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PREFACE

The scope of Human Resources management is indeed vast. All major activities in the
a  life of a worker ± form the time of his or her entry into an organization until he or
she leaves ± come under the purview of HRM. Specifically the activities included are ± HR
planning, job analysis and design, recruitment and selection, orientation and placement,
training and development, performance appraisal and job evaluation, employee and executive
remuneration, motivation and communication, welfare, safety and health, Industrial Relations
etc.

HRM differs from Personnel Management both in scope and orientation. HRM views people
as an important source or asset to be used for the benefit of organizations, employees and the
society. HRM is being integrated into the overall strategic management of business. Different
departments of the organization are internal customers of one another. In every industry there
exists web of individual, group and organizational relationships. These relationships are
complex because economics and business are involved in it. These premises prepare the
ground for the study as to what is the perception regarding HR department and its services by
the other departments.

This research constitutes real feedback and perceptions from 60 employees from managerial
and executive level from different departments of the organization regarding to the functions
of the HR department. Whatever the HR personnel and HR department think of the value
and contribution of HR, it is very important to know what the internal customers believe.
Their perceptions, whether justified or not, form the most important half of the reality of the
department¶s relationships with them.

This study will help to understand the perception of HR department in the organization and
also to get the feedback from the employees from different departments regarding to the
functions of HR department to find out avenues for improvement in the services and to
prepare an action plan to contribute more effectively.

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

I take this opportunity to express my profound gratitude to my research guide, Dr. Leena
Singhvi for her constant and valuable support, guidance and encouragement. Her valuable
guidance was ever a positive force behind me.

My sincere thanks to all the respondents for making this study possible with their frank and
true opinions. I would like to express my indebted gratitude to L&T for granting me the
permission to conduct the study.

I am very grateful to all of them who helped me in conducting my study successfully.

Finally my sincere appreciation to my family, friends and all other who helped me in research
work.

Baroda

30th March, 2011 Aserkar Shirin

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GNTRODUCTGON:

HRM has come a long way from its good old days of Personnel and Administration
functions. What started as a welfare and administration oriented activity, has now assumed
significance as the employees started getting recognized more as live resources with their
own minds and hearts than as inanimate objects or robots.

DEFGNGNG HRM:

Human Resource Management (HRM) is the function within an organization that focuses on
recruitment of, management of, and providing direction for the people who work in the
organization. Human Resource Management can also be performed by line managers.

Human Resource Management is the organizational function that deals with issues related to
people such as compensation, hiring, performance management, organization development,
safety, wellness, benefits, employee motivation, communication, administration, and training.

The Human Resources Management (HRM) function includes a variety of activities, and key
among them is deciding what staffing needs you have and whether to use independent
contractors or hire employees to fill these needs, recruiting and training the best employees,
ensuring they are high performers, dealing with performance issues, and ensuring your
personnel and management practices conform to various regulations. Activities also include
managing your approach to employee benefits and compensation, employee records and
personnel policies. Usually small businesses (for-profit or non-profit) have to carry out these
activities themselves because they can't yet afford part- or full-time help. However, they
should always ensure that employees have²and are aware of²personnel policies which
conform to current regulations. These policies are often in the form of employee manuals,
which all employees have.

There is a long-standing argument about where HR-related functions should be organized


into large organizations, e.g., "should HR be in the Organization Development department or
the other way around?"

The HRM function and HRD profession have undergone tremendous change over the past
20±30 years. Many years ago, large organizations looked to the "Personnel Department,"

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mostly to manage the paperwork around hiring and paying people. More recently,
organizations consider the "HR Department" as playing a major role in staffing, training and
helping to manage people so that people and the organization are performing at maximum
capability in a highly fulfilling manner.

Although the strategic dimension has been an integral part of the HRM literature from the
start onwards, this strategic focus has been stressed more and more in the literature during the
last decades. Human Resource Management has become ë   Human Resource
Management as witnessed by many introductions to the field. In doing this the added value of
HRM is stressed. In much of the recent literature the contribution of HRM to the business
performance is studied and the assumption seems to be that a more strategic focus of HRM
will contribute to added value and/or performance. The strategic focus of HRM asks for an
integration of HRM issues within senior management issues. In other words senior managers
must be aware of the importance of HRM issues, and include HR considerations within their
decision making.

Despite getting redefined as HRM, it continued to retain is ³SUPPORT ONLY´ tag, rarely
finding a place in the decision making process. Fortunately, things are changing for the better
and HR Department is no longer seen myopically as cost centers only, but as strategic
business partner too.

More so in the present difficult economic environment, CEOs in a volte face are turning to
their HR heads to save costs, in terms of retaining the key employees and motivating them to
deliver their best. Thus the HR professional has to fulfill business aspirations and at the same
time, meet the employee expectations«.

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CHALLENGGNG ROLE GNDEED«..

Employees may join the organization for pay, brand or any other reason, but they will stay for
the care, concern and sensitivity the organization shows towards them as they move along.
Even laying off or parting with some could be handled with compassion as the key lies in
keeping the communication open, free and transparent.

Going an extra mile in extending a helping hand in their outplacements shall go a long way in
boosting the image of the organization. For this, the HR professional, apart from their
functional knowledge need to develop an innate desire to understand the business, its
intricacies and challenges.

There is no denying of the fact that HRM is a vital organizational function and the line
between success and failure of any organization generally owes its origin to the HR
Department. The workplace is changing fast with knowledge industry ruling the roost and the
HR function is getting more complex by the day. Thus it is in a state of transition from mere
support function to an almost an operational or a line one, to say the least.

Understanding and managing people will assume a totally new dimension in the sense;
employer pays well and expects high contribution from the employees at the same time:
which by itself is a tall order for HR to handle. There may arise a situation where many
routine HR activities could be outsourced and the vital few with a strategic orientation only
continues to remain in the HR¶s domain. Talent management may have to cross the
traditional HR boundaries to align with other unconventional disciplines.

Of all, the changing role of HR Professional also demands them to educate the top echelons,
in social responsibility, public policy and ethics etc., to that extent they may have to redefine
their own role now along with the perception prevalent within the organization about their
role and functions.

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       . The strategic contribution to the
organization is contingent on the operational contribution. One wonders whether it is also the
other way round: is the operational contribution also contingent on the strategic one? We do
not think ± at least not in the perception of managers. It is believed so because for many

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managers fulfilment of specific operational HR tasks is paramount. Fulfilment of strategic
activities is a nice extra, but the day-to-day operations will not be much affected by it. On the
other hand, their perception of role effectiveness of strategic roles will be affected by the day-
to-day operations carried out by HRM.

      . Organizational culture affects the perception of HR role


effectiveness. Looking at public organizations one can discern a more traditional, hierarchical
organizational culture, and a more modern organizational culture oriented on flexibility and
the individual employee. The former (hierarchical) culture is more oriented towards the
traditional personnel management function, the latter more towards HRM. With respect to the
operational roles, the employee will not be valued so much in a hierarchical culture. Hence
one would expect that a hierarchical culture will be positively related HR role as
administrative expert, and negatively to the other three roles.

  
  . Managers will use different leadership styles. Some styles have a better fit
with HRM roles than others. Especially a coaching leadership style fits with the HR role as
employee champion. However, to operate effectively one also needs some basic information.
Therefore, it is expected that managers with a more coaching leadership style will more
positively evaluate both operational HR roles.

     Some managers are trained in HRM, and are therefore familiar with the
HRM   , others are not, and will therefore be less familiar with HRM ideas. One can
assume that those who are trained in HRM will know that HRM should also have a strategic
focus. Managers who are trained in HRM will be more positive about the role performance of
the HR roles as strategic partner and change agent.

In recent times, the HR professionals need to achieve qualitative and quantitative results in all
basic sub-functions of human resource management. The challenge is managing and
achieving quality results in situations which are demanding better time management, resource
management and growth of the organization.

HR professionals need to play a balancing role. The role being referred to is that of driving
task performance at the same time caring for the needs to the employee. Management is
happy if employees can achieve more than expected and employees are happy with
employers go extra mile to see employee needs are understood and taken care of...


     ±

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Y. Career opportunities.

2. Welfare policies.

3. Training policies.

4. Reward policies.

The above policies need to take care of minimum legal requirements and also should be able
to manage the expectations of employees and management.

Duly considering the fact that Talent is a scarce resource and that the future competitiveness
of any company will be related with the capacity that an organization will have in hiring,
retaining, capacitating and motivating them and much needed to ensure business continuity.
To achieve this goal is needed full commitment from Senior Management and a targeted
communicational strategy to overcome any behavior of resistance to change on the part of
employees.

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PERCEPTGONS OF EMPLOYEES

In the process of finding a job, almost everyone's first point of contact with a company is its
human resources department. Resumes are sent to their attention, interviews are scheduled
through them, and a large part of the hiring process ² from the first call to the offer letter ²
is managed by them. And after being on a first-name basis with everyone in the HR
department for months, most employees have almost no interaction with them until it's time
for the perfunctory exit interview. Unless of course, there's a problem such as a conflict with
a supervisor or colleague, issues of harassment or improper conduct in the workplace or a
smaller-than-hoped-for raise or bonus. In fact, human resources professionals play a vital role
in how well (or poorly) a company functions, even if most of their work is behind the scenes.
They perform an almost unfathomably large range of tasks, including managing diversity
initiatives, resolving interpersonal work-related conflicts and managing compensation and
benefits issues. As a result, HR jobs can be some of the most challenging and diverse.

One of the reasons the profession is so exciting is because it's so varied. You can be a
generalist, which means you handle every aspect of the employee relationship from designing
discipline systems to analyzing future needs based on where the company wants to go with
recruitment and hiring. Even though most of us think of HR experts only when it comes to
hiring, HR is not all staring at resumes and dealing with the dotting of I's and crossing of T's
on employee benefits paperwork. "One of the things an HR specialist spends their time on is
converting the strategy of an organization into action through people.

Many HR positions involve large amounts of interaction with employees and managers
throughout a company in order to determine what the skills of the current workforce are, and
to determine which skills are needed in the future to manage growth. HR also involves doing
a lot of industry research in order to take advantage of any trends or changes in a given
industry so that the company can run as efficiently as possible. „  , if a company is
losing employees and potential new hires to a competitor, it's up to the human resources
group to figure out why it's not able to be as competitive. The answer may be as simple as a
salary discrepancy, but other issues such as commute times, work culture and perks might
also be factors that must be addressed.

