critics Association and London Critics Circle (Best Supporting Actor).

Other notable performances include Robert Redford’s acclaimed Quiz Show, Kathryn Bigelow’s
Strange Days, Gillian Armstrong’s Oscar and Lucinda and Martha Fiennes’ Onegin opposite Liv
Tyler, which Fiennes also executive produced, Neil Jordan’s The End of the Affair, The Good
Thief, The Avengers and Istvan Szabo’s Sunshine.

In 1994, Fiennes played the title role in “Hamlet” for a sold-out production by Jonathan Kent and
the Almeida Theatre Company at the Hackney Empire. The production moved to Broadway and
in 1995 Fiennes won a Tony Award for his performance.

Also in 1995, Fiennes starred in the Academy Award-winning epic The English Patient, directed
by Anthony Minghella, for which he was nominated for an Academy Award, a Golden Globe and
a BAFTA.

Fiennes then returned to the theatre in Jonathan Kent’s acclaimed production of “Ivanov” at the
Almeida Theatre in London. His performance won rave reviews, which took the play to Moscow.
During 2000, Fiennes appeared triumphantly on the London stage in the title roles of “Richard II”
and “Coriolanus” for the Almeida Theatre, and shone in a guest cameo role in Kenneth Branagh’s
West End production of “The Play I Wrote.”

In 2002, Fiennes starred in David Cronenberg’s film Spider, as a disturbed schizophrenic in


search of his past, and in Red Dragon, as a psychotic but vulnerable serial killer, opposite Emily
Watson and Edward Norton. He had a cameo role in Neil Jordan’s The Good Thief and also
starred opposite Jennifer Lopez in Maid in Manhattan.

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In 2005, Fiennes appeared in The Chumscrubber, opposite Rita Wilson and Glenn Close, which
debuted at the Sundance Film Festival that year. Fiennes was also seen in Martha Fiennes’
Chromophobia with Kristen Scott Thomas and Penelope Cruz. Chromophobia premiered as the
closing-night film at the 2005 Cannes International Film Festival. Fiennes’ voice was also featured
in the animated feature Wallace and Gromit: Curse of the Were-Rabbit. That same year, Fiennes
starred in Fernando Meirelles’ The Constant Gardener, opposite Rachel Weisz and Danny
Huston. For this role, Fiennes received a London Critics Circle Award for Best British Actor and a
British Independent Film Award for Best Actor.

Fiennes also starred in the final Merchant-Ivory film, The White Countess, opposite Natasha
Richardson. And played the pivotal role of the dreaded Lord Voldemort in Harry Potter and the
Goblet of Fire.

In 2006, Fiennes reunited with director Jonathan Kent to star on stage in Brian Friel’s Tony Award
nominated play “Faith Healer,” which originally premiered at Dublin’s Gate Theatre. During its
limited run at the Gate Theatre, for the first time in the venue’s history tickets sold out before
previews began. Fiennes and the play received Tony nominations.

Fiennes reprised his role as Lord Voldemort in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, the fifth
installment of the blockbuster series. In February 2008, Fiennes starred in the critically acclaimed
HBO telefilm “Bernard and Doris,” opposite Susan Sarandon and directed by Bob Balaban. Next
for Fiennes was In Bruges, opposite Colin Farrell and Brendan Gleeson, which follows two hit
men forced to spend time in Bruges, Belgium after a job gone wrong. Fiennes was next seen in
The Duchess, opposite Keira Knightley.

Fiennes recently starred in a production of Yasmina Reza’s “God of Carnage” at London’s


Gielgud Theatre. “God of Carnage,” a new comedy that has opened to rave reviews, follows what
happens when two sets of parents meet up to deal with the unruly behavior of their children.
Fiennes was seen in Samuel Beckett’s one-man show, “First Love,” performing at New York’s
Lincoln Center Festival and presented by the Gate Theater of Dublin. Fiennes was then reunited
with director Jonathan Kent to star opposite theatre legend, Clare Higgins, as the title role in
“Oedipus Rex,” staged at the National Theatre in London.

Fiennes has been an avid supporter of UNICEF since 1999 and became an ambassador for the
organization in 2001. He currently resides in London.

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GUY PEARCE (Sergeant Matt Thompson) recently portrayed Harry Houdini in Death Defying
Acts, appeared in Bedtime Stories with Adam Sandler and starred in Traitor with Don Cheadle.
Pearce was born October 5, 1967, in Cambridgeshire, England. His father, a member of the
Royal Air Force, moved the family to Australia when Pearce was three. Interested in acting from a
young age, he wrote to various members of the Australian television industry requesting a screen
test when he was 17. His efforts proved worthwhile as he was invited to audition for a new
daytime drama called “Neighbours.” Pearce won a significant part on the show, where he
remained from 1986 to 1990. After additional TV roles, Pearce made his big screen debut in the
1992 film Hunting. He acted in a few more small films and in “My Forgotten Man,” a 1993
television biopic of Errol Flynn, before coming to the attention of film audiences everywhere in the
1994 sleeper hit The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert. As the flamboyant and often
infuriating Adam/Felicia, he gave a performance that was both over the top and immensely
satisfying.

The role led to his casting in Curtis Hanson's 1997 adaptation of James Ellroy's L.A. Confidential.
The film was an all-around success and drew raves for Pearce and his co-stars, which included
Kevin Spacey, Danny DeVito, Kim Basinger (who won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for her
performance) and fellow Australian Russell Crowe.

After the success of L.A. Confidential, Pearce went on to make the indie A Slipping Down Life,
which premiered at Sundance in 1999. He followed that with Ravenous, Antonia Bird's tale of
chaos and cannibalism, which cast Pearce alongside David Arquette and Robert Carlyle. Though
his role in the following year's military drama Rules of Engagement would offer a commendable
performance by the rising star, it was another film the same year that cemented his status as one
of the most challenging and unpredictable performers of his generation. Cast as a vengeance
seeking, tattoo-covered widower whose inability to form new memories hinders his frantic search
for his wife's killer, Pearce's unforgettable performance in Christopher Nolan’s backwards-
structured thriller Memento drove what would ultimately become one of the biggest sleepers in
box office history.

