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“A STUDY OF BRAND AWARENESS ABOUT DEEPAK

FERTILIZERS (SELECTED PRODUCTS)”


A PROJECT REPORT SUBMITTED

TO

SWAMI TIAMANAND TEERTH MARATHWADA UNIVERSITY, NANDED

FOR THE DEGREE OF

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

UNDER THE FACULTY OF MANAGEMENT SCIENCE

BY

Mr. Sushant V. Madane

UNDER THE GUIDENCE OF

Prof.Pramod. Patil.Sir

SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT,

SWAMI TIAMANAND TEERTH MARATHWADA UNIVERSITY, SUB-CENTRE LATUR

1
APRIL -2011

Swami Ramanand Teerth Marathawada


University, Nanded.
School Of Management Sub-Centre, Latur

CERTIFICATE

This is to certify that Mr. . Sushant V. Madane, a bonafied student of Master


of Business Administration (Marketing) of the Swami Ramanand Teerth
Marathwada University Nanded, conducted by our institute (School of
Management, Sub Centre Latur) has completed the project titled as

“A STUDY OF BRAND AWARENESS ABOUT DEEPAK FERTILIZERS (SELECTED


PRODUCTS)”

This project is accomplished adequately and submitted in partial fulfillment of


Master of Business Administration curriculum as per the rule of S.R.T. M.
University Nanded for batch of 2010-2011.

(Prof.P.H. Patil) (Dr. S.V. Mane) (Dr. D.N. Mishra)


Project guide Director Director
School of Management Sub Centre,Latur

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“DEDICATED TO MY PARENTS”

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DECLARATION

I hereby declare that the thesis entitle “A STUDY OF BRAND AWARENESS ABOUT DEEPAK
FERTILIZERS (SELECTED PRODUCTS)”

Completed written by me has not previously formed the basis for the award of any degree or diploma or
other similar title of this or any other University or examining body.

Place:

Date: Sushant V.Madane

(Research Student)

4
CERTIFICATE

This is to certify that the thesis entitled “A STUDY OF BRAND AWARENESS ABOUT DEEPAK
FERTILIZERS (SELECTED PRODUCTS)”

Which is being submitted here with for the award of the degree of Master of Business Administration
of Swami Ramanand Teerth Marathwada University, Nanded.

The result of original research work completed by Mr. Sushant V.Madane under my supervision and
guidance and to the best of my knowledge and belief, the work embodied in this report has not formed
earlier on the basis for the award of any degree or similar title of this or any other University or
examining body.

Place:

Date: Prof.. P.H.Patil

(Research Guide)

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GRATITUDE

Several persons have contributed to make this research work an accomplished fact to which I remain
indebted I wish to record my sincere thanks to all of them, who has given me constant strength by their
heavenly blessings throughout my life.

Sushant V.Madane

(Research Student)

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Sr. No CONTENTS Page
No.

1 CHAPTER: I Research Methodology


1.1Introduction to study 1

1.2Importance of study
4
1.3 Statement of problem

5
1.4Objective of study

5
1.5Methodology adopted-

1.6Tools of data collection 6

1.7Scope of the study 10

1.7 Limitations of the study 12

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2 CHAPTER: II Theoretical Frame Work 14

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3 CHPPTER: III Organizational Profile 27

4 CHAPTER: IV 40
Data Presentation, Analysis & Interpretation

5 CHAPTER: V Finding & Suggestion 60

Reference 62

CHAPTER:1 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY


1.1 INTRODUCTION TO SELECTED PROJECT TITLE:
Presently agriculture land is getting spoiled with the excess use of chemical fertilizers. The
chemical fertilizers give quick result and increase the yield. That’s why the farmer are using
chemical fertilizer as more quantity as compared to organic fertilizer. hence reducing the excess
use of chemical fertilizer, the govt. taking measures for reducing production of chemical
fertilizers. The solution for this was that the government has ordered these companies to produce
at least 5% of organic fertilizers and thus increase this rate by 5% every year. considering this
solution the use of chemical fertilizers will get totally reduced and hence the organic fertilizer
market shall be captured.

Fertilizer can be described as any substance, organic or inorganic, natural or artificial, which
supplies one or more of the chemical elements required for plant growth. According to experts
sixteen elements are identified as essential elements for plant growth, of which nine are needed
in larger quantities and seven elements are required in smaller quantities.

Carbon, oxygen and hydrogen are directly supplied by air and water and therefore not treated as
nutrients by the fertilizer industry.

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Indian Fertilizer Industry
Indian Fertilizer industry is one of the vital industries for the Indian economy, since it
manufacturers a very critical raw material for agriculture. The fertilizer industry especially the
ammonia urea plants are energy demanding in their operation.

The main objective of the fertilizer industry is to ensure the supply of primary and secondary
nutrients in the required quantities.

The fertilizer industry in India has performed a vital role in enabling the necessary increase in
the use of plant nutrients for achieving the objectives of self sufficiency in food grains
production and accelerated and continuous agricultural growth.

The fertilizer industry which is one of the most energy intensive sectors is very important from
the context of environmental discussions. Due importance to increasing productivity through the
implementation of competent and pollution free technologies in the manufacturing sector would
be most desirable in combining economic, environmental and social development objectives.

Pre Liberalization
In India the per hectare consumption of fertilizer in 1950-51 was less than 1/4th of the global
average. Production was by and large in the purview of public sector and co operative sector.

In 1977 the government introduced the Retention Price Scheme (RPS) with the goals of
providing fertilizers to farmers at reasonable rates without affecting the profitability of the
manufacturers. Under this policy the government would pay the manufacturers, the difference
between the administered price (sale price) and the retention price (cost of production).

Over and above the retention price subsidy, the equated freight subsidy was introduced to enable
the manufacturers to cover the cost of transportation.

Post Liberalization
The policy of economic liberalization has its effect on the fertilizer industry too. The government
in a move aimed at reducing subsidy, decontrolled all the phosphatic and potassic fertilizers in
1992.This strained the ratio of fertilizer utilization. With this policy of liberalization, the
retention pricing scheme (RPS) which had been introduced in 1977, got confined only to urea.

Post liberalization, the government strategized a long term fertilizer policy to be completed in
three different phase, beginning in 2000-01 and ending in 2006-2007.

Phase 1: 2000-01 and 2001-02


• Evaluate existing capacity.
• Increase in urea prices from time to time.
• Evaluate the possibility of a coal based expertise.
• Promote joint ventures.

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• Finalize policy on fertilizer pricing and capacity enhancement.
• Eliminate distribution controls on urea and augment concession scheme to bio fertilizers.
Phase II (2002-03-2003-04)
• Finalize decision on feedback.
• Long term strategy of increased capacity.
• Decide on extent of protection to local industry.
• Eliminate MRP and encourage productive investment.
• Reorganize the association between the industry and farmers.
• Judicious utilization of fertilizer and greater emphasis on eco friendly fertilizer.
• Establish Fertilizer Policy Planning Board.
Phase III (2004-05-2006-07)
• Removal of MRP
• Define government's role in decontrol setup and with respect to policy relating to LNG.
W T O Implications
• The restriction on quantity of fertilizers to be imported has been eliminated from April 1,
2001.The proposed plan to establish a tariff rate quota (TRQ) for the import of urea has
been deferred.
• The Government has planned to impose a higher tariff of 150-200 per cent on imported
urea in future. This would lead to increase in prices of imported urea and be detrimental
to the demand supply gap which is likely augment in future.
Future Trends
• India's demand for fertilizers in 2007-08 was 26 MM tons, which went up to 29 MM tons
in 2008-09 against a supply of 20 MM tons in 2008-2009.
• The demand for fertilizers in 2011-12 is forecasted to be around 35.5 MM tons.
• More fertilizer projects are in the pipeline.
• Gujarat is expected to play a leading role in fertilizer production.
• Indian companies have penetrated the overseas market, signaling a new phase for the
industry.

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1.2 IMPORTANCE OF THE STUDY:

The company always suggest to farmer to using organic fertilizers, pesticides, growth
regulator for various plants. It is very important because without using organic plant
product we are not achieve “Green Earth” means our traditional bio-diversity. If we want
to keep balance in environment then we force on using organic plant growth product.
Some are reason why company need to study. Now company want to launch new product
which cure 90% soil problems generally known as Magsulf.