One of the mandates of any HR team is to evaluate and analyze current situations in order to
keep the company running as best it can with few wasted resources. HR specialists have roles
in functional areas such as benefits, diversity, compensation, recruiting and organizational

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development. Watching the want ads, you'll notice more and more jobs are looking for people
who have an organizational development background, which is one of the most important
roles that HR groups play today, is based on "talent management, looking at jobs and figuring
out what skill sets people need to move around in jobs and how to develop those skill sets,
job analysis, workforce planning and analysis ² really looking at the whole of the
organization and what is needed in the workforce. Change management initiatives are in that
arena, and so at the pace companies are changing these days that's why people with
organizational development backgrounds are in such high demand."

In what might seem like a blast of sweet irony, HR professionals need to apply for (and
interview for) their jobs just like everyone else. While there is no set list of skills that
guarantees employment, a mix of the right work and academic experience is key to getting
hired. Historically, and as late as Y0 to Y years ago, degree programs in HR weren't
available, so you didn't have folks in college saying I'm going into Human Resources, most
often, you came from other disciplines in the organization and you gravitated toward HR
either because of a desire or skill. Today, many universities offer undergraduate and
graduate-level programs in HR, and there are also part-time and online certificate programs
for people who want to build their human resources skills.

In addition to having the right academic pedigree, analysis, strategy and strong people skills
are important in human resources. Even today, it is more common for someone to enter HR
mid-career from another functional area because the skills needed to perform the job are best
cultivated with experience. While many employers now seek applicants who hold degrees in
human resources, the experience of working in other positions in a company gives a greater
understanding of what those jobs are like, and that empathy can be particularly valuable when
evaluating job structure and performing other duties in HR. HR is really an umbrella that
covers many different jobs within a company, and as such there are jobs for people with just
about any personality type or skill set. For those who enjoy meeting new people, an ideal job
might be in campus recruiting. These positions can involve quite a bit of travel, and typically
require back-to-back meetings with eager young applicants at school-sponsored job fairs. For
people who enjoy number crunching, working on the benefits side of the fence can be a good
career option. In short, no matter what kind of abilities one may possess, there's a good
chance.... that there's a good match in an HR department. I think what's most important about
someone going into HR today is not so much the traditional HR background but having good
business skills is just as important as the HR knowledge of employment laws.

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STRATEGGC HR

How different is it from the conventional administrative HR? The current HR function is very
much configured like the company¶s purchasing department. People, like parts and supplies,
are requisitioned by user departments based on depletion and growth rates of their operations.
Both resources are screened for quality control and cost or budget constraints. The only slight
difference is that unlike purchased parts, people are trained or prepared before they are sent to
the requisitioning parties which may train them further before actual deployment or usage.
HR is also involved in the replacement, termination and retirement process of unusable
people assets, much like the handling of depreciated equipment. In short, most HR systems
exist not only for replenishment and maintenance of a resource called people; they also tend
to be engaged in developing, nurturing and grooming them.

Strategic HR does not abandon these administrative responsibilities. Otherwise, no other


department in the company will carry out these ³operations-sustaining´ activities. But its
main task is to participate in corporate strategy rather than support administration. Strategic
HR is more proactive rather than reactive in its relationships with the other functional areas.
It is more concerned about what its internal customers need in the future to compete globally.
Strategic HR managers do not wait for instructions, requisition or complaints. It does its
homework, does research on the future, and offers proactive solutions and strategic advice.

Strategic HR is preventive rather than corrective or punitive. It is developmental in


orientation. The conventional HR function is the dispenser or implementers of justice and
protector of corporate assets. It views employees as resources not are wasted rather than
strategic resources to be developed. Strategic HR aims to create a working environment
conducive for employees to do things right the first time. It aims to prevent mistakes rather
than punish them.

Strategic HR is output driven rather than input oriented. For instance, training results are
measured not in terms of training hours or number of trainees per year, but in terms of
improvement in the trainee performance attributable to the training. Performance
improvement can be in terms of productivity, efficiency, Quality of Production (defects),
customer satisfaction or conversely, number of customer complaints received. Strategic HR
personnel are concerned with these results as much as the operating departments it serves. In
spite of the fact that output results are more difficult to measure than input deployed, strategic

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HR aims to find ways and means to directly and indirectly measure these more accurate
metrics of its success and effectiveness.

Strategic HR is mainly pre-occupied in moulding the employees of the future today. For
organizations to survive and excel in the future, its needs to develop or acquire employees
who are multi-skilled, cross-functional, empowered, team players. In addition, they have to
have high emotional intelligence (EQ) and capable of thinking ³Out of the Box´ about the
future. They should be capable not only of improving their work, but reengineering or
reinventing it if necessary. Front liners, who are engaged in millions of ³Moments of Truth´
meeting customers, must have superior flexibility, resourcefulness, and excellent memories
especially if their task requires greeting customers by their first or last names. Strategic HR
keeps these employee attributes as its goals while conducting its basic processes of
recruitment, training, job rotation, career mapping, and performance appraisal.

Strategic HR aligns performance criteria systems with corporate goals and strategies rather
than traditional functional concerns. It includes in performance criteria of both rank and file
employees and managers those that will enable them to contribute to corporate goals. Most
traditional HR performance appraisal systems basically gauge how well a subordinate
satisfied his boss or superior during the appraisal period. This degree of satisfaction may or
may not be related to how well the employee contributed to corporate goals. Most of the time,
it does not. For this reason, conventional performance appraisal has become a highly
politicized, controversial, wasteful exercise that creates more disharmony than teamwork in
the organization. Strategic HR appraises people on the more relevant output performance like
quality, productivity, internal and external customer satisfaction. If negative criteria are used,
these become defects or rework, wastes, and internal and external customer complaints or
returns. In banking, performance appraisal may include lost calls, closed accounts, queuing
time, and clerical errors, ATM downtime, improvement projects. Strategic HR aims to
change employee behaviour and attitude by directly connecting his appraisal (and eventually
his pay) to what actually matters to corporate performance and customer satisfaction. It puts
less weight on nebulous criteria like teamwork, attendance, boss satisfaction, and neatness.

HR is no longer a backroom or support function. It is in the forefront of corporate strategy,


much like sales and marketing. It provides and determines competitiveness to an ever
increasing degree. All other things being equal ± financial, physical, and product assets ±

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people will make the difference between two competing companies. Strategic HR can make
this difference happen.

Looking at all these aspects, there is spurring need to recognize the importance of HR and
value of the intangible assets, particularly people. A few years ago, Infosys did a human
capital accounting exercise which valued each employee at more than 70 lacs, the total value
of human capital far exceeding the revenues of the organization. Any manager who only
looks at the financials in a balance sheet, audited by chartered accountants, and does not
understand the value of intangible assets like human capital, has to start learning the ABC of
business.

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RESEARCH TGTLE:

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SGGNGFGCANCE AND NEED OF THE STUDY:

Many HR positions involve large amounts of interaction with employees and managers
throughout a company in order to determine what the skills of the current workforce are, and
to determine which skills are needed in the future to manage growth. HR also involves doing
a lot of industry research in order to take advantage of any trends or changes in a given
industry so that the company can run as efficiently as possible.

In every industry there is a web of relationships which consists of the relationship between
individuals, groups and between the organizations. In an organization different departments
are internal customers for the HR department. This study is to understand the perceptions of
the internal customers towards the functions of HR department which will help to understand
the image of the department and also to find out the areas in which there is a need for
improvement to contribute more effectively to the organization.

This study was aimed to understand perception of HR department¶s functions by different


departments and to find out avenues for improvement in the services provided by the HR
department in order to contribute more effectively in the organization.

This study will help to understand the perception of HR department in the organization and
also to get the feedback from the employees from different departments regarding to the
functions of HR department to find out avenues for improvement in the services and to
prepare an action plan to contribute more effectively. There has been a genuine effort to
make the tool for the data collection as relevant as possible to the particular organization and
the target group for data collection.

This study would help students and to professional practitioners to understand the perceptions
of the internal customers towards the functions of HR department in a manufacturing set up.
This will help them to find out the areas on which they should focus as HR professionals to
be more effective in the organization.

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Larsen & Toubro

Vadodara: Larsen & Toubro (L&T), whi h is setting up Knowledge Cit , wants to
develop Vadodara as country¶s largest engineering hub. While inaugurating an engineering
campus at Waghodia on the outskirts of the city on Friday, L&T¶s chairman and managing
director AM Naik said that Vadodara will act as headquarters of three out of 18 operating
companies of the group, including L&T Power, L&T Hydrocarbon and E-engineering.

³City will have 12,000 to 15,000 engineers by 2020 at a single location,´ said Naik, adding
that Knowledge City will act as headquarters of the three companies. L&T also wants to set
up an engineering college for its employees for which it has already approached state
government.

Naik said that former ABB India head Ravi Uppal has already been appointed as
CEO and managing director of L&T Power, a 100 percent subsidiary of L&T. ³In
engineering services, we will create 10,000 new jobs over next four years, of which half will
be in Gujarat,´ he said, adding, ³In hydrocarbon space, it will cater to needs of the upstream,
midstream and downstream sectors and in power, design support for complete projects. We
expect to generate project exports revenue of over Rs 2,000 crore within five years and
generate employment to around 5,000 technical professionals in next five years,´ he said.
Integrated campus will enable L&T to extend and further develop its existing capabilities in
process engineering, product development, mechanical design and analysis, process
evaluation and technology adaptation.Apart from that, L&T is also setting up Institute of
Project Management to develop project managers across domains of engineering,
procurement, construction and manufacturing at µKnowledge City¶. The campus that
presently houses three buildings will see investment worth Rs 500 crore in infrastructure and
buildings alone spread over a period of five years. L&T plans to have 11 buildings
constructed across 112 acres in first phase which will also house convention centre,
employees hostel, residential colony, food courts and entertainment facilities. ³We have
utili ed only part of the capacity and it has potential for expansion ten times over,´ said Naik,
adding that in next five years, over 2,000 employees will live on the campus.

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HR Department :

Efficiency, Profitability and in fact the very existence of the undertaking will depend on this
constituents. Co-operation and dedication in performance on the part of its personnel ends in
the accomplishment of its objectives. Therefore human resource is of immense importance
since it involves matters such as identifying, placing, evaluating, and developing individuals
at work and maintaining effective multilateral communication systems. Human resources
along with financial and material resources contribute to production of goods and services in
an organi ation.. In short HRM may be defined as the art of procuring, developing and
maintaining competent workforce to achieve the goals of an organi ation in an effective and
efficient manner.

T y

Larsen & Toubro Limited is the largest engineering firm in South Asia.

Our Net sales stood at Rs.248531 million, PBT at Rs.27392.20 million and PAT at Rs.21734.20
million (All figures are as on 31st March 2008)

Determined to become a professionally managed multinational, dedicated in providing optimum


satisfaction to both internal and external customers, L&T conducts business in line with its
Corporate Vision statement.