Pearce was now officially hot property on the Hollywood scene, and producers wasted no time in
booking him for as many upcoming blockbusters as they could. A memorable performance as the
villain in The Count of Monte Cristo found Pearce traveling back in time and his subsequent role
in The Time Machine sent him so far into the future that mankind had reverted to prehistoric
ways. A return trip to the land Down Under found Pearce next appearing as a hapless bank
robber in the crime effort The Hard Word, and the actor would remain in Australia for the 2002
elliptical drama Till Human Voices Wake Us. In 2004, Pearce played a lion hunter in the family-

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oriented epic Two Brothers. The following year, Pearce won acclaim for his portrayal of the pop
artist Andy Warhol in the film Factory Girl.

DAVID MORSE (Colonel Reed) is an Emmy nominated actor whose versatility and talent make
him one of the most well-respected performers working in film, television and theater. In 2008,
Morse played George Washington in the acclaimed HBO mini-series “John Adams,” opposite
Paul Giamatti and Laura Linney. He also recently Morse starred opposite Anne Hathaway in
Rodrigo Garcia's Passengers.

Morse played James “Sharky” Harkin in Conor McPherson's “The Seafarer,” which went to
Broadway after receiving its world premiere at London's National Theatre in 2006, receiving two
Olivier Award nominations, including Best New Play.

Earlier stage credits include the 1997 Off-Broadway production of Paula Vogel's Pulitzer Prize-
winning drama, “How I Learned to Drive.” His performance won him the Drama League Award,
the Lucille Lortel Award, the Drama Desk Award and the Obie Award. He made his Broadway
debut in the role of Father Barry in the theatre adaptation of “On the Waterfront” and won a
DramaLogue Award for his performance in the Los Angeles production of “Of Mice and Men.”
Other stage appearances include the Off-Broadway productions of “The Trading Post,” “Threads”
and “A Death in the Family.”

On the silver screen, Morse was most recently seen in the hit thriller Disturbia and Richard
Donner's action-thriller 16 Blocks, opposite Bruce Willis and Mos Def. The film marked Morse's
reunion with Donner, who directed him in his motion picture debut, Inside Moves, more than 25
years ago.

In 1991, Morse starred with Viggo Mortensen in Sean Penn's directorial debut, The Indian
Runner. Morse re-teamed with Penn a few years later to star opposite Jack Nicholson, Anjelica
Huston and Robin Wright Penn in The Crossing Guard. The performance earned Morse an
Independent Spirit Award nomination for Best Supporting Male.

Over the next several years, Morse appeared in multiple films that grossed over $100 million,
including The Rock, with Sean Connery and Nicolas Cage; Robert Zemeckis' Contact, opposite
Jodie Foster; and Frank Darabont's The Green Mile, with Tom Hanks and Michael Clarke
Duncan, based on the novel by Stephen King. The ensemble cast was nominated for a Screen
Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Theatrical Motion Picture.

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Morse has starred in films by some of Hollywood's most acclaimed directors. Other credits
include Terry Gilliam's Twelve Monkeys, opposite Bruce Willis; F. Gary Gray's The Negotiator,
opposite Kevin Spacey and Samuel L. Jackson; Lars von Trier's Dancer in the Dark, with
Catherine Deneuve (which won the Palme d'Or at the 2000 Cannes Film Festival); and Taylor
Hackford's Proof of Life, opposite Meg Ryan and Russell Crowe.

Additional film credits include Desperate Hours, with Anthony Hopkins; Joseph Ruben's The
Good Son; Michael Apted's Extreme Measures, opposite Gene Hackman; The Long Kiss
Goodnight, with Geena Davis and Samuel L. Jackson; Crazy in Alabama, directed by Antonio
Banderas; Antoine Fuqua's Bait, opposite Jamie Foxx; Scott Hicks' Hearts in Atlantis, with
Anthony Hopkins and Hope Davis; Alex and Andrew Smith's The Slaughter Rule, opposite Ryan
Gosling; Kuo-fu Chen's Double Vision (which broke box office records in Taiwan and garnered
Morse a Golden Horse Award nomination, the Chinese equivalent of the Oscar, for Best
Supporting Actor); Down in the Valley, opposite Edward Norton and Evan Rachel Wood;
Dreamer, with Kurt Russell and Kris Kristofferson; and Deborah Kampmeier's Hounddog.

On television, Morse was recently nominated for an Emmy Award for Outstanding Guest Actor in
a Drama Series for his multi-episode story arc as Detective Tritter on the hit FOX show “House.”
But Morse is probably best known for his role as Dr. Jack "Boomer" Morrison on the Emmy-
winning ensemble drama “St. Elsewhere.” He also starred for two seasons on the CBS crime
drama “Hack.”

CHRISTIAN CAMARGO (Colonel John Cambridge) is a graduate of Juilliard who began his
career in New York and London theater. His Broadway debut was in David Hare's “Skylight” with
Michael Gambon. Other theater credits include the title role of the Public Theater's “Marlow,” the
world premiere of Steve Martin’s “The Underpants” and multiple plays for New York’s
Shakespeare in the Park. He was back on Broadway in 2008 for Arthur Miller's “All My Sons” with
Dianne Wiest, John Lithgow and Katie Holmes.

Camargo is also a founding member of Shakespeare’s Globe Theater in London, where he


performed in “Henry V” and “A Chaste Maid in Cheapside.” His film and television roles include
K19: The Widowmaker, National Treasure 2: Book of Secrets, Showtime's “Dexter” and the
upcoming film Happy Tears, with Demi Moore and Parker Posey.