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1.3SATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM:

The DEEPAK Fertiliser Company want the launch new product in market. product of this
company is organic, which is the non poisonous in nature. This product is All in one
Magsulf (Magsulf) which is want company launch newley thats why company did this
Consumer awareness to know the feedback of the farmers.

1.4 Research objectives


1). To make awareness amongst the farmers about new Magsulf (Magnesium)
2) To find out interest of farmer in compost manure and make them aware.
3) To find out use of organic manure in farm and make aware to farmers about that..

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4) To understand various problem in soil which presently use for growing plant and which
solution use by farmer to overcome that problem.
5)To find out the interest level of farmer in non poisonous material and make them aware.

1.5 METHODOLOGY ADOPTED:


Research is a scientific and systematic search for pertinent information on a specific topic and
Research methodology is to systematically solve the research problem. It may be understood as
science of studying how research is done. In it one studies the various steps that are generally
adopted by a researcher in studying his research problem along with the logic behind it. It shows
the type of sample design used and the size of the producer has used to draw the sample.

Research Process:-

Chart No. 2
PROBLEM IDENTIFICATION

RESEARCH DESIGN

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DEFINE RESEARCH OBJECTIVES

SOURCES OF DATA

PRIMARY DATA SECONDARY DATA

DATA COLLECTION

DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

FINDINGS

SUGGESTIONS AND RECOMENDATIONS

Research Design

Types of Research Designs used for the study:-

Research design for survey of Magsulf

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Descriptive Research : - Descriptive study could be taken up are when researcher is interested
in knowing the proportion of people in a given population who have behaved in a particular
manner, making projections of a certain thing; or determining the relationship between two or
more variables. The objective of such a study is to answer the “who, what, when, where and
how” of the subject under investigation. For instance, in rural region, people given answer on
basis of how much they would like to buy “All In One ’’ Magsulf.
Sample design

Research plan in Band Distribution:-


Step – I Defining the problem & Research objectives:-
Market research for Magsulf was done for find out market potential to new launching product as
well as farmer expectation about company new product. Main objective was carried out to study
the how people response in future when company launch newly innovative Magsulf in market.
Many farmer use chemical plant products which never result oriented while company’s product
show good result on same field.
Step – II – Developing Research Plan:-
In order to find out solution on that objective as questionnaire format made by company and
given to me. That questionnaire format
Mainly concentrated on general prediction about new launching product.
With future aspect about new product, company also want to know a current expectation of
customer about exiting company’s various products.
Step- III – Collecting the Information:-
The market survey was conducted by dividing LATUR into 10 different areas. Researchers were
assigned routes in their respective by pomogranate and grape production area.
Step IV – Analyzing the information –Information gathered from asking question to farmer
according to questionnaire format. On that format we can analysis actually what are expectation
of people has about our product.
Step V. Presentation of information:-

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From the above study a brief report was prepared consisting of the analysis of the gathered data,
data interpretation along with suggestions and recommendation for solving the above stated
problem

Sample size – 100

Sample Frame – Farmer from LATUR TAL. IN LATUR DISTRICT mainly producing
POMENGRANATE AND GRAPE

Sampling method
Systematic Sampling method: - The entire LATUR TAL was divided into a cluster of
geographical regions which produce POMENGRANATE AND GRAPE. From the Sysematic
was further interview was taken randomly from that village .

Method of Data Collection –


Data collected from the farmer by personal contact by using the structured and questionary data
Instrument for data collection:-
A structured questionnaire was prepared with both closed ended multiple choice questions and
open ended questions for suggestions.

1.6 TOOLS OF DATA COLLECTION:


Primary Data
The data is original in nature and it is collected at first time for a specific purpose is called as
‘Primary Data’.
Primary Data for Market Survey is as follows:-
TABLE NO.2.1

Total No. of farmer visited 100


villages Covered 09

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Routes covered are as follows: -

Sr no No of
TABLE NO.2.2
Village sample
1 10
Bablgaon
2 16
Khadgaon
3 08
Pakarsangvi
4 07
Peth
5 18
Chandeswaar
6 14
Wasangaon
7 10
Gangakhed
8 11
Fultapur
9 06
Bhatkheda
100
TOTAL

Secondary Data
Secondary Data was collected form books and the internet website mentioned below in
bibliography. I will also take the help of senior manager to get some technical information.

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Actual Field work to be done
The actual field Work was divided into two major parts:-.
➢ 60 Days survey was carried out in LATUR TAL. IN LATUR DISTRICT. The farmer of
POMENGRANATE AND GRAPE.
➢ The farmers in that particular village is visited personally and giving them information
about the product .

➢ And also try to helps to solve the other problems of the fermer also.

1.7 SCOPE OF THE STUDY:


The scope of study is very restricted. Company new in area that’s why company have need to
knowing about various factors which directly affect to company’s product sales. Some are
factors described as following –

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Consumer Satisfaction: - By studying Latur area Market Company can know consumer
expectation towards the company products and can make a product which is alternative to
chemical pesticide and fertilizer.
Promotion: - by the Consumr awareness company can know where is the need of promotion
activity and can increase their sale.
Distribution Network and Supply: - Consumer awareness gives brief idea about the demand in
market of the particular product and accordingly company can make stronger distribution
network. Because there is more potential for company to grow their business in Latur area.
Market Share: - company can know there product position in the market.
Major Competitors: - by the Consumer awareness company can know the major competitor in
the market for their products.

1.8 Limitations of study :-


1) The time constraint was a major limitation to the study.

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2)The information collected solely depends upon the respondents answers and accuracy of
information could vary.
3)Getting actual information from the respondents was difficult.
4)According to the sample size, the findings might only be suggestive and not conclusive.

CHAPTER 2 THEROTICAL FRAMEWOK:

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Introduction To Consumer awareness
THE PROCESS of development along with the expanding globalisation and liberalisation
process has increased the number of consumer related issues. Consumer protection has earned an
important place in the political, economic and social agendas of many nations. In India, the
Government has taken many steps including legislative, to protect consumers.
Education is a life long process of constantly acquiring relevant information, knowledge and
skills. Consumer education is an important part of this process and is a basic consumer right that
must be introduced at the school level. Consumers by definition include all citizens who are, by
and large the biggest group, who are affected by almost all government, public or private
decisions. The most important step in consumer education is awareness of consumer rights.
However, consumer education is incomplete without the responsibilities and duties of
consumers, and this influences individual behaviour to a great extent.

Definition
Consumer awareness is making the consumer aware of His/Her rights.
Consumer awareness it a marketing term. It means that consumers note or are aware of products

Need Of Consumer awareness


we need it so we will not be misled by producers,it explains if what we buy is worth to our
money..and not harmful to us and to environment .

Many people are ignorant of their rights to get protected against the exploitation by so many
others. So when there is a forum for such redress of grievances there seems to be no such
exploitation by many; and becomes a rare one. So in order to get a clear picture of the level of
exploitation of consumers, the awareness is required.

Awareness means having knowledge or perception of a situation or fact (Oxford


Dictionary of English). Hence awareness is a relative concept and comprises
perception and cognitive reactions to a condition or event. The level of awareness

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can be categorized in; (1) partially aware, (2) subconsciously aware, and (3) acutely
aware. Consequently, awareness does not equal understanding, it is the state of being
Awareness within brand management refers to the perception of a brand in the mind
of the stakeholders. Awareness reflects earlier experiences and affects future
perceptions, attitude and behaviour. Accordingly awareness fulfils an important role
within brand equity as demonstrated in brand models of Kapferer (figure 20), Aaker
(figure 21), and Keller (figure 23). Aaker argues that brand awareness reflects the
knowledge and salience of a brand - the capacity to recognize - in the mind of
customers. The level of brand awareness is heavily affected by the synergy of the
brand name itself and the attached symbols, imagery and a brand slogan within the
given condition (Aaker, 1996:330-331).
Aaker defines three levels of brand awareness (Aaker, 1996:10-13):
1. Brand recognition.
• Recognition reflects familiarity and linking acquired from past exposure.
Remembering as such, one brand among others is a manner of aided recall.
2. Brand recall.
• Recall reflects awareness of a brand when it comes in mind as soon as its product
class is mentioned. A manner of unaided recall.
3. Top of mind.
• The highest awareness level, the brand dominates the mind and pops up as first
when ever applicable.
Kapferer distinguishes the same order of brand awareness. On top of that Kapferer
argues that each level of awareness has its own purpose and implications (Kapferer,
2007:159-160):
1. Aided awareness.
• The purpose of aided awareness is to reassure the brand. Aided awareness helps
the brand to get out of the anonymity. In B2B, salespeople can benefit by advert to
it. The importance of aided awareness is at the point of purchase.

