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Stephanie

Rudnicki ED478 Final Unit Plan U.S. History The Civil War 8th Grade To be used with: American Journey 2007 Glencoe Chapters 15 (Road To Civil War), 16 (The Civil War), & 17 (Reconstruction and its Aftermath) The History Channels Civil War 150 Website http://www.history.com/interactives/civil-war-150#/home http://www.history.com/topics/american-civil-war/interactives/national-civil- war-student-challenge The History Channels Civil War Today iPad App Students will define the Civil War and recall the information that they already know. Students will be able to compare and contrast major differences between the North and South that resulted in the Civil War. Students will analyze one of Lincolns speeches and evaluate how the North and South would respond. Students will summarize what life was like for Union and Confederate soldiers and record important facts and figures about the army size, racial make up, etc. Students will be able to identify the weapons and technology of the Civil War, describe their functions, and evaluate their role in the war. Students will be able to identify the major battles and players of the war. They will be able to summarize where major battles took place, when they happened, and what happened. They will be able to evaluate how these battles affected the war. Students will be able to identify major players in the war, summarize their lives briefly, and evaluate their affect on the war. Students will be able to summarize the way that the war was paid for, comparing and contrasting the North and South. B.8.1 Interpret the past using a variety of sources, such as biographies, diaries, journals, artifacts, eyewitness interviews, and other primary source materials, and evaluate the credibility of sources used B.8.3 Describe the relationships between and among significant events, such as the causes and consequences of wars in United States and world history

B.8.5 Use historical evidence to determine and support a position about important political values, such as freedom, democracy, equality, or justice, and express the position coherently B.8.7 Identify significant events and people in the major eras of United States and world history

Day Lesson 1 Introduction Students will watch a video clip in which historians describe the civil war. Students will then demonstrate their knowledge of the Civil War in the form of discussion and individual KWLs.

Context: This unit plan is designed for an 8th grade class within a suburban set middle school. Ideally, the class would have an even and diverse mix of students with different ethnicities, cultures, and backgrounds. The class would be comprised of 25 individuals, predominantly proficient English speakers. Approximately 5 students in this group would have learning difficulties. Class periods are 90 minutes long. Rationale: This unit incorporates text reading, video media, and technology from the History Channels Civil War 150 website. In addition, the website also integrates the History Channels iPad app, which students will use as a model in creating their final project. Students will be lead through teacher-directed learning, addressing key aspects of the war. As students progress through the unit, their learning will contribute to the creation of their final project where they will integrate their knowledge. Groups for this project will be composed of five groups of four and one group of five. This group size is small enough for students to accomplish the task and large enough to make sure students do not exclude one group member. Groups will be determined by the teacher, integrating children of high performance, proficient performance, and developing performance. Groups should have an even ration of males and females, so that no students feel left out. Student will have the last 15-20 minutes of each class to meet with their groups and discuss/work on their project. Objectives Students will define the Civil War and recall the information that they already know. Assessment Students will write their own definition of the Civil War and recall prior knowledge on a KWL chart.

Students will then be assigned into groups for a cumulative project and given instructions and criteria. 2, & Causes of the War 3, Students will watch The Civil War: A Nation Divided and compare and contrast major differences between the north and south that lead to the war and analyze one of Lincolns speeches. 4 & Who Were The 5 Soldiers & How Did They Die? In their text, students will read about life as a soldier. Using the Civil War 150 website, students will record facts and figures. 6 Technology Using their textbook and the Civil War 150 website, students will identify the weapons and technology of the Civil War. 7 & Major Battles and 8 Players As a class, students will read about the major battles and identify the major players in the war. Students will pause during reading to

Students will be able to compare and contrast major differences between the North and South that resulted in the Civil War. Students will analyze a speech and evaluate how each side would respond.