In addition to his acting, Camargo founded the Fast Ashleys vintage car shop, where he restored
classic cars and produced reality-based docudramas including MTV's “Fast, Inc.,” History
Channel's “Full Throttle” and New Line's “Sunday Driver.”

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EVANGELINE LILLY (Connie James) has earned a reputation as one of the most promising
young actresses in Hollywood through her combination of irresistible, playful charm and natural
talent.

Lilly was discovered by a Ford talent agent on the streets of Kelowna, British Columbia. Six
months later, she moved to Vancouver to attend the University of British Columbia and study
international relations. After appearing in a few commercials, she chose to give up acting and
focus on studying. A couple of years later, a friend urged her to give acting another shot and soon
thereafter she landed the non-speaking roles of a corpse in both an episode of Stephen King’s
“Kingdom Hospital” and the film The Long Weekend.

Lilly landed her first speaking role on a television series in January 2004 as Kate, a strong-
minded survivor in ABC’s hit show “Lost,” which has become a worldwide phenomenon. Created
by J.J. Abrams, Damon Lindelof and Jeffrey Lieber, “Lost” won the 2006 Golden Globe Award for
Best Television Drama Series as well as the Screen Actor’s Guild Award for Best Ensemble in a
Drama Series. Lilly was nominated for a Teen Choice Award for Choice Actress in a Drama
Series and also received a 2007 Golden Globe nomination for Best Actress in a Drama Series.

When not in Hawaii filming the show, Lilly is wholeheartedly devoted to philanthropy, traveling
and gaining a higher knowledge of various cultures around the world. During her college years,
Lilly founded and ran a world development and human rights committee. She later spent three
weeks living in a grass hut in the jungles of the Philippines and has been a volunteer for
children’s projects since the age of 14.

Fluent in French, Lilly loves reading, writing, painting, music, nature, staying active, learning, tea
and travel.

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ABOUT THE FILMMAKERS

KATHRYN BIGELOW (Director and Producer) has distinguished herself as one of Hollywood’s
most innovative filmmakers.

In 1985, Bigelow directed and co-wrote the stirring cult classic Near Dark, produced by Steven-
Charles Jaffe. The film was critically lauded as a “poetic horror film.” As always, Bigelow’s visual
style garnered positive reactions from the press, who described it as “dreamy, passionate and
terrifying, a hallucinatory vision of the American nightworld that becomes both seductive and
devastating.” Following the release of the film, the Museum of Modern Art honored Bigelow with a
career retrospective.

In 1991, Bigelow directed the action thriller Point Break, which starred Keanu Reeves and Patrick
Swayze. Executive produced by James Cameron, Point Break explored the dangerous extremes
of a psychological struggle between two young men. The Chicago Tribune commended her
astonishing filmmaking sensibilities and described her as “a uniquely talented, uniquely powerful
filmmaker…Bigelow has tapped into something primal and strong. She is a sensualist in the most
sensual of mediums.”

When Strange Days was released in 1995, Roger Ebert called it a “technical tour de force.” In the
film, Bigelow explored the unsettling prospects of computer-generated virtual reality and the
impending new millennium. Strange Days received rave reviews and was highly praised for its
energy and unique, intense visuals. Janet Maslin, in The New York Times, stated that “the
furiously talented” Bigelow was “operating at full throttle… using material ablaze with eerie
promise… she turns Strange Days into a troubling but undeniably breathless joyride.” Starring
Ralph Fiennes, Angela Bassett and Juliette Lewis, Strange Days was co-written by James
Cameron and released by Twentieth Century Fox.

Bigelow also directed The Weight of Water, starring Sean Penn, Sarah Polley, Catherine
McCormack and Elizabeth Hurley. Based on the bestselling Anita Shreve novel, The Weight of
Water made its world premiere in a gala screening at the 25th annual Toronto International Film
Festival in 2000 and drew praise from critics and filmmakers alike. Variety described the film as
being “Bigelow’s richest, most ambitious and personal work to date; imbued with suspense,
benefiting from Bigelow’s penchant for creating a visual sense of menace and an atmosphere of
fear.”

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On the release of K-19: The Widowmaker, The New York Times declared Bigelow “one of the
most gifted…directors working in movies today.” Starring Harrison Ford, Liam Neeson and Peter
Saarsgard, it was one of the more critically well-received films of the summer of 2002. The film
tells the true story of a heroic Soviet naval crew who risked their lives to prevent a near nuclear
disaster aboard their submarine. Critics praised Bigelow as “an expert technician who never steps
wrong” (Roger Ebert).

Bigelow went where no other filmmaker has gone before, making Soviet soldiers from the Cold
War era the heroes of a major American production. For Bigelow, there was a larger purpose to
telling this important forgotten chapter of history. “…At times I allow myself to hope that K-19 will
also have another role to play, that it can help to throw open the narrow ideological window
through which we, as Americans, have viewed a particular past and culture. In those moments
I’m thinking back over the many disquieting things I saw in Russia, and most of all the people I
met there: Our former enemies whose great courage we may now, finally, after all these years, be
prepared to acknowledge.”

MARK BOAL (Writer and Producer) is a journalist, screenwriter and producer. Born and raised
in New York City, he graduated with honors in philosophy from Oberlin College before beginning
a career as an investigative reporter and writer of long form non-fiction. An acclaimed series for
the Village Voice on the rise of surveillance in America led to a position at the alternative weekly
writing a weekly column, “The Monitor,” when he was 25. Boal subsequently covered politics,
technology, crime, youth culture and drug culture in stories for national publications including
Rolling Stone, Brill’s Content, Mother Jones, The New York Observer and Playboy. He is
currently a writer-at-large for Playboy.