2. Unaided awareness.
• The purpose of unaided awareness is to position the brand on the immediate
memory shortlist of brands. This is important in the decision process where the
first shortlist is based on immediate memory before the brands are examined in
dept.
3. Top of mind.

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• The purpose of top of mind is to position the brand as the preferred brand in the
mind of consumers. This is crucial under the circumstances where buyers have to
make a decision without having a selection process and/or have a low
involvement.
The specific activities to increase or to transit of each level of awareness, depends
on; the purchase cycle, on the decision making process, and on the level of
involvement. Awareness comes from customers who feel them self attracted and
interested to the brand, is not just a matter of high pressure advertising. It's all about
managing selective perceptions, exposure, attention and memory (Kapferer,
2007:159-160). Brand recognition (aided awareness) and brand recall (unaided
awareness) are both very important and need to be in balance to take full advantage
of brand awareness. The relative power of recall against recognition is shown in the
Graveyard model as developed by Young and Rubicam Europe as quoted in Aaker
(Aaker, 1996:11-15). See figure 19.

Figure 19. The Graveyard model, as quoted in Aaker (Aaker, 1996:15).

Brands in a product class tend to follow the curved line as plotted - recognition
(aided) versus recall (unaided). There are two exceptions of the rule; both exceptions
will demonstrate the importance of recall. The first exception is related to healthy
niche brands which are positioned below the curved line. Although the brand is not
widely known (low overall recognition) it has a high recall among their loyal
customer group. Low recognition under these circumstances is not related to poor
performance. The second exception is situated in the left top corner, the graveyard
area where brands have a high mass recognition against a low recall. Brands in this
position are in deep trouble, the reason behind this has to do with the mindset. As

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described mind are limited, new additional information will not come through if it
doesn't match the current mindset. In the graveyard zone, minds are set. It is not
necessarily the result of a strong brand and/or marketing campaign. The most
challenging is to create willingness among customers and prospects in listening to
new brand story due to the brand familiarity (Aaker, 1996:11-15).
Keller also distinguishes brand recognition and brand recall performance within
brand awareness. Keller argues that most information in memory is substantially
more adapt at recognizing a brand then at recalling it. This is also shown by the
curved line in figure 19. The benefits of having a high level of brand awareness is
three folded, brand awareness delivers:
1. The learning advantage: the higher the level of awareness the easier people
learn about the brand and the better the brand is registered in the mind.
2. The brand as part of the consideration set.
3. The choice advantage within low-involvement purchase decisions in case of
a lack of purchase motivation and/or ability.

Actual theory about the product used for consumer awareness

1.Product:

B)Magsulf (Magnesium)

This is the one of the mixed fertilizer used as a Magsulf and named as a Magsulf. Magnesium

• Vital for good crop establishment


• Deficiency symptoms...
1. Alternate green and pale yellow bands along leaves
2. Older leaves affected first
3. Leaves dieback prematurely

Ca in Magsulf:multiply cell division in the crops.role as a catalyst in crops for maximum


uptakeof NPK

Mg in Magsulf: Plays important role in photosynthesis & chlorophylln pigment.

S in Magsulf: Maintain respiration activity in the crops. Increases the diseases resistance power
in the crops. 20-30% growth in the crop yield, oil content

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B) Speed

Wonder SPEEDis an innovation in Bio-fertilizer techniques. A unique Bio-fertilizer produced by


mixing vegetative origin products in a scientifically controlled environment to give the optimum
output. Wonder SPEEDis a vegetable origin seaweed based product intended for direct seed
application and for root dipping in transplanted crops / cutting.

c) Splender

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Splendor is a blend of high potent oils of proven medicinal herbs and has strong larvicidal
properties. Splender has Stomach. Contact and systemic kind of mode of actions and hence it is
considered to very powerful larvicide. Splender acts as Antifeedant, Growth inhibitor,
Oviposition deterrent, and Repellent.

2. The pest
. There generally exists an uneasy truce between the insects pests and man , and this is termed
as 'balance in nature'. This balance is the result of two opposing phenomena, the 'biotic
potential',i.e.,the tremendous capacity of insects to reproduce and multiply and the environment
resistance which keeps their numbers under check. The environment resistance results in the
death of adults before oviposition, in the mortality of eggs, larvae or pupae of the insects because
of desiccation, starvation, parasites, predators, diseases and other adverse environmental
conditions. Even any slight slakening of any of the processes of 'environment resistance' results
in a population explosion of an insect species and the consequent epidemic.

The change in 'environment resistance' may take place owing to a number of causes, either
natural of operated by different agencies. Man is perhaps the single most important agent, who
has, from time to time, disturbed the 'balance of nature' and this has caused numerous pest

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problems and pest epidemics. The nature too, plays an important role in causing pest epidemics.
Favourable conditions which reduce the natural mortality and bring down the rapid development
of the insect coupled with the conditions.

PRINCIPLES OF INSECT-PEST CONTROL:-

• Physical and Mechanical control

This is one of the oldest methods, and has been in use since time immemorial. It includes
measures like, collection of egg masses and other inactive stages, the removal of infested parts or
whole plants, the beating of drums or tins or trenching.

• Cultural control

This is a preventive method which is inexpensive and may prove more efffective and efficient, if
employed after acquiring a through knowledge of the life history and habits of a pest. Deep
ploughing after harvesting the crop ( to expose the hiding and resting insects), the removing and
destroying of the suitable and other trash, adjusting the time of sowing (toavoid the peak
incidence period), clean cultivation, the removal of alternative wild hosts, catch crops & suitable
rotations are some of the important measures included under this method of control.

• Biological control

Practically every crops pest has its natural enemies in the form of parasites, predators and disese
causing organisms. The biological control involves a large scale multiplication of and liberation
of such agents, or creating conditions under which the naturally occuring agents can act
effectively. This type of control cannot be undertaken by individual farmers and has necessarilt
to be carried out by specialised agencies.

• Chemical control

After the discovery of the insectisides properties of DDT in 1939 by Paul Muller, the chemical
control of insects has become most popular. As a matter of fact, the method has become so
popular that most of the cultivators and extension workers speak only about insecticides,
whenever the question of insect control is raised. The main reason for its popularity is the
spectacular and immediate results obtained by the ude of such chemicals.

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.

3. INSECTICIDES

The concept of using chemicals for controlling insect pests is not new ; however, its importance
and popularity increased only after the discovery of the insecticidal properties of DDT.
Originally, these chemicals were classified on the basis of their mode of entry in the bodies of
insects,viz. stomach poisons, contact poisons and fumigants. However, this classification has
become outdated, because most of the synthetic organic insecticides act both as stomach and
contact poisons and some have also the added fumigant action. At present the generally
acceptable classification is based on the chemical nature of the insecticides.

BHC, DDT, Malathion, Parathion (Methyl), Toxaphene, Pyrethrum extract, Nicotine sulphate,
Fenitrothion, Methyl-demeton, Phosphamidon and Dimethoate

4. DISEASES MANAGMENT
The best way to control diseases is to exclude them from the area of sphere in which
the host plants are being known. This method of exclusion enforced through certain legal
measures is commonly known as quarantine. In India, Destructive Insects & Pests Act, was
enacted in 1914. Directorate of Plant Protection & Quarantine was established in Delhi.

Quarantine stations have been established in airports, seaports & selected railway stations. Plants
& Plant Products to pass through these quarantines should be accompanied by a phytosanitary
certificate, as per international convention, issued by the competent authority of the exporting
country.

