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English 12: Medieval Period Unit

Descriptive Course Data Instructor: Kristen Bergeson Grade Level: 12 Alabama Course of Study Standards Met: ACOS 1. Compare organizational structure, figurative language, and literary devices, including use of paradox, among predominantly British short stories, drama, poetry, essays, and other nonfiction literature. (explaining use of allusions, interpreting irony, analyzing poetry for rhyme schemes, identifying use of parody, analyzing major historical developments in language and literature in the British Isles) ACOS 2. Read with comprehension a variety of informational and functional reading materials. (analyzing charts and tables for conclusions) ACOS 3. Analyze British literature for style, audience appeal, cultural significance and plot structure. ACOS 4. Identify literary elements in British literary selections from various genres. ACOS 5. Determine word meaning in British literature using word structure and context clues. ACOS 7. Write for a variety of purposes including critical essays on literary topics. (editing drafts for appropriate style, developing an effective voice suitable for audience and purpose) ACOS 9. Revise drafts to increase sentence complexity. ACOS 12. Evaluate oral presentation skills of self and others for effectiveness. Course: British Literature Unit: Medieval Period

English 12: Medieval Period Unit


Day 1 Monday, Jan. 23 Objectives: 1. Write sentences using vocabulary terms. 2. Relate understanding of contemporary class structure in the U.S. to the social hierarchy of England in the 14th century. 3. Identify key characteristics of the Medieval Period and how they influence the characters and plot of The Canterbury Tales. 4. Analyze the development of the English language. 5. Analyze the use of satire and irony in the Prologue to The Canterbury Tales. 6. Interpret Chaucers depiction of characters in the Prologue to The Canterbury Tales. Bell Ringer (15 minutes): I will post the weeks vocabulary terms and definitions on the board, as well as on Moodle. Students will spend 10 minutes working in pairs to write sentences using each of the terms. During this time, I will rotate between pairs to check for understanding. We will spend the remaining five minutes sharing sentences, and I will ask students to explain how the words are connected. Students will be expected to complete the activity for homework. This meets the first objective. Before Activity (30 minutes): Purpose to activate background knowledge Students will spend five minutes writing in response to the following questions: Does modern society have a class structure? If so, is it possible for individuals to move, or change positions, within that structure? Explain your response. Students will form groups of 3 or 4 to share their responses and complete a contemporary class structure chart. Groups will then be invited to share and explain their charts to the class (using the document camera), and I will segue into a discussion of the medieval British class structure. I will present a brief PowerPoint presentation on the Middle Ages, pilgrimages, and Chaucer. Students will add irony and satire to their lit-terms notes. In order to demonstrate the evolution of the English language (the class previously listened to a recording of Beowulf read in Old English), we will listen to an audio recording of a scholar reading the first 34 lines of The General Prologue (http://www.vmi.edu/fswebs.aspx?tid=34099&id=34251). This meets objectives 2-4. During Activity (40 minutes): Purpose to engage with the text and integrate new information with prior knowledge Students will receive character charts to complete as they read The General Prologue (pp. 94-114). We will read the first three character profiles aloud, pausing between each to discuss Chaucers use of irony and satire. Based on our discussions, I will complete a character chart on the smart board. Students will be expected to add these notes to their charts as well. Students will then read the next five profiles independently and work in groups to continue filling out the chart. During this time, I will call groups of students to the table at the front of the room to go over one characters description. The small-group time will give me the opportunity to check each students understanding and provide additional instruction as needed. This activity meets objectives five and six. After Activity (5 minutes):

English 12: Medieval Period Unit


Purpose to reflect on the content of the lesson and respond to text through writing I will give each student an index card. On one side, they will identify one example of irony in the text, and on the other, they will write one unanswered question about the text. Homework: Sentences with vocabulary terms are due tomorrow (students will receive a daily participation grade for completing). Prologue charts are due Thursday.