In 2003, Boal’s article “Jailbait,” about an undercover drug agent, was adapted for FOX
television’s “The Inside.” In 2003, he wrote “Death and Dishonor,” the true story of a military
veteran who goes searching for his missing son, which later became the basis for Paul Haggis’
follow up to Crash, In the Valley of Elah. Boal collaborated with Haggis on the script and shares a
co-story credit on the film, deemed “a deeply reflective, highly powerful work” by the Hollywood
Reporter.

NICOLAS CHARTIER (Producer) is the owner and president of Voltage Pictures. He began his
entertainment career as a screenwriter, selling his first script when he was 18, before changing
careers and going into distribution. Prior to forming Voltage, Chartier was VP of sales and
acquisitions at Myriad Pictures where he was involved in the sales of a diverse range of films
including Van Wilder, People I Know with Al Pacino, The Good Girl with Jennifer Aniston and the

28
Olsen twins’ TV movies. As the President of Vortex Pictures, he sold such titles as My Big Fat
Greek Wedding, The Man from Elysian Fields and Sonny, Nicolas Cage's directorial debut. As
head of sales and acquisitions at Arclight Films, Chartier acquired the sales rights for Dean
Devlin's The Librarian, 2006 Academy Award winner Crash and The Matador, with Pierce
Brosnan. During his time at Arclight, Chartier also sold Lord of War with Nicolas Cage, The
Merchant of Venice with Al Pacino and Wolf Creek. He then partnered with Dean Devlin (writer
and producer of Independence Day, Godzilla and Stargate) to launch Voltage Pictures.

In the last three years, Chartier has distributed more than 60 movies internationally, including
Dean Devlin and Bryan Singer’s The Triangle; Flyboys; Spread, with Ashton Kutcher; Personal
Effects, starring Kutcher and Michelle Pfeiffer; and George A. Romero’s Diary of the Dead.

GREG SHAPIRO (Producer) is an independent producer whose recent credits include Harold
and Kumar Escape from Guantanamo Bay, written and directed by Jon Hurwitz and Hayden
Schlossberg, starring John Cho and Kal Penn.

Past credits include Rise, written and directed by Sebastian Gutierrez, starring Lucy Liu and
Michael Chiklis; Neverwas, written and directed by Joshua Michael Stern, starring Ian McKellen,
Aaron Eckhart and Brittany Murphy; Harold and Kumar Go to White Castle, directed by Danny
Leiner; The Rules of Attraction, based on the book by Bret Easton Ellis, adapted and directed by
Roger Avary, starring James Van Der Beek, Shannyn Sossamon and Jessica Biel; Investigating
Sex, directed by Alan Rudolph and starring Neve Campbell, Dermot Mulroney and Julie Delpy;
and Simpatico, based on the play by Sam Shepard, directed by Matthew Warchus and starring
Nick Nolte, Jeff Bridges and Sharon Stone.

Upcoming projects in development include The Rum Diary, based on the novel by Hunter S.
Thompson, adapted and to be directed by Bruce Robinson, to star Johnny Depp; and
Detachment, written by Carl Lund, to be directed by Tony Kaye and to star Peter Sarsgaard.

TONY MARK (Executive Producer) was born and raised in Manhattan. After Horace Mann High
School and Carnegie-Mellon University, Mark spent years in regional theatre, founding and
serving as the artistic director for Valley Theatre Company in Poughkeepsie, New York. He also
produced, directed, and acted with Abraxas Repertory at the Hyde Park Playhouse.
He won the Best Actor award at the New England Theatre Festival for his performance of the title
role in “Lenny” and the Best Actor award in the New York Regional Theatre festival for his work in
“Girl on the Via Flaminia.” During radio’s free-form days, he hosted the show “Grotto of the
Orange Pumpkin” at WEOK-FM. Mark also worked extensively as a photojournalist for a variety

29
of regional newspapers including United Press International and The New York Times. In New
York City, Mark produced television commercials for IBM, GE, Texaco, Coca Cola, Budweiser
and other major accounts.

Mark has produced films that range from art house to the commercial and has worked with a wide
variety of filmmakers, from edgy young directors like Spy Kids’ Robert Rodriguez to the legendary
director of West Side Story, Robert Wise. Films that Mark has been involved with as a producer
have been nominated for Academy Awards (The Fisher King) and Emmy Awards (HBO’s
“Witness Protection,” “And Starring Pancho Villa as Himself”) while being featured at film festivals
such as Sundance (Zelly and Me), Toronto (Billy Galvin), Telluride (Go Tell It on the Mountain)
and others. He has shot films all over the United States and in 14 countries including Mexico,
France, Italy, China, Greece and Jordan. Mark has written for MGM, ABC, NBC, Showtime and
USA Networks and has directed second units on numerous films for Sony, HBO, CBS and
Dimension. He also directed a documentary for the Guggenheim Foundation on the art
collections of Solomon and Peggy Guggenheim.

Mark co-founded and serves as president of the board of directors for Assistance Dogs of the
West, an organization that provides service dogs to the disabled.

BARRY ACKROYD (Director of Photography) was born in Manchester, U.K. and attended the
Portsmouth College of Art, where he majored in film. After relocating to London, he started his
career as a camera assistant on documentaries and commercials before his talent as a
cinematographer was recognized. He then went on to supervise cinematography on a broad
range of television movies and documentaries as well as independent films.

In 1996, he was nominated for a Camerimage Golden Frog for his work as director of
photography on Carla’s Song, a romantic drama set in Nicaragua. That same year, he directed a
critically acclaimed short, The Butterfly Man, for which he received several awards and
nominations including a BAFTA nomination for Best Short Film. He won several technical awards
for his work on the powerful Sweet Sixteen (2002).

Most recently, Ackroyd has shot feature films such as the Oscar-nominated United 93, the drama
Battle in Seattle and The Wind that Shakes the Barley, winner of the Palme d’Or at the 2006
Cannes Film Festival. His contribution to United 93 earned him a BAFTA nomination for Best
Cinematography. He had previously been nominated for a BAFTA television prize for Best
Photography and Lighting on “The Lost Prince” (2003). He most recently reteamed with United 93
director Paul Greengrass on the upcoming Matt Damon thriller Green Zone.