To export the plants & plant Products from India, State Plant Pathologists have been empowered
to issue phytosanitary certificates. Some of the plant materials have been totally banned for
import into India irrespective of any certificate. Potatoes can not be imported to India from any
wart disease and/ or golden nematode infested areas. Unginned cotton can not be imported.
Sugarcane cuttings from Australia, Fiji & Philippines cannot be imported. Import of cocoa from
Africa & Sri Lanka is totally banned. Rubber plant & seeds from South America & West Indies

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& Sunflower seeds from Argentina & Peru are totally banned. Within India, Domestic
quarantines have also been established.

6. DIFFERENT SOIL NUTRIENTS

Macronutrients

Macronutrients can be broken into two more groups:


primary and secondary nutrients.

The primary nutrients are nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K). These major
nutrients usually are lacking from the soil first because plants use large amounts for their growth
and survival.

The secondary nutrients are calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), and sulfur (S). There are usually
enough of these nutrients in the soil so fertilization is not always needed. Also, large amounts of
Calcium and Magnesium are added when lime is applied to acidic soils. Sulfur is usually found
in sufficient amounts from the slow decomposition of soil organic matter, an important reason
for not throwing out grass clippings and leaves.

Micronutrients

Micronutrients are those elements essential for plant growth which are needed in only very
small (micro) quantities . These elements are sometimes called minor elements or trace elements,
but use of the term micronutrient is encouraged by the American Society of Agronomy and the
Soil Science Society of America. The micronutrients are boron (B), copper (Cu), iron (Fe),
chloride (Cl), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo) and zinc (Zn). Recycling organic matter
such as grass clippings and tree leaves is an excellent way of providing micronutrients (as well
as macronutrients) to growing plants.

7. Organic fertilizers

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1.Cottonseed Meal - Cottonseed meal is one common organic fertilizer. It is a byproduct of the
cotton manufacturing process. It is great for acid-loving plants, because it has an acidic reaction
in the soil. It generally contains about 7% nitrogen, 3% phosphorous, and 2% potash. Cottonseed
meal is usually used for flowering plants like azaleas and rhododendrons.

2.Fish Emulsion - Fish emulsion is a very popular organic fertilizer. It is made of a blend of
decomposed fish. It is a high-nitrogen fertilizer, and also contains a lot of trace elements than can
be very beneficial for plants. Fish emulsion is a nice, balanced fertilizer.

3.Blood Meal - Blood meal is the blood of cattle that is collected from slaughterhouses and then
dried and powdered. It is high in nitrogen, and care must be taken to ensure it does not burn
plants. You should be very careful not to exceed the recommended dose, because this could
really harm your plants. Blood meal is also high in several trace elements like iron.

4.Seaweed Fertilizer - Seaweed fertilizer in the form of a seaweed tea is often used by organic
gardeners. Dried seaweed is added to water and steeped like tea, then applied to plants like other
liquid fertilizers. This can be a very good fertilizer, and will not burn plants. It is very high in
nutrients. Use a dried seaweed, and be sure it is not roasted or seasoned.

5. Sewer Sludge - Some people use sewer sludge for their fertilizer. It is made from recycled
material from sewage treatment plants. You can purchase activated sludge, which is higher in
nutrients, and you can buy composted sludge, which is not quite as good. It is generally found in
a granular form.

Retrieved from "http://www.articlesbase.com/gardening-articles/types-of-organic-fertilizers-and-


compost-469543.html"

8. WEED

• Any plant that crowds out cultivated plants

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• A weed in a general sense is a plant that is considered by the user of the term to be a
nuisance, and normally applied to unwanted plants in human-made settings such as
gardens, lawns or agricultural areas, but also in parks, woods and other natural areas. ...
den.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weed

• Any plant growing in cultivated ground to the injury of the crop or desired vegetation, or
to the disfigurement of the place; an unsightly, useless, or injurious plant; A species of
plant considered harmful to the environment or regarded as a nuisance; Short for
duckweed; Marijuana; Tobacco

Different Types of Weed and Their Effects


Marijuana grown in different parts of the world will differ in the potency of its results. The
weather conditions, the soil fertility, the amount of care taken of the plant and many other factors
play a part in deciding how potent a particular plant of marijuana actually is. Learn more about
the side effects of cannabis. Given below is a list of a few of the most well known different types
of weed plants and different types of weed names.

• Afghani: This is considered to be one of the best out of the many different types of weed
joints.

• Kush: This plant is thought by many to be the best version of weed. This is an excellent
plant for growing indoors and is known to have a very special taste.

• Northern Lights: This is a great indoor plant and many years of selective breeding have
made it one of the most potent versions of the indica strain.

• White Widow: This is also a very popular choice and is an indica strain said to possess a
very 'skunky' taste. Many believe that this is the strongest form of weed in the world. The
high is said to be extreme, and the taste is believed to be divine.

• Shiva: The name for this plant is derived from the Hindu God of Transformation. Like
other indica strains, this plant remains small in height and does not get very bushy.

31
• Haze: Haze is the original sativa plant from Jamaica, and as is common with all sativa
plants, it grows very tall and gets very bushy. The seeds of this plant are very small, but
very potent at the same time.

9. PLANT PATHOGENS.
Disease Agents

• Bacteria: These single cell organisms absorb the nutrition from their host plant and thrive
by killing the plant and living off of their decomposing organic matter. This is often
described as a saprophytic relationship. Bacterial pathogens cause blights, rots, and wilts.

• Fungi: Fungal pathogens are spread by many different environmental conditions such as
wind water, seeds, human and other non-human vectors. (A vector is a host capable of
transferring a particular pathogen.) Fungi that are capable of regenerating spores during
the growing season and re-infecting plants are known as polycyclic. Fungi that must wait
for next season are monocyclic.

• Viruses: Viruses are pieces of genetic material (RNA/DNA) and disturb the plants by
mimicking naturally occurring genetic abnormalities. There are more than 700 plant
viruses known. Viruses can be spread by tractors or equipment, tainted seed, or by a
traveling vector.

• Nematodes: Nematodes are both a pathogen and a vector. Nematodes are microscopic
worms and are one of the most abundant phyla with over 20,000 different species. A
nematode either infects a plant by injecting a needle like mouth into the plant or it
actually enters the plant with its entire body. The nematode's saliva is the infecting agent
and disturbs the metabolic process of the plant and causes disease and death.

32
CHAPTER :3 ORGNISARIONAL PROFILE:

Introduction to the organization

OVERVIEW
The genesis of Deepak FERTILIZERS And Petrochemicals Corporation could be said to be in
the year 1970 when Mr. C. K. Mehta set up Deepak Nitrite Ltd, combining his skills in trading
and manufacturing. DNL grew by leaps and bounds, surpassing expectations of all investors and
also won many prestigious awards like the Sir P.C.Ray award, for being the best Chemical