Students will compare and contrast major differences between the North and South in a Venn diagram. Afterwards, they will analyze on of Lincolns speeches and evaluate how and why northerners and southerners would respond. Students will Students will make two summarize what life brochures. One brochure was like for Union and will summarize what life Confederate soldiers was like for Union and record important soldiers. The other facts and figures about brochure will summarize the army size, racial what life was like for make up, etc. Confederate soldiers. Both will call for students to recall information from the Civil War 150 Website. Students will be able to Students will complete a identify the weapons worksheet in which they and technology of the identify the Civil War, describe weapons/technology of their functions, and the war, describe their evaluate their role in functions, and evaluate the war. their role in the role. Students will be able to identify the major battles and players of the war. They will be able to summarize where major battles took place, when they happened, and what happened. They will be Students will apply cost benefit analysis to evaluate the best means of production. Students will individually prepare a business statement that evaluates their groups work and explains why or why not it will be

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watch video clips. Afterwards, students will use the text and Civil War 150 website to complete a bio packet on the battles and people of the war before returning to discuss what they have found. War Time Economics Using what they already know, students will brain storm how they think the war was paid for. Afterwards, students will use their text and the Civil War 150 Website to complete a worksheet. Presentations of Newspapers Students will present the newspaper that they have created in their groups to the class. Civil War Game As a form of test review, Students will play the game National Civil War Student Challenge. Test Students will have a short period of time to review their work. As a class, the test will be read over and directions will be discussed. Students will then take a written test

able to evaluate how successful. these battles affected the war. Students will be able to identify major players in the war, summarize their lives briefly, and evaluate their affect on the war. Students will be able to summarize the way that the war was paid for, comparing and contrasting the North and South. Students will write a short one-page paper that summarizes how the war was paid for. Within their paper, they will compare and contrast the differences between the North and South.

covering the entire unit.


U.S. History (8th Grade) Lesson Plan: Introduction (Lesson 1) Objective: Students will define (knowledge) the Civil War and recall prior knowledge (knowledge) through a KWL chart. Goal: B.8.7 Identify significant events and people in the major eras of United States and world history Time Needed: 1 class period (90 minutes) Materials Needed: KWL Charts Different colored writing utensils Final Project Directions/Criteria Introduction - 10 minutes Ask students by show of hand how many of them have learned about the Civil War before. Ask students how many of them feel comfortable with what they learned. After some hands have gone down, ask students how many of them would feel comfortable explaining the topic to another student. When few hands are still up, tell the class that they are beginning a unit on the Civil War. Before they begin, you want them to think about what the Civil War means. To get them started in this thought process, you would like to show them a video clip of what the topic means to historians. Play clip. Steps for Instruction - 70 minutes 1. After students have watched the video, ask them how they would define the Civil War. Give them two minutes to write down their answer. 2. Have students share their definition with the person sitting next to them. 3. Return the students to whole group and ask students to share what they have come up with. Why are some students definitions different from others? 4. Guide students so that they realize different definitions are a result of the amount of time each student has spent with the subject and what they have focused on. Inform them that they all have very unique perspectives on the Civil War and will be sharing that today. 5. Have students individually fill out their KWL chart in one colored pen. 6. Have students meet with a partner to discuss what they have written and, in a different color, add to their KWL chart. 7. Have students switch one more time. 8. Ask students how their understanding has already changed. Allow students to spend the next two minutes adding to their definition. 9. Focus the group and explain that like today, they are going to gradually add to their understanding over the next 2 weeks. All of this new knowledge will result in a final group project. They will have the entire unit to work on this. 10. Hand out directions and criteria and read as a class. Have students ask questions.

11. Put students into their groups, giving them time to discuss the project. Finally, demonstrate the app that students will base their project off of. Strategies for Students Students will use technology and participate in a variety of discussion styles. Engagement levels should remain high throughout the lesson. Students will rely on classmates to help add to their understanding. Closure - 5 minutes The lesson closes after students have helped each other add to their understanding. The closing procedure for this lesson is the short discussion of how their understanding has increased and their new definitions of the Civil War. After closure, the project is explained. Assessment Students will be formally assessed on their discussions, KWL charts, and Civil War definitions. Students will be informally assessed on their participation.