L&T is being led forward in the path of change, by a team of dedicated professional leaders, whose
vision and constant striving for excellence has helped the organi ation reach greater heights.

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L & T Structure :






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To compete and grow in a globalised business environment, L&T is implementing a strategic plan
(LAKSHYA) for 2005-10. The plan has been drawn up in consultation with a leading international
strategy consultant. It has set ambitious growth targets for each business. Also included are
opportunities for diversification of L&T's business portfolio.

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The company views success not as an end in itself but a means of attaining the greater good for the
society. The company is built around the pursuits of adding values to employees, stakeholders, and
the society at large. The excellence lies in what the company does/produce to make India proud. The
company believes its true success to be in the transformation of people through continuous
enrichment of their minds and the quality of their lives.

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OBJECTG ES OF THE STUDY

¦c To study ?              


¦c To study the views of the employees, their experiences, grievances towards the
HR Department.
¦c To study the perceptions of the employees at managerial and executive levels
from different departments regarding the contribution of HR department in the
organization and towards their department
¦c To study the perception through 8 subsystems of HR through which it contributes
to the organization
¦c To study the image of the HR department in the organization
¦c To study the areas for improvement for the HR department

Universe:

The universe of the study was the total employees at staff level including managers and
executives at all levels from all the departments at L&T, which has  employees at staff
level out of which 6 employees are from other than HR department.

Samp e Size:

For the purpose of the study all the 6 employees at staff level were considered. Only the HR
department personnel were exempted from the universe.

Samp ing Technique:

For the purpose of selecting the sample for the study, the census inquiry technique was used.
All the employees from staff level which work in the departments other than the HR
department were covered.

Research design ±Exp orator and Descriptive in nature

Reference period ± Ma 2010 to March 2011

Samp e Size- 56 emp o ees

Data Co ection: The information has been collected with the help of the questionnaire tool,
which will consist of the closed ended questions only.

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Treatment of data: The intended method for analysis of the data shall be done through SPSS
software.

Resu ts Presentation: A ong with the theoretica presentation, the findings and
conc usions are shown in the form of Pie charts and Tables.

The technique used was questionnaire to derive the perceptions of the employees on different
aspects.

› 
              

Y.c Strongly Agree


2.c Agree
3.c Partially agree
4.c Disagree
.c Strongly Disagree
Along with the five pointer scale, a 3 pointer scale is also used:

Y.c Yes
2.c No
3.c Can¶t say

LGMGTATGONS OF THE STUDY:

The responses taken from the respondents may not be accurate on account of:

a)c Lack of understanding on part of the respondent


b)c Indifference towards the survey process
c)c Though the great efforts were put to convince the respondents for the study, the responses
received were not real but biased one as the employees had the fear that management
will take actions against them based on the opinion given by them.
d)c Another limitation of the study is the time factor. The respondents did not have much
time to fill up questionnaire seriously and they filled the questionnaire just for the sake
of filling it.
e)c The study is to a certain extent limited by the vastness of the canvas and the time
available with the researcher for the study.

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PRESENTATGON OF THE STUDY:

The study is presented in the following manner.

Chapterisation:

Chapter 1 - Introduction & Research Methodology

Chapter 2 - Review of Literatures

Chapter 3 - Data Analysis and Interpretation

Chapter 4 - Findings, Conclusion and Suggestions

Annexure: Y. Bibliography

2. Questionnaire

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Review of literature is necessary for scientific approach and is regarded important for
scientific research. It gives the researcher the insight into various facts of problem. It also
gives researcher the understanding of work done in past one cannot precede with research in
proper direction with various theories until he has gone through various related literature and
is well acquainted.

The review of literature is the most important component of the research. It prepares the
researcher to formulate a researchable problem as well as helps in avoiding any duplication of
work done earlier. A careful review of literature enables the researcher to collect and
synthesize prior studies related to the present study. It also gives insight regarding the
possible methods which can be persuaded for the undertaking of similar investigation.

A retrospective survey of literature was undertaken to investigate the related researches


conducted in that area. The review of literature has been collected from various sources such
as books, previous researches and websites.

In this chapter discussion on various aspects of the perception of the employees about the role
of HR was done. It included the expert views on different roles assumed by HR and
important factors that help HR to gain and retain its niche in the organization.

In order to make the review clear and understanding, it had been broadly divided into
different sub- topics.

Comparing Line and HR Executives' Perceptions of HR Effectiveness: Services, Ro es,


and Contributions

A Stud b Patrick M. Wright, Schoo of GLR, Corne Universit , 2003.

This study compares HR and line executives' evaluations of the effectiveness of the HR
function in terms of its service delivery, roles, and contributions to the firm. Survey responses
from 44 HR and  line executives from Y4 companies indicated that (a) HR executives
consistently rated the functions' effectiveness higher than did line executives, and (b) the
greatest differences were observed on the more important and/or strategic aspects of HR.

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Emp o ee perceptions and their inf uence on training effectiveness

Ama ia Santos, Ro a Botanic Gardens, Kew , Universit of Leeds

Studies of the benefits of human resource development (HRD) for organizations have
assumed a direct connection between training strategy and a hierarchy of performance
outcomes: learning, behavioral change and performance improvement. The influence of
workplace practices and employees' experiences on training effectiveness has received little
attention. This study investigates evaluation strategies designed to elicit greater training
effectiveness, and explores the influence of trainees' perceptions and work environment
factors on this. Drawing on detailed case study findings, the authors highlight the importance
of management practices, trainees' perceptions of the work environment and systems of
reward in explaining behavior change after training.

A stud on Focus of HR functions shifts from interna operations to a more direct ro e


in corporate performance b

D    ë b Mercer Human Resource Consu ting, 2006

The human resource (HR) function around the world continues to change as it shifts its focus
from enhancing internal operations to maximizing contribution to the corporation¶s business
performance. According to the 2006 D    P    ë   b Mercer Human
Resource Consu ting, half ( 0%) of organizations are in the midst of transforming their HR
functions, while Y2% completed a transformation within the past year and another Y0% plan
to begin the process within the next year.

HR transformation is the process of recreating or reinventing the HR function with the


specific intent of enhancing HR¶s contribution to the business. Mercer¶s study, which builds
on a similar one conducted in 2003, includes responses from nearly Y,400 organizations in all
industries across Asia, Australia, Europe, Latin America, New Zealand and North America. It
provides insights about the current realities, trends, obstacles and opportunities facing
organizations¶ HR functions around the world.

The stud shows a c ear shift in HR priorities. While 40% of survey respondents listed
human capital strategy as a principal function of HR today, 64% expect it to become a key
function within two to three years. Leadership development and talent management are other
areas expected to become more important. Conversely, 46% of survey respondents listed

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operational excellence within the HR function as a priority today, while only 32% see it as a
key function in the next few years.

³HR transformation is clearly a continuous process. The first wave of transformation, which
started to Y0 years ago, focused on improving technology and service delivery with the
expectation that HR would transition to a more strategic role within the organization,´ said
Karen Piercy, a principal and HR effectiveness expert in Mercer¶s Human Capital business.
³Today, HR functions around the world are challenged with delivering on this expectation ²
to make human capital strategies a reality rooted in improving competitiveness and
profitability.´

The Gmportance of Being in HR

With just one swipe of Budget 200 , the Finance Minister has made life difficult for HR
professionals. The Fringe Benefit Tax threatens to nullify all the creativity and innovation
displayed by the HR fraternity over the last Y0 years to offer improved benefits to employees.
It's time for the profession to rework its strategies.

In the Y60s and Y70s, creativity, ingenuity, innovation and resourcefulness were terms that
were not normally associated with the HR fraternity. Gera d G. D'Souza, Senior Vice-
President HR, The UB Group, says that it's only in the last Y0 years that HR has come into its
own. "Hardcore organisation development, organisational behaviour and training have
become centre-stage."

It's also true that HR as we know it today dominates IT and other knowledge-based
industries. "Earlier what we called 'welfare activities' is now being championed by HR," says
D'Souza, adding, "and activities that are part of normal work are called HR interventions.
This is how jargon gets built up."

Rahu Varma of Accenture says that the HR department, over the years, has become more
strategic to an organisation's success. High-performing companies focus on building human
capital that comprises core HR processes such as recruiting, career development and
competency management, as well as broader issues such as workplace design, learning and
training, and knowledge management.

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"Our research has shown that there is a strong link between the maturity of an organisation's
human capital processes and its overall financial performance. Effective human capital
management practices do matter," he adds.

What Needs to Be Done

There are a lot of things that need to be accomplished in HR before HR programs and
practices can begin supporting the corporate brand. The list is immense, but some
recommended starting points follow:

Stop executing HR in a vacuum. Managing the most valuable corporate asset in a world-class
way requires cooperation with marketing and finance.

Identify where your standard operating procedures, policies, and reward systems contradict
the customer experience your corporate brand depends upon, and fix them. (Every company
should find at least one major contradiction. If you are having problems, look at how you
provide bonus compensation.)

Measure the success of your recruiting and training initiatives based on the customer
perception of the quality of your workforce; after all, it is their opinion that matters most!

Identify how your employees perceive your organization, and compare that to how you want
customers to perceive your organization. If there is a disconnect, it must be resolved. (Note
that resolution does not mean telling the employee they are wrong! Branding relies upon their
perception, not yours.)

Conc usion
You and I both know that corporate branding initiatives are created in a vacuum, and not
always based upon reality, or the ability of our firm to live up to the image created.
Unfortunately, failing to follow through on a promise put forth by our brand, either stated or
implied, is one of the easiest and most effective ways to drive customers away and revenues
down.

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Branding initiatives should always have the customer as their primary focus, and focus on
their needs and wants. In some cases, the customer is internal, in other cases external.
Branding can be used to accomplish a variety of challenges, but success depends upon follow
through, and that depends upon the quality of your workforce and their ability to deliver.

As people become the key competitive advantage in any industry the human resource (HR)
development function will and should play a more strategic role. It should go beyond its mere
administrative support function to operations and front line departments. Whether or not
company views HR strategically may decide whether market share, sales, or profits would
increase or not. An effective HR strategy becomes equally decisive as the company¶s
marketing strategy.

Technology too is changing HR roles. As industries, and the way they compete become
knowledge-based, HR performance indicators will shift from manpower and man-hours
supplied to brainpower and brain hours delivered. The key result areas in people management
will also shift from production and quantity to productivity and quality. Capability, measured
in employee ideas generated and implemented, and productivity gained, will be more
important than capacity, measured in man-hours available, man-hours lost, absenteeism, etc.