33
Industrial unit in India.
In 1983, Deepak FERTILIZERS and Petrochemicals Corporation Limited (DFPCL)
started commercial production of ammonia (in technical collaboration with Fish International
Engineers (USA) using natural gas as feedstock. This marked the fulfillment of a need for lateral
integration into the world of basic building block chemicals, premium FERTILIZERS and
petrochemicals. At the time, this was India's only merchant ammonia manufacturer. The
International Finance Corporation initially supported this venture of Deepak group in the form of
equity participation in DFPCL.
The company undertook major expansion and diversification in 1989 to achieve forward
integration of ammonia and diversification in Methanol.
In July 1992, DFPCL commenced commercial production of Low Density Ammonium
Nitrate (LDAN), Nitro Phosphate (NP), Dilute Nitric Acid (DNA), and Concentrated Nitric Acid
(CNA).
This has resulted in a multi-product portfolio for DFPCL consisting of chemicals,
petrochemicals, FERTILIZERS and other agri-inputs. To ensure an uninterrupted supply of
natural gas to its plant, DFPCL laid its own 43 km gas pipeline from the coastal fall point of
Bombay High to its plants in Tajola, thus becoming one of the first companies in India to have
its own gas pipeline.
The Company has now diversified into specialty retailing with Ishanya, India’s largest
Design Centre and Specialty Mall for interiors and exteriors. This 5,50,000 sq.ft. project is
located near the hear of Pune and is home to 52 product and service categories in interiors and
exteriors.
DFPCL has a chemical storage terminal at Jawarharlal Nehru Port Trust (JNPT) to
provide support to its logistics management system and ensure a window to the world trade in
chemicals. It is in the process of adding new storage facilities for Ammonia, Methanol and other
products. The company also leases port storage capacities at Bombay Port Trust and
Vishakhapatnam.
DFPCL's business can be broadly categorised into : -
1. Chemicals
2. Agribusiness
3. Specialty Retailing
Chemicals: This division of DFPCL manufactures Methanol, various grades of Nitric
Acid and Ammonia. DFPCL is one of the largest producers of Methanol in India, which in turn
is used to manufacture drugs, pharmaceuticals, DMT, pesticides, methylamines, formaldehyde,
etc. DFPCL is also one of the largest manufactures various concentrations of Nitric Acid (60%,
68%, 72% and 98%). Ammonium Nitrate: The explosives division manufactures Low Density
Ammonium Nitrate, which is used for making Ammonium Nitrate-fuel oil (ANFO), blasting
agents and also emulsified ANFO (HANFO). DFPCL is the largest manufacturer of ammonium
nitrate in India (capacity expanded to 100.000 tpa in September 2002), and the only one making
prilled Ammonium Nitrate (AN). Their products are used for open cast mining, underground
metalliferrous mining and construction Industry...

34
(See presentation on Chemicals related products of DFPCL)
Agribusiness: This division of DFPCL manufactures 23:23:0 prilled Nitrophosphate fertiliser
under the brand name Mahadhan. DFPCL markets
Mahadhan through a network of over 1000 dealers. Thanks to the company's rigorous adherence
to quality, Mahadhan is one of most widely accepted fertilizer brands in India...

(See presentation on Agriculture related products of DFPCL)


Specialty Retailing:
Ishanya: Ishanya is India's first International Design Centre and Specialty Mall - a centre for
excellence in space design and the one-stop shop for interior and exterior products.
• For architects and interior designers, Ishanya is a platform to showcase their art, craft
and vision to a targeted and discerning audience.
• For manufacturers and retailers of interior and exterior products, it's the perfect
marketplace to make the most of India's real estate and construction boom. For
homeowners, corporate shoppers and visitors, Ishanya will provide the ultimate
experience in shopping for the home.
Social Responsibilities: The Company has been contributing towards social causes for nearly
two decades. The Deepak Charitable Trust (DCT) and the Deepak Medical Foundation (DMF)
with the support of DFPCL and Deepak Nitrite Limited are carrying on development activities
for society.
DCT has been actively working in the area of mother and childcare. Through an integrated
network of women health workers the foundation has been imparting training and
communication on health care. Extending the activities on both sides, the Foundation has
catalyzed and supported the creation of Aanganwadis, and taken education to youth on family
planning. The Foundation is now working to curtail the spread of HIV / AIDS.
DFPCL takes an active interest in environmental protection. In addition to regulatory
requirements of the State Pollution Boards and Federation of Indian Industries, care is taken to
reduce pollution by incorporation of appropriate effluent handling disposal systems.
Ishanya Foundation
The Ishanya Foundation is focused on ‘Women Empowerment’, ‘Education’ and ‘Health’. As its
maiden project, the foundation started a Diabetic Centre at the Jehangir hospital, Pune. The
Ishanya Foundation Diabetic Centre is equipped with advanced machines like Biothesiometer,
Hand Doppler, and the RS Scan (foot mapping machine). The centre offers a preventive, curative
and research effort on diabetes. In its outreach programmed, a number of diabetic camps and
cataract operations were conducted free of cost for the needy.
The Ishanya Foundation serves 27 villages around Taloja by offering free OPD check-up by a
team of doctors, trained medical and paramedical staff. It has started self help groups to enable
women save money and put it to right use, thereby gaining recognition and respect in the society.
Mobile libraries have been started in three schools in Taloja and joyful activities are carried out
for these children.

35
In our plants we continuously monitor solid, semisolid and gaseous affluent discharges to ensure
that they are within allowable limits. We also help other small industries as well as customers in
solving their environment- related problems.
Future Prospects: DFPCL will continue to make deeper inroads into value-added chemicals,
agro inputs and related services and specialty retailing.
• DFPCL plans to leverage its well-knit marketing and distribution network in chemicals
and fertilizer industry to provide value-added services to their customers for sourcing
raw materials and assisting them in exporting their products. The chemical storage and
drumming facilities at Jawaharlal Nehru Port (JNPT) near Bombay will provide further
value-added services.
• We are now executing two projects—an Ammonia storage facility at JNPT and a 300
MTPA AN manufacturing facility at Paradip in Orissa on the East Coast of India
• Deeper in-roads into agro-inputs and services markets are on the drawing board,
including the MAHADHAN Agriculture Research Centre (MARC), which will serve
to partner with farmers, providing education, training and ensuring that they achieve
the best performance. The Mahadhan Saarrthie initiative is being quickly expanded
across Maharashtra.
Dreams of visionary minds and planned strategy by professional managers will give shape to an
exciting future at DFPCL

VISION & VALUES

Vision
To develop a fast growing DFPCL with sustained returns to stakeholders

Values
We Care: Caring for the company, colleagues, customers, family, society, environment, health
and above all spirituality
Respect for individuals: Listening to others views and respecting cultural diversity,
understanding the need for growth and appreciation
Team Work: Working together, being accessible, collaborating and sharing our views and in the
process moving forward and achieving togethe
Philosophy

36
C. K. Mehta
Chairman
A few thoughts...
Openness...
Perseverance...
Belief in the ultimate goodness...
Caring...
As I look back and reflect over the four decades of my association with the enterprising world of
chemicals, these have been the words, which represent the underlying currents of thoughts that
have shaped our words, our actions and ultimately our destiny. Beginning with trading in
chemicals in the late 50's, today the DFPCL Group has a manufacturing base with investments of
about Rs.800 crores (approx. US$ 200 million) in dyes, intermediates, aromatic chemicals,
petrochemicals and FERTILIZERS.
And as we look ahead, with India awakening to its true potential as an integral part of the world
enterprise, at DFPCL we see the future unfolding into many exciting facets, emanating from a
fabric, woven with self reliance, collaborative associations and strategic alliances with the world
beyond the Indian shores. It is in this spirit of openness that I invite you to have a glimpse of
DFPCL's past, and present and share our vision of the future.
Warm Regards,
C. K. Mehta
Chairman

STRENGTHS
Over the years, DFPCL has built up some unique strengths that have allowed it to grow, through
good and bad times.
Operational flexibility
DFPCL has a broad product range and the operational flexibility to optimise its product mix (by
switching between products) depending on market conditions and supply constraints. This is
further enhanced by their port storage infrastructure, pipelines and manufacturing facilities,