U.S. History (8th Grade) Lesson Plan: Causes of the War (Lesson 2 & 3) Objective: Students will be able to compare and contrast major differences between the North and South that resulted in the Civil War. Students will analyze a speech and evaluate how each side would respond. Goal: B.8.5 Use historical evidence to determine and support a position about important political values, such as freedom, democracy, equality, or justice, and express the position coherently Time Needed: 2 class period (90 minutes each) Materials Needed: The Civil War: A Nation Divided program Computer with Internet access Resources about the Civil War and Abraham Lincoln. Civil War 150 Abraham Lincoln Video Venn Diagram Introduction - 10 minutes Ask students by show of hand how many of them have learned about the Civil War before. Ask students how many of them feel comfortable with what they learned. After some hands have gone down, ask students how many of them would feel comfortable explaining the topic to another student. When few hands are still up, tell the class that they are beginning a unit on the Civil War. Before they begin, you want them to think about what the Civil War means. To get them started in this thought process, you would like to show them a video clip of what the topic means to historians. Play clip. Steps for Instruction - 70 minutes 1. After watching The Civil War: A Nation Divided , discuss how regional differences contributed to the outbreak of the Civil War. The following questions will help guide the conversation. a. How did the economies of the North and South differ before the Civil War? (The North was industrialized; the South was agricultural.) b. Why was slavery so important to the South? (Landowners depended on slaves to work in the fields; the South's economy was entirely dependent on slavery.) c. How did the addition of new states to the Union create dispute? (Free states and slave states both worried about the other side having an advantage. The Missouri Compromise, for example, was designed to maintain a balance of power.)

2. Review some of the significant events that, from 1860 to 1861, led 11 Southern states to secede from the Union. For example: Compromise of 1850, Fugitive Slave Act, Publication of Uncle Tom's Cabin, Dred Scott Decision, Kansas-Nebraska Act, John Brown's raid on Harper's Ferry, Virginia 3. Discuss conflicting opinions of Abraham Lincoln during the war. Ask students: Did most Northerners and Southerners feel the same way about the President? What was the Emancipation Proclamation? How did it affect peoples' feelings towards Lincoln? How did it change the war? Help students understand that the Confederates were angered by this edict to abolish slavery, believing it would ruin the Southern economy. The Emancipation Proclamation also shifted the emphasis of the war from keeping the nation together to a struggle to free the slaves. 4. In the video, students learned about several assassination attempts on Lincoln's life. Ask: Why would people want to kill the president? (They believed that removing Lincoln from power would leave the Union weak and help the South win the war.) 5. Explain that students will read and analyze a famous speech or writing by Lincoln to better understand his views. Either assign of have them choose one of the following: First Inaugural Address (March 4, 1861), Emancipation Proclamation (January 1, 1863), The Gettysburg Address (November 19, 1863), Second Inaugural Address (March 4, 1865) 6. Students can find these online at these sites: http://showcase.netins.net/web/creative/lincoln/speeches/speech.htmandhtt p://showcase.netins.net/web/creative/lincoln/speeches/writings.htm. 7. To help students with historical context, remind them that the war began April 12, 1861, when Confederate forces attacked Fort Sumter, South Carolina, and that it ended on April 9, 1865, when General Robert E. Lee surrendered to Union General Ulysses S. Grant at the village of Appomattox Courthouse, Virginia. For other important dates, direct them to this online Civil War Timeline: http://www.historyplace.com/civilwar/index.html. 8. Once students have read through their speech or writing, ask them to write a brief essay that addresses the following. 9. When did Lincoln make this speech or present this writing? 10. a. Briefly summarize Lincoln's message. Describe the tone or language he used, giving at least one significant quote as an example.

b.

How do you think most Northerners and most Southerners responded to the speech or writing. Why?

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What reaction do you imagine Americans today would have to the speech or writing?

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How do you think this speech or writing affected the Civil War? During the next class period, give students an opportunity to share their essays. Then discuss their ideas and findings. Ask: What impact did the speeches and writings have on the Civil War? In what ways did the responses differ between the North and South? How do most Americans respond to Lincoln's words today?