KEY FGNDGNGS

DEMOGRAPHICS

The   survey attracted a strong respondent sample of Y8Y6 individuals. Some notable
facts about the sample include:

‡ Y378 HR managers and 438 non HR managers responded to the survey

‡ Nine out of Y0 respondents are from organizations that have an HR function

‡ Three quarters of respondents hold an HR position in the organization

‡ Nine out of Y0 HR respondents hold a formal quali¿cation in HR.

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SUMMARY OF FGNDGNGS

SG KEY FGNDGNGS OF THE SURVEY:

1. Understanding the HR role: A considerable number of HR respondents (63. %) believe


that employees in the business do not understand or are unsure about what the human
resources department does or what it should be doing. Of non-HR respondents to the survey,
that number stands at 80.4%.

2. Effectiveness of HR: On the related question of whether HR is seen as effective, 4 .% of


HR respondents believe it is not effective or they are unsure, and 73. % of non-HR
respondents take the same view. That should come as no surprise. If people in the business do
not know what HR should be doing, they are not going to be well placed to determine
whether they are effective in doing it.

3. Whose interests should HR serve? A further disparity in the data relates to the question
about whose interests HR should be serving. While nine out of Y0 respondents quite properly
expect HR to serve µthe business¶ as its ¿rst priority, they also report that HR is perceived to
serve the interests, in order, of µsenior management¶ (72%), µemployees¶ (60%) and µthe
CEO¶ ( %). Those ¿gures are not conducive to a good look for the HR profession.

4. Is HR necessary? With only one in Y0 non-HR respondents (YY%) believing that HR is not
a necessary function in the business, there is clearly a signi¿cant divide between the high
expectations placed on the HR function and what it¶s seen to deliver.

5. Responsibility of the business. Notwithstanding the strong belief in the necessity of the
HR function, survey respondents report that the most senior HR person in their organization
is a direct report to the CEO in only 4% of cases. That relatively low number suggests that a
great many businesses largely fail to understand and adequately recognize a part of the
business that is critical to their success. If the HR function matters, and this survey says it
does, the onus is on both the business and the HR practitioners within it, to accord the
function an appropriate standing and to resource it accordingly.

6. An image makeover? Not surprisingly, approximately three quarters (7 %) of respondents


surveyed believe the HR function in business needs an image makeover, a conclusion from
which at least three things can be inferred:

¦c HR practitioners need to behave differently, and that includes being more highly

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trained to perform the roles for which they claim expertise.
¦c HR practitioners need to explain their value to the business more effectively, and have
good reason to expect that value to be endorsed from the top.
¦c The business needs to assume responsibility for properly recruiting, training and
developing HR staff to enable them to exercise leadership and strategic thinking, and
to accord staff at that level appropriate standing within the business.

HR: PERCEPTGON AND REALGTY

1. UNDERSTANDGNG THE HR ROLE

Nearly two thirds of HR respondents believe that their colleagues in the business do not
understand what they do or what they should be doing, or are unsure on the question (36%
and 27. % respectively). With approximately eight out of Y0 non-HR respondents (80.4%)
taking similar views ( Y.3% and 2.Y% respectively); the task for HR to be transparent and
articulate is inescapable. Clearly there is a case for HR practitioners within business to
market their skills more effectively. At the same time it is incumbent on the business to make
that accountability a key performance indicator of a staff member with sufficient clout as an
internal communicator to realize that marketing objective. There may also be a case for the
business to train HR staff in the skills required to more effectively articulate the areas of their
expertise that create value to the business.

2. EFFECTGVENESS OF HR

Effectiveness relates to impact and the capacity to make a difference. If HR is widely seen
within the business to be ineffective, as the survey ¿ndings indicate, that perception goes
directly to the issue of image. It may also be a reÀection of competence. With three quarters
of non-HR respondents, believing HR is not effective or are unsure of its effectiveness, there
clearly exists a crisis of con¿dence from key stakeholders.

Because the answers to the question on effectiveness are linked to the issue of understanding
about what HR does in the business, it¶s almost certain that in a number of cases HR is not
receiving credit for work that it undertakes and brings to fruition. An intervention is
necessary at that point to ensure credit is accorded to the appropriate function where value

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has been given, if for no other reason than to enable those in the business to know from
whom they should be requesting that function in the future.

Conversely, the confusion about understanding and effectiveness of the HR role no doubt
leads to HR being on the wrong end of the blame chain with respect to matters for which it
has little or no responsibility. That is, while in a blurry business environment HR may get
inadvertent credit for positive things it did not do, it may also be falsely accused of
contributing to undesirable results or failing to contribute to desired ones.

Unless there are sound strategic reasons for doing so, HR leaders should not easily agree to
wear the dirty linen for the business. If the business makes hard but unpopular decisions,
those decisions need to be communicated as decisions of the business. HR must support
them, of course, but not agree to be perceived as the powerless handmaiden of the CEO or
other sectional interests who are looking for corporate martyrs or scapegoats.

Where HR makes input into decision making or has a role in implementation, it is incumbent
on both the business and the HR leaders to ensure that accountabilities are articulated clearly
and openly.

As a ¿nal observation on the data in it¶s worth noting that many HR respondents are under no
illusions about the extent to which their role is misunderstood. A total of 63. % HR
respondents doubt whether the business understands what they do and 4 .% doubt whether
they are seen to be effective. The point here is that those HR respondents are a sizeable
proportion of the sample in each case and they are not in denial on the matter. That¶s got to
be a good starting point.

3. WHOSE GNTERESTS SHOULD HR SERVE?

In terms of image, the HR function must ensure it is not simply seen as looking after its own
patch. The survey respondents clearly indicate that primary role of HR is to contribute to the
achievement of results for the business as a whole. One respondent put it this way:

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That too few respondents in the survey ¿ ¿ndings see HR actually serving the business is a
clarion call when 0% of respondents are saying HR should be doing exactly that.

Similarly, that HR is seen by % of respondents to be looking after the interests of the CEO
instead, suggests that HR practitioners need to make signi¿cant adjustments, either to how

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they are perceived or to how they are actually behaving, or more likely to both.

That may be a challenge for a HR department in a business where the CEO or a group
director is keen to use HR as a cover to convey unpopular business decisions. The HR leaders
in those cases need to persuade the executives concerned that it¶s not in the long-term
interests of the business to behave that way. If persuasion is not enough, the exercise of
appropriate leverage may be necessary or even the exercise of raw courage as a last resort.

Whatever means are used; HR must consistently adopt the position of serving the interests of
the business and be seen to do so, as indicated by the great majority of survey respondents.
They must also resist attempts to have them positioned as serving sectional interests,
including their own interests.

4. GS HR NECESSARY?

Hammonds is in no doubt about the centrality of HR with respect to business performance,


so much so that his scorn arises from the gap he sees between the potential of HR and his
claims about its record of non-delivery.

While Hammonds doesn¶t go to the issue of image, he raises the issue of competence and, in
his estimation, HR doesn¶t measure up: ³HR people are, for the most part, neither strategic
nor leaders´, he says.

To the extent Hammonds has hit on a kernel of truth, the challenge for HR practitioners is to
ensure they measure up, and are seen to be measuring up. Very often that will mean more
training or a refocusing of the character of training.

In answer to the survey question on the importance of formal training, with the exception of a
specialist HR quali¿cation, both HR and non-HR respondent groups nominated subject areas
in exactly the same order; namely, business, psychology, law, ¿nance, marketing and
economics. Business was a standout ¿rst choice for both groups which is a strong indicator
that HR and other business unit managers are talking the same language.

That ¿nding is also an indication that HR formal quali¿cations need to be rigorous and reÀect
the business priorities indicated in the data; i.e. that they contain adequate content in
business, psychology and law, for example.

The development of quality HR training relies on a concerted effort to consult with relevant
parties in the workplace, and is a role typically played by a professional association. The

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Australian Human Resources Institute, for its part, has undertaken that role with some degree
of success, but clearly more work needs to be done.

5. RESPONSGBGLGTY OF THE BUSGNESS

While HR practitioners and the professional association need to assume responsibility for the
standing of their own profession, on the basis of this survey business itself needs to face up to
its obligation to play a leadership role with respect to the standing of a professional group that
can make a critical contribution to business performance.

This   surve reveals that in only 4% of cases does the most senior HR person in
the business report to the CEO, with Y6% reporting to the corporate services director.

While there is a case to say that HR needs to earn the respect required to become a direct
CEO report, it is also true that organizations which recruit HR staff exclusively from the
junior or middle management ranks all but ensure that the function remains without clout and
without a voice at the executive level.

For HR to get the leadership it deserves, initiative from the CEO and executive level in the
business is critical, ¿rst in recruiting candidates who are capable of providing frank and
fearless advice at executive level but also those who are capable of providing leadership and
cohesion to the team that brings business-driven HR expertise to the enterprise.

6. AN GMAGE MAKEOVER?

While the survey respondents agree strongly that an image makeover is in order for HR, the
data suggests it is not going to be a simple public relations campaign that will bring about a
fresh look. Three interconnected things need to occur to bring that about, namely the way in
which HR professionals go about their practice, how effectively they communicate their areas
of expertise within the business, and the extent to which the business can be made to
recognize that it needs to take a level of responsibility for boosting the stocks of a necessary
occupational group which is to some extent under siege.

In addition to working on its perception within the business, there is an imperative for HR to
more positively position itself with respect to the wider community in the public arena. Entry
level recruits into the profession will come from members of the general public and one way
to attract the best talent is to more competitively position HR as an occupation of ¿rst choice.

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DOES HR CREATE MORE WORK FOR MANAGERS?

We asked: ³Does your HR department produce unnecessary µred tape¶?´


Some 34 per cent of HR professionals admitted that it does. But 46 per cent of managers said
they experienced unnecessary red tape from HR. Challenge the need for form-filling, for
additional levels of authorization at every stage. When making every choice think µhelp¶ not
µhinder¶. How many of your processes exist simply because they do?

WHAT GS HR GOOD/BAD AT?

We asked HR professionals and managers to rate HR on Y3 disciplines that typically fall


under HR¶s remit. HR rates itself as less than fairly good in two areas: employer branding
and succession planning. Managers¶ bottom two scores are for change management and
succession planning. The latter averages little more than not very good.

It was not all bad news for HR, though. When respondents were asked to rate the extent to
which they agreed with a list of statements, managers rated HR more highly on some aspects
of the job than HR professionals themselves. Against the statement, ³The HR department
produces too much paperwork´, HR scored itself 3.6 (tending towards agree slightly), while
managers scored 3.22 (nearer neither agree nor disagree). And against the statement,
³Managers within the company associate HR with bad news´, HR scored 3.28, while
managers scored 3.08.

HOW GS HR PERCEGVED?