37
which allow them to switch between imports and manufacturing, again to maximise variations in
domestic and international prices. These capabilities have provided the company with significant
resilience and stability, despite operating in markets that tend to be cyclical.
Assimilation of the best technology
DFPCL has always sought the best technology and boasts several strong international technology
partners. Equally important, we have been able to absorb the technology for optimal utilisation
and today have some of the best capabilities in the quality production of bulk hydrocarbons and
heavy chemicals.
Our products meet international quality standards and have been well received both in domestic
and global markets. All our plants have been tested for 100% capacity run.
In recognition of our efforts, DFPCL has received several awards, including three awards in
different categories at the 2000 Annual FERTILIZERS Association (FAI) seminar held in New
Delhi (India).
Strong marketing and distribution network
DFPCL has a strong marketing and distribution network for bulk fertilizers and chemicals. We
have a widespread and loyal dealer network, and our presence is very significant in the agri-input
market, especially in some specific areas like Maharashtra, Gujarat, Karnataka and Andhra
Pradesh.
Branding
A multiple set of agricultural products and services (seeds, FERTILIZERS, micronutrients,
testing, advice and education for farmers) are marketed under the umbrella brand
"MAHADHAN". This has enabled strong brand recognition and loyalty, even for the commodity
itesm in the portfolio of products/services. DPCL has strong brands in Ammonium Nitrate viz.
Optimex, Optispan and Optiform.
Import logistics
DFPCL has invested resources in building capabilities for trading and handling bulk imports and
exports of hazardous items. We have been able to develop import sources and develop a robust
logistic management system by leasing the necessary infrastructure - Port storage capacities at
Bombay Port Trust and Vishakhapatnam.
Capability in handling hazardous chemicals
DFPCL has capabilities for handling and movement of hazardous, toxic and inflammable
chemicals. A measure of its skill and efforts in maintaining a good record on health and safety, is
the fact that in 2000-2001, the company received the British Safety Council Award for the third
year in a row.
Ability to raise resources
DFPCL has the ability to raise resources from the financial institutions as well as from the
markets, thanks to a relatively strong Balance Sheet and a good track record.
Management resilience
The management of DFPCL has tremendous resilience in adverse external conditions, a trait no
doubt, gained from the chairman of the company. Its mettle was put to the test in 1993, when a
series of disasters (government decontrol of FERTILIZERS, an explosion at the methanol plant)

38
struck the company, which pushed it into the red zone. However, by 1995, through sheer grit and
determination, the company was back in the black! And has never looked back!
Real estate infrastructure to grow capacity
There is real estate infrastructure availability at Taloja as well as at Pune, wherein the company
can add to the business portfolio with lower investment as compared to green field projects.
Locational advantage
DFPCL is in the heart of the chemicals market, Western India. And close to another major
market, South India. Our port facilities at Vishakapatnam also give us further access to markets
in the East and South.

Dun and Bradstreet Award

Dun and Bradstreet Award - DFPCL has been ranked 3rd as per
'Total Income' in the Chemicals sector in Dun & Bradstreet's India's Top
500 Companies 2009.
Forbes Asia's Best Under a Billion

DFPCL in the prestigous Forbes Asia's Best Under a Billion - It is the


only company in the agricultural and chemical sector from India to
have made it to the Forbes magazine's Asia's Best under a billion
list.
US Pharmacopoeia Certification

39
Our Company has received the US Pharmacopoeia certification under the excipient verification
program for its IPA product and enjoys the distinction of being the first company in the world to
have received this certification.

Excellence in Fertiliser Extension Services award

DFPCL selected as a winner for - Excellence in Fertiliser Extension


Services award

Environment, Agriculture and Rural Development Award


This award is for outstanding contribution in the field of:
• Control of air and water pollution in industry
• Rural development for the benefit of the poorer sections of the people
• Agriculture for highest productivity of a crop
The Indian Merchants' Chamber has conferred its 'environment, agriculture and rural
development' award for 2001 to Deepak FERTILIZERS.
The award decided by the trustees of the Chamber's 'diamond jubilee endowment trust', was
given to DFPCL for "its outstanding contribution to promoting the growth of India's rural
economy".
The area of study was - Women's Dairy Co-operative and Self Help Groups (Savings and Credit
Society). Both these rural development programs were recognised. The award ceremony was
organised in Mumbai on 02 May, 2002.
Annual FERTILIZERS Association of India (FAI) Honour
The Fertiliser Association of India awards are given to provide incentives for high quality
fundamental or applied research amongst the Indian scientists in the field of Fertiliser Use
Research.
DFPCL was honoured with three awards, in various categories at the 2000-2001 Annual Seminar
of Fertiliser Association of India, held at Delhi. Shri.S.S.Dhindsa, Union Minister of Chemicals
and FERTILIZERS presented the awards.
1. Shri. T. D. Mathwani, Sr. Vice President received the FAI Award for
Improvement in Overall Performance of the Taloja Plant.

40
2. Shri V. M Deshpande, Vice President, Marketing - Agri Inputs received the FAI
runner up Award for the paper "IT Applications in Fertiliser Marketing".
3. Shri Tushar Mehta, Communication and Publicity Department, won the FAI
runner up award for the video film "Sulphur - the Fourth Nutrient" for its
outstanding research work done on Sulphur as a plant nutrient.
National Safety Council of India Safety Awards - 2000
National Safety Council of India declared DFPCL the winner of the Prashansa Puraskar for
developing and implementing very effective Occupational Safety and Health Management
Systems and Procedures and achieving very good performance.
National Safety Council of India is a member of the Asia-Pacific Occupational Safety and Health
Organization (APOSHO) is an international body composed of non-profit professional
organizations devoted to the prevention of occupational accidents and diseases.

ENVIRONMENT
As part of our commitment to managing a successful chemical business, DFPCL’s philosophy
takes environment conservation and protection seriously. We believe in curtailing the generation
of pollutants to eliminate and minimise end treatments.
DFPCL adheres to the regulatory requirements and standards of the State Pollution Boards and
Federation of Indian Industries.
We have incorporated appropriate effluent handling and disposal systems. This helps in the
continuous and daily monitoring of solid, semi-solid and gaseous affluent discharges, to keep the
allowable limits in check. In the Fertiliser Plant, emissions are duly controlled by scrubbers and
bag filters. Three ambient air-monitoring stations are installed in the factory premises to monitor
air quality continuously.
1. The Concentrated Nitric Acid Plant of the Company is the first and only plant in India
to be based on the magnesium nitrate route rather than the conventional sulphuric acid route.
This eliminates the generation of pollutants and facilitates the use of effluent condensate
containing Nitric Acid as absorbant for Dilute Nitric Acid Plants. In the relocated Nitric Acid
plant the deNOx unit has been successfully commissioned, thereby reducing NOx emission to
levels lower than permitted under statutory regulations.
2. In the Ammonia and Methanol Plants, waste gases containing Hydrogen and Carbon
Monoxide are burnt in a flare. A separate flare to burn off Ammonia is provided for in Ammonia
storage section in case of emergency.
3. In order to eliminate chromate effluent, the company has recently changed over to
non-chromate treatment of cooling water in the Methanol Plant. Recognising the effect of Ozone
depletion due to Freon, refrigeration systems have been changed over from Freon to Ammonia as
refrigerant. The Carbon Dioxide recovery solvent has been changed from Amine Guard to
aMDEA, which is more environment-friendly.
4. The project to convert waste gaseous Carbon-dioxide from the stack in Ammonia
plant into Food Grade Liquid Carbon-dioxide and Dry Ice has been executed, thus contributing
to environmental protection as well as converting the waste into a useful product.

41
5. DFPCL believes that preservation of fossil fuels is a social responsibility. To reduce
the consumption of hydrocarbons, a waste heat recovery project has been successfully
commissioned in which steam is generated from the off gases of CES engines, thereby reducing
the consumption of Naphtha in service boilers. The lower temperature of the final exit gases is
also more conducive to the atmosphere.
In addition to these efforts, an appreciable part of Research & Development is directed towards
developing environment control measures. Employees are provided training and education to
create awareness and commitment towards maintaining the required standards in the company.
DFPCL is also working at spreading awareness and helping small industries and customers in
solving any environment-related problems.
Effluent Treatment Facilities
Effluent Treatment Facilities and waste management, generally the neglected area in any
chemical company is given a lot of importance in DFCPL.
An Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP) at our factory is in operation, which comprises
physiochemical and biological treatment. A Sewage Treatment Plant has been provided to treat
all sanitary waste generated in the factory complex. A new scheme for using treated water for
gardening and sanitary purposes is under implementation.
The environment cell of the Company, which works under Technical Services, continuously
monitors pollution control equipment. A third party environment statement report is
commissioned annually, so that we benchmark with the best global practices.
Various safety systems, such as carrying out HAZOPS, Risk Assessments, On Site Emergency
Plans, Safety Audits and Formulation of Safety Operating Procedures etc, are part of our regular
practices.
Consecutively for the last three years, the British Safety Council, in recognition of its safety
procedures and low rate of accidents, has presented a Safety Award to DFPCL.
India is one of the important countries in biofertilizer production and consumption in the world.
The present production capacity of different biofertilizer production units in the country is about
4500 tonnes per annum. The maximum production capacity is in Agro Industries Corporation
followed by State Agriculture Departments, National Biofertilizer Development Centre, State
Agriculture Universities and private sector. Among the different states, the maximum production
capacity is in Tamil Nadu followed by M.P., U.P., Gujarat, and Maharashtra.
National Biofertilizer Development Centre has been established at Ghaziabad with six Regional
Biofertilizer Development Centres each at Jabalpur, Hissar, Nagpur, Bangalore, Bhubaneswar
and Imphal. Under this scheme 74 BF production units have been established with central
financial assistance having annual production capacity of 8475 tonnes. Main bio producing
companies are GSFC, MLF, SPIC etc. Some more fertilizer companies (IFFCO, KRIBHCO,
NFL, RCF etc.) are likely to start production soon and many more are planning to join the
biofertilizer business.