Strategies for Students Students will be use technology and participate in a variety of discussion styles. Engagement levels should remain high throughout the lesson. Closure - 5 minutes Have students summarize the main differences between the North and South. In what ways could this lead to conflict? Assessment Students will be informally assessed on participation and discussion. Students will be formally assessed on summaries within their Venn Diagram and analysis and evaluation of Lincolns speech. Use the following three-point rubric to evaluate students' work during this lesson. Three points: Students were active in class discussions; demonstrated a strong understanding of differences between the North and South, significant events leading to the Civil War, and conflicting opinions about Abraham Lincoln; wrote a thorough, engaging essay about Lincoln's speech or writing. Two points: Students participated in class discussions; demonstrated a satisfactory understanding of differences between the North and South, significant events leading to the Civil War, and conflicting opinions about Abraham Lincoln; wrote a clear, complete essay about Lincoln's speech or writing. One point: Students did not participate in class discussions; demonstrated a weak understanding of differences between the North and South, significant events leading to the Civil War, and conflicting opinions about Abraham Lincoln; wrote a vague or inaccurate essay about Lincoln's speech or writing.

U.S. History (8th Grade) Lesson Plan: Who were the soldiers and how did they die? (Lesson 4 & 5) Objective: Students will summarize (comprehension) what life was like for Union and Confederate soldiers and record (knowledge) important facts and figures about the army size, racial make up, etc. Goal: B.8.1 Interpret the past using a variety of sources, such as biographies, diaries, journals, artifacts, eyewitness interviews, and other primary source materials, and evaluate the credibility of sources used Time Needed: 2 class period (90 minutes each) Materials Needed: Textbook Civil War 150 Website Blank Paper/Coloring Utensils Civil War Soldier Journal Entry Introduction - 15 minutes Begin by handing out copies of a soldiers journal. As a class, read the entry. Ask students to think about what life might have been like as a soldier in the Civil War. Have them spend 5 minutes writing and then share with a partner. Return the class to whole group and discuss. Steps for Instruction - 65 minutes 1. Tell students that today they will be looking at the experience of soldiers in the war. Explain that they may notice differences between the North and South and White and Black soldiers. 2. Explain that they will be reading from the text and using the information as resources. After they are done, they will create brochures. Hand out the instructions and criteria. Read through as a class and answer any questions. 3. As a class, read through the text. 4. Allow students to begin working independently on brochures at the computers. 5. When students are finished. Have them rotate through the class and share what they have found. Strategies for Students Students will use technology, discussion, and reading, to create a brochure. This variety of methods will appeal to multiple learning styles. Closure - 5 minutes Have students volunteer to show their brochure to the class. What main ideas did they learn about the North and South soldiers? Black and white soldiers? Why might there have been differences? Assessment Students will be formally assessed on their brochures according to the criteria. Students will be informally assessed on participation by use of a behavior checklist.

U.S. History (8th Grade) Lesson Plan: Technology (Lesson 6) Objective: Students will be able to identify (knowledge) the weapons and technology of the Civil War, describe their functions (comprehension), and evaluate (evaluation) their role in the war. Goal: B.8.1 Interpret the past using a variety of sources, such as biographies, diaries, journals, artifacts, eyewitness interviews, and other primary source materials, and evaluate the credibility of sources used Time Needed: 1 class period (90 minutes) Materials Needed: Textbook Civil War 150 Website & Video Worksheet Introduction - 7 minutes Remind students what they have learned already about Civil War soldiers. They have already gained a lot of insight into their lives. However, what do they know about the tools that soldiers fought with? Have students brainstorm what they know about Civil War technology. What was it? What did it do? How did change things? Steps for Instruction - 60 minutes 1. Have students read from the text about advances in technology. 2. Hand out the worksheet and read through directions. Answer any questions. 3. Allow students to move to the computers and use the Civil War 150 website and their text to answer questions. Strategies for Students Students will use technology, discussion, and reading, to complete a worksheet. This variety of methods will appeal to multiple learning styles. Closure - 8 minutes As a whole group, have students identify the major weapons. Which ones do they think were most important? Have students spend two minutes answering how they think advances in technology changed the war, then show the video clip and give historians perspectives. Ask students how their views compare. Assessment Students will be formally assessed on their worksheets. Students will be informally assessed on participation by use of a behavior checklist and quality of answers given during discussion.