We asked: ³How well do you think your HR department is perceived in your organization?´
HR professionals scored 3.38 and managers scored 2.62, proving there are some rose-tinted
spectacles on the noses of many HR professionals. We also asked: ³How approachable is
your HR department?´ HR scored itself a more than very approachable 4.2 while line
managers reported 3. ± midway between very and fairly approachable. Ask yourself: what
are we doing to make ourselves accessible to staff? How visible are we? How secretive do we
appear?

DO YOU OFFER VALUE FOR MONEY?

We asked: ³Does your HR department offer good value for money?´


Turkeys don¶t vote for Christmas, and HR professionals would not suggest they are a waste

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of money. A healthy 80 per cent declared their HR department offered good value, and only
Y0 per cent said no. However, a shockingly low 3Y per cent of managers said their HR
department offered good value for money, and 48 per cent said it did not. If that view is
shared by your chief executive or finance director, it may be worth considering how you pitch
the work that HR does. However, a breakdown of this research reveals the more senior a
manager is (both inside and outside HR), the more they value the HR function, so it seems
HR has friends in high places.

REFLECTGONS ON BUGLDGNG CREDGBGLGTY

³Credibility has to be earned. But it¶s so simple: build a real partnership by listening and
understanding what the business does and the challenges it has, then deliver tailored,
practical, quality solutions on time, every time,´ says Gi Hibberd, corporate director,
Buckingham Count Counci . ³This is what the business has to deliver to clients ± if it
doesn¶t, it fails. The business expects the same from you.

³Understanding also means knowing what the business does for clients, so why not spend a
little time with them on the frontline seeing how they work? This would improve your
knowledge, build your network, demonstrate your commitment, and would be a great first
step to real partnership. HR should also work with the business with confidence,´ he says.

³HR serves business¶s needs, but that doesn¶t mean being treated like a servant. If you act as
a servant you will be treated like one, and then you will lack real credibility.´

³HR directors must ensure that their department¶s contribution is not purely focused on
policy or administrative functions, but is also proactive in offering advice and opinions to
help managers make the right decisions,´ he says. ³HR representation at every level ± from
headquarters through to small regional offices ± is key to ensuring a two-way dialogue.´

A SHARED RESPONSGBGLGTY GS ARGSGNG

It is no secret that success in business relies upon excellence in execution. While corporate
leaders have historically looked to other functions, such as product development, marketing,
and sales, to drive corporate success, today more and more eyes are looking to HR for help.

The reason for this newfound reliance on HR stems from a decrease in the effectiveness of
the traditional levers marketing organizations used to differentiate a firm and their products.
Marketers have traditionally used "the 4 P's" (product, price, position, and promotion) to set

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the products of their firm apart from those of the competitor in the market place. However, in
the new economy, product features, pricing, and positioning become almost irrelevant as
competitors can now mimic and upstage your efforts in very short periods of time, thanks in
part to innovations in technology and reductions in global barriers.
While this development forces marketing to become more and more branding oriented, it also
forces corporate attention on other avenues that can be used to establish and maintain a
corporate brand in the marketplace. Most corporate leaders and professional marketers now
admit that one of the few (if not the only) channels left to communicate the corporate brand
to customers is the employee, and the customer experience they are capable of providing.
Customer service is a factor that is largely influenced by the quality of the workforce, which
in turn is largely influenced by the quality of recruiting and workforce management systems
developed and maintained by HR.

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Age Frequency Percentage (%)


21-30 4 7.1
31-40 40 71.4
41 and above 12 21.4
Total 56 100.0


 

 

The
above
 
table and
chart 
shows the

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distribution of the workforce as per the age group. It can be inferred that out of total 56

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respondents, 40 (71.4%) belong to the 31-40 age group, which constitute the majority of the
response. 4 (7.1%) belong to the 21-30 age group and 12 (21.4%) belong to the41 and above
group. We can infer from the above data that the majority of the workforce falls between the
age group of 31-40 years.

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Gender Frequency Percentage (%)


Male 54 96.4
Female 2 3.6
Total 56 100.0


  





  

The above table and chart shows the distribution of the workforce as per the gender. It can be
inferred that out of total 56 respondents, 54 (96.4%) are male, which constitute the majority
of the response. And only 2 (3.6%) are female. We can infer from the above data that the
majority of the workforce is male.

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Tab e GGG: Department

Department Frequency Percentage (%)


Production Y 26.8
Tool Room Y3 23.2
Marketing 4 7.Y
Finance 4 7.Y
Stores 8 Y4.3
QA/QC Y0 Y7.
IT 2 3.6
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows the distribution of the workforce as per the departments... It can be
inferred that out of total 6 respondents, Y (26.8%) belong to the Production Department,
which constitute the majority of the response. Y3 (23.2%) belong to the Tool room. 4 (7.Y%)
are absorbed in the marketing and finance. 8 employees work in the stores. Y0 (Y7.%) people
are engaged in QA/QC and 2 (3.6%) staff member serves in IT department. We can infer
from the above data that the maximum people working in the company are absorbed in the
Production Department.

Tab e GV: Educationa Qua ification

Educational Qualification Frequency Percentage (%)


Technical 3 62.
Non-Technical 2Y 37.
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows the distribution of the workforce as per their educational qualification.
It can be inferred that out of total 6 respondents, 3 (62. %) possess technical educational
background, which constitute the majority of the response. Whereas 2Y (37. %) belong to
non-technical academic background. We can infer from the above data that the majority of
the workforce possesses the basic technical knowledge.

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The HR department he ps the organization to reach its objectives

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Unsatisfactory Y4 2 .0
Satisfactory 2 44.6
Good Y2 2Y.4
Very good 4 7.Y
Excellent Y Y.8
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table represents that out of total 6 respondents, 2 (44.6%) said they were
satisfied, which absorbed the major part of the response.Y4 (2 %) were unsatisfied with this
statement, Y2 (2Y.4) said they felt it was moderately good, i.e., average. 4 (7%) ranked it as
very good and only Y (Y.7%) rated it as excellent. We can infer from the above data that
majority of the respondents feel that HR¶s role in helping the organization in reaching its
objectives by providing information and details at the right time, making proactive moves and
suggesting newer developments to the management, is quite satisfactory only.

HR department he ps to improve the effectiveness of the organization

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Unsatisfactory 8 Y4.3
Satisfactory Y8 32.Y
Good 24 42.
Very good 8.
Excellent Y Y.8
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 24 (42.) said they felt it was
moderately good, i.e., average, which absorbed the major part of the response. 8 (Y4.3%)
were unsatisfied with this statement, Y8(32.Y%) said they were satisfied, (8.%) ranked it as
very good and only Y (Y.8%) rated it as excellent. It can be concluded that the HR¶s role in
organizational effectiveness by taking proper measurements like performance appraisal on
the right time and by right people, overall productivity maintenance and improvement,
introduction of various programs and policies, is only moderate or average.

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HR department he ps the organization consider emp o ees¶ views.

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Unsatisfactory 8 Y4.3
Satisfactory 20 3 .7
Good 20 3 .7
Very good 3 .4
Excellent 8.
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 20(3 .7%) said they were satisfied
and another 20 (3 .7) felt it was moderately good, i.e., average, which absorbed the major
part of the response 8 (Y4.3%) were unsatisfied with this statement, 3 ( .4%) rated it as very
good and (8.%) rated it as excellent. We can infer that majority of the respondents feel that
the employee¶s views considered in the organization are satisfactorily and moderately. HR¶s
efforts in making the employees voice heard by suggestion schemes, employee
representations, transparent and open communication etc not effective totally but they have
scored average and satisfactory both.

HR department he ps the organization to prepare for change

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Unsatisfactory Y4 2 .0
Satisfactory 30 3.6
Good 8 Y4.3
Very good 3 .4
Excellent Y Y.8
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 30( 3.6%) said they were satisfied
which absorbed the major part of the response. Y4(2 %) were unsatisfied with this statement,
8 (Y4.3%) felt it was moderately good, i.e., average, 3 ( .4%) rated it as very good and Y
(Y.8%) rated it as excellent. It can be inferred that the majority of the respondents feel that
HR has only an average role to play in the change management. HR¶s role in sensitizing
people for the upcoming change, making them unfreeze from the current condition and
making the whole process of change comfortable by adequate training and communication is
only satisfactory.

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Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Unsatisfactory 8 14.3
Satisfactory 26 46.4
Good 9 16.1
Very good 12 21.4
Excellent 1 1.8
Total 56 100.0


  



 





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The above table and the chart represent that out of total 56 respondents, 26 (46.4%) said they
were satisfied which absorbed the major part of the response. 8 (14.3%) were unsatisfied with
this statement, 9 (16.1%) felt it was moderately good, i.e., average, 12 (21.4%) rated it as
very good and 1 (1.8%) rated it as excellent. We can infer from the above data that majority
feel that HR has a very satisfactory role to play in strategy formulation and implementation,
i.e., making the organi ation¶s plans and policies keeping in mind the vision and mission, the
long term developments and external influences has a verylimited scope for HR.

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Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Unsatisfactory 2 3.6
Satisfactory 31 55.4
Good 16 28.6
Very good 6 10.7

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Excellent Y Y.8
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 3Y ( .4%) said they were satisfied
which absorbed the major part of the response. 2(3.6%) were unsatisfied with this statement,
Y6 (28.6%) felt it was moderately good, i.e., average 6 (Y0.7%) rated it as very good and Y
(Y.8%) rated it as excellent. We can conclude that majority of the respondents feel that
execution of HR processes and policies regarding the recruitment, terms and conditions of the
employment, performance appraisal and management, training and development, exit
procedures etc. has very satisfactory performance by HR.

HR department is invo ved in improving commitment of the emp o ees

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Unsatisfactory  Y6.Y
Satisfactory 24 42.
Good Y 33.
Very good 3 .4
Excellent Y Y.8
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 24 (42.%) said they were satisfied
which absorbed the major part of the response.  (Y6.Y%) were unsatisfied with this
statement, Y (33.%) felt it was moderately good, i.e., average. 3 ( .4%) rated it as very
good and Y (Y.8%) rated it as excellent. We can conclude that majority feel that HR¶s
performance in improving commitment, by creating the organizational culture that fosters
high morale and improved employee satisfaction, valuing the human assets and treating them
with dignity etc, in of the employees is satisfactory.

HR¶s invo vement in change management and organizationa Cu ture

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Unsatisfactory Y2 2Y.4
Satisfactory 33 8.
Good  Y6.Y
Very good Y Y.8

 c
c
Excellent Y Y.8
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 33 ( 8.%) said they were satisfied
which absorbed the major part of the response. Y2 (2Y.4%) were unsatisfied with this
statement,  (Y6.Y%) felt it was moderately good, i.e., average. Only Y (Y.8%) rated it as very
good and as excellent. It can be inferred that majority feels that HR¶s role in change
management and culture development is satisfactory only.