42
2.4 Future prospect

➢ To increases the brand image of the company.

➢ Atchive maximum sales

➢ To extend the business all over India.

➢ To provide proper services to give the maximum customer satisfaction

➢ To keep attyention towards the maintaining the quality.

➢ To prepare the products which are helpful to the environment and soil.

➢ 2.5 Organizational Structure

Chairman

Vice Chairman

General Body

General Manager

Regional Reigonal Reigonal Reigonal

Manager-1 Manager-2 Manager-3 Manager-4

43
Area Manager-3 Area Manager-3 Area Manager-3 Area Manager-3

Executives-3 Executives-3 Executives-3 Executives-3

Field Officer-4 Field Officer -4 Field Officer-4 Field officer-4

CHAPTER :4 DATA PRESANTATION .ANALYSIS AND


INTERPRETATION:
Data analysis Techniques
The data thus collected from the brand distribution and production efficiency survey has been
analyzed as per the research plan stated above.

The techniques that are used for analysis of data are:-


1. Tabulation of data.
2. Pie charts – analysis of Brand distribution survey.
3. Bar graphs- representing secondary information.

44
4.1 VILLAGES COVERED ARE AS FOLLOWS: -
Sr no Village No of sample
1 10
Bablgaon
2 16
Khadgaon
3 08
Pakarsangvi
4 07
Peth
5 18
Chandeswaar
6 14
Wasangaon
7 10
Gangakhed
8 11
Fultapur
9 06
Bhatkheda
100
TOTAL

Interpretation:
The graph shows the no of farmers visited in particular village.

45
4.2 THE GRAPH OF AREA HOLDING BY FARMERS

SR.NO AREA OF FARM NO. OF FARMERS


1 0-5 38
2 5-15 32
3 15-25 18
4 >25 12

**THIS GRAPH SHOWS THE AREA HOLDING BY DIFFERENT FARMS BETWEEN

THAT AREA.

4.3 THE GRAPH OF CROPS OF FARMERS

SR.NO NAME OF CROP NO OF FARMERS


1 GRAPES 62
2 POMOGRANATE 29
3 OTHERS 09

Interpretation:

This graph to show the includes of area 62% farmers Tacking


Grapes,29% are Pomogranates & others are 9%

46
4.4- THE GRAPH OF
Response Farmers AWARENESS ABOUT THE
Yes DEEPAK .
40

No
60

INTERPRETATION:THIS GRAPH SHOWS THE INFORMATION OF HOW MANY


NO. OF FARMERS ARE INTERESTED IN THE DEEPAK PRODUCTS60% ARE AWARE& 40%
ARE NOT.

4.5 THE MODE OF AWARENESS OF FARMERS

MODE OF
SR.NO. NO OF FARMERS
INFORMATION
1 ADVERTISE 15

47
2 FRIENDS 12
3 RELATIVES 07
4 OTHERS 06

INTERPRETATION:THIS GRAPH SHOWS THE MODE OF AWARENESS THROUGH WHICH


FARMERS GET ACKNOWLEDGD ABOUT DEEPAK PRODUCTS .15% ARE ADVERTISE,12%
ARE FRIENDS,7% ARE RELATIVES,6% AWARE TO OTERS.

NO4.6- THE GRAPH OF EXTENT OF USE OF PRODUCTS OF DEEPAK.

SR.NO NAME OF PRODUCT NO.OF FARMERS


1 MAGSULF 05
2 SPEED 20
3 SPLENDER 11
4 HUMIC RICH 09

48
INTERPRETATION:THIS GRAPH HELPS TO GIVE THE INFORMATION ABOUT THE WHICH
PARTICULAR PRODUCT OF DEEPAK PARTICULARLY PREFERED BY PEOPLES. ARE MAGSULF
5,SPEED 20,SPLENDER 12,& HUMIRICH 8.

4.7 GRAPH OF AWARENESS ABOUT PEST IN FARMERS.

Response Farmers
Yes 45
No 55

INTERPRETATION: THIS GRAPH HELPS TO GIVE INFORMATION ABOUT HOW MUCH PEOPLES
IN THAT AREA KNOWN ABOUT WHAT IN MEAN BY PESTS IN CROPS? 55% YES OR 45% ARE NOT.

4.8 GRAPH OF KNOWING AWARENESS ABOUT DISEASES.

Response Farmers
Yes 44
No 56

49
INTERPRETATION:THIS GRAPH HELPS TO GIVE INFORMATION ABOUT HOW MUCH PEOPLES
IN THAT AREA KNOWN ABOUT WHAT IS MEAN BY DISEASES IN CROPS ARE 56% YES OR 44% ARE
NOT.

NO.9- GRAPH OF
Response Farmers
AWARENESS OF ORGANIC
Yes 57
FERTILIZERS.
No 43

INTERPRETATION: THIS GRAPH HELPS TO GIVE INFORMATION ABOUT HOW MUCH


PEOPLES IN THAT AREA KNOWN ABOUT WHAT IS MEAN BY ORGANIC FERTILIZERS 57% YES OR
43% ARE NOT.

4.10 GRAPH OF AWARENESS ABOUT SOIL CONTENTS AND THIR PROBLEMS.

Response Farmers

50
Yes 38
No 62

INTERPRETATION: **THIS GRAPH HELPS TO GIVE INFORMATION ABOUT


HOW MUCH PEOPLES IN THAT AREA KNOWN ABOUT WHAT IS MEAN BY SOIL
CONTENTS AND THIR PROBLEMS ARE 38% YES OR 62NOT.

4.11 GRAPH OF AWARENESS ABOUT WEEDS.

Response Farmers
Yes 30
No 70

INTERPRETATION: THIS GRAPH HELPS TO GIVE INFORMATION ABOUT HOW MUCH


PEOPLES IN THAT AREA KNOWN ABOUT WHAT IS MEAN BY WEEDS.30% YES OR 70% ARE
NOT.

4.12 GRAPH OF KNOWING AWARENESS ABOUT PLANT PATHOGEN.

51
Response Farmers
Yes 12
No 88

INTERPRETATION: THIS GRAPH HELPS TO GIVE INFORMATION ABOUT HOW


MUCH PEOPLES IN THAT AREA KNOWN ABOUT WHAT IS MEAN BY PLANT
PATHOGEN12 RE AWARE OR 88% ARE NOT.

4.13- GRAPH OF KNOWING AWARENESS ABOUT MICRO NUTRIENTS.

Response Farmers
Yes 47
No 53

52
INTERPRETATION: **THIS GRAPH HELPS TO GIVE INFORMATION ABOUT
HOW MUCH PEOPLES IN THAT AREA KNOWN ABOUT WHAT IS NUTRIENTS
ARE 53% YES OR 47% RESPONDENTS ARE NOT AWARE.

4.14 GRAPH OF KNOWING WHICH COMPANYS PRODUT USED BY


FARMER,WITHOUT DEEPAK.

SR.NO NAME OF COMPANY NO OF FARMERS


1 SYNGENTA 37
2 BASF 22
3 GLOBAL GREEN 13
4 ZUARI 28

INTERPRETATION: THIS GRAPH HELPS TO GIVE INFORMATION ABOUT HOW MUCH PEOPLES
IN THAT AREA USES DIFFERENT COMPANIES PRODUCTS.