English 12: Medieval Period Unit


Day 2 Tuesday, Jan. 24 Objectives: 1. Analyze the use of satire and irony in the Prologue to The Canterbury Tales. 2. Interpret Chaucers depiction of characters in the Prologue to The Canterbury Tales. Before Activity (10 minutes): To define key vocabulary Students will add frame story and characterization to their lit-terms notes. During Activity (60 minutes): Students will finish reading The General Prologue and completing the character charts independently. I will rotate between students during this time to answer questions. After 40 minutes of independent reading, we will discuss the charts as a class and address any unanswered questions. Students who have not completed their charts will need to finish them by the beginning of class Thursday (participation/daily grade). This activity meets objectives one and two. After Activity (5 minutes): Students will write and submit a brief response to the following prompt: Which character do you believe best represents the ideal in Chaucers view? Which character do you find the most deplorable? Explain your answers. Introduce Assignment (15 minutes): At the end of class, I will introduce a writing/presentation assignment, for which students will analyze Chaucers depiction of an assigned pilgrim in The General Prologue and compare that character to a modern-day celebrity or a character in a well-known contemporary production (movie, TV show, book). As an example, I will provide a brief analysis and a sample presentation comparing the host to Jon Stewart. On day 4 of this unit, students will give a 2- to 3-minute presentation to the class that includes a picture/image of their chosen celebrity and at least two reasons why this person or character is the modern-day equivalent of the pilgrim. I will provide feedback on their analyses and presentations at this time. Students will then write a formal essay on this topic. Complete rough drafts will be due on day 7 of this unit, and students will have time in class to proofread and conduct peer reviews. Final drafts will be due on day 9. Homework: Prologue charts and character-comparison presentations are due Thursday.

English 12: Medieval Period Unit


Day 3 Wednesday, Jan. 25 Objectives: 1. Write sentences with quoted material, using correct punctuation and MLA citations. 2. Identify three types of irony in The Pardoners Tale. 3. Summarize the plot of The Pardoners Tale. Bell Ringer (30 minutes): MLA Format activity; quotations and citations I will distribute copies of the MLA Quick Guide handout. Students will read the handout silently, underlining anything they dont understand or writing down questions, before I go over it with the class. I will discuss plagiarism and use a few lines from The Canterbury Tales to demonstrate how to quote material in an essay. This meets objective one. Before Activity (10 minutes): Purpose to activate prior knowledge and make predictions Students will review their notes about the Pardoner from the Prologue activity and, with a partner, discuss their responses to the following question: Based on Chaucers description of the Pardoner, what kind of story is he likely to share with the other pilgrims? We will then discuss as a class. During Activity (40 minutes): Purpose to summarize text and integrate new information with prior knowledge Students will be asked to consider the following questions as we read the The Pardoners Tale (pp. 117-122) aloud: Do you find it surprising that the Pardoner chose to tell this tale? Is it ironic? Can you spot examples of situational, dramatic, and verbal irony? (definitions for these literary terms are provided on p. 116) What do you think is the moral of this exemplum? When finished reading, students will work independently to write a brief paragraph summarizing the plot. Students who finish early may work on their CT character-comparison essays or, if they are not already completed, the prologue charts. This meets objectives two and three. After Activity (10 minutes): Purpose to respond to text through discussion and writing and to examine questions that guided reading Students will discuss the above questions with a partner and choose one to respond to in a brief paragraph following their summaries. At the end of class, I will collect students responses as an exit slip, for which they will receive a daily participation grade. If we have time (doubtful), I will read aloud The Tale of the Three Brothers, a story in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hollows that, according to J.K. Rowling, was inspired by The Pardoners Tale. I well then lead a class discussion asking students to compare and contrast the two stories. Homework: Prologue charts and character-comparison presentations are due tomorrow.