HR department motivates the emp o ees

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Unsatisfactory Y4 2 .0
Satisfactory 30 3.6
Good 8.
Very good 6 Y0.7
Excellent Y Y.8
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 30 ( 3.6%) said they were satisfied
which absorbed the major part of the response. Y4 (2 %) were unsatisfied with this statement,
(8.%) felt it was moderately good, i.e., average. 6 (Y0.7%) rated it as very good and Y
(Y.8%) rated it as excellent. We can infer from this that majority feels that HR¶s role in
motivating employees by linking the performance and rewards in a fair manner, giving
everyone the opportunity to grow and develop, creating career path and goal setting and
treating everyone equally, is satisfactory only.

c
c
cicci i cicc ic

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Unsatisfactory 10 17.9
Satisfactory 28 50.0
Good 12 21.4
Very good 5 8.9
Excellent 1 1.8
Total 56 100.0

 





    ë      c   

The above table and chart show that out of total 56 respondents, 28 (50%) said they were
satisfied which absorbed the major part of the response. 10 (17.9%) were unsatisfied with this
statement, 12 (21.4%) felt it was moderately good, i.e., average. 5 (8.9%) rated it as very
good and 1 (1.8%) rated it as excellent. It can be inferred that majority feels that alignment of
the organi ational and HR strategies by mapping the HR strategies for the development in
alignment with the organi ational plans, vision and objectives, drawing the blue print of the
organi ation form the current as well as future perspective etc., is done satisfactorily only.

c c

c
c
HR processes are efficient  managed

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Unsatisfactory YY Y.6
Satisfactory Y6 28.6
Good 20 3 .7
Very good 6 Y0.7
Excellent 3 .4
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 20 (3 .7%) felt it was moderately
good, i.e., average which absorbed the major part of the response. YY (Y.6%) were
unsatisfied with this statement, Y6 (28.6%) said they were satisfied. 6 (Y0.7%) rated it as very
good and 3 ( .4%) rated it as excellent. It can be concluded that majority feels that HR¶s
performance in managing the HR processes efficiently, i.e., the functions and modalities of
HR like time office, training and development, compensation and benefits, recruitment,
performance management, career development etc., is good or average.

HR po icies meet the interests and demands of emp oees

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Unsatisfactory Y4 2 .0
Satisfactory 2Y 37.
Good Y 26.8
Very good 3 .4
Excellent 3 .4
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 2Y (37. %) said they were satisfied
which absorbed the major part of the response. Y4 (2 %) were unsatisfied with this statement,
Y (26.8%) felt it was moderately good, i.e., average. 3 ( .4%) rated it as very good and as
excellent. We can infer that majority feels that HR policies have only satisfactory role to play
in meeting the interests and demands of the employees, i.e., the policies devised by HR do
not exactly meet with the expectations of the employees, how they want them to be or how
they wish them to be seen as.

c
c
c cciccciyccci ic

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Unsatisfactory 11 19.6
Satisfactory 30 53.6
Good 9 16.1
Very good 3 5.4
Excellent 3 5.4
Total 56 100.0

The above table shows that out of total 56 respondents, 30 (53.6%) said they were satisfied
which absorbed the major part of the response. 11 (19.6%) were unsatisfied with this
statement, 9 (16.1%) felt it was moderately good, i.e., average. 3 (5.4%) rated it as very good
and as excellent. We can conclude that majority feels that HR policies¶ role in improving
change capacity of the organi ation is mere satisfactory.

cciccic c/cicc

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Yes 29 51.8
No 12 21.4
Can't say 15 26.8
Total 56 100.0

 

 
 

    c

c
c
The above table and the chart represent that out of total 6 respondents, 2 ( Y.8%) answered
in affirmation, which absorbs major part of the response. Y2 (2Y.4%) answered negatively.
While Y (26.8%) remained neutral. We can conclude from the above data that majority feels
that HR has a role to play as advisor for strategic HRM, i.e., HR¶s advices and suggestions
regarding the strategies for the overall organizations are welcomed and accepted, the
strategies devised for the human assets of the organization are well defined and well
coordinated and are capable of yielding better results.

HR as expert in administrative processes

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Yes 38 67.
No YY Y.6
Can't say 7 Y2.
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 38 (67.%) answered in affirmation
which absorbs major part of the response. YY (Y.6%) answered negatively. While 7 (Y2. %)
remained neutral. We can conclude that majority sees HR as administrative expert, i.e., HR
has proficiency in the administrative functions such as time keeping, coordination with
internal as well as external clients, security and estate upkeep etc.

HR as a stress buster for emp oees

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Yes Y0 Y7.
No 2 44.6
Can't say 2Y 37.
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 2 (44.6%) answered negatively
which absorbs major part of the response Y0 (Y7.%) answered in affirmation. While 2Y
(37. %) remained neutral. We can infer that majority don¶t consider HR as a stress reliever,
i.e., HR doesn¶t undertake the activities that relieve the employees from stress, there are not
much things done for employee engagement or fun-at-wok etc.

c
c
HR as a change agent

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Yes 34 60.7
No Y2 2Y.4
Can't say Y0 Y7.
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 34 (60.7%) answered in affirmation
which absorbs major part of the response. Y2 (2Y.4%) answered negatively. While Y0 (Y7.%)
remained neutral. We can conclude that majority see HR as a change agent and a change
advisor.

HR department devotes maximum time to strategic issues

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Yes 2 Y.8
No 8.
Can't say 22 3.3
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 2 ( Y.8%) answered in affirmation
which absorbs major part of the response. (8.%) answered negatively. While 22 (3.3%)
remained neutral. We can conclude that majority thinks that HR does spend maximum time
for strategic issues.

c
c
HR department devotes maximum time in operationa issues

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Yes 38 67.
No 8 Y4.3
Can't say Y0 Y7.
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 38 (67.%) answered in affirmation
which absorbs major part of the response. 8 (Y4.3%) answered negatively. While Y0 (Y7.%)
remained neutral. Majority thinks that HR spends maximum time in operational issues, i.e.,
HR has a good consideration for the basic issues or formal procedure and main stream issues
along with the strategic issues in the organization

maximum time in istening to emp oee and answering their queries

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Yes 27 48.2
No Y4 2 .0
Can't say Y 26.8
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 27 (48.2%) answered in affirmation
which absorbs major part of the response. Y4 (2 %) answered negatively. While Y (26.8%)
remained neutral. We can infer that majority feels that HR spends maximum time in listening
to employees and solving their queries, i.e., HR keeps both the eyes and ears open for the
employee suggestions as well as grievances and their problems are governed quite efficiently
by creating win-win solutions for the aggrieved parties.

c
c
motivate emp oees to get a better organizationa performance

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Yes 2 Y.8
No Y3 23.2
Can't say Y4 2 .0
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 2 ( Y.8%) answered in affirmation
which absorbs major part of the response. Y3 (23.2%) answered negatively. While Y4 (2 %)
remained neutral. We can conclude that majority see HR as a motivating agency to the
employees for a better performance by making the policies that support the growth of the
organization, creating the climate which provides scope for more productivity and high
employee morale and healthy industrial relations.

Most decisions are taken b higher ups in the organization

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Yes 2 2.
Can't say 4 7.Y
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 2 (2.%) answered in affirmation
which absorbs the majority of response. And the rest 4 (7.Y%) have remained neutral. No one
has responded negatively. We can infer from the above table that majority of the respondents
agree that most decisions are taken by higher ups in the organization, i.e., the decision
making system is quite centralized and revolves around the leadership bench in the
organization.

c
c
Gn m organization f exibi it is important

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Yes 38 67.
No YY Y.6
Can't say 7 Y2.
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 38 (67.8%) answered in affirmation
which absorbs major part of the response. YY (Y.6%) answered negatively. While 7 (Y2. %)
remained neutral. It can be concluded that majority feels that flexibility is important in their
organization, i.e., organization supports the participative management thereby making it
congenial for the employees to have good working environment.

Gn m organization oa t and obedience are important

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Yes 22 3.3
No Y3 23.2
Can't say 2Y 37.
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 22 (3.3%) answered in affirmation
which absorbs major part of the response. Y3 (23.2%) answered negatively. While 2Y
(37. %), which is relatively a major portion, remained neutral. It can be inferred that majority
feels that loyalty and obedience are important in the organization.

 c
c
Emp oees need to fo ow strict ru es and procedure

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Yes 37 66.Y
No 6 Y0.7
Can't say Y3 23.2
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 37 (66.Y%) answered in affirmation
which absorbs major part of the response. 6 (Y0.7%) answered negatively. While Y3 (23.2%)
remained neutral. We can conclude that majority feels that employees are made to follow
stringent rules and procedures.

Qua ities of ever emp oee is associated with the tasks in the organization

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Yes 32 7.Y
No 6 Y0.7
Can't say Y8 32.Y
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 32 ( 7.Y%) answered in affirmation
which absorbs major part of the response. 6 (Y0.7%) answered negatively. While Y8 (32.Y%)
remained neutral. We can conclude that majority feels that their qualities are in congruence
with the tasks in the organization, i.e., the task allotment is done based on the competence
and skills of the individual employees.

 c
c
Gn m organization inking performance and reward is important

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Yes 27 48.2
No 2Y 37.
Can't say 8 Y4.3
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 27 (48.2%) answered in affirmation
which absorbs major part of the response. 2Y (37. %) answered negatively. While 8 (Y4.3%)
remained neutral. We can infer that majority thinks that the organization puts a lot of
emphasis on linking rewards with performance, i.e., the employees are rewarded in
proportion with the level of performance exhibited by them and a transparent system of the
same is followed across the organization.

Emp oees need to earn new competencies

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Yes 3 6.6
No Y2 2Y.4
Can't say 8.
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 3 (6.6%) answered in affirmation
which absorbs major part of the response. Y2 (2Y.4%) answered negatively. While (8.%)
remained neutral. We can infer that majority feel that employees are expected to learn new
competencies.

c
c
Emp oees enjo their jobs

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Yes 27 48.2
No Y8 32.Y
Can't say YY Y.6
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 27 (48.2%) answered in affirmation
which absorbs major part of the response. Y8 (32.Y%) answered negatively. While YY (Y.6%)
remained neutral. It can be concluded that majority feels that employees love their jobs in the
company.