4.15 GRAPH OF KNOWING PROBEMS FACED BY FARMERS.

SR.NO TYPE OF PROBLEM NO OF FARMERS


1 SOIL 20
2 MARKETING 30

53
3 DISEASE 27
4 OTHER 13

INTERPRETATION: **THIS GRAPH HELPS TO GIVE INFORMATION ABOUT


WHICH PROBLEMS FACED BY THE FARMERS IN THAT PARTICULAR ARE
AER20% HAVE SOIL ,30% HAVE MARKETING,27% HAVE DISEASE PROBLEMS
& 18 HAVE OTHERS PROBLEMS

4.16 GRAPH OF SHOWING FROM WHETHER FARMERS PREFER TO PURCHASE


PRODUCTS.

SR.NO PREFER TO PURCHASE NO OF FARMERS


1 WHOLESALER 33
2 RETAILER 15
3 COMPANY OUTLET 32
4 OTHER 20

INTERPRETATION: **THIS GRAPH HELPS TO GIVE INFORMATION ABOUT


FORM WHICH THE PEOPLES USE TO PREFER TO PURCHASE THE FERENT
PRODUCTS ARE 33 % ARE WHOLESALLER,RETAILER 15%, DISTRIBUTER
32%,COMPANY 20%.

54
4.17 GRAPH OF KNOWING HOW MUCH QUANTITY OF FERTILIZERS USED

SR.NO PER ACRE FERTILIZERS NO.OF FARMERS


1 >50 57
2 50-100 17
3 100-150 13
4 <150 13

INTERPRETATION :THIS GRAPH HELPS TO GIVE INFORMATION ABOUT IS THEIR PEOPLES


AWARE ABOUT HOW MUCH QUANTITY OF PRODUCTS ARE USED BY FARMERS FOR PARTICULAR
AREA.

4.18 GRAPH OF DECISION OF PURCHSING OF PRODUCT BY FARMER.

Response Farmers
Yes 38
No 62

**THIS GRAPH HELPS TO GIVE INFORMATION ABOUT THE ABOVE GIVEN


INFORMATION IS LIKED BY FARMER OR NOT OR WHAT DECISION HE TAKES
ABOUT PURCHSING ARE 38% YES OR 62% ARE NOT.
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4.19 GRAPH OF KNOWING ABOUT WHAT IS THE QUALITY OF THE PRODUCT.

THE OPINION ABUT


SR.NO NO. OF FARMERS
PRODUCT
1 SUPER 19
2 GOOD 48
3 POOR 23
4 BAD 10

INTERPRETATION: THIS GRAPH HELPS TO GIVE INFORMATION ABOUT TH WHAT IS THE


QUALITY HE FEELS AFTER USING , LISTENING ABOU THE PRODUCT 10% ARE BAD.

CHAPTE:5 Findings:-
.
a) In the pomegranate farmers faced the soil releated problem like wilting nematode
b) As compare to pomegranate the soil releated problem in grape is very few in percentage
c) mostof the farmer are not ready to use the non poisonous product they want hard poisonous
product
d) from the survey the farmers are facing the problem regarding various fungus which can create
much problem to growing crop and affect the yield of crop.

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e) The farmer are facing the problem regarding the compost which is produced by the farmers
are not proper decomposed.
h) The farmers are facing the common problem of weed. The compost is prepared by using
various agricultural waste and cow Doug. The animal eats various weed and seed of these weed
are remain in the compost and spread in the field

Suggestion:-

PRODUCT
1)Compost has good demand in market so introduce the type of product.
2)Magsulf has good character weight of one bag is 25kg so prepare the bags of small sizes so
that it should be easy to handle.

PLACE;-
3)Improve distribution channel:The distribution chnnel should be prepared so that the farmers in
each area should get the products easily

PROMOTION:

5)Increase promotional activity due to low product awareness


*Form the following ways.
i)Do the advertisements in local newspapers and radios.
ii)Make the pamphlets for giving the information.
iii)Make the farmers aware about products through personal contacts.
iv)Prepare a short film showing the demonsration.
v)Prepare the demonstration field for giving the practical knowledge.

6)Increase advertisements in local news paper

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PRICE
7)The farmers should provide some schemes like discounted prices for large purchasing.
8)Mach the price to the competitors price

Conclusion

1) Magsulf has no competitor in market; no other company has providing integrated solution for
soil and crop protection.
2) Product promotion is done through the consumer awareness.
3) Soil has spoiled due to excess use of chemical fertilizer farmer want to change traditional
farming method of using chemical fertilizer.
4) This project helps to guide farmers about the different problems, diseases and all other concepts..
5) Product is not available in convenient location
6) While doing consumer awareness it is benifitial to the farmers for getting the solutions and
knowledge.

Bibliography:
Books:-
1.Marketing Management By Philips Kotler.
2.Marketing Management By Ram swami.
3.Research Methodology By Williams’ Zigmunds

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Other:
Agricultural booklets
Leaflets
www.wikipidiya.com

Drafting of the Questionnaire:-


While drafting a questionnaire for the research the following points were taken into
consideration:-

1. The main aim of the study was to find the scope of soilkit in the given area.
2. To know the farmer interest level in Magsulf.
3. To know the farmer response to the organic product.
4. To collect the valuable suggestions and experiences of farmer in terms farm management.

Layout of the Questionnaire.-

Chart No.2.2:-

Layout of Questionnaire
QUESTIONAIRE LAYOUT AND DESIGN

DECIDE ON CONTENT OF EACH QUESTION


INFORMATION METHOD OF SAMPLING
NEEDED DATA
DECIDE ON TYPE OF QUESTIONS METHOD AND
COLLECTION SAMPLING
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DECIDE ON WORKING OF QUESTIONS SIZE

DECIDE ON SEQUESCE OF QUESTIONS

DECIDE ON LOGICAL LAYOUT OF QUESTIONS

DECIDE ON PRETESTING OF QUESTIONAIRE


FINAL TEST OF REVISED QUESTIONAIRE
Questionary

Q.1 what is your name?

Q.2 what is your village name?

Q.3 How many acres of farm area you have?

1)<5Acres 2)5-15Acres 3)15-25Acres 4)>25Acres

Q.4 which crop is cultivated on your field?

1)Grape 2)Pomogranate 3)Sugarcane 4)other

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Q.5 Do you know about the pest in crops?

1)Yes 2)No

Q.6 Do you know about the diseases in crops?

1)Yes 2)No

Q.7 Do you know about the organic fertilizers?

1)Yes 2)No

Q. 8 If tes then which organic fertilizers you know?

Q.9 Do you know about the soil contents and problems in soil?

1)Yes 2)No

Q.10 Do you know about the weed?

1)Yes 2)No

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Q.11 Do you know about plant pathogen.

1)Yes 2)No

Q.12 Do you Know about fully decomposed organic fertilizers?

1)Yes 2)No

Q. 13 Wchich specific products of deciposed fertilizers you are yousing?

Q.14 Do you know about micro nutrients?

1)Yes 2)No

Q.15 Do you know there is one product of DEEPAK containing all above characteristics like
weed free, fully decomposed organic fertilizer, containing micro nutrients ?

1)Yes 2) No

Q.16 Do you heard about DEEPAK products?

1)Yes 2)No

Q.17 How will you know about it?

1)Advertise 2)Frinds 3)Relatives 4)Other

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Q.18 Do you use any product of DEEPAK?

1)Yes 2)No

Q.19 Which product specifically you prefer to use?

1)Magsulf 2)Speed 3)Splender 4)Humic rich

Q.20 Do you using any other products of any other company for the problems mentioned
above?

1)Syngenta 2)BASF 3) Green global 4) Zuari

Q.21 Do you face any other problems for using these organic fertilizers.

1)Diseases 2) Soil 3) Marketing 4)Other

Q.22. From where you prefer to purchse your products?

1)Wholesaler 2)Retailer 3)Dealer 4)Company

Q.23 How much quantity of organic produts per acre you are usig ?

1)<50 2) 50-100 3) 100-150 4) 150<

Q.24 So what will be your opinion about this product?

1) Good 2) Bad 3) Poor 4) Super

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Q.25 Do you interested in purchasing the Magsulf?

1) Yes 2) No

Date :

Time :

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