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Energize the economy, restore the rule of law
and rebuild the damaged institutions
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
ANALYSIS
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
Aquino expected to brag
on anti-corruption gains
Red carpet
rolled out
at Batasan
yearly rite
The good, the bad and the forgotten
The Presidents promises:
LP seeks
shakeup
in Senate
leadership
Congress moves to reverse
ruling on its one vote in JBC
Chinese garrison up in Sansha
At half-staff. The US ag ies at half-staff at the US Embassy in Manila to honor those
killed in the shooting rampage by a gunman at a Colorado movie theatre during the premier
of the Batman movie The Dark Knight Rises. Twelve people were killed and 50 injured.
Ofcial seal. An employee
hangs the ofcial seal of the
President of the Philippines at the
podium where the president will
deliver his State of the Nation Ad-
dress. MANNY PALMERO
By Christian Cardiente
PRESIDENT Be-
nigno Aquino III
will today deliver
his third State-of-
the-Nation Address
before Congress and
to his bossesthe
Filipino people. It will
be his fourth major
speech since he won
the 2010 presidential
elections.
All past addresses contained
and reected the Presidents vision
for the country; his teams appre-
ciation of the problems besetting
our people and the priority plans
and strategies to address them; his
administrations focus and style of
governance; and the effectiveness
and sincerity of his leadership.
Those speeches also served as a
report card of his administrations
accomplishments.
By Macon R. Araneta
and Julito G. Rada
PRESIDENT Benigno Aqui-
no III is expected to trumpet
his achievements in ghting
corruption today in his State-
of-the-Nation Address, but
Senator Joker Arroyo says
graft continues to thrive in his
administration two years after
he came to power proclaiming
the straight path.
Corruption continues in
the lower echelons of the gov-
ernment, Arroyo said in an in-
terview with dzBB radio.
If you go to government of-
ces, its just the same from the
directors level down. Thats
the way it is, he said but ac-
knowledged some reforms at
the departmental level.
Arroyo said his driver was
given the run-around when he
sent him to pick up a parcel for
THE House of Representatives is
all set for the State-of-the-Nation
Address of President Benigno
Aquino III today.
The President is expected to
deliver his third SONA at 4 p.m.
Other than saying the speech
would be a look backward and a
look forward, Malacaang remained
tight-lipped on the details. It will be
delivered in Filipino with visual aids.
At least 1,700 former and in-
cumbent public ofcials are ex-
pected to troop to the Batasan
Complex in Quezon City to wit-
ness the Presidents third address
since he assumed ofce in 2010.
Apart from the 285 congress-
men and 23 senators, about 80
Next page
ALL SET FOR SONA
By Francisco S. Tatad
After an extremely barren two
years, President Benigno Aquino
III has a fresh opportunity of den-
ing his strategic vision, basic objec-
tives and policy directions for the
country when he delivers his third
State-of-the-Nation Address at the
nal session of the 15th Congress
which opens today. He cannot pass
it up.
So far, the bachelor-President
has led a charmed life. Blessed by
the lack of a genuine opposition,
an adversarial mainstream media,
or a militant public that unceas-
ingly demands its due, his conduct
of the presidency has by and large
escaped close and critical review.
He has been able to govern, if that
indeed is the right word, largely
through the media, making his war
on his immediate predecessor and
her former chief justice his chief
priority.
In his rst two Sonas, he
made the nation sit up by speak-
ing purely in Filipino, without
any simultaneous or written
translation for the foreign diplo-
matic corps or the non-Filipino-
speaking Cebuano. He was the
rst Filipino President ever to do
so, to his eternal credit. But his
rhetoric was a carryover from his
2010 campaign when the catchy
but ill-framed slogan (kung wa-
lang korap walang mahirap)
was sufcient to win the day.
His ability to deliver crisp,
punchy speeches in Filipino re-
mains a major asset, but he can-
not be using the same rhetoric.
In his third Sona, he will have to
show more substance than in his
rst two. He will have to nally
reveal a clear and coherent vision
for the country, spell out relevant
programs and policies, identify
targets and priorities, harness the
necessary resources and assign
the appropriate implementing
agencies.
TODAY
Standard
Manila
Vol. XXVI No. 135 22 Pages, 3 Sections
P18.00 MONDAY, July 23, 2012
www.manilastandardtoday.com mst@mstandardtoday.com
By Maricel V. Cruz
THE ruling Liberal Party is seeking
an alliance with other top political
parties to control the Senate and re-
place Senate President Juan Ponce
Enrile with Senator Franklin Dri-
lon, an LP stalwart, a source from
the Liberal Party said Sunday.
The ruling party wants to ally
with Senator Manuel Villars Na-
cionalista Party and businessman
Eduardo Cojuangcos National-
ist Peoples Coalition to boost its
chances of controlling the Senate
By Christine F. Herrera
THE House and Senate on Sunday re-
jected the Supreme Courts ruling and
asserted their continued joint presence
in the Judicial and Bar Council, claim-
ing Congress was there to ensure trans-
parency and checks and balances.
Senate President Juan Ponce En-
rile and JBC members Senator Fran-
cis Joseph Escudero and Iloilo Rep.
Niel Tupas Jr. blamed the 1987 fram-
ers of the Constitution for the over-
sight, saying they failed to consider
the vote when the government shifted
from a unicameral to a bicameral sys-
tem and retained the one vote for the
two houses.
THE The Association of Southeast
Asian Nations has agreed on a six-
point statement in line with Chinas
stand to turn the disputed South Chi-
na Sea into a sea of peace, friendship
and cooperation even as its central
authority approved to form a garri-
son on the newly established city of
Sansha, according to the state news
agency Xinhua.
The statement was an ofcial
response to the South China Sea is-
sue after the Asean failed to reach
a joint communique at the foreign
ministers meeting in Phnom Penh.
Life in a cart. A homeless
family copes with the realities
of life in a cart. They will be
unmindful of the Presidents
SONA. EY ACASIO
Next page
Next page
continued on page 5
Next page
Next page
Next page
News
ManilaStandardToday mst.daydesk@gmail.com JULY 23, 2012 MONDAY
A2
Former reporter Nixon Cua shot
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
Cua, 49, was at the house
of his brother Allyson, 46, at
the Ayala Greeneld Estates
when four armed men entered it
around 8 p.m. and one of them
red at Nixon, hitting him in
the face and body. Another gun-
man red at Allyson and hit
him in the shoulder, police said.
The gunmen then snatched a
handbag containing P90,000 and
an iPhone from Cuas 21-year-old
daughter Sue Anne before eeing.
Calamba police said they had
set up a task force to look into
the case and offered a P100,000
reward for the gunmens arrest.
Cua, a former reporter of
The Philippine Star, was ap-
pointed by President Joseph Es-
trada to head the PTA in 2000
after the agencys previous
chief, Lito Banayo, resigned.
The National Press Club said
Sunday it was dismayed by his
killing.
There is still much to be
done to improve the utterly
dismaying state of peace and
order in the country as evi-
denced by the recent attack
on... Nixon Cua, group presi-
dent Benny Antiporda said.
FORMER Philippine Tourism
Authority chief Nixon Cua was shot
Saturday night at the residence of his
younger brother in Calamba, Laguna,
and is now in critical condition at the
Calamba Medical Center, police said
Sunday.
Aquino ...
one of his children at the post
office.
Their heyday contin-
ues. Theyre still asking [for
bribes].
Arroyo said his office had
been receiving complaints
about rampant graft and cor-
ruption, and that some of the
victims had even taken the time
to visit his office personally.
Every day, thats happen-
ing, so its just the same as it
was in the past, Arroyo said.
Unlike most lawmakers, Ar-
royo said, he planned to skip
President Aquinos State-of-
the-Nation Address today, lik-
ening it to a beautiful fashion
show in which lawmakers
dress up in their expensive fin-
ery to listen to the Chief Ex-
ecutive talk about the same
things.
They have been talking
about the same things---their
achievements and what they
will do next year, so Im not
going, said Arroyo, who has
not been to a SONA since he
walked out of one during the
Ramos administration.
Aside from the main points
of the Presidents speech, the
media coverage of his previous
addresses have traditionally
focused on the battle of the
gowns among senators, con-
gresswomen, the wives of leg-
islators and their invited guests
who parade in gowns made by
the countrys top couturiers
and fashion designers.
Senator Loren Legarda on
Sunday said that Filipinos
needed to see how the adminis-
trations anti-corruption efforts
translated to food on the table,
education and health services
for all, access to clean energy,
and a healthy and secure envi-
ronment.
Governance policies, while
important, need to be translat-
ed into services and programs
whose benefits can be felt by
the ordinary Filipino, she
said. said.
The opposition members of
the House said they will not
boycott the Presidents speech
today, but expressed the hope
that he would focus on plans
for the economy rather than the
persecution of his political en-
emies on corruption charges.
We expect the President
to talk about his plans for the
country to achieve a robust
economy, but if he talks about
[anti-corruption], I wont be
surprised, said House Minor-
ity Leader Danilo Suarez.
Siquijor Rep. Orlando Fua
said he expected the President
to talk about his accomplish-
ments even if those had yet to
be realized.
I guess his SONA is going
to be an enumeration of his
performance, but nothing has
been performed, Fua said.
He said the administration
had yet to demonstrate that the
6.4-percent growth in the first
quarter could be maintained for
the rest of the year.
Business leaders, meanwhile,
said they were more interested
in President Aquinos plans for
the next four years than listen-
ing to his achievements.
Miguel Varela, president
of the Philippine Chamber of
Commerce and Industry, said
the business sector wanted
some pronouncements from the
President on how to make the
economy more stable and how
to attract more foreign direct
investments to generate more
jobs.
What is more important for
us are stable and predictable
macroeconomic fundamentals.
We want a clear-cut policy
direction aimed at attracting
more foreign direct invest-
ments, Varela said.
PCCI chairman Sergio Ortiz-
Luis said he expected the Presi-
dent to announce an increase in
the budget of the departments
responsible for producing jobs
in the country.
These departments include
the Department of Trade and
Industry and Department of
Science and Technology, he
said. With Maricel Cruz and
Gigi Muoz-David
On June 30, 2010, the Presi-
dent said the governments
foremost duty was to lift the
nation from poverty through
honest and effective gover-
nance. It would be done by
appointing ethical and honest
officials and by reviewing the
midnight appointments by the
previous administration.
He vowed to address the
classroom shortage and im-
prove school facilities, to boost
the infrastructure for transpor-
tation, tourism, and trade, and
to revive his mothers emer-
gency employment program.
The government would fight
corruption at the Bureau of In-
ternal Revenue and Customs
and raise revenue collection to
finance quality education, im-
prove public health services, and
provide a home for each family.
Mr. Aquino He promised to
strengthen the Armed forces
and the police and to provide
irrigation and farm implements
to farmers. The government
would reduce red tape and pro-
mote a predictable and consis-
tent investment environment.
A Truth Commission would
be formed and the peaceful and
just settlement of the conflict
in Mindanao would be pursued.
There would be a stronger
consultation and feedback
mechanism, and the President
would not ignore the orders
of his bosses. There would
be no more junkets, no more
senseless spending, no more in-
fluence-peddling, no more pa-
tronage politics, no more steal-
ing. No more sirens, no more
short cuts, no more bribes.