30
KARL JÚLÍUSSON (Production Designer) honed his skills in production design by working on a
number of Icelandic television shows and films. His contribution as production designer for the
Oscar-nominated Dancer in the Dark, directed by Lars von Trier and starring world-renowned
Icelandic singer-actress Bjork, earned him much critical acclaim and offers to work on high-profile
feature films. His next project was the thriller The Weight of Water, starring Catherine McCormack
and directed by Kathryn Bigelow.

Júlíusson continued to build a reputation for inventive production design through his work on
Bigelow’s action-drama K-19: The Widowmaker, starring Harrison Ford, and Dear Wendy,
starring Bill Pullman. He served as creative consultant for production design on Lars von Trier’s
Dogville and continued to work on Icelandic and Scandinavian titles such as A Little Trip to
Heaven, The Beautiful Country and The Kautokeino Rebellion.

His latest endeavor is the historical thriller Max Manus, a Norwegian film about one of the most
brilliant saboteurs of WWII and his battle to overcome his inner demons.

BOB MURAWSKI (Editor) was born in Detroit and grew up in the northeast area of Michigan. He
graduated from Michigan State University where he majored in telecommunications. After moving
to Los Angeles, he worked his way up in the editorial departments of smaller independent films.
In 1992, he edited Sam Raimi’s Army of Darkness, which became a cult smash, and later, Hong
Kong director John Woo's first American feature, Hard Target.

Following Hard Target, Murawski edited a number of feature films including Last Lives, Uncle
Sam, American Hero and the Night of the Scarecrow. He is best known for editing all three of
Raimi’s blockbuster Spiderman films.

In 1995, while working on the TV series "American Gothic," Murawski was introduced to his future
editing partner, Chris Innis, by executive producer Sam Raimi. They have since worked together
on Raimi's The Gift and Spider-Man III. The pair has also collaborated on various Grindhouse
Releasing and Box Office Spectaculars films.

Bob Murawski is a partner at Grindhouse Releasing with actor and director Sage Stallone, and
also runs his own distribution arm, Box Office Spectaculars. He has restored and digitally
remastered classic cult horror films Make Them Die Slowly (aka Cannibal Ferox) and Lucio
Fulci's horror masterpiece, E tu vivrai nel terrore (aka The Beyond) as well as Cannibal
Holocaust, I Drink Your Blood and director Juan Piquer Simón's cult horror film, Pieces.

31
CHRIS INNIS (Editor) graduated from University of California, Berkeley with a B.A. in film and
received her M.F.A. from the Cal Arts Film School. Raised in Southern California, she worked her
way up through Hollywood’s rank-and-file as a teenage movie theater cashier and popcorn
salesgirl at United Artists, Mann and Landmark theaters.

Innis was mentored by Academy Award-winning editor Pietro Scalia, with whom she served as an
assistant editor. She worked with Scalia on such films as JFK, The Quick and the Dead and G.I.
Jane. Some of her other editorial credits include Indecent Proposal, Dead Beat, I Shot a Man in
Vegas and White Man’s Burden.

Since 1997, Innis’ editing partner has been Bob Murawski. They were introduced by executive
producer Sam Raimi on the TV series “American Gothic,” where the two worked as editors. They
worked together on Raimi's The Gift and Spider-Man III. The pair also collaborated on various
Grindhouse Releasing and Box Office Spectaculars films, both companies that distribute cult films
for the VHS and DVD markets.

MARCO BELTRAMI (Composer) is an Academy Award-nominated protégé of acclaimed


composer Jerry Goldsmith who got his big break scoring Wes Craven’s Scream. In his approach
to scoring the film, Beltrami threw away conventional horror music clichés. Instead, he likened the
film to a Western and, calling upon the influences of his idol Ennio Morricone, went on to write
one of the most unexpected and imaginative scores in recent memory. Wes Craven would remark
in the liner notes of the soundtrack, “Without Marco’s genius, Scream would have been little more
than a whisper."

Beltrami scored blockbusters including Live Free or Die Hard, I Robot and Terminator 3 before
finding his way back to Western compositions when Tommy Lee Jones hired him to score The
Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada. The film won the Best Director and Screenplay awards at
the Cannes Film Festival. Walk the Line director Jim Mangold was a fan of Beltrami’s suspenseful
and beautiful Western score and hired him to write the music for 3:10 to Yuma. Michael
Rechtshaffen of The Hollywood Reporter wrote, "The impressive work extends behind the scenes
to... Marco Beltrami's percolating score, which subtly yet effectively signals Yuma's status as a
thinking person's Western."

Next, Beltrami re-teamed with Tommy Lee Jones on In the Electric Mist, directed by renowned
filmmaker Bertrand Tavernier. He also scored the psychological thriller Knowing, starring Nicolas
Cage.

32
VOLTAGE PICTURES
Presents

In Association With
GROSVENOR PARK MEDIA, LP
And
F.C.E.F.S.A.