U.S. History (8th Grade) Lesson Plan: Technology (Lesson 7 & 8) Objective: Students will be able to identify (knowledge) the major battles and players of the war. They will be able to summarize (comprehension) where major battles took place, when they happened, and what happened. They will be able to evaluate (evaluation) how these battles affected the war. Students will be able to identify (knowledge) major players in the war, summarize (comprehension) their lives briefly, and evaluate (evaluation) their affect on the war. Goal: B.8.7 Identify significant events and people in the major eras of United States and world history B.8.3 Describe the relationships between and among significant events, such as the causes and consequences of wars in United States and world history Time Needed: 2 class periods (90 minutes each) Materials Needed: Textbook Civil War 150 Website & Video Worksheet Introduction - 5 minutes Summarize the students learning so far. They have become familiar with why the war was fought and who fought it. It is now time they focus on how the war was fought. Inform students that they will be working independently to learn about the battles and key figures by completing a bio packet. Steps for Instruction - 65 minutes 1. Hand out the bio packets and read through as a class; answer any questions. 2. Send students to computers to work independently in completing the packet. 3. Monitor the classroom and check in with students progress often. Maintain a behavior checklist. Strategies for Students Students who struggle with reading will be able to read in small groups. Extensive use of technology should keep students engaged throughout. Closure - 5 minutes Have students share what struck them most about battles and important figures. Did they notice any patterns? Was the outcome of the war always certain? Assessment Students will be formally assessed on their bio packets according to the rubric. Students will be informally assessed on participation by use of a behavior checklist.

Extra! Extra! The War Is Ending!


Goal: As the war draws to an end, your task is to create a newspaper that reflects the events that have unraveled. Role: You are serving as a journalist and cartoonist on a newspaper. You will represent the ideas of a Northern or Southern writer depending upon your assignment. Audience: You are writing to the general public who may not be very well informed on the topic. You are also writing to preserve this historical event in writing for future generations who may one day read your paper. Situation: The South has surrendered and the war is now over. As journalists, you are preserving this event and summarizing what has happened over the past four years. Depending on your assignment, you will represent either a Northern view or a Southern view. Performance: Individually, you will write a front-page article, an editorial, a political cartoon, an interview with a soldier, and research one photo. In your groups, you will compile these pieces to create a newspaper that will be showed to your peers. Standards: Your newspaper should include the following:
Front-page article: Each group member will write about the secession of the southern states and the bombing of Ft. Sumter. Especially focus on the causes of the war.How would the South present the "facts"? How would the North present the "facts"? Editorial: Each group member will write an editorial about the issue of slavery. State reasons why the South believed in slavery; or why the North believed slavery was wrong.Give examples to justify your reasons and be sure to express your feelings. Remember whose side you are writing for. Political Cartoon: Each member will make fun of the other side by drawing your own political cartoon. Here are some possible topics: slavery, greed of the North, the Emancipation Proclamation, John Brown, Dred Scott case, advantages of North over the South, the horrors of war, etc. Interview of a soldier: Each group member will write an interview with a soldier. Ask about the soldier's background, his reason for fighting, his experiences of war, what camp life is like, his feelings, etc. Photo Gallery: Each group member will research and find 1 picture about any subject from the Civil War that interests you and has been studied in class. Write a caption explaining each picture... Possible topics are: a famous battle: e.g. Gettysburg-a famous general or any other famous person-medicine-weapons of war: e.g. the Monitor and Merrimack-women in the war-the role of the black soldier-medicine-camp life, etc.

Rubric A "5" paper *Takes a very clear point of view and *Skillfully organizes information to support it.*Demonstrates detailed, accurate knowledge of the time period.*Deals with the most significant issues and trends relevant to the question.*Supports ideas and conclusions with appropriate and accurate reasons andevidence; provides relevant, specific examples (names, events, places, etc.)* Follows directions in formatting and organizing the newspaper.* Newspaper is very neat. A "3" paper *Takes a point of view and *Adequately organizes information to support it.*Demonstrates some knowledge of time period.*Deals with relatively significant issues and trends.*Supports ideas and conclusions with at least some reasons and evidence; providesexamples, but in limited depth.* Some errors in following directions for formatting and organizing the newspaper* Newspaper is neat. A "1" paper *May not take a point of view and/or *Organization is erratic.*Little evidence of historical knowledge*Demonstrates very little understanding of most significant issues and frequentlygoes off on tangents.*Little attempt to support conclusions with examples.* Did not follow directions in formatting and organizing the newspaper.* Newspaper needs to be "cleaned" up.