Barely a month into office,
Mr. Aquino disclosed a litany
of abuses and corrupt practices
by the previous administration
in his 2010 address. He pledged
to terminate the excessive perks
and allowances in state corpora-
tions, and to end wasteful use of
government funds through zero-
based budgeting.
In addition to the promises
made during his inauguration,
Mr. Aquino vowed to run after
tax evaders and punish the per-
petrators of summary killings.
He promised to implement
the Public-Private Partnership
program to boost the economy
and act as the primary vehicle
to fund infrastructure require-
ments, agricultural facilities, the
K+12 curriculum, and the dole
to the poor.
The President committed to
job creation and the pursuit of
legislative agenda including the
passage of the following bills:
(I) the fiscal responsibility bill,
(ii) amendment to the procure-
ment law, (iii) the anti-trust bill,
(iv) national land use, (v) the
whistle blowers bill, (vi) the fis-
cal incentives bill, and (vii) wit-
ness protection bill.
Perhaps due to the calamities
of 2010, the Presented shifted
his attention to environmental
woes during his 2011 speech and
considered making informal set-
tlers the stewards of coffee and
cacao trees in the governments
tree planting program.
He then vowed to pursue the
passage of the following bills, in
addition to those mentioned in
the 2010 speech: (i) compensa-
tion to the victims of martial law,
(ii) the kasambahay bill, (iii) im-
provement of the pension sys-
tem of retired soldiers, (iv) the
expansion of the DOST scholar-
ship, (v) universal quality health
care, and (vi) the establishment
of facilities during calamities.
In his 2011 speech, Mr. Aqui-
no cited record highs in the stock
market and improved credit rat-
ings for the country as indica-
tions of an improving economy
under his watch. According to
him, the government created
more jobs and there were less
poor and hungry Filipinos. Bil-
lions were poured into the gov-
ernments dole program.
Whether those corresponded
with the governments poverty
alleviation and inclusive growth
targets is yet to be determined.
For one, there have been sev-
eral reverse fluctuations in em-
ployment and hunger statistics
since the current administration
took to task. There were periods
when they were also up.
If it is an indication, there
has been a sharp increase in the
peoples disapproval rating and
a reduced approval rating of the
Aquino administration recently on
the issues of inflation, salary, cor-
ruption, poverty, and job creation.
In fact, there were indicators
suggesting that the administra-
tion should accelerate the execu-
tion of its plans and programs
and improve on the effective
utilization of its biased for
the poor and underprivileged
budget, if not to totally over-
haul its strategy. The countrys
economy slowed down to 3.7
percent in 2011 largely due to
governments infrastructure un-
der spending, from 7.6 percent
in 2010.
Two years down the road, the
governments PPP projects have
yet to make a tangible contribu-
tion to the economy. Of the 22
identified priority projects, only
the P1.96-billion Daang Hari-
South Luzon Expressway Link
Road has been awarded so far,
with most projects still on their
pre-feasibility or feasibility stage.
There were clamors for a more
able leadership from the Presi-
dent himself, and calls for more
competent people in his official
family.
All these beg the question: Are
these the governments response
to the promised poverty alle-
viation through effective gover-
nance?
While there is progress in
improving the welfare of the
uniformed personnel through
housing programs and upgraded
equipment; much remains to be
desired in addressing human
rights abuses and extra-judicial
killings in the country.
It is the same case with devel-
opments in the ongoing peace
talks with the rebel groups.
Leaders of the Moro Islamic
Liberation Front have criticized
the slow pace of the peace pro-
cess.
Meanwhile, according to a re-
cent report by the international
agency Human Rights Watch,
the Aquino administration has
made little progress in address-
ing impunity.
The government has largely
failed to prosecute military per-
sonnel implicated in such kill-
ings, even though strong evi-
dence exists in many cases. Only
seven cases of extra-judicial kill-
ings from the past decade have
been successfully prosecuted,
none of which were in 2011 or
involved active duty military
personnel, said HRW.
Anakbayan national chairman
Vencer Crisostomo said that
in the first quarter of the year
alone, an average of one youth
or student was abused by sol-
diers per week.
In all of our documented cas-
es, not a single soldier has been
prosecuted. This speaks volumes
about the Aquino administrations
stance on human rights. Even their
own yes-man who heads the
Commission on Human Rights
has admitted that they have done
nothing, he said, referring to
CHR commissioner and Aquino
ally Etta Rosales.
In addressing the classroom
shortage, the Department of
Education told Manila Standard
that 22,066 classrooms have
been built since Mr. Aquino as-
sumed office, down from the
66,800 classroom shortfall.
But Anakbayan and Kabataan
Partylists say otherwise, argu-
ing that the classroom shortage
and other basic public education
problems have actually wors-
ened under the Aquino adminis-
tration.
The Alliance of Concerned
Teachers, meanwhile, questioned
the government figure, saying that
by their own estimates, class-
room shortage numbers are still at
more than 100,000.
On the proposed bills, Malaca-
ang said that most bills are al-
ready in the advanced stage of
legislation at the Congress. The
Lower House in April passed the
bill protecting whistleblowers.
The SONA contains the
plans and programs of the gov-
ernment, by order of impor-
tance. While many of promises
in the past addresses are yet to
be met or have been totally for-
gotten, a fresh list of vows will
be made today.
LP ...
and changing its leadership,
according to the source who
refused to be named.
The Liberal Party already
controls the House of Rep-
resentatives, and it now ap-
pears it wants to also con-
trol the Senate by easing out
Enrile, a member of former
President Joseph Estradas
Partido ng Masang Pilipino.
That has been discussed
in one of our meetings, the
source said.
We may exploit the immi-
nent alliance for next years
polls with other political par-
ties to secure the Senates
leadership.
The source said the LP,
which has Drilon and Sena-
tors Francisco Pangilinan,
Ralph Recto and Teofisto
Guingona III, was eyeing to
get at least 12 of the 23 sena-
tors, adding that the Nacio-
nalista Party now had five
senators: Villar, Alan Peter
Cayetano, Pia Cayetano, Fer-
dinand Marcos Jr. and Anto-
nio Trillanes IV.
It remains a tough chal-
lenge for us to convince the
group of Senator Villar to
back our candidate [Drilon]
for the Senate presidency,
the source said.
He said the Liberal Party
was also counting on NPC
members Senators Loren
Legarda and Vicente Sotto
III, although we admit that
Senator Sotto is a staunch
supporter of Enrile.
The source said Villar had
influence over fellow Nacio-
nalistas senators Joker Arroyo,
Lito Lapid and Miriam De-
fensor-Santiago, all of whom
could support the Liberal Par-
ty in its attempt to change the
Senates leadership.
We are also banking on the
support of Senator Ping [Pan-
filo] Lacson, who might be ap-
pointed by President Aquino to
the Cabinet, and even Senator
Serge Osmea who is close to
the President, the source said.
He said Senator Ramon
Revilla Jr. might also back
the LPs plan to secure the
Senate presidency.
Enrile will be left with
the solid support of Senators
Jinggoy Estrada and Grego-
rio Honasan, the source said.
Red...
former lawmakers had
also confirmed their atten-
dance, said House Secre-
tary General Marilyn Yap.
Other dignitaries, includ-
ing former Presidents, for-
eign diplomats and local
government officials, were
also expected, Yap said.
Political observers said
some officials and guests
were expected to make a
fashion statement by wear-
ing their best clothes.
Yap said security had
been in place as early as
last week, and that the Ba-
tasang Pambansa had been
locked down since Friday.
Weve put up perimeter se-
curity considering that the num-
ber of informal settlers around
the Batasan has increased,
Yap said, referring to the
squatters around the complex.
The National Po-
lice said 5,000 policemen
would be deployed out-
side the Batasan Complex.
The members of the Police
Security Protection Group
will secure the VIPs and their
guests, and the members of
the Special Action Force
will provide area security.
Metro Manila troops will also
be on standby, while the Bureau
of Fire Protection will deploy
31 fire trucks and nine ambu-
lances at the Batasan complex.
Police said thousands of
protesters from the mainly
leftist groups were expected,
but the weather bureaus pre-
diction of continuing rain
for Monday could dampen
the expected protest actions.
Mondays rain would come
as a result of the southwest mon-
soon, weather forecaster Ben-
jie de Paz said. Maricel Cruz
and Jonathan Fernandez
Escudero said the Solicitor
General would be the one to
file the joint motion for recon-
sideration and put forward the
House and Senates position
on the issue.
He said he remained hopeful
that the high court could still
overturn its decision declar-
ing Congress should be rep-
resented by only one member
in the Judicial and Bar Coun-
cil, the body that recommends
the appointees for the vacan-
cies that may arise in Supreme
Court and the lower courts.
But Senator Joker Arroyo said
the Supreme Court would not
change its ruling.
Still, Enrile rejected the rul-
ing that the House and Senate
were only entitled to one vote
or half a vote each.
I dont think that was indi-
cated in the Constitution, he
said.
The only thing I can say is
that if a retired Justice of the
Supreme Court will have one
vote, why shouldnt a repre-
sentative of either House of
Congress have a vote? A vote
of equal weight?
Enrile said that when the
Constitution was amended in
1987, the framers of the new
Constitution were thinking of
a single House.
All of a sudden it became
two Houses, and they did not
repair these provisions. That is
why there is a need to review
the Constitution.
Tupas described the high
court ruling as absurd.
In our motion for reconsid-
eration, are argument is simple:
If one of us will take leave, it
is no longer called Congress. If
the Senate remains, that is no
longer Congress. If the House
remains, that is also not Con-
gress, Tupas said.
He said the JBC would be
more transparent if a senator
and a congressman was not
transparent. They would act as
fiscalizers in the council.
The JBC is under the su-
pervision of the [high court].
The Presiding Officer is a
[Supreme Court] member, he
said.
If the votes of Congress are
curtailed, in a way this favors
the [high court]. I feel there are
lots of maneuvers here and they
cannot control and manipulate
the two members of Congress
because we are there as part of
the checks and balances.
Tupas said even the proposal
to open the Councils proceed-
ings to the media came from
Congress.
Enrile said it was also com-
pelling that all justices of the
Supreme Court should pass
confirmation from the power-
ful Commission on Appoint-
ments whose members were
senators and congressmen.
Tupas said the motion for
reconsideration would be filed
Monday or Tuesday. With
Macon Ramos-Araneta
The statement covered the
implementation of the Decla-
ration on the Conduct of Par-
ties in the South China Sea,
the need for an early conclu-
sion of a regional code of
conduct, full respect for the
universally recognized prin-
ciples of international law, the
continued exercise of self re-
straint and non-use of force
by all parties, and the peace-
ful resolution of conflicts, Xi-
nhua reported.
Foreign Ministry spokes-
man Hong Lei said China val-
ued its relationship with the
10-member Asean bloc and
was willing to work together
with the members open to
consultations with the Asean
on the conclusion of a Code
of Conduct in the South China
Sea.
The Peoples Liberation
Armys Guangzhou Military
Command said Friday the
Central Military Commission
had authorized it to form the
garrison on a division-level
command under the PLAs
Hainan provincial sub-com-
mand, responsible for manag-
ing Sanshas defense mobili-
zation, military reserves and
carrying out military opera-
tions.
Xinhua said the PLAs San-
sha Garrison Command would
be under the dual leadership
of the Hainan provincial sub-
command and the citys civil-
ian leaders.