A
VOLTAGE PICTURE
FIRST LIGHT
KINGSGATE FILMS
Production

A
KATHRYN BIGELOW
Film

THE HURT LOCKER

JEREMY RENNER

ANTHONY MACKIE

BRIAN GERAGHTY

CHRISTIAN CAMARGO

SUHAIL AL-DABBACH
CHRISTOPHER SAYEGH

EVANGELINE LILLY

With
RALPH FIENNES
DAVID MORSE
And
GUY PEARCE

Executive Producer
TONY MARK

Director of Photography
BARRY ACKRODY, BSC

33
Production Designer
KARL JULIUSSON

Editors
BOB MURAWSKI
CHRIS INNIS

Costume Designer
GEORGE LITTLE

Music By
MARCO BELTRAMI And BUCK SANDERS

Music Supervisor
JOHN BISSELL

Sound Design
PAUL N.J. OTTOSSON

Casting By
MARK BENNETT

Unit Production Manager


TONY MARK

First Assistant Director


DAVID TICOTIN

Second Assistant Director


NICK HARVARD

34
CAST

Staff Sergeant William James JEREMY RENNER


Sergeant JT Sanborn ANTHONY MACKIE
Specialist Owen Eldridge BRIAN GERAGHTY
Sergeant Matt Thompson GUY PEARCE
Contractor Team Leader RALPH FIENNES
Colonel Reed DAVID MORSE
Colonel John Cambridge CHRISTIAN CAMARGO
Black Suit Man SUHAIL AL-DABBACH
Beckham CHRISTOPHER SAYEGH
Professor Nabil NABIL KONI
Contractor Charlie SAM SPRUELL
Contractor Jimmy SAM REDFORD
Contractor Feisal FEISAL SADDUN
Contractor Chris BARRIE RICE
Iraqi Police Captain At UN IMAD DAOUDI
Mortuary Affairs Officer ERIN GANN
Sergeant Carter JUSTIN CAMPBELL
Sergeant Foster MALCOLM BARRETT
Solider At Intersection KRISTOFFER WINTER
Guard At Camp Liberty Market J.J. KANDEL
Guard At Liberty Gate RYAN TRAMONT
Iraqi Translator MICHAEL DESANTE
DVD Merchant HASAN DARWISH
Insurgent In The Stairwell WASFI AMOUR
Nabil’s Wife NIBRAS QASSEM
US Army Medic BEN THOMAS
Insurgent Sniper NADER TARAWNEH
Soldier At UN ANAS “TIPSY’ WELLMAN
Butcher OMAR MARIO
Solider At Airfield FLEMING CAMPBELL

Co-Producer DONALL McCUSKER

Associate Producer JACK SCHUSTER

Associate Producer JENN LEE

Production Manager KARIMA LADJIMI

35
Production Supervisor J. GIBSON

Art Director DAVID BRYAN

Camera Operators SCOTT McDONALD


DURAID MUNAJIM

Special Effects Supervisor RICHARD STUTSMAN

Set Costumer RICK DE SOUZA

First Assistant Editor SEAN VALLA

Assistant Production Coordinator ISSA SAWAQED

Script Supervisor ASLAUG KONRADSDOTTIR

Production Consultant FAUD KHALIL

Production Secretary MAJD HIJJAWI


Second Assistant Director YANAL BARAKAT

Hi-Speed Camera Operator DORY AOUN (THRID EYE FX)

First Assistant Camera STEWART WHELAN


OLIVER DRISCOLL
IMAD RECHICHE

Second Assistant Camera THOMAS TAYLOR


GLENN COULMAN
MOUNA KHAALI

Camera Assistants BEISAN ELIAS – TAMER NABER


RUSSELL WEBER
Key Grip MHER KESHISHIAN
Best Boy Grip ELIE MERHI
Grips CHADY CHEHADE
PRINCE KHOURY – HUSNY BKHAA
Video Assist Operator SAMI SEHWEIL
Assistant Video Assists ALI SHAHEEN – AHMAD TAKARI
ZEID NAWAFLEH
Sound Mixer RAY BECKETT
Boom Operator SIMON BYSSHE

Assistant Art Director NADEER IBRAHIM


Standby Assistant Art Director SANA’A JABER

36
Key Scenic Painter SAMIR ZAIDAN
Assistant Scenic Painter RIME AL-JABER
Storyboard Artist GARY THOMAS

Special Effects Foremen BLAIR FOORD


ERNST GSCHWIND
Special Effects Technicians WOLF STEILING
ERNST LANNINJER
Special Effects Purchaser RAFIQ KAMHAWI
Special Effects IED Consultant MOHAMMAD AL KURDI
Special Effects Technician, Jordan HELMI ANDEEN

Re-Recording Mixer PAUL N.J. OTTOSSON

Dialogue/ADR Editors ROBERT TROY


KIMBERLY HARRIS
SFX Editors JAMIE HARDT
BERNARD WEISER
RICH FRANKLIN
Foley Editors JOHN SANACORE
ALEX ULLRICH
First Assistant Sound Editor RYAN JUGGLER
Assistant Editor KICHAEL KAZ
ADR Voice Casting THE FINAL WORD
Post-Production Supervisor JACK SCHUSTER

Costume Supervisor MOIRA MEYER


Assistant Costume Designers DANIEL LESTER
HANADI
On-Set Costumers FADI OMEISH
PHAEDRA DAHDELEH
Costume Buyer KARMA HIJJAWI
Costume Ager MELISSA BINDER
“Suit” Costumer BLUE SOLE
Wardrobe Assistants ABED AL FATAH RAYAN
MOHAMED MAHSEERI

Set Decorator AMEEN AL-MASRI


Set Dressers ZACHARIA
ASAD

Hair and Make-Up Designer DANIEL PARKER


Assistant Hair and Make-Up Designers ELIZABETH RAPLEY
YELKA GUTIERREZ
Prosthetic Make-Up Artist ROBIN PRITCHARD

37
Gaffer MATTHEW MOFFATT
Best Boy Electric OSAMA NAMROUQA
Electricians BASHIR MOUAWAD
ELIE BEAINO
FIRAS DIHOUS
BASSEL SLAYEBE
MELIK KHAZZOUM
ISSAM DOURY
Generator Operator HAMMADA EL BAKA
MIKE MALIK
KARIM KHEIR
NASSER ZOUBI
FARIS ZIYOUD
DAVID FENCL
KHALIL HARB
CHRIS SURBER

Construction Coordinator MARWAN KHEIR

Production Accountant DEBBIE CHESEBRO


First Assistant Accountant MARK HOUSTON
Second Assistant Accountant DEBBIE PETERSEN