English 12: Medieval Period Unit


Day 4 Thursday, Jan. 26 Objectives: 1. Write an introduction for a formal essay. 2. Use effective presentation skills. 3. Interpret Chaucers depiction of characters in the Prologue to The Canterbury Tales. Bell Ringer (5 minutes): Students will prepare to present their character comparisons. Presentations (45 minutes): Students will present their character comparisons. I will provide feedback on their analyses and complete a presentation-skills rubric to help them prepare for the graded choice-novel presentations on day 5 of this unit. This meets objectives 2 and 3. Writing Introductions activity (40 minutes): Students will receive a handout with four examples of introductions to a formal paper. Students will read the introductions and select the ones they believe are the most and least effective. In groups of three or four, they will discuss their selections and write a list of the elements/techniques of a strong introduction and another list of the elements/techniques of a weak introduction. We will discuss as a class and create a comprehensive list of dos and donts. (If students are struggling with this, we can refer to the writing tutorial available at http://writingcenter.unc.edu/resources/handouts-demos/writingthe-paper/introductions.) Students will then have 15 minutes to compose rough introductions for their character-comparison essays. I will take these up and provide feedback. I will also post our list to Moodle so students can refer to it as they write essays throughout the semester. This activity meets objective one. Homework: Study for vocabulary test and complete choice-novel presentations.

English 12: Medieval Period Unit


Day 5 Friday, Jan. 27 Objectives: 1. Demonstrate understanding of vocabulary terms. 2. Identify and interpret themes of a student-selected novel. 3. Create visual representations of the themes of a student-selected novel. 4. Use effective presentation skills. Bell Ringer (5 minutes): Students will study for the vocabulary test. Other Activities: (15 minutes) Students will take the vocabulary test. When finished, students may review their notes for the choice-novel presentations. This meets objective one. (75 minutes) Students will give choice-novel presentations*. This meets objectives 2-4. *These presentations were assigned prior to this unit. Homework: A complete rough draft of the CT character-comparison essay is due Tuesday.

English 12: Medieval Period Unit


Day 6 Monday, Jan. 30 Objectives: 1. Define vocabulary terms. 2. Identify the correct use of quotations marks and italics/underlining. 3. Edit drafts to increase clarity, reduce errors in grammar and punctuation, and ensure that the style is suitable for the purpose and audience. Bell Ringer (10 minutes): I will post the weeks vocabulary terms and definitions on the board, as well as on Moodle. Students will spend 10 minutes working in pairs to write sentences using each of the terms. During this time, I will rotate between pairs to check for understanding. We will spend the remaining five minutes sharing sentences, and I will ask students to explain how the words are connected. Students will be expected to complete the activity for homework. This meets the first objective. Mini Grammar Lesson (5 minutes): Discuss why The Canterbury Tales should be italicized and not in quotation marks and why The Pardoners Tale is in quotation marks and not italicized. This meets objective 2. Discuss and pass out Bergeson Bonus cards. Presentations (15 minutes): Students who did not present their character-comparisons or summer-reading projects will present today. Writing Workshop (60 minutes): Students will check out laptops and conduct peer reviews of their character-comparison essays. I will point them to the proofreading checklist on p. 458 of their textbooks and go over a peer-editing checklist. During this time, I will rotate between pairs to check that each student has completed a rough draft and to offer guidance as needed. This activity meets objective 3. Homework: Pilgrim Charts are due tomorrow. Final drafts are due Thursday.

English 12: Medieval Period Unit


Day 7 Tuesday, Jan. 31 Objectives: 1. Identify attitudes toward women and marriage in 14th- century England. 2. Explain how the Wife of Baths Tale reflects on both her character and Chaucers view of marriage and women. Bell Ringer/Before Activity (15 minutes): Purpose to activate prior knowledge and make predictions Students will spend five minutes writing in response to the question, What do women want? I will then invite students to share their responses and introduce The Wife of Baths Tale by explaining that, in the story, the queen offers to spare the knights life if he can answer this question. Students will review their notes about the Wife of Bath in the pilgrim chart and the previous days worksheet and, with a partner, predict how the wife of Bath would answer the question and discuss what kind of story they believe the character would tell. During Activity (60 minutes): I will show a video of The Wife of Baths Tale prior to our reading. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_XJCOmcKadQ We will read lines 1-88 as a class, and students will read the remainder independently. I will post the following questions on the smart board for students to consider as/after they read: What new insights does The Wife of Baths Tale reveal about her character? The hag of the story says to the knight, Poverty is, though wanting in estate, / A kind of wealth that none calumniate. / Poverty often, when the heart is lowly, / Brings one to God and teaches what is holy (375-378). To what extent do these lines undermine the medieval belief in natural hierarchy? After Activity (10 minutes): Students will choose one of the above questions to respond to in a quick write and write one or two questions that they have about the text. I will take these up at the end of class. Homework: Final drafts of the CT character-comparison essays are due Thursday.