The Asean last week failed
to issue a joint communique
for the first time since it was
founded in 1967.
Xinhua said the failure was
over the Philippines and Viet-
nams requests to include the
bilateral maritime dispute in
the document.
Chinese ...
Congress..
The good...
News
ManilaStandardToday
mst.daydesk@gmail.com JULY 23, 2012 MONDAY
A3
Audit billions of relief aidLegarda
House bill to benet NBN-4
Corruption not
Constitution
Arroyo
Policy on
tourists
imposed
A BILL has been led in the House
of Representatives seeking to amend
the law that banned the government-
owned television network NBN-4
from selling advertising to generate
income, a network ofcial said on
Sunday.
Julmunin Jannara, vice presi-
dent of NBN Employees Asso-
ciation, said the bill, authored by
Leyte Rep. Lucy Torres-Gomez,
would allow the television network
to generate advertising income to
fund its operations and rehabilita-
tion.
The network needs capital infusion
to make it self-sufcient and commer-
cially viable again, Jannaral said.
NBN-4, which started operation in
1974, was intended as a public-service
network. Its operations is subsidized by
the government and it needs capital infu-
sion so it can compete with commercial
networks in terms of programming.
Jannaral said the network would
ask the government to increase its
budget from P1 billion to P5 billion to
sustain its operational requirements.
The re-positioning of NBN-4
is crucial from being known as the
government television station into
being regarded as a public service
network. We are behind the good
representative Lucy Torres-Gomez
in her push for signicant changes
in NBN, Jannaral said.
By Macon Ramos-Araneta
Sen. Loren Legarda on Sunday
called for an audit of billions
of pesos donated by foreign
governments and international
humanitarian groups to help
families displaced by Typhoon
Sendong that devastated Cagayan
de Oro City and neighboring areas
last year.
Legarda said the government released P961 million
from the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Man-
agement Fund for recovery projects in addition to the
$500 million from the World Bank, $7.4 million from
the United Nations, and $25 million from other coun-
tries and foreign communities.
Despite the huge amount for their rehabilitation, al-
most 4,000 families still live in evacuation centers un-
der difcult conditions and with barely enough money
for food and other basic needs.
These families survived a disaster, but they con-
tinue to suffer to this day, Legarda said. I am deeply
saddened that seven months after Sendong, as many as
3,995 families are still living in evacuation centers.
Legarda visited the Sendong survivors in Barangay
Canituan in Cagayan de Oro City last week. The evac-
uees appealed for livelihood assistance and said they
lack basic necessities such as water and electricity.
Nearly 1,000 people were killed in landslides
and flash floods when Sendong hit the area shortly
before Christmas in 2011. Thousands were rendered
homeless and many of them sought shelter in evacu-
ation centers.
Legarda said government agencies and institutions
that received Sendong donations should report how the
funds were utilized.
How was this vast amount of donations used?
Legarda said, asking that they should report the sta-
tus of the funds, the number of beneficiaries and oth-
er data because of speculations of possible misuse of
donated funds.
Look, whos behind Pnoy. Activists denounced US involvment in Philippine affairs during a demonstration at the
Chino Roces bridge near Malacanang on the eve of President Aquinos State of the Nation Address. EY ACASIO
By Eric Apolonio
THE Bureau of Immigration
would impose nes on airlines
that allow foreign tourists to
board an aircraft and travel to
the Philippines without return
tickets, airport operations chief
Ben Se said on Sunday.
Se said the administrative
order on return tickets issued
by Immigration Commission-
er Ricardo David, which takes
effect today, is an internation-
al practice, which is imple-
mented in almost all countries
in the world.
This rule is meant to guar-
antee that a tourist will leave the
host country before the lapse of
his stay as a temporary visitor,
David said in his order.
Section 29 of the Immigra-
tion Act provides that aliens
who arrive as tourists would be
excluded and sent back to their
port of origin they do not have
valid return or onward tickets.
Balikbayans are exempted
because they are former citizens
of the Philippines. But their stay
is limited to one year.
Ed Monreal, Airline Opera-
tors Council chairman and Ca-
thay Pacic Station Manager,
said they have been implement-
ing for some time the no return
ticket, no entry to the Philip-
pines to all tourists who come
to the country.
THE government
should eliminate graft
and corruption to lure
foreign investors into
the country rather than
amend the constitu-
tion to suit their needs,
Senator Joker Arroyo
said on Sunday.
Investors complain
of corruption in busi-
ness deals and not the
60-40 ownership pro-
vision of the consti-
tuion in favor of Fili-
pinos, Arroyo said in a
radio interview.
It is the difculty
of investing and put-
ting up a company
here. There was al-
ready corruption even
before they can put up
their business. Their
application for permits
often drag for a long
time due to various
regulations, Arroyo
said.
The Philippines has
lagged behind other
countries in Asia in
terms of foreign in-
vestments and some
sectors have proposed
amending the econom-
ic provisions of the
constitutiion such as
the 60-40 ownership
requirement to attract
investors.
So we are lagging
behind in terms of in-
vestments. If they are
not coming here, its
not due to the consti-
tutional provision on
60-40 sharing, but be-
cause of the way we
handle and respond to
their invesstments,
Arroyo said.
But the 25-year-old
constitution should be
reviewed to make it at-
tuned to the changing
times, Arroyo said.
He said charter
amendments can be
introduced if Presi-
dent Aquino decides
that it is necessary
because we have
a unitarian form of
government and not a
truly respresentative
democracy.
What the President
wants, that will hap-
pen, Arroyo said.
Opinion Adelle Chua, Editor
ManilaStandardToday
mst.lettertotheeditor@gmail.com JULY 23, 2012 MONDAY
A4
AS Congress resumes sessions
today, House Speaker Feliciano
Belmonte has yet again given us
accid assurances that the long-
delayed reproductive health bill
might nally get passed. Lack-
ing in rmness and conviction,
this promise is consistent with
Mr. Belmontes unblemished
record of failure to date to move
this crucial piece of legislation
forward.
Under his leadership, the
House of Representatives has
allowed the bill, which seeks
to establish a national policy
on population management, to
languish in endless committee
debates, only to be set aside for
more important national con-
cerns such as impeaching the
Presidents political enemies.
This despite the extensive and
spirited debates that have oc-
casioned the bills introduction,
both inside and outside the halls
of Congress.
We will try our best to have
these measures approved at
least before the year ends,
Belmonte said of the repro-
ductive health bill and the
freedom of information bill,
another piece of legislation
that appears to be a priority
in name only. That limp prom-
ise stands in stark contrast to
the braggadocio he displayed
when he and his lieutenants
went after the chief justice of
the Supreme Court with ham-
mer and tongs, emboldened
by his marching orders from
the Palace. The same compari-
sons can be made to how this
Congress has obediently ap-
plied a rubber stamp to every
Palace budget request since
Mr. Aquino came to power,
with little regard for how he is
shoveling mountains of hard-
earned taxpayers money into
the maw of an unproductive
dole program.
As uninspiring as the Speak-
ers words were, the House
majority leader, Rep. Neptali
Gonzales II, was even less reas-
suring when he said last week
that the window for approving
the reproductive health bill was
closing fast.
Realistically, we are running
out of time to pass the bill,
Gonzales was quoted as saying,
rattling off his reasons for saying
so including several congres-
sional breaks and the campaign-
ing that is expected before the
2013 mid-term elections.
But the bills author, Albay
Rep. Edcel Lagman, correctly
points out that political will, not
time, is the commodity that is in
short supply.
This lack of political will
springs from the banks of the
Pasig River, where the Palace
has paid only lip service to
making the bill a priority and
sought unsuccessfully to push
a watered-down version of the
measure to appease the Catholic
Church.
We certainly would like to
see the end to the debates but
again, we will leave it with the
legislature as to when the de-
bates will end and there will be
an up or down vote on the RH
bill, a presidential spokesman
said, effectively passing the
buck to an ineffective House.
The supporters of the bill in
the House say they will soldier
on, but success can only be
achieved when the House lead-
ers show something they have
hitherto kept well hiddena bit
of spine.
Limp promises
The chief justice and
the Supreme Court
BETWEEN Facts and Norms is
the title Habermas gives the tome
that he calls his contribution to a
discourse theory of law and democ-
racy. It is, in every respect, typi-
cally Habermas: in its theme, in the
reliance on communicative action
(that he thoroughly takes up in the
two-volume Theory of Communi-
cative Action) and in a style that
can be virtually opaque if one is un-
familiar with the Habermas corpus.
He devotes an entire section of his
work to the role of the constitu-
tional court -- by which he means
the court with jurisdiction to pass
upon constitutionality -- in a democ-
racy. In the Philippines, of course,
this is the Supreme Court. The el-
emental right in a
discourse theory
of democracy
and of law is the
right to partici-
pate in discourse.
That form of ra-
tional exchange
between persons
who regard each
other as equals,
and therefore re-
spond to each
others demands
for justication of questioned
claims, is juris-generative. It is
the well-spring of legitimacy; it is
the condition for the validity of law.
In a representative democracy, of
course, collective will-formation is
verticalized in a Legislature that
must itself be permeable so that the
exchange among legislators is not
only discourse between the elected
representatives of the people but
also permeated by collective will-
formation.
One function he assigns the con-
stitutional court is to be the apex
of the judiciarys self-examination.
That, to me, is a very interesting
thesis. It has occurred several times
in our legal history that the Supreme
Court has been called upon to rule
on the limits of its own authority
and power, the latest having to do
with the impeachment of former
Chief Justice Renato Corona. When
you ask such questions as whether
or not deliberations internal to the
court may be disclosed via a dis-
senting opinion, or whether the
Supreme Court may pass upon the
validity of Articles of Impeach-
ment, or whether a TRO may issue
to suspend trial before the Senate,
the Judiciary, through the Supreme
Court, must perforce ask itself about
the breadth of judicial power. And
it does not follow that the resolu-
tion of such issues will always be in
favor of an ever increasing reach of
judicial power, because that would
be to suppose that the members of
the High Court hold values diverse
from those of the members of the
coordinate branches of government.
While there is a difference be-
tween the legislative audience
and the judicial audience, it still is
reasonable to insist that the base of
consensus be broadened. A relaxed
judicial attitude in relation to the
requirement of standing is con-
sistent with expanding the consen-
sual base. For quite some time, we
have seen the Court waver between
severity and laxity. In some cases
we have read it demand of parties
that they show real interest in or in-
jury resulting from the enforcement
of legislation or assailed executive
action. Thankfully, however, we
have a growing number of cases
maintaining that in cases of tran-
scendental signicance (a phrase, I
imagine, that the Court can only ut-
ter with unction!)
standing does
not have to fulll
the requirement
of real-party-in-
interest. In fact,
the oral argu-
ment before the
Supreme Court
is an eminent ex-
hibition of that
rationality that
Habermas makes
the ultimate court
of appeal. There
are, to be sure, thinkers like Justice
Posner who are wary of putting too
much faith in discourse. Exchang-
es, Posner wryly observes, hardly
bring about consensus. They only
serve to highlight irreconcilable dif-
ferences. I share the frustration, but
I am not quite ready to give up on
rationality!
In passing upon the constitution-
ality of laws, the Supreme Court, in
Habermas thought, plays the role of
guardian of the consistency of the
legal order. Logic, of course, is by
no means the preserve of justices of
the Supreme Court, so others can be
guardians of the consistency of the
legal order -- but to safeguard such
consistency with the power to call
upon the States reserve of force for
purposes of enforcement, that is the
prerogative of the Supreme Court.