Stills Photographer JONATHAN OLLEY

Jordan Publicity ISSA MATALKA


Travel Coordinator IMAD DAOUDI
Location Manager FAWAZ ZOUBI
Assistant Location Manager HAITHAM KAYED
Locations Assistant MOHAMED (GABA) NAWAFLEH
ALI AL KHALAILEH

Jordan Casting LARA ATALLA


Extras Coordinator SETENAY ISHAK
Editorial Assistant RUPERT LLOYD
UK Film Runner DAVID MORRIS
Assistant to Ms. Bigelow JOHN R. SCOTT
Assistant to Mr. Boal OMAR HABIBB
Assistant to Mr. Chartier ANDREA BALL
Assistant to Mr. Mark LARA SAWALHA
Production Assistants YAHYA SHAHEEN
BADER ALAMI
BASSEL GHANDOUR
OMAR SWALHA
RAYA QARAEIN
MOHAMED JAWAD

38
THERESA GUNTLI
Production Runners ZIAD FARAJ
ZEID DARWAZEH
Military Advisor CSM JAMES CLIFFORD, USA/EOD
(RETIRED)
Technical Consultants BEN THOMAS
BARRIE RICE
MATTHEW THOMPSON
Jordanian Military Liaison MARWAN ABADI

Stunt Coordinator ROBERT YOUNG


Stunt-Co-Coordinator BARRIE RICE
Stunt Performers ANTONIO MARSH
ISAAC HAMON

Transportation Manager MAHDI NAWAFLEH

Jordanian Production Services SANDBAG PRODUCTIONS

SECOND UNIT
Director of Photography NEILS REEDTZ JOHANSEN
First Assistant Camera RUSSELL KENNEDY
Second Assistant Camera MAX GLICKMAN
Coordinator ASHRAF ASA’AD
Camera PA ABDEL SALAM HAJJ

CANADIAN UNIT
Canadian Production Services INSIGHT FILM STUDIOS
Associate Producer KIRK SHAW
Director of Photography TOM SIGEL, ASC
Production Manager ROB LYCAR
First Assistant Director LEE CLEARY
Second Assistant Director MICHELLE FITZPATRICK
Production Coordinators MICAH GARDENER
JIM McKEOWN
Casting LAURA BROOKE TOPLASS
Script Supervisor ANA SEBAL
Production Sound Mixer CRAIG STAUFFER
Boom Operator JUNIPER WATTERS
Third Assistant Director ASHLEY BELL

Trainee Assistant Director DALE BREDESON


Costume Designer VICKI MULHOLLAND
Production Designer PAUL JOYAL
Set Supervisor SARA RAKHSHANDEF
Set Decorator IAN NOTHNAGEL

39
On-Set Dresser SPENCER WEST
Key Make-Up Artist DANA MICHELLE HAMEL
Key Hair Stylist JANICE RHODES
Props Master DAVID INKSTER
First Assistant A Camera DAVID LOURIE
Second Assistant A Camera JEREMY SPOFFORD
B Camera Operator DALE JAHRAUS
First Assistant B Camera ROBIN SMITH
Sesond Assistant B Camera ANDY CAPICK
Loader ROBERT FINNIGAN
Stills Photographer ED ARAQUEL
Locations Manager JAMIE LAKE
Scout CAMPBELL SWEENY
Key Grip DAVE “BUCKET” WALKER
Best Boy Grip KRIS GRUNEWALD
Dolly Grip JULES QUESNEL
Gaffer JIM SWANSON
Best Boy Electric GEOFF DANE
Business Affairs BREANNE HARTLEY
SHANNON McA’NULTY
Production Counsel DORAN CHANDLER (ROBERTS &
STAHL)
Production Accountant KAREN AUSTIN
Payroll Accountant LEAH TANAFRANCA
Catering Operator NIN RAI (TRUFFLES)
Craft Services/First Aid RODOLFO SCALI
Transportation Coordinator DEAN FITZPATRICK
Security Captain DARREN HOWARD

Digital Intermediate & Visual COMPANY 3


Effects Provided by

CO3 Executive Producer STEFAN SONNENFELD


Colorist STEPHEN NAKAMURA
DI Producer ERIK ROGERS
On-Line Editor/VFX Artist ALEX ROMANO
DI Technologist MIKE CHIADO
Head of Production BRUCE LOMET
VP, Feature Sales JACKIE LEE
DI Scanning Supervisor MICHAEL BOGGS
DI Scanner IAN TURPEN
Digital Dirt Removal MICHAEL CORONADO
DI Assistants JAMES CODY BAKER
JEREMIAH MOREY

Titles By SCARLET LETTERS

40
VFX
CGI Supervisor MITCH GATES
Visual Effects Producer TOM KENDALL
Visual Effects Artists GAVIN MILJKOVICH
DAVE NEUBERGER
R. EDWARD BLACK
DOUG SPILATRO
CG Artists DAN LOPEZ
KURT McKEEVER
CHANGSOO EUN
RODRIGO WASHINGTON
I/O Data Management DAVID CAMARENA

Insurance AON/ALBERT G. RUBEN INSURANCE


SERVICES, INC.
Legal Services By EISNER & FRANK
Product Placement By STONE MANAGEMENT
Product Placement Coordinators ADAM STONE
CAT STONE
Payroll Company ENTERTAINMENT PARTNERS
Collection Account Management FINTAGE CAM B.V.
By
Cameras & Lenses By ICE FILMS
Film Stock By FUJI LONDON
KODAK
Grip/Electric Equipment TELEMAX/PLATFORM
Lab Facilities By SOHO IMAGES
Telecine By SOHO IMAGES
Deluxe Labs Color Timer GILBERT CARRERAS