Reward sstem c ear  shows what tpe of attitudes and behavior is expected

Response Frequency Percentage


Yes 2 44.6
No 20 3 .7
Can't say YY Y.6
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 2 (44.6%) answered in affirmation
which absorbs major part of the response. 20 (3 .7%) answered negatively. While YY (Y.6%)
remained neutral. It can be inferred that majority see that reward system shows explicitly the
kind of behavior and attitude expected out of employees.

c
c
Mobi it of personne is accepted and norma (both interna & externa 

Response Frequency Percentage


Yes 26 46.4
No 7 Y2.
Can't say 23 4Y.Y
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 26 (46.4%) answered in affirmation
which absorbs major part of the response. 7 (Y2. %) answered negatively. While 23 (4Y.Y%)
remained neutral. We can infer that majority feels that internal and external mobility is
accepted and normal for the organization, i.e., HR makes a point that the job rotation of the
employees give them opportunities to discover other areas of operation in their jobs as well as
external mobility to let the employees switch on to something else when they find themselves
not comfortable with the organization.

Ke advices to organization

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Unsatisfactory 8 Y4.3
Satisfactory 36 64.3
Good Y0 Y7.
Very good Y Y.8
Excellent Y Y.8
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 36 (64.3%) said they were satisfied
which absorbed the major part of the response. 8 (Y4.3%) were unsatisfied with this
statement, Y0 (Y7.%) felt it was moderately good, i.e., average. Y(Y.8%) rated it as very good
and excellent. We can infer that majority thinks that HR¶s performance in giving key advices
to the organization is only satisfactory.

c
c
Gntegrated manageria information

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Unsatisfactory Y Y.8
Satisfactory 3 62.
Good Y2 2Y.4
Very good 7 Y2.
Excellent Y Y.8
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 3 (62. %) said they were satisfied
which absorbed the major part of the response. Y (Y.8%) were unsatisfied with this statement,
Y2 (2Y.4%) felt it was moderately good, i.e., average. 7(Y2. %) rated it as very good and Y
(Y.8%) rated it as excellent. We can conclude that majority thinks that HR¶s performance in
Integrated Managerial information i.e., dissemination of the vital internal as well external
information at the right time, in the right quantum, to the right people, is satisfactory only.

c
c
c  iccicii

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Unsatisfactory 15 26.8
Satisfactory 21 37.5
Good 14 25.0
Very good 5 8.9
Excellent 1 1.8
Total 56 100.0










    ë      c   

The above table and the chart shows that out of total 56 respondents, 21 (37.5%) said they
were satisfied which absorbed the major part of the response. 14 15 (26.8%) were unsatisfied
with this statement, (25%) felt it was moderately good, i.e., average. 5(8.9%) rated it as very
good and 1 (1.8%) rated it as excellent. We can conclude that majority thinks that HR doesn¶t
help a lot to the organi ation in developing a strategic vision, i.e., providing a strong and
convincing roadmap for the future courses of action for the organi ation etc. c

c
c
Management of diversit

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Unsatisfactory Y4 2 .0
Satisfactory 23 4Y.Y
Good Y3 23.2
Very good 3 .4
Excellent 3 .4
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 23 (4Y.Y%) said they were satisfied
which absorbed the major part of the response. Y4 (2 %) were unsatisfied with this statement,
Y3 (23.2%) felt it was moderately good, i.e., average. 3 ( .4%) rated it as very good and
excellent. We can infer that the majority sees HR¶s performance as satisfactory in managing
diversity, i.e., the cultural diversity, and changes in the mind sets of the people etc.

Emp oee friend  po ic formu ation

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Unsatisfactory Y 26.8
Satisfactory 23 4Y.Y
Good Y0 Y7.
Very good 6 Y0.7
Excellent 2 3.6
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 23 (4Y.Y%) said they were satisfied
which absorbed the major part of the response. Y (26.8%) were unsatisfied with this
statement, Y0 (Y7.%) felt it was moderately good, i.e., average. 6 (Y0.7%) rated it as very
good and 2 (3.6%) rated it as excellent. It can be concluded that majority thinks that HR¶s
role is only satisfactory in employee friendly policy formulation.

c
c
Basic information about personne

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Satisfactory Y4 2 .0
Good 30 3.6
Very good 8.
Excellent 7 Y2.
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 30 ( 3.6%), which absorbed the
major part of the response felt it was moderately good, i.e., average. Y4 (2 %) were satisfied
with this statement, (8.%) rated it as very good and 7 (Y2. %) rated it as excellent. We can
conclude that HR can be rated as good in providing basic personnel information like leaves,
attendance etc.

Recruitment and se ection

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Unsatisfactory 7 Y2.
Satisfactory 26 46.4
Good  Y6.Y
Very good  Y6.Y
Excellent 8.
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 26 (46.4%) said they were satisfied
which absorbed the major part of the response. 7 (Y2. %) were unsatisfied with this
statement,  (Y6.Y%) felt it was moderately good, i.e., average and very good, whereas
(8.%) rated it as excellent. We can infer that majority feels that HR¶s performance in
recruitment and selection i.e., man power planning process, availing best talent to the needed
department within shortest possible time frame etc., is satisfactory.

c
c
Juridica Advice

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Unsatisfactory 3 .4
Satisfactory 26 46.4
Good Y8 32.Y
Very good 7 Y2.
Excellent 2 3.6
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 26 (46.4%) said they were satisfied
which absorbed the major part of the response. 3 ( .4%) were unsatisfied with this statement,
Y8 (32.Y%) felt it was moderately good, i.e., average. 7 (Y2. %) rated it as very good and 2
(3.6%) rated it as excellent. It can be concluded that majority feels that HR¶s performance in
juridical advice is satisfactory.

Working condition of our emp oees

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Unsatisfactory Y4 2 .0
Satisfactory Y8 32.Y
Good Y3 23.2
Very good 7 Y2.
Excellent 4 7.Y
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, Y8 (32.Y%) said they were satisfied
which absorbed the major part of the response. Y4 (2 %) were unsatisfied with this statement,
Y3 (23.2%) felt it was moderately good, i.e., average. 7 (Y2. %) rated it as very good and 4
(7.Y%) rated it as excellent. We can infer that majority thinks that HR¶s performance in
providing working conditions, i.e., taking care of the ergonomics, hygienic facilities
availabilities etc., to the employees is satisfactory.

c
c
 c
c
Main objective is the a ignment with interest, needs and va ues of emp oees

Response Frequency Percentage (% )


Yes 30 3.6
No Y7 30.4
Can't say  Y6.Y
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 30 ( 3.6%) answered in affirmation
which absorbs major part of the response. Y7 (30.4%) answered negatively. While  (Y6.Y%)
remained neutral. It can be inferred that majority thinks that HR¶s main focus has to be
interest, needs and values of the employees.

Gives new and inexperienced emp oees amp e time to earn the organization and
deve op

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Yes 46 82.Y
No 8 Y4.3
Can't say 2 3.6
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 46 (82.Y%) answered in affirmation
which absorbs arguably major part of the response. 8 (Y4.3%) answered negatively. While 2
(3.6%) remained neutral. This concludes that majority feels that HR does give the novice
enough time to learn and get adjusted to the new organization.

 c
c
When there are frictions and conf icts among emp oees, tries to so ve these b
communication

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Yes 33 8.
No  Y6.Y
Can't say Y4 2 .0
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 33 ( 8.%) answered in affirmation
which absorbs major part of the response.  (Y6.Y%) answered negatively. While Y4 (2 %)
remained neutral. This infers that majority thinks that HR solves the friction among
employees by communication, i.e., HR tries not to take radical actions or steps I the first
place and try to come out to amicable solutions by communicating and interacting with those
in grievances and try to implement the solution promptly.

Participation of emp oees is va ued whi e taking decision

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Yes 20 3 .7
No Y3 23.2
Can't say 23 4Y.Y
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 20 (3 .7%) answered in affirmation
which absorbs major part of the response. Y3 (23.2%) answered negatively. While 23
(4Y.Y%), which is arguably high response rate for this category, remained neutral. This can
conclude that majority thinks that their opinions are considered while taking decision.

c
c
Regu ar  visits emp oees on the work-f oor to support with their tasks

Response Frequency Percentage (%)


Yes 2 44.6
No Y7 30.4
Can't say Y4 2 .0
Total 6 Y00.0

The above table shows that out of total 6 respondents, 2 (44.6%) answered in affirmation
which absorbs major part of the response. Y7 (30.4%) answered negatively. While Y4 (2 %)
remained neutral. We can conclude that majority thinks that HR does takes shop-floor visits
regularly and support the employees.

FGNDGNGS:

Following are the Findings of the study conducted about ?       
at L&T.

    "

öc It was found that 4 % respondents feel that role of HR Dept. in helping the organization
reach its objectives is very satisfactory. And 2 % rated it as unsatisfactory.
öc Majority of the respondents, i.e., 43% respondents feel that performance of HR Dept. in
improving the effectiveness of organization is good or average. where as another 32%
have rated it as only satisfactory.
öc Majority of the respondents, i.e., 36% respondents have rated HR¶s performance in taking
into account the interest and wishes of the employees as good and satisfactory both.
öc It was found that 4% respondents have rated HR¶s performance in preparing for change
as satisfactory. Whereas 2 % have rated it as unsatisfactory.
öc It was found that 46% respondents have rated HR¶s performance in formulation of the
strategy for the organization as satisfactory. Whereas 2Y.4% have rated it as very good.
öc Majority of the respondents, i.e., % respondents have rated HR¶s performance in the
execution of the HR process and practise as satisfactory. Whereas 2% have rated it as
good.

c
c
öc It was found that 43% respondents have rated HR¶s performance in improving
commitment of employees as satisfactory. Whereas 34% have rated it as good.
öc It was found that % respondents have rated HR¶s performance in Implementing change
in organisational cultural as satisfactory. Whereas 2Y% have rated it as unsatisfactory.
öc Majority of the respondents, i.e., 4% respondents have rated HR¶s performance in
Motivating employees as satisfactory. Whereas 2 % have rated it as unsatisfactory.
öc It was found that 0% respondents have rated HR¶s performance in taking care that HR
strategies and organizational strategies are aligned as satisfactory. Whereas 2Y% have
rated it as good.
öc Majority of the respondents, i.e., 36% respondents have rated HR¶s performance in taking
care that HR processes are efficiently managed as good. Whereas 2% have rated it as
satisfactory.
öc It was found that 38% respondents have rated HR¶s performance in taking care that HR
policies meet the interests and demands of employees as satisfactory. Whereas 27% have
rated it as good.
öc It was found that 4% respondents have rated HR¶s performance in taking care that HR
processes improve the change capacity of the organization as satisfactory. Whereas 20%
have rated it as unsatisfactory.
öc Majority of the respondents, i.e., 2% respondents have agreed that HR department is seen
as Advisor for strategic HRM/strategic management, whereas significant 27% have
remained neutral about this.
öc It was found that 68% respondents have agreed that HR department is seen as an expert in
administrative processes, whereas 20% have negatively rated this statement.
öc Majority of the respondents, i.e., 4 % respondents have said that they don¶t see HR as a
stress buster for them whereas 38% have remained neutral and only Y8% have agreed that
HR is a stress buster for them.
öc It was found that 6Y% respondents have agreed that HR department is seen as a change
advisor/agent, whereas 2Y% have negatively rated this statement.
öc Majority of the respondents, i.e., 2% respondents have agreed that The HR department
devotes maximum time for Strategic issues, whereas 3% have remained neutral about
this.
öc It was found that 68% respondents have agreed that The HR department devotes
maximum time for operational issues, whereas only Y4% have negatively rated this
statement.

c
c
öc Majority of the respondents, i.e., 48% respondents have agreed that The HR department
devotes maximum time for Listening to employees and answering their questions, whereas
27% have remained neutral about this and rest 2 % have negatively rated this statement.
öc Majority of the respondents, i.e., 2% respondents have agreed that The HR department
devotes maximum time for Motivating employees to get a better organizational
performance, whereas 2 % have remained neutral about this and rest 23% have negatively
rated this statement.