English 12: Medieval Period Unit


Day 8 Wednesday, Feb. 1 Objectives: 1. Write poems in the style of The Canterbury Tales. Bell Ringer (10 minutes): Quick Write Students will write a one-page response to the following questions: What is your most memorable experience on the Bob Jones campus? When you look back 10 years from now, what are you most likely to remember? Prologue Poems (60 minutes) Students will receive handouts for the Patriot Pilgrimage assignment and spend 10-15 minutes composing a 4- to 8-line poem for the class Prologue. The prologue portion of the assignment invites students to demonstrate their understanding of satire and parody by spoofing themselves. I will read the students prologue poems (as well as my own, as the host) before embarking on the Patriot Pilgrimage, during which students will read their longer poems recounting an important memory or event that took place on the Bob Jones campus. The prologue poem will be due at the end of class, allowing me to provide feedback before students complete the final Pilgrimage assignment, which is due Monday, Feb. 6. This activity meets objective 1. (Tell students about rhymezone.com, a website that they may use to help them find rhyming words for their poems.) Review (20 minutes): We will review the prologue and tales from The Canterbury Tales. Homework: Final drafts of the CT character-comparison essays are due tomorrow (paper copy in class or via Moodle by midnight). Patriot Pilgrimage poems are due Tuesday, Feb. 7.

English 12: Medieval Period Unit


Day 9 Thursday, Feb. 2 Objectives: Summarize the Knights Code of Chivalry. Determine how medieval society and cultural beliefs influence the literature produced at this time. Before Activity (20 minutes): Code of Conduct activity Purpose to activate prior knowledge and establish a purpose for reading Individually, students will spend five minutes jotting down character traits of the ideal student and the ideal teacher. Students will then form groups of three or four to synthesize their lists and answer the following questions: Is it possible for students and/or teachers to live up to this ideal? Do any of these character traits contradict another? I will ask students to share their responses and use this to segue into a brief discussion about the Knights Code of Chivalry. During Activity (45 minutes): Prior to reading excerpts from Le Morte dArthur (pp. 196-205 in the textbook), I will ask for volunteers to play the roles of each character. As we read the story aloud, students will act out the scene. After Activity (5 minutes): As an exit slip, students will write a brief response to the following question: How do King Arthurs men exemplify the Code of Chivalry in the battle with Sir Mordred? Prologue Poems (15 minutes): I will return students prologue poems with feedback and discuss common errors. Homework: Study for vocabulary quiz. Medieval Unit test is Monday, and Patriot Pilgrimage poems are due Tuesday.

English 12: Medieval Period Unit


Day 10 Friday, Feb. 3 Objectives: 1. Demonstrate understanding of vocabulary terms. 2. Identify and analyze the use of irony and satire. Bell Ringer (5 minutes): Students will study for the vocabulary test. Vocabulary Test (20 minutes): Students will take the vocabulary test. This meets objective one. Le Morte dArthur, continued (30 minutes): Le Morte dArthur, continued I will show clips from Monty Python and the Holy Grail and ask students to look for examples of satire and irony. We will discuss their findings as a class. Final Test Review (30 minutes): We will review for the Medieval Unit Test. I will ask students to summarize the texts weve read in class and to answer questions related to these works. Homework: Medieval Unit Test is Monday. Patriot Pilgrimage poems are due Tuesday.