Financing Provided By GROSVENOR PARK MEDIA, LP


Completion Guaranty Provided By CINEFINANCE INSURANCE SERVICE,
LLC
U.S. Military Equipment Provided CHARLES TAYLOR MOVIE ARMAMENTS
By GROUP
Prosthetics By ANIMATED EXTRAS
Craft Services FADI SARAF
Catering ASKADENIA CATERING SERVICES
NATIONAL FOOD COMPANY
EPK By CHRIS BOAL
EPK Assistant AMER AL DWEIK
Security BARRIE RICE

MUSIC
Music Supervisor JOHN BISSELL

41
Music Coordinator SARAH FERGUSON
Music Editor JULIE PEARCE
Music By MARCO BELTRAMI
BUCK SANDERS
Music Preparation By JOANN KANE MUSIC SERVICES
Guitar Performed By BUCK SANDERS
Violin Performed By ENDRE GRANAT
Cello Performed By ANDREW SHULMAN
Bass Performed By MIKE VALERIO
Erhu Performed By KAREN HAN
Voice and Ethnic Instruments YORGOS ADAMIS
Performed By
Musicians Contracted By PETER ROTTER
Music Mixed By JOHN KURLANDER

SONGS
“Fear (Is Big Business)”
Written By JOURGENSEN/VICTOR/MINISTRY
Performed By MINISTRY
Courtesy of 13TH PLANET RECORDS, INC.

“Palastenia”
Written by JOURGENSEN/VICTOR/MINISTRY
Performed By MINISTRY
Courtesy of 13TH PLANET RECORDS, INC.

“Your Smiling Face”


Written By NORMAN CANDLER
Performed By MINISTRY
Courtesy of APM MUSIC

“Khyber Pass”
Written By JOURGENSEN/MINISTRY/RAVEN/VICTOR
Performed By MINISTRY
Courtesy of 13TH PLANET RECORDS, INC.

SPECIAL THANKS TO

42
HIS MAJESTY KING ABDULLAH II OF JORDAN
HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS PRINCE ALI AL HUSSEIN
HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS PRINCE HUSSEIN NASSER MIRZA
HER ROYAL HIGNESS PRINCESS RYM AL ALI
HIS EXCELLENCY AMBASSADOR TIMOOR GHAZI DAGHISTANI
FEISAL SADOUN
ROYAL JORDANIAN FILM COMMISSION
GEORGE DAVID
NADER TARAWNEH
FADI SARAF

EF SOLUTIONS, LLC

NORTHROP GRUMMAN CORPORATION


PAUL C. CABELLON

MED-ENG
JOHN EAREY

REMOTEC, INC.
MARK KAUCHAK - JIM DANIELS - ROYCE HOLLMAN

PRODUCERS ALSO WISH TO THANK

MIKE ADLER SPIKE HOOPER WILLIAM SEERY


CHRIS ANDREWS CAROLYN HUNT RUSSEL SHATTLES
BONNIE BERNSTEIN ERIK HYMAN BRIAN SIBERELL
JIMMY DE BRABANT STEVEN CHARLES MEAGHAN SILVERMAN
JAFFE
NADINE DE BARROS PERRY KIPPERMAN BRAD SMALL
SIMON BERESFORD JOHN LOGAN LEE SOLOMON
STEVEN BROOKMAN BOB LOVE CHRISTIAN HALSEY
SOLOMON
SANDRA BENOIT JOEL LUBIN JASON SPIRE
SPENCER KOOL MARDER DONALD STARR
BAUMGARTEN
JOE COHEN CHUCK MARSHALL DONALD W. STEELE
ANN DUVAL HARRIS MELANSKY MIMI STEINBAUER
CRAIG EMANUEL ALISSA MILLER KEN STOVITZ
JAMIE FELDMAN FRED MILSTEIN ERIC SUDDLESON
IRENE FLORES ROBERT OFFER ROEG SUTHERLAND
DARIN FRANK DIERDRE OWENS DARREN TRATTNER
BETH HOLDEN GARLAND HYLDA QUEALLY DAVID WEBER
MATTHEW GABIN EILEEN RAPKE SALLY WILLCOX
DIANE GOLDEN ELIZABETH RIAL STEPHEN ZAGER
RICHARD GOLDSTEIN LEE ROSENBAUM

43
5.11 TACTICAL BRIGADE MECHANIX
QUARTERMASTERS
AMREL CYALUME MOTORTABS
ASP, INCANHEUSER- DOCKERS OAKLEY
BUSCH.
APPLE ESS PEPSI
ASP, INC. LEATHERMAN TOOL PUMA
GROUP
BENCHMADE UNDER ARMOUR

MOTION PICTURE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA


NO. 45024

DOLBY DIGITAL IN SELECTED THEATRES

FILMED ON LOCATION IN JORDAN


AND IN VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA

THIS IS A WORK OF FICTION. THE CHARACTERS AND INCIDENTS


PORTRAYED AND THE NAMES HEREIN ARE FICTITIOUS, AND ANY
SIMILARITY TO OR IDENTIFICATION WITH THE NAME, CHARACTER OR
HISTORY OF ANY ACTUAL PERSONS LIVING OR DEAD, PRODUCT OR
ENTITY IS ENTIRELY COINCIDENTAL AND UNINTENTIONAL.

THIS MOTION PICTURE IS PROTECTED UNDER THE LAWS OF THE


UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND OTHER COUNRTRIES. ANY
UNATHORIZED DUPLICATION, DISTRIBUTION AND/OR EXHIBITION MAY
RESULT IN CIVIL LIABILITY AND CRIMINAL PROSECUTION.

COPYRIGHT 2008 HURT LOCKER, LLC


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

DISTRIBUTED BY SUMMIT DISTRIBUTION, LLC

GROSVENOR PARK

44
THE HURT LOCKER

Production Notes
For additional publicity materials and artwork, please visit:
www.maplepictures.com
For more information, please contact:
Angie Burns
Maple Pictures
2 Bloor St. West, Suite 1001
Toronto, ON
M4W 3E2
P: 416.415.7231
E: aburns@maplepictures.com

Minat Terkait