    

öc Majority of the respondents, i.e., 3% respondents have agreed that most decisions are
taken by higher ups in the organization whereas only 7% have remained neutral about this.
öc It was found that 68% respondents have agreed that in the organization flexibility is
important whereas 20% have negatively rated this statement.
öc Majority of the respondents, i.e., 3% respondents have agreed that in the organization
loyalty and obedience are important whereas 23% have negatively rated this statement and
very significant 38% have remained neutral about this.
öc It was found that 66% respondents have agreed that Employees need to follow strict rules
and procedures whereas 23% have remained neutral about this.
öc Majority of the respondents, i.e., 7% respondents have agreed that Qualities of every
employee is associated with the tasks in the organization whereas 32% have remained
neutral about this.
öc It was found that 48% respondents have agreed that in the organization linking
performance and rewards is important whereas 38% have negatively rated this statement.
öc Majority of the respondents, i.e., 70% respondents have agreed that Employees need to
learn new competences whereas 2Y% have negatively rated this statement.
öc It was found that 48% respondents have agreed that Employees enjoy their jobs whereas
32% have negatively rated this statement and 20% have remained neutral about this.
öc Majority of the respondents, i.e., 4 % respondents have agreed that by using a reward
system it is made clear to employees what type of attitudes and behaviour is expected of
them whereas 36% have negatively rated this statement.
öc Majority of the respondents, i.e., 46% respondents have agreed that Mobility of personnel
is accepted and normal (both internal & external) whereas significant 42% have remained
neutral about this.

c
c
› 
 

öc It was found that 64% respondents have rated HR¶s performance in Key advices to
organisation as satisfactory, whereas only Y8% have rated it as good.
öc Majority of the respondents, i.e., 63% respondents have rated HR¶s performance in
integrated managerial information as satisfactory, whereas only 2Y% have rated it as
good.
öc It was found that only 38% respondents have rated HR¶s performance in developing a
strategic vision as satisfactory, whereas only 23% have rated it as good and 27% have
rated it as unsatisfactory.
öc Majority of the respondents, i.e., only 4Y% respondents have rated HR¶s performance in
Management of diversity as satisfactory, whereas only 23% have rated it as good and
2 % have rated it as unsatisfactory.
öc It was found that only 4Y% respondents have rated HR¶s performance in Employee
friendly policy formulation as satisfactory, whereas only Y8% have rated it as good and
27% have rated it as unsatisfactory.
öc Majority of the respondents, i.e., 4% respondents have rated HR¶s performance in Basic
information about personnel (sickness, leave) as good whereas 2 % have rated it as
satisfactory.
öc It was found that 46% respondents have rated HR¶s performance in Recruitment and
selection as satisfactory, whereas only Y6% have rated it as good and very good both.
öc Majority of the respondents, i.e., 46% respondents have rated HR¶s performance in
juridical advice as satisfactory, whereas 32% have rated it as good.

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       ?  

öc It was found that 66% respondents have agreed that Main characteristic of an HR
personnel in the organization is competence for empathy and motivation of others whereas
2Y% have negatively rated this statement.
öc Majority of the respondents, i.e., 4% respondents have agreed that Main objective of an
HR personnel in the organization is the alignment with interests, needs and values of
employees whereas 30% have negatively rated this statement.

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öc It was found that 82% respondents have agreed that HR in their organi ation gives new
and inexperienced employees ample time to learn the organisation and develop themselves
whereas only 14% have negatively rated this statement.
öc Majority of the respondents, i.e., 59% respondents have agreed that When there are
frictions or conflicts among employees, HR tries to solve these by communication
whereas only 16% have negatively rated this statement and 25% have remained neutral
about this.
öc It was found that 36% respondents have agreed that Participation of employees is valued
while taking decisions whereas 23% have negatively rated this statement and significant
41% have remained neutral about this.
öc Majority of the respondents, i.e., 47% respondents have agreed that HR personnel
Regularly visits employees on the work-floor to give support with their tasks if necessary,
whereas 30% have negatively rated this statement and 25% have remained neutral about
this.

à  L TI Ec!I I c
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    ë      c   

The above chart shows the cumulative response of the employees about the Performance of
HR Department.

$c Majority of the respondents, 45% have rated the performance of HR as satisfactory.


$c 25% have rated the performance as good.
$c 19% have rated the performance as unsatisfactory.

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$c 8% feel the performance of HR is very good.
$c Only 3% have rated the performance as excellent.

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Ñ#c ciiic



    ë       c   

The above pie chart shows the cumulative response of the employees about the HR activities.

$c Majority of the respondents, 41% have rated the HR activities as satisfactory.


$c 24% have rated the HR activities as good
$c 18% have rated the HR activities as unsatisfactory.
$c 11% feel that the HR activities are very good.
$c Only 6% feel that the HR activities are excellent.

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   c

The above pie chart shows the cumulative response of the employees about the involvement
and contribution of HR in building and maintaining the organi ational culture.

$c Majority of the respondents, 52% have agreed that HR does help build and maintain
the organi ational culture.
$c 25% have remained neutral about HR¶s contribution in building and maintaining
Organi ational culture.
$c 23% have negatively responded about the HR¶s contribution in building and
maintaining Organi ational culture.

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o#c ! ci ci ccc c #c






    cë

The above pie chart shows the cumulative response of the employees about favorable
behavioral attributes of HR personnel.

$c Majority of the respondents, 58% have agreed that HR personnel have shown a very
favorable and positive behavioral pattern.
$c 22% have negatively responded about the same.
$c 20% have remained neutral about the HR¶s behavior.

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c
CONCLUSGON:

After evaluating the collected data, it can be inferred that most of the employees have
responded in the category of satisfactory, good and unsatisfactory, these are the areas which
need to be taken care of by HR Department by making process improvement and efficiency
enhancement.

Being visibly active and efficient in organizational strategies, implementation of change,


motivating employees, creating vision for the organization, executing policies and
procedures, careful recruitment and selection, career development , working condition of the
employees, provision of training and educational facilities etc. are the areas where in
employees want to see more efficient services by HR.

Training and development is one such area where HR can make even more efficient mark as
the employees have responded that they are not highly satisfied with the training being
provided. Employees have rated the recruitment and selection function which is considered
the basic forte of HR as just good, which can be improved upon drastically.

Maximum employees have responded that most decisions are taken higher up in the
organization, which lead to lesser participation from the employees in decision making. This
makes the organizational climate centralized and less autonomous. HR can suggest some
ideas to bring the management and employee pockets together.

HR has not been seen as a stress buster which connotes that the employees don¶t find the HR
activities to be employee friendly. There can be activities arranged for the employee to
overcome their stress and HR should address this grave issue at the earliest.

Apart from the above stated areas, the HR personnel¶s conduct and behavior has been very
welcoming and liked by the employees as they have shown a very highly positive response
for the behavioral attributes of the HR personnel in the organization.

c
c
SUGGESTGONS:

$c HR department must ensure that their department¶s contribution is not purely focused on
policy or administrative functions, but is also proactive in offering advice and opinions to
help managers make the right decisions.
$c HR department should participate more effectively in decision making process rather than
playing a suggestive role.
$c Informal gatherings and meeting should be arranged frequently to foster team spirit as
well as employee engagement so as to lessen their stress and improve the employee
morale.
$c Further improvement in HR activities should be done to recruit and retain talent through
proper career planning, succession planning and leadership development measures.
$c Periodic meetings with different departments should be arranged regularly to discuss HR
issues.
$c There is a scope for improvement in the area of Workers¶ training. There should be a
proper system for training need identification to find out the areas in which employees
need to enhance their knowledge and skills to perform their jobs more effectively and for
their professional growth. Provision of training, development and educational faculties
can be improved and enhanced.
$c Career development plan should be prepared for the employees providing clear picture of
one¶s growth opportunities with respect to time in the organization.
$c Performance appraisals, recruitment and training need identification could also be made
on the basis of competencies.
$c HR department should increase its shop floor presence to understand the business
priorities and needs of each department so that they can add the value more effectively.
$c There should be a proper system for training need identification to find out the areas in
which employees need to enhance their knowledge and skills to perform their jobs more
effectively and for their professional growth.
$c Training programs should be conducted on the topics such as Process ownership,
Leadership, Team work for workers to enhance productivity
$c Creative methods like Group work and role play could be used in such training programs
$c Self managing groups could be created at plant level to foster team spirit, improve
performance and develop competitiveness

c
c
REFERENCES

Books:

I.c Agarwal .R.D.(Y78),   ?        Tata McGraw
Hill, New Delhi.
II.c Armstrong, M and Baron, a. (2002) strategic HRM: the key to improved business
performance. Developing practice. London: chartered institute of personnel and
development
III.c Aswathappa.K. (200 ),  ?    Tata McGraw Hill,
New Delhi.
IV.c Flippo.E.B.(Y88) ?  ?   , Vth Ed. McGraw Hill Pub.
V.c Gokhale.S.K. (Y8Y), ?         r 
  Susheel
Prakashan, Pune.
VI.c Kothari C.R. (2004)      P , New Age International
Pub.
Artic es:

I.c Dileep Kumar M., Strategic Human Resource Management (SHRM): An Over View
GG.c Rob Willock , Time for HR to reflect on its image problem,

URLs Visited:

I.c http://www.citehr.com/3037-personnel-administration.html
II.c http://www.coo avenues.com/know/hr/sumanth_2.php
III.c http://industria re ations.naukrihub.com/emp oee-we fare.htm
IV.c http://www.rtdonline.com/BMA/GM/Y.html
V.c http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corporate_training
VI.c http://www.humanresourcesmagazine.com.au/artic es
VII.c http://www. ahri.com.au
VIII.c http://www. personneltoday.com
IX.c www.humanresourcesmagazine.com

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