Of course, this role becomes all the
more troublesome if the Supreme
Court itself contributes to inconsis-
tency in the form of unstable doc-
trine (equal to non-doctrine!) and
the now proverbial ip-opping.
But Habermas is cognizant of the
counter-majoritarian difculty: the
ever recurrent problem of why the
unelected should interdict the will
of the elected. My answer to this
has always been straightforward:
Government has never been -- and
cannot practicably be -- by the elect-
ed alone.
EDITORIAL
A conditional investment
WE hope that todays State of the Na-
tion Address of President Benigno
Aquino III reects the realization that
the time for blaming his predecessor,
ex-President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo,
for all the problems of the Philippines is
over because it is not credible anymore.
Mr. Aquino has already completed one-
third of his six-year term and the blame
game will not work anymore. He has been
in ofce for two years already and if there
is anyone to blame for anything, it would
already be him and his ofcials.
They have been in charge of things for
a long time already and have had the pow-
er to do what they have to do to correct
whatever shortcomings, real or imagined,
of the Arroyo administration were.
Its been two years already, Mr.
President. What the people would like
to hear in your Sona are your plans to
improve the lives of Filipinos in your
remaining four years in ofce.
***
British American Tobacco, which re-
turned to the Philippines in February after
abandoning the country in 2009, is an ex-
ample of a foreign investor that the Philip-
pines does not need and should not want.
BAT, which sells Lucky Strike in
the Philippines but has other brands
like Kent, Dunhill and Pall Mall in the
international market, is what is best de-
scribed as a conditional investor.
The companys intention to invest in
the Philippines only if certain conditions
that it has set are met was clear from the
candidly blunt statement of BATs Philip-
pine operations CEO James Lafferty who
said: We are committed to investing in
the Philippines a minimum of $200 mil-
lion [roughly P8 billion] over ve years.
We have been clear, we will not pour the
money in unless excise tax reform is done.
It is contingent on excise tax reform.
Lafferty must have been encour-
aged to make such imperious statement
by the willingness of some members
of the House of Representatives to do
BATs bidding. Such hectoring, how-
ever, might have the opposite effect on
Pres. Aquino who might nd the threat
of BAT not to continue with its $200
million investment, to be made in a ve-
year installment, a bit too much.
Actually there is no problem with
the bluster coming from Lafferty if
what BAT really wants is simply a
level playing eld. In previous inter-
views, he has said that all they want is
for Lucky Strike to pay the same ex-
cise tax as the other brands at the same
price. He claims that they dont want
any special treatment and they dont
want special grants from the govern-
ment.
But of course this is not what Laffer-
ty and BAT actually want. The proposed
legislation that the company wants
Congress to pass will grant the British
company huge tax concessions and give
Lucky Strike and other brands that BAT
will introduce in the Philippines special
treatment at the expense of locally pro-
duced brands.
The bill that BAT wants to be enact-
ed into law will impose a record-break-
ing tax increase in Philippine history.
But guess what; BAT brands will be
exempted from the huge tax increases
which will be imposed only on locally
produced low-priced and mid-priced
cigarettes.
BAT claims that there is no discrimi-
nation because the sin tax bill it wants
to be passed will impose the same taxes
as the premium brands that it imports as
those imposed on locally produced mid
and high-priced brands.
This is not true. The nal version of
the BAT-backed sin tax bill approved
by the House of Representatives just
before Congress went into recess will
virtually give BAT a tax holiday on the
rst year of the implementation of the
cigarette tax reform law.
Under the bill approved by the
House, mid-priced, high-priced and
premium brands will now be lumped
together. Mid-priced brands currently
taxed P7.56 per pack will pay P28.30 on
the rst year. High-priced brands now
paying P12 will also pay P28.30 in tax-
es. BATs Lucky Strike which now pays
P28.30 will pay the same amount in the
rst year of the bills implementation.
Thus mid-priced brands will be im-
posed a 274-percent increase. High-
priced brands will get a 135-percent
increase. BATs brand will get a zero-
percent tax hike.
In the second year of implementa-
tion under the House version, all brands
whether mid-priced, high priced or
premium will be taxed P30 per pack.
This means that BATs brand will get
a six-percent increase during the entire
two-year transition period while total
tax hikes for high-priced brands will
amount to 150 percent and mid-priced
brands will have a 297 percent increase.
This is BATs version of fairness and
a level playing eld. It says we have to
accept it -- or else it will not invest in
the Philippines.
ALVIN
CAPINO
COUNTER-POINT
FR. RANHILIO
CALLANGAN AQUINO
PENSES
The choice of a
chief justice is too
serious a business
to be left to color
preferences!
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MEMBER
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The National Association
of Philippine Newspapers PPI
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Turn to page 5
JULY 23, 2012 MONDAY
A5 Opinion Adelle Chua, Editor
ManilaStandardToday
mst.lettertotheeditor@gmail.com
A DAY after the July 9 publication of
my article entitled A deplorable busi-
ness practice, in Standard Today
where I scored the continued denial by
Mitsubishi Motors that there is anything
wrong with its Montero sports vehicle
four persons contacted me about ac-
cidents involving the Montero in ex-
actly the same way it has happened to
other Montero users, with the vehicle
suddenly accelerating to full speed, un-
controlled and un-commanded.
One came from a fellow female law-
yer who narrated how her brother, a
skilled driver, got the scare of his life.
One Sunday, as her brother started the
Montero to back out from the garage,
the vehicle suddenly, and without the
accelerator being stepped on, went on
full speed in the re-
verse position. When
the vehicle would
not stop despite his
stepping hard on the
brake pedal, he had
the sense to shift to
drive from a re-
verse position. This
slowed down the
Montero until he was
able to completely stop it. The lawyer
attributes the success of her brother in
halting the vehicle to her brothers years
of driving and presence of mind. Still,
her brother now refuses to drive the
Montero again for fear that the same
weird incident might happen. She said
that she has been paying hard-earned
money to defray the vehicles amortiza-
tion; now she cant even use it.
A similar occurrence of sudden un-
intended acceleration was narrated by
another lawyer involving his Montero
sport vehicle. After the incident, he said
he brought his Montero to the dealer for
check-up only to be told later that there
was nothing wrong with it. Another reader
said that her friends car was parked when
a Montero, from a parked position, sud-
denly rammed into her car. The driver of
the Montero claimed his vehicle suddenly
surged forward uncontrollably. One read-
er asked what Mitsubishi has done, apart
from denying that there is anything wrong
with the Montero. To this reader and to
the general public, the ofcial stand of
Mitsubishi is embodied in the following
statement which is published in its Web-
site and which it gives to Montero owners
who complain: Mitsubishi Motors Phil-
ippines Corporation would like to inform
the public that the Sudden Unintended
Acceleration claims insinuating that the
Montero sport is defective are without
any basis. xxx MMPC would like to cau-
tion the public that pedal application er-
rors (driver unintentionally stepping on
the gas pedal instead of the brake pedal)
may cause sudden unintended accelera-
tion. The statement goes on to say that
Owners/drivers should always be mind-
ful of their driving, making sure to step on
the brake pedal when starting and when
shifting gears. The statement adds that
owners should read the vehicle manual
as there are important reminders there on
proper driving procedure.
As if rubbing salt to a wound, Mitsubi-
shi pins the blame on driver or pedal error.
The claim of Mitsubishi is that all the 36
or so reported cases of sudden unintended
acceleration of the Montero was due to
driver or pedal error. If this is not a matter
for Ripleys, I do not know what is.
Dr. Antony Anderson, a British elec-
trical engineering consultant, made an
exhaustive study on this phenomenon
when he was asked to testify as an ex-
pert witness in New Zealand involving
a Mitsubishi Outlander which crashed
into the glass window of a store. He
said that there are two mutually exclu-
sive causes of the sudden unintended
acceleration of a vehicles installed with
an electronic throttle system. The rst
is vehicle malfunction where the elec-
tronic throttle moves un-commanded
to a fully open position. The second
is driver malfunction or the startle hy-
pothesis. In the startle hypothesis, the
driver gets startled and, because of his
shock, steps on the accelerator instead
of the brake. Anderson said, however,
that under this hypothesis, there must be
an initiator or cause of the startlement
that sets off the chain of events resulting
in sudden acceleration In other words,
he said, the vehicle must have malfunc-
tioned in some way, startling the driver
into carrying out an emergency braking
operation. This hypothesis depends on
having a cause of startlement. With-
out any pre-cursor of
the startle or pedal
error, this hypothesis
is implausible, Dr.
Anderson explained.
In such a case, he
said, there can only
be one other reason
for the sudden unin-
tended acceleration
of a vehiclevehi-
cle malfunction. Dr. Andesons theory
for which he credits another expert, Mr.
Ron Belt, is that more likely, a tempo-
rary deciency in the electrical power
supply, resulting from an ageing battery
causes the temporary brownout in
the vehicle, forcing it to make a sudden
full throttle to charge the battery. Then,
when the voltage rises again, the elec-
tronic control unit could re-start with in-
correct system values stored in memory,
causing sudden acceleration.
We have been watching and writing
about the sudden unintended accelera-
tion of the Mitsubishi Montero in this
column in the hope of awakening Mit-
subishis social conscience. In the his-
tory of the car manufacturing industry,
car makers have recalled models with
defects to spare the public from loss of
life, limb, and property. In 2009, for
instance, Nissan Motor Co. voluntarily
recalled 50,000 units of Nissan Sentra
fearing that a faulty positive battery
terminal could stall the vehicles while
in motion. In June 2011, Volvo recalled
certain models because the power steer-
ing uid may leak from the oil pipe
connection at the steering gear valve. In
March 2012, BMW voluntarily recalled
1.3 million cars worldwide due to a pos-
sible problem of the battery cable which
might cause electrical system malfunc-
tioning or failure to start. Also in March
2012, Toyota recalled, on two separate
recalls, 680,000 vehicles in the US. The
rst recall involved airbags in pick-ups;
the other involved faulty brake lights in
sedans and crossovers. Then, in the rst
week of July this year, Audi recalled
some 13, 172 units of certain models
manufactured in 2011 on suspicion that
their sun roof panels may break in ex-
tremely cold temperatures.
Incidents of sudden unintended ac-
celeration involving the 2009 to 2011
models of the Montero sport vehicle
continue to happen. Still, Mitsubishi
continues to deny that the vehicle is de-
fective. Can Mitsubishi not take the he-
roic course, as other car manufacturers
have, if only to save lives and its busi-
ness reputation, too?
Email: ritalindaj@gmail.com Visit:
www.jimenolaw.com.ph
Montero watch
in progress
What the Sona must be
THE reportage on the run-up to the State
of the Nation Address is becoming too
formulaic.
Theres the barrage of trafc adviso-
ries, the de rigueur mass calisthenics of
anti-riot cops, the pre-Sona kodakan of
rally leaders and police ofcers as they
discuss the ground rules of their traditional
fourth-Monday-of-July street patintero.
From the Palace come hints of what
the Sona will contain, which despite be-
ing given in small morsels, still draw
canned applause from the hallelujah
chorus in the House, the loudest of
which comes from the likes who want to
be included in the salubong contingent
that will fetch the President.
Up in the Batasan, theres the foot-
age of the spruced-up grounds, and
downtown, of militants applying nish-
ing touches on the efgies that will be
burned. Why, even bomb-snifng dogs
are having their 15 seconds of fame.
And because the SONA is the haute
couture event of the year , I wont be
surprised at all if some socialite invites
a TV crew into her boudoir to show the
gown shell be will wearing when she
sashays down the fashion runway that is
the Batasan red carpet.
To ll what would otherwise be a lot
of dead air, were being fed with llers
that dont improve the national conver-
sation on the state of the nation.
I hope that when the President
mounts the rostrum this afternoon, focus
will shift on the substance of his report
and no longer on the sartorial style of his
perfumed audience.
A Sona is part looking back, part look-
ing forward. As a friend told me, a Sona is
a one-man play of two acts. First is the sa
una part, which will dwell on the what
went before, which will then segue to the
sana portion, on what we hope for.
A Sona is not merely an accounting
of what the government did during
the time the earth took one revolution
around the sun.
It is for this reason that when the
President reads his speech from the tele-
prompter this afternoon , he shouldnt
treat it as a rear-view mirror. Instead he
should see it as a high-denition screen
that shows the road ahead.
Only by imagining the future and
projecting it with clarity to his fellow
citizens will he be able to transform his
Sona into a pep rally for the country, one
that will lift the spirits of the people and
boost their morale.
But oratorical ourish alone does
not make a great motivational speech.
Something more than theatrics will
move this nation to a common goal.
People will still rate a speech not by
the pitch-perfect cadences it was deliv-
ered, but by the calls and the challenges
it contained. Immune to rhetoric, people
will choose the message over the medium.
This is probably why many are pin-
ning so much hope on the Sona. The ex-
pectation is that there will be something
for everybody in that speech.
But unless the President speaks at
3,000 words per minute and we have a
listening comprehension that matches
that speed, it would be impossible for
Mr. Aquino to compress the nations as-
pirations in an hour-long speech.
The fact is the Sona is not an audio Of-
cial Gazette that will re off one scal
years worth of general instructions to the
bureaucracy. It is neither an almanac of so-
lutions to our woes nor an encyclopedia of
answers to all our problems.
Yet, many are of the opinion that the
Sona must be a veritable alphabet soup
of forthcoming programs that will be
spoon fed to us. They want the Sona to
touch on all our problems from A to Z.
With the breadth and depth of our
troubles, it can never be. Let me just
pick one letter in the alphabet the
letter C -- and cite the challenges be-
ginning with that letter which I hope the
President would touch, even briey, in
his annual pontication.
I call them the Big Cs that must be
licked.
First is the China problem. Were
all ears on how he will handle a neigh-
borhood bully who treats our backyard
pond as his own shpond. If the Presi-
dent skips it, for he himself has pressed
the mute button on our ofcials loud-
speakers, then we will understand. Chi-
nas transgressions however have been
so brazen that we have to break radio
silence from time to time.
Our quandary is that acoustics war is
our only weapon and the only one were
good at. We can scribble words and load
them in our propaganda artillery while
China can scramble ships and planes.
Our dilemma is that China speaks softly
but carries a big stick while we speak
loudly but can only carry a toothpick.
Second is criminality. Without doubt
theres an epidemic of lawlessness rag-
ing. When adolescents act like ma-
rauders in Edsa and rob cars in daylight
while escaping across the tall fence of
the MRT, then a crime contagion is in-
deed in our midst.
Third are our chaotic streets. Billions
of pesos are lost to trafc, in terms of
wasted fuel and foregone economic op-
portunities when its gridlock in parking
lots masquerading as roads, not to men-
tion the trafc accidents.
Ill stop at three in just one letter
alone. If next year some headway is
made in licking these items in our Milky
Way of problems, I will already be a
happy man.
Many would dismiss these as inconse-
quential concerns that are mere dots in our
universe of worries. But if we cant solve
them, then how can we solve poverty?
Continued from page 1
He will need to do this to prepare for
and prevail in next years midterm elec-
tions, which could serve as a popular
referendum on his administration after
three years. Without any solid achieve-
ment, the only other way the adminis-
tration could prevail in such an election
would be to manipulate the process by
ultimately controlling the precinct count
optical scan machines.
In talking about his achievements,
Mr. Aquino may nd it natural to refer
to the reported 6.4-percent GDP growth
during the last quarter, the strong peso,
and the $1 billion-loan the government
has extended to the International mon-
etary Fund to help in the bailout of Eu-
rope. These are not to be sneered at, but
he would be well-advised not to over-
state their merit. Just as one swallow
does not a summer make, a relatively
high growth for one quarter does not
quite establish a trend.
The strong peso must be seen within
the context of the weak euro and the weak
U.S. dollar. But Mr. Aquino must not for-
get that the dollar-earning Overseas Fili-
pino Workers and Filipino exporters are
the ones bearing the cost and are being
punished by this strong peso.
As for the country becoming a net
creditor nation with its $1 billion loan
to the IMF, Mr. Aquino may nd it nec-
essary and convenient to tell the nation
that the government continues to oat
bonds and borrow money from abroad
for various needs. The country, there-
fore, is not yet out of the woods.
Mr. Aquino may likewise talk of the
electoral sabotage and plunder charges
against former President Gloria Maca-
pagal Arroyo, who is now detained, and
the conviction of Chief Justice Renato
Corona by the Senate impeachment
court as palpable achievements of his
anti-corruption drive. Many see this
as nothing more than the victory of those
in power against those who are out.
But what many people want to hear
from the President is a rm and unequivo-
cal declaration saying that where corruption
had existed before, no such corruption exists
now, and that there is absolutely no truth to
the rumor that the container cargo racket at
Customs is bigger than before, that jueteng
and other forms of illegal gambling are very
much alive and protected by powerful indi-
viduals, that farm-to-market roads are rou-
tinely converted into farm to pocket roads,
and that the congressional pork barrel and
the local executives internal revenue allot-
ment funds have become the best sources
of private personal funds, and that the cor-
rupt politician is only in danger of answering
for anything if he or she is not on the side of
Malacanang.
In the House of Representatives, the
leaders have lavished superlatives upon
themselves for getting rid of Corona. They
have shown no remorse that 188 congress-
men had signed the eight Articles of Im-
peachment at the behest of Malacanang
without reading the document, and that the
House prosecutors had used illegally pro-
cured evidence to convict the respondent
on what many lawyers thought was a non-
impeachable offense.
Still, the President may not want any-
one to forget that it was he, rather than
the House of Representatives, who re-
ally initiated the impeachment and saw
it through to the very end. He could
claim the credit himself, but he would
be well-advised not to do so. For under
the Constitution the President has noth-
ing to do with the impeachment process,
except where he himself is the one im-
peached. Any attempt on Aquinos part
to claim credit for Coronas removal
would be a stark admission that he had
openly violated the Constitution, which
is itself an impeachable offense.
Neither can he say it was a victory
for the rule of law, for it was the very
rst thing that was sacriced. By openly
interfering in the process, the President
trashed the separation of powers and
took virtual control of the three branches
of government. That was a naked attack
on the Constitution, and the nation has
since borne the consequences.
If the President wants to repair the
breach, and deliver a meaningful Sona,
he could focus on the core issues. These
could include:
1. the restoration of the rule of law
and our damaged institutions;
2. the raising of employment, trade
levels and living standards and the stra-
tegic positioning of the national econo-
my, in the region and the world;
3. the conservation of our natural re-
sources and environment;
4. the attainment of self-sufciency
in food, water, and energy;
5. the expansion of our anti-poverty
programs and the basic social services;
6. the effective conduct of our for-
eign and national security policies and
the peaceful settlement of all disputes;
7. the upgrading of our civil defense
capability, for risk reduction and disas-
ter preparedness;
8. the autonomy of the family and the en-
hanced role of civil society in civic affairs.
These need to be captured in a detailed
program of government. But Mr. Aquino
could discuss some points now. For in-
stance, to restore the rule of law and our
damaged institutions, he could commit to
reinstate the separation of powers and the
principle of check and balance by allow-
ing the two other coequal and coordinate
branches of government, and the constitu-
tional commissions, to function indepen-
dently, according to their constitutional
rights and duties, without interference
from Malacanang.
In the naming of the new chief jus-
tice, for instance, he could allow the
incumbent justices to choose their own
chief justice instead of the President
making the appointment himself. This
is not expressly provided for in the Con-
stitution, but nothing in the Constitu-
tion prohibits it either. And it is fully in
accord with the principle and practice
of the other independent and co-equal
branch of government, the Legisla-
tive Department, whose members, not
the President, choose their own Senate
President and Speaker of the House of
Representatives.
In the case of Congress, the President
could restore to it the power of the purse,
and cooperate in budgetary reforms to
prohibit the politicization of programs
and projects under the General Appro-
priations Act and the illegal impounding
of funds by Malacanang.
The President could also recognize the
fact that, under the Constitution, he has no
role to play in proposing any amendment
to, or revision of the Constitution. He
need not say anything on whether or not
the leaders of Congress should consider
amending the Constitution.
As a specic measure, the President
could specically disown and disautho-
rize Administrative Order 2012-009 is-
sued by Health Secretary Enrique Ona
on June 27, 2012, which seeks to ood
the country with contraceptives, contra-
gesives and sterilants, in violation of the
Constitution, and without any legal
authority from Congress, which has
refused to pass the patently unconstitu-
tional and anti-Catholic population con-
trol cum reproductive health bill being
pushed by the international population
control lobby abroad.
The illegal order comes after 190
countries at the Rio + 20 international
conference had decided to delete the
phrase reproductive health from its
nal document, because it was seen as
a code word for abortion. The order
could create a restorm for the adminis-
tration, if it is not immediately disowned
and withdrawn.
To position the national economy
strategically in the region and the world,
the President may want to be guided by
what the Japanese Prime Minister, the
Minister of the Economy, Trade and
Industry, and some select members of
the Diet told Vice President Jejomar C.
Binay in ofcial conversations in Tokyo
last week about expanding the Japanese
economic presence in the Philippines.
Japan is still the worlds third larg-
est economy, after the United States
and China, and the countrys number
one trading partner, foreign investor and
source of Ofcial Development Assis-
tance. A big chunk of its manufacturing
abroad is based in China and in Thai-
land. Following the great earthquake-
tsunami in northeast Japan and the di-
sastrous ooding in Thailand, Japanese
investors had begun to look to Vietnam,
Indonesia and even Myanmar for some
of their manufacturing activities.
In separate meetings, Deputy Prime
Minister Katsuya Okada and METI
Minister Yukio Edano told Binay Japan
would like to see the Philippines get a
bigger share of the Japanese investments
that are now going to Vietnam, Indone-
sia and Myanmar. All that is needed is
for the government to improve the envi-
ronment for investments.
Binay pointed out that the Aquino
administration was already doing ev-
erything to create such an environment,
and that some Japanese investors had al-
ready responded favorably to it. Edano
said that if you improve the environ-
ment even more, then much more Japa-
nese investments would come to the
Philippines.
A denitive ofcial statement that the
appropriate infrastructure will be built,
power rates will be brought down, the
sanctity of contracts will be respect-
ed and the rules of the game will not
change with every new set of political
administrators would go a long way to
assure the outside world that the Philip-
pines has decided to become a serious
place for long-term investments.
Cant Mitsubishi
take the heroic
course?
RITA LINDA
V. JIMENO
OUT OF THE BOX
ANALYSIS
PASTOR APOLLO
QUIBOLOY
PLUMBLINE
But Habermas makes a very
important proposal. Just as France has
a Constitutional Council that rules on
proposed legislation prior to enactment,
Habermas believes that a body of review
within the legislature itself may very
well be formed, sufciently distanced
from the proponents of legislation but
still part of the legislature to obviate the
theoretical as well as practical problems
of review assigned to a distinct branch
of government.
I am not going to watch the
interview of candidates for the ofce
of Chief Justice. I do not think that
such a process should become a public
spectacle, which, I am willing to
vouch, it is going to be. And while
we, the sovereign people, have the
right to know, we do not have the right
to know everything. Making JBC
members and interviewees face the
glare of annoying camera lights will
provide those given to grandstanding
the long sought opportunity to do just
that, but it will also cause the more
prudent and circumspect to be reticent
about asking questions that may truly
matter, because the questions and the
answers may not be rated Gfor
a general audience. The proposition
that in a democracy, every discussion,
every inquiry, every document is for
the general audience on the basis of
the right to know is simply false.
The Chief Justice is not really just
primus inter pares. I have some
familiarity with the culture of the
Supreme Court, having been full-time
with the Philippine Judicial Academy
for ve years, and I know that a chief
justice is accorded plenty of deference
at least the chief justices I knew! A chief
justice does not only set the pace of the
courts work. Without infringing on the
intellectual liberty of his peers, he can,
by his moral ascendancy and suasion,
bring a particular philosophy to bear on
the Courts approach to issues that come
before it. In short, the choice of a chief
justice is too serious a business to be left
to color preferences!
rannie_aquino@sanbeda.edu.ph
rannie_aquino@csu.edu.ph
rannie_aquino@yahoo.com
From A4
The chief...
Energize the economy
News
ManilaStandardToday mst.daydesk@gmail.com JULY 23, 2012 MONDAY
A6
House leaders: No to Lazarus franchise
Del Monte, Sulpicio
to pay handling costs
Seafarers signal SOS over job racketeers
Alcala:
Enough
food on
the table
Given the support of Malacaang
and other government agencies,
Agriculture Secretary Proceso
Alcala said high quality and
affordable basic commodities
will be on the table of Filipinos
before the Aquino term
concludes in 2016.
Cheaper foods especially
for the poor will help resolve
hunger and poverty in our
country, he said. That is our
target and we know we can
achieve it.
The department has targetted
next for the country to have
sufcient rice stocks along with
a steady supply of vegetables,
sh, pork and beef.
Alcala said the Bureau of
Animal Industry has started
bringing in from Australia and
New Zealand cows to upgrade
local stocks.
High-quality of beef but
cheaper in price is the result of
this cross-breeding, he said.
Alcala said the kep to
food security rested on the
continuous ow of water to
rice elds and farm lots.
National Irrigation
Administration head Antonio
Nangel said remote communities
are assured of water through the
communal irrigation system.
With the steady water supply
we can harvest rice, vegetables
and other commodities at least
three or four times unlike the
usual once or twice a year, he
said. Gigi Muoz David.
By Maricel V. Cruz

Two House leaders on Sunday backed the
governments action against the restoration of
at least 489 franchises to public utility buses
companies plying north and Central Luzon.
Rep. Eastern Samar Rep.
Ben Evardone, chairman of the
House Committee on Public
Information, commended the
decision of Transportation
Secretary Mar Roxas prevented
the sale of so-called Lazarus
franchise amid the objections of
various groups, including former
workers of Pantranco.
It was an unheralded but
solid accomplishment in the
drive against irregularities in
government because the agency
involved, the Land Transport
Franchising and Regulatory
Board, (has) vast regulatory
powers, he told Manila
Standard.
Agham party-list Rep. Angelo
Palmones said LTFRB ofcials
had a lot to explain after being
told that Pantranco lines had
expired in 1993, and that the
franchises could neither be sold
nor transferred to other parties.
We should get into the
bottom of this controversy, and
so I led a resolution to clarify
everything, he said.
Evardone, member of the House
Committee on Transportation, said
the LTFRB only granted franchises
after verifying a real need to
revive them through surveys by a
technical working group.
The simple process of
extending the validity of a single
bus franchise takes close to one
year to complete, he said. The
most an operator can get after the
long and torturous award process
is 25 or 30.
Evardone said the DOTC
ordered the Land Transportation
Ofce to halt any effort to
process transactions under
the 489 franchises pending
investigation.
The LTFRB allegedly revived
the franchises of Pantranco North
Expresses Inc., awarding them to
several bus rms owned by the
Victory Liner Group.
Under Sections 1 and 3, Rule
19 of the 2011 Revised Rules of
Practice and Procedure of the
LTFRB, the DOTC Secretary
has the power to review motu
propio (of his own initiative)
and issue an order staying the
execution of the decision of the
LTFRB, the DOTC earlier said
in a statement
In awarding the contract, the
489 franchises were made to
appear as franchises owned by
two workers unions, namely the
Pantranco Retrenched Employees
Association and the Pantranco
Employees Association, said
Evardone.
By Rey E. Requejo
THE Court of Appeals has
sustained the ruling of the
Manila City Regional Trial Court
ordering Del Monte Philippines
and Sulpicio Lines Inc. to
shoulder the expenses for the
handling of about 10,000 kilos of
endosulfan retrieved from MV
Princess of the Stars, which sunk
off Sibuyan Island, in Romblon
four years ago.
The CAs Eighth Division
through Associate Justice Edwin
Sorongon upheld the Dec. 3,
2008 ruling of then Manila RTC
Judge Antonio Eugenio, now
deputy court administrator of
the Supreme Court, which found
the storage, repacking, transfer
and other incidental costs of the
endosulfan cargo chargeable to
Sulpicio and Del Monte.
But the appellate court barred
the RTC from implementing its
orders which granted the motion
led by the Ofce of the Solicitor
General seeking to compel Del
Monte and SLI, now listed as
Philippine Span Asia Carrier
Corp., to give P25-million each
for the repacking and reshipment
of the cargo.
The Ofce of the Solicitor
General represents the
Presidential Task Force on
Princess of the Stars on the
retrieval of the toxic substances
in the sunken vessel.
The CA ruled that the lower
court committed grave abuse
of discretion in granting OSGs
motion considering that the Task
Force is not a party to the case.
The Task Force is neither a
plaintiff nor a defendant in the
case a quo. In fact, it was merely
directed by the court a quo to act
on its behalf and take delivery of
the endosulfan cargo, the CA
said. Hence, it could only act
upon the directives of the court,
but it is the latter which must
set forth the procedures on what
should be done to the cargo after
the Task Force took delivery
thereof.
The CA directed the Manila
RTC to determine the procedure to
be undertaken for the disposition
of the endosulfan cargo.
The CA also tasked the
parties to submit within 15
days their respective proposals
for the proper disposition of
the said cargo together with an
estimate of fees or quotations
from the service providers of
their choice.
It also ordered the Task Force to
submit to the RTC within 15 days
contracts it executed with certain
service providers, evidence of
services actually rendered by
each, and the reasonable amount
charged by them, taking into
consideration the prevailing costs
charged.
Del Monte and SLI were
given 10 days from receipt of the
Task Forces submission to le
their respective comments, after
which the trial court is directed
to determine the reasonable fees
due to the service providers.
The MV Princess of the Stars
which capsized at the height
of typhoon Frank on June
21, 2008 left at leat 300 poeple
dead and more than 300 others
missing. Del Monte was the
consignee and supposed owner
of the endosulfan, a chemical
used as fertilizer for its pineapple
plantations.
THE Luneta Seafarers Welfare
Foundation, a non-government
organization managing the
Luneta Seafarers Center
along T.M. Kalaw Avenue in
Manila, is seeking assistance
from the Philippine Overseas
Employment Administration in
going after illegal recruiters.
Administrator Anfred Yulo
said reports have mounted on
shady transactions at the one-
stop-shop center for sailors.
We have regulated
manning activities in the area
and prevented them from
going beyond information
dissemination, advertising,
and promotions of seafarer job
vacancies in their respective
companies since POEA
temporarily suspended its
Memorandum of Agreement
with LUSWELF in May 2009
and stopped issuing Special
Recruitment Authority to
manning agencies in the
area, he said. But now that
such reports have reached the
POEA, we are inviting their
representatives to help us ght
and banish illegal recruiters
by properly coordinating
and collaborating with the
management of LUSWELF.
Through the Luneta
Seafarers Center, Filipino
seafarers and representatives
of local manning agencies are
given a venue to congregate for
the promotion of job vacancies
in the maritime industry.
According to Yulo, formal
recruitment process happens at
the ofces of manning agencies,
starting from the time a seafarer
lls up an application form to
formally signing a shipboard
contract with the institutions.
While LUSWELF has never
been and shall never be in the
business or recruitment, we
welcome the POEA to come
back at the Luneta Seafarers
Center so that the agency
can regulate and monitor for
itself the activities of manning
agencies in the area, he said.
Luneta Seafarers Center has
been nominated in 2010 by the
International Committee on
Seafarers Welfare as one of the
best seafarers centers in the
world.
By Jonathan Fernandez
THE National Police Commission
will le criminal suit against the
police ofcer who refused to give
way to President Benigno Aquino
IIIs convoy in Quezon City last
July 17.
Napolcom chairman and
Interior Secretary Jesse Robredo
said Senior Police Ofcer 2
Ricardo Pascua would also
face charges for usurpation of
authority and illegally drawing
salaries and other benets from
the National Police.
According to Robredo, Pascua
had been dismissed from the service
but managed to get reinstated.
The policeman was dismissed
twice--on June 30, 2001 and Dec.
10, 2002--based on two separate
decisions by the Peoples Law
Enforcement Board in Quezon
City for grave misconduct
cases.
Robredo said the rst case
was led by one Amalia
Buenaventura-Peregrina for
robbery/extortion and violation
of other laws before the QC
PLEB District II-A ofce.
The second was led by one
Siony Tabuac for illegal arrest
of sidewalk vendors before the
QC PLEB District III ofce.
In both cases, the PLEB
ordered the dismissal of Pascua.
Aquino-blocking
policeman faces raps
Such orders of dismissal from
the PLEB are immediately
executory under Napolcom
Memorandum Circular Nos.
91-002 and 2002-010,
Robredo said.
Despite being dismissed from
the service, Pascua still posed as a
member of the PNP and led an
appeal before the National Capital
Region Napolcom Appellate
Board (which) afrmed the two
PLEB decisions.
On Dec. 6, 2004, then Napolcom-
NCR director Emilio Salumbides
issued an implementation order
for Pascuas dismissal addressed
to then NCRPO director Avelino
Razon based on the Peregrina
case.
Thus, by virtue of the
implementation order issued
in the Peregrina case, the PNP
Headquarters Support Service
(HSS) issued Special Order
No. 214 dated June 5,2002
ordering Pascua dismissed
from the PNP service effective
June 3, 2002, Robredo said.
A stitch in
time.
Ernest Arulkumar,
(left) managing
director, Singer
Sewing Machine
Australia and Daniel
Wan, Singer Sewing
Machine Asia
Pacic senior vice
president, present the
companys product
line during its 160th
year anniversary
celebration at Marriott
Hotel in Pasay City.
MANNY PALMERO.
Very
capable.
Quezon City
Mayor Herbert
Bautista receives
a plaque from
president Renato
Cada, of the
Federation of
Persons with
Disabilities-
QC chapter,
during the
34th National
Disability
Prevention and
Rehabilitation
Week witnessed
by Dr. Ponciano
Aberin, QC-
PWD consumer
cooperative
chairman.
Separate ways.
A fence with an anti-
jaywalking sign is used
by the residents along
Mendiola street in Manila
to dry clothes while a dog
takes to the street using
the proper lane.
DANNY PATA
JULY 23, 2012 MONDAY
A7 Sports Riera U. Mallari, Editor
ManilaStandardToday
sports_mstandard@yahoo.com
London welcomes Team PH
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
If MVP can do it, so can RSA
AL S. MENDOZA
ALL THE WAY
THE Olympic Games are just
four days away, blasting off for
sure on July 27 in foggy Lon-
don barring a hitch of cata-
strophic proportions as in the
English Channel suddenly dry-
ing up, maybe?
Seriously now, I pray that our
11 athletes achieve their dream in
London, a dream this nation had
long wanted to happen: A rst
gold medal ever in the quadren-
nial event.
Weve won Olympic medals
in athletics and boxing, yes, but
not gold. Never.
Bronze medals were what we
had in Olympic athletics through
Misters Toribio and Yldefonso.
Twice we struck Olympic silver
in boxing but not gold. Never.
In the last 48 years alone, weve
won only two Olympic medals:
Both silver. They came in boxing.
Anthony Villanueva won the
rst silver for the country in the
1964 Tokyo Olympics, losing the
gold to a Russian in a closely-
fought contest that saw the late
Joe Cantada, covering the ght by
radio from ringside, virtually rais-
ing hell.
We were robbed of the gold
medal! boomed the incompa-
rable Joe Cantada, albeit saying
that repeatedly.
In 1996, Mansueto Onyok
Velasco likewise settled for the
boxing silver, also dropping a
close decision in yielding the
gold medal to a Bulgarian in the
Atlanta Olympics.
That was the last time we had
been that close to winning our
rst Olympic gold as we went
home empty-handed from our
last three Olympic stints in 2000
in Sydney, 2004 in Athens and
2008 in Beijing.
It seems bleak likewise again
for us in London as we only have
a solitary bet in boxing through
Mark Anthony Barriga after a
bright prospect in Charly Suarez
had narrowly missed an Olympic
boxing slot in China only some
weeks back.
As history tells us, it is in box-
ing that, traditionally, we have
the strongest chance to win a
medal. In fact, our other two
post-war Olympic bronze med-
als came also in boxing through
Leopoldo Serrantes in the 1988
Seoul Olympics and Roel Velas-
co in the 1992 Barcelona Games.
Barriga, as our chief golden
bet in London, is in high spirits
after topping his qualifying event
in China to make it to the Ol-
ympiad. He is only 19, but his
demeanor is that of a full-grown
ghter already.
It helps that the Philippine
Sports Commission, the govern-
ments nancial arm for sports, has
dangled a P5-million bonus to an-
yone from our 11 Olympians who
can bring home a gold medal. A
silver medal is worth P2.5 million
and a bronze P1 million.
Business tycoon Manny V. Pan-
gilinan, the countrys big boss in
boxing, isnt saying anything, but
Im sure hell give more bonus
once Barriga achieves the ulti-
mate dream that all of us had been
dreaming of all this time: the rst-
ever Olympic gold.
And, of course, it goes without
saying that our 10 other Olympi-
ans have as much chances to win
as Barriga, even though many of
them are in disciplines where win-
ning is almost next to impossible.
I refer to swimmer Jasmine
Alkhaldi, long jumper Marestel-
la Torres, 5,000-meter bet Rene
Herrera, shooter Brian Rosario,
weightlifter Hidilyn Diaz and
archers Mark Javier and Rachelle
Anne Cabral. They are in events
where competition is at its tough-
est so that should anyone of them
wins even a bronze, it would glit-
ter already like gold.
But who knows, maybe, ju-
doka Tomohiko Hoshina and
BMX rider Danny Caluag might
stun us, if not the world, by suc-
cessfully snatching a medal?
In everything that we do, luck
always plays a vital role.
And if Lady Luck gets to smile
at any one or two of them, who
knows a shower of bonanza
could also pour in?
This nation is never lacking in
big hearts and if theres another
one worthy of mentioning here
apart from MVP, thatd be Ram-
on S. Ang, the San Miguel Cor-
poration chieftain known simply
now as RSA.
If RSA could so easily toss in
P500 million for housing to the ty-
phoon victims of Cagayan de Oro
City last year, wouldnt an additional
P10 million more from him for eve-
ry Filipino gold medalist in London
be a mere drop in the bucket?
Try him.
* * *
ALL IN. Happy birthday to
both Mayasoh M. Sadiwa [July
21] and Sol F. Juvida [July 23)].
Heres a fervent prayer that the
both of you have more birthdays
to come and continue to have a
healthy life for many more years
to come. Cheers for beers!
FILIPINO skeet shooter Brian
Rosario is ready to conquer the
world.
Aside from his strong determi-
nation to do well in the London
Olympics, which starts on Friday,
the support of his family and the
Philippine National Shooting As-
sociation is one factor that keeps
his passion burning.
Though Rosarios entry to the
greatest sporting spectacle was
through the backdoor earning
a wildcard shooting president
Mikee Romero, is condent
thats the countrys only shoot-
ing bet is up to the challenge.
Hes doing well in practice,
hes shooting 24 over 25 now,
but I hope he reaches his peak
next week, said Romero. Hes
very a determined shooter and
he wants to prove something.
While he did not promise
to bring home the elusive gold
medal, he committed to his fam-
ily to do his utmost best to make
them proud.
Walang naman siyang ipi-
nangako sa amin basta gagawin
niya daw ang lahat para guman-
da lalo ang performance niya,
said Paul Rosario, Brians fa-
ther. Hes been shooting since
12 years old, so this is his ulti-
mate dream.
Romero said he will join the
Philippine delegation tomorrow
to personally support Rosarios
campaign.
OLIVER Dimakiling kept the lead
after the 10t h round of the 2012
Battle of Champions in Aklan on
Sunday by drawing with Eugene
Torre, but Giovanni Mejia once
again stole the show by upsetting
top seed Oliver Barbosa.
Dimakiling drew in a 83-move
French Defense against Torre,
giving him 14.5 under a new scor-
ing system. Wins are worth two
points, draws 1.5 points for play-
ers forcing stalemate and 1 point
for a truce and a loss zero.
Dimakiling earned his second
grandmaster result Saturday when
he defeated Barbosa, ending what
he described in a text message to
Manila Standard Today as six
arduous years of attaining the
norm. He needs only one more re-
sult to become a grandmaster.
Mark Paragua drew with Dar-
win Laylo to remain in second
place with 13.5 points. Laylo
shared third with Joey Antonio,
who beat Roderick Nava.
Mejia was threatening mate in
one against the Philippines no. 2
player when Barbosa gave up in a
32-move Caro-Kann Defense.
My pawn sacrice worked,
said the 14-year-old La Salle
Greenhills high school junior in a
phone interview by Manila Stand-
ard Today. He was referring to al-
lowing Barbosa to capture a seem-
ingly harmless pawn, but it keyed
a pawn storm on Barbosas castled
king.
Barbosa, whose tournament
wins abroad early this year,
made him a favorite to top this
tournament, was unsure whether
he would qualify for the Ol-
ympiad team with his second
straight loss.
It was a day of mixed fortunes
for the Mejias as Giovannis elder
sister Cherry Ann, lost a chance to
gain ground on the leader, Woman
International Master Catherine
Perena, when she lost to untitled
Bernadette Galas.
In other games, Manny Senador
drew with Haridas Pascua; John
Paul Gomez beat Ino Sadorra,
Rogelio Barcenilla Jr drew with
Richard Bitoon and Roland Salva-
dor defeated Randy Segarra.
For 30 memorable minutes at the
Plaza in the heart of the Athletes
Village, 120 performers in colorful
getup sang, danced, ran, jumped
and somersaulted as they enter-
tained the Filipino contingent with
a celebratory show highlighting the
ag-raising ritual ahead of the 30th
Olympic Games.
Eight of the 11 athletes, ve
team ofcials and a handful of
guests from the embassy and
Filipino community took part in
the ceremony that saw the Philip-
pines become the ninth country in
a starting cast of 204 to have its
national colors raised as part of
the Olympic tradition.
An exchange of gifts between
chief of mission Manny Lopez
and Village mayor Charles Allen
took place shortly after the latter
spoke glowing words for the ath-
letes whose time has come and
the real stars of the Olympics.
our time has come. We cant
wait to see you display your ath-
letic talents, said Allen to the
rousing applause from Team PH
and the Vietnamese squad.
Lopez gifted the Village head
with a commemorative replica
of a golden passenger jeepney
placed inside a special box, while
getting in a return a stainless post-
card with local landmarks such as
Big Ben, Buckingham Palace and
London Bridge carved on it.
All members of Team PH were
present during the ceremony that
began a few minutes before high
noon, save for weightlifter Hidilyn
Diaz, boxer Mark Anthony Barri-
ga and BMX rider Danny Caluag.
Joining the team was PH am-
bassador Enrique Manalo, who
was celebrating his birthday.
As he received birthday greet-
ings and exchanged handshakes
with everyone including for-
eign coaches Yasuhiro Sato and
Chung Jae-hun, the ambassador
told the group that he was happy
to see you in good spirit and be
with you on my special day.
On the invitation of Lopez, the
ambassador, along with two em-
bassy people and three members of
the Filipino community, lunched at
the Village dining hall and and took
a brief look at the rooms of Team
PH in one of the 11 blocks of 2,818
townhouses and apartments that
will house more than 15,000 ath-
letes and ofcials.
Weighlifter Hidilyn Diaz and
her coach Tony Agustin missed
the program, coming in late as
the bus that carried them after a
practice session took sometime to
pass through the extra-tight secu-
rity leading to the Village.
Barriga is still in Cardiff, Wales
wrapping up the nal stage of his
long training, while Caluag is
into the closing days of a stint in
the Netherlands. They are join-
ing the rest of their teammates
on July 24, three days before the
opening ceremony.
In attendance were archers Mark
Javier and Rahel Cabral, swim-
mers Jessie Khing Lacuna and Jas-
mine Alkhaldi, judoka Tomohiko
Hoshina, long jumper Marestella
Torres, 5000-m runner Rene Her-
rera, shooter Brian Rosario, admin-
istrative ofcer Arsenic Lacson and
coaches Gay Corral of swimming
and Joseph Sy of athletics.
BARCELONA, SpainThey
carry cameras and microphones,
sprinting toward Kobe Bryant like
Christmas shoppers who just spot-
ted the it gift sitting on shelves.
Their questions come quickly,
some in English, many in Span-
ish, and Bryant gives the perfect
answer every time.
Yes, Spain is an incredible team
that can pose problems for the US.
No, Pau Gasol isnt getting
traded from the Lakers as long as
he is there.
The only thing Bryant cant
seem to explain to reporters is
why hes so much more popular
than his teammates on the Olym-
pic basketball team.
I dont know. I dont know
where it comes from or how that
happens, he said Saturday with
a laugh. It all started with the
Dream Team in terms of basket-
ball becoming so global. When
I came into the NBA, I kind of
inherited kind of the globaliza-
tion of the game, and then hav-
ing grown up overseas they really
kind of laid claim to me because
this is where I learned how to play
the game, is overseas.
Chris Paul gures Bryant owes
it to the way hes won and carried
himself through the years -- along
with one other thing.
A lot of its got to do, too, that
he plays for the Lakers. I learned
that, too, I learned that quick,
Paul said. Everywhere you go,
shoot, the Lakers, they never
play a road game. Only time they
might play a road game now is in
Oklahoma City.
Bryant is not the best player on
the US team, probably just crack-
ing the top three at this stage of his
career. Yet for as good as LeBron
James, Kevin Durant or any other
US player is, none draws the at-
tention of Bryant once the Ameri-
cans leave home.
Well, hes been doing it for 16
years in the NBA and in those 16
years the accomplishments are in-
credible. I mean, theyre worthy
of a top-ve player in the history
of the game, really, US coach
Mike Krzyzewski said. And then
hes been so visible, been all over
the world. In others words, hes
traveled all over in the offseason.
Even when were on this tour,
hes a guy that gets out, meets
people. I think he has just made
a commitment to being out there
and as a result, you know, people
follow him.
The Americans still marvel
at the frenzy surrounding Bry-
ant four years ago in Beijing.
US.assistant Mike DAntoni once
joked that the thunderous Kobe!
Kobe! chants during the open-
ing ceremonies had even James,
Dwyane Wade and Carmelo An-
thony going, What are we, pot-
ted plants?
Bryant had made multiple
promotional trips to the Far East
by then and kept going out even
during the Olympics to see other
sports. He was already better
known than most players be-
cause of all his All-Star appear-
ances and ve NBA champion-
ships. AP
LYTHAM ST. ANNES, England
The ball tumbled over the edge
of a pot bunker and appeared to put
Adam Scott in the worst spot he had
been all day at the British Open.
All he saw was opportunity.
From the wet sand right of the
17th green, Scott had to clear
two more pot bunkers to reach
the green, with the ag only ve
paces from the edge. Scott was
thinking about birdie, not trying
to save par, so he condently told
caddie Steve Williams, I can
handle this. The shot came out
pure, trickled by the cup and set-
tled a foot away.
The more relevant questions
are one round away.
Can he handle a four-shot lead,
knowing this is a year when no
lead appears safe? Can he han-
dle a leaderboard with four ma-
jor champions among the top six
names, including Tiger Woods?
Can he handle the wind that is
expected to nally arrive at Royal
Lytham & St. Annes?
Im just happy to be in this posi-
tion,Scott said. To be honest, Im
really excited about tomorrow.
Scott has never had a better
chance to end his long wait for
a major - and he owes much of
that to his long putter. He stayed
in the game early with two key
par saves, pulled away with three
birdies around the turn and was
solid at the end Saturday for a
2-under 68 and a four-shot lead
over Graeme McDowell and
Brandt Snedeker. AP
ROOKIE pro Zanie Boy Gialon
jumped from No. 18 to seventh
in the Order of Merit race on the
ICTSI Philippine Golf Tour, his
surge bolstered by his playoff
victory over frontrunner Tony
Lascuna in the rain-shortened
ICTSI Negros Occidental Classic
in Bacolod last week.
Gialon, 22, pocketed P200,000
in edging Lascuna to claim his
biggest purse in a young pro
career, raising her earnings to
P356,250 heading to the circuits
eighth leg in the ICTSI Iloilo
Golf Challenge this week.
Gialon and Lascuna will head-
line the P1 million event at Sta.
Barbara beginning Wednesday
(July 25) with the former hop-
ing to play with renewed con-
dence as he goes for back-to-
back against a eld teeming with
talent.
I hope to play well again in
Iloilo but for sure, everybody will
be watching me, said Gialon,
who missed the cut in his rst two
tournaments as a pro last summer.
Lascuna will surely go all-out
to redeem himself from a sec-
ond straight playoff setback in
Bacolod after losing to Robert
Pactolerin on the fourth extra
hole last year as he resumes his
chase for a third leg victory in the
16-stage circuit organized by Pili-
pinas Golf Tournaments, Inc.
Rosario
ready for
challenge
Gialon makes Top 10
Dimakiling draws with Torre, keeps chess lead
Kobe still the star of the US team
Scott takes 4-shot lead at The Open
IN BRIEF
3 PH boxers lose
Eagles, Tams win
Star Group scores
THREE more Filipino ghters
have been beaten by much su-
perior Thai opponents in a ght
card in Chantaburi, Thailand.
Undefeated 21-year-old
southpaw Jeffrey Arienza,
moved up 10 pounds to face
International Boxing Fed-
eration Pan Pacic light wel-
terweight prospect Patom-
suk Pathompotong and was
forced to retire at the end of
the seventh round.
Randy Gorilla Megrino
lost by a third-round TKO to
Thai featherweight Vacharakrit
Senahan, while former Thai Ol-
ympian Amnat Ruenroeng con-
tinued his winning streak since
turning pro with a comfortable
win over Louie Bantigue in a
super yweight over six rounds.
Ronnie Nathanielsz
THE Star Group of Publica-
tions completed a champi-
onship sweep of the 4th Na-
tional Press Club Presidents
Cup Media Invitational Bad-
minton Championships at the
Rizal Memorial Badminton
Center in Vito Cruz, Manila.
Edu Punay and Nikki Cor-
dero powered Pilipino Star
Ngayon past Manila Bulle-
tins Odie Palomo and Yehl
Versoza, 3-0, in the mixed
doubles event as the PSN
scribes claimed the Media
Division of the tournament,
serving as part of a series of
activities leading to the NPCs
60th founding anniversary
celebration on Oct. 26.
Ariel Bentajado and Mer
Layson carried PSN in the
mens doubles event, posting
a 21-16, 21-12 victory against
Jef Hitosis and Dong Aguinal-
do, before Jona Magnaye and
Dalia Saguid defeated the pair
of Cathy Anchinges and Sher-
yl Vitto, 21-11, 21-10, in the
womens doubles event.
ATENEO and Far Eastern
University outplayed separate
rivals Saturday at the start of
the 10th Fr. Martin Division 2
Cup basketball tournament at
the St. Placid gymnasium of
San Beda College.
Joma Adornado, son of
former basketball star Bogs
Adornado, red a game-high
27 points to lead the Blue
Eagles to an 86-76 win over
Trinity University of Asia.
The Tamaraws leaned on
two triples from Giovanni
Cruz and Rod Dennison to
edge Angeles University
Foundation, 76-73.
The PH team poses for a souvenir shot in front of the PH secretariat inside the Village minutes before the
welcome, ag raising rites.
LONDONIn an Olympic moment to
remember, Team Philippines was greeted
with songs and dances in a joyous wel-
come rite that left its athletes, ofcials
and guests loving every minute of it.
sports@manilastandardtoday.com sports_mstandard@yahoo.com
Sports
Manila Standard TODAY
Adamson duo tops Petron volleyfest
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
JULY 23, 2012 MONDAY
A8
Riera U. Mallari, Editor
LOTTO RESULTS
6/49 000000
3 DIGITS 000
2 EZ2 00
P11.7M+
Eagles tame
NU Bulldogs
UAAP SCORES
ADAMSONS Paulina Soriano
scored nine crucial points on attacks
in the second set as she and new
teammate Sheila Mae Pineda ruled
the third leg of the 2012 Petron La-
dies Beach Volleyball Tournament
at the sand-courts of the University
of the East-Caloocan campus.
Sorianos timely plays allowed
her team to a pull off a 21-14, 21-
11 upset of their University of the
East rivals Francislyn Cais and
Jessica Paron to win their rst-
ever Petron volley circuit crown
in the tournament also backed by
Speedo and Mikasa.
Kumpiyansa na kami pagkatapos
namin makuha ang rst set. Mas fo-
cused kami sa receives and serves,
said Soriano, a 19-year-old manage-
ment junior at Adamson University.
It was also the pairs strongest
performance yet in a tournament
after settling for third spot in 74th
University Athletic Association of
the Philippines last year.
The 58 Soriano took charge
in the second set, with her power-
ful smashes to the backline giving
the Lady Falcons the lead on three
straight points, 5-3.
Pinedas service winner and So-
rianos drop shot in the ensuing
plays allowed the Lady Falcons to
move out of range, 13-6.
The two almost never made it
to the seminals after they found
themselves in a tiebreak for the
last semis berth in Group A with
AMA Computer College stand-
outs Lorie Lyn Longalong and
Sheila Mae Fajardo, and UE-2s
Krysel Cueva and Marni Pedrosa.
All three had the same 3-2 records.
But a better tiebreak put Soriano
and Pineda in a seminal show-
down with La Salle-Dasmarinas
pair MoniqueTiangco and Maribeth
Lara, whom they turned back, 23-
21, 24-22, to set up a championship
showdown with Cais and Paron.
With the Lady Falcons trail-
ing 21-22 in the nal set, Pineda
scored the last two points with
her power smash to the net and
a placement shot that sailed past
Tiangco as she went for a defen-
sive block on the right side.
The UE tandem Paron and Cais
fought their way into the championship
round after clipping San Sebastian Col-
leges Gretchel Soltones and Czarina
Berbano, 21-19, 12-21, 15-8.The Ad-
amson duo and the UE pair clinched
slots to the Petron Battle of the Cham-
pions in October. Peter Atencio
ADMU (89) Salva 21, Ravena 17,
Slaughter 14, Chua 12, Gonzaga 9,
Tiongson 8, Buenafe 3, Elorde 3, Er-
ram 2, Capacio 0, Pessumal 0, Porter 0.
NU (65) Parks 22, Mbe 14,
Villamor 10, Ignacio 6, Roo 5,
Alolino 2, Betayene 2, De Guz-
man 2, Javillonar 1, Khobuntin 1,
Rosario 0, Neypes 0, Labing-isa 0.
Quarterscores: 28-17; 55-34; 72-
54; 89-65
Promoter condent Casimero will keep title
Sermona bucks bad weather, wins race Fired-up
Altas take
on Bombers
Yo, Ge rule jungolfs
school season tourney
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
By Ronnie Nathanielsz
PROMOTER Sammy Gello-
ani is condent of the chances
of newly crowned Interna-
tional Boxing Federation junior
yweight champion Johnriel
Casimero (16-2, 10 KOs) in de-
fending his title against unde-
feated Mexican Pedro Guevara
(18-0-1, 13 KOs) in Sinaloa,
Mexico on Aug. 4.
Gello-ani told the Manila
Standard that Casimero will head
for Los Angeles on July 30 before
ying to Mexico a couple of days
before the ght.
Casimero is so familiar and used
to ghting abroad just like in Argen-
tina, when he won the interim title
with a 10th-round TKO of Luis La-
zarte, and we know how to manage
these things, Gello-ani said.
The promoter said the impres-
sive record of Guevara didnt
awe Casimero because the Mex-
ican had fought ghters with
no names so far. I am condent
Casimero can hold on to the title
because of his experience out-
side.
Gello-ani said the ght against
Guevara had been planned
months, but was postponed on
more than one occasion.
|Casimero had trained for so
long that we had to go slow be-
cause of the change of plans from
June to July 28 and now Aug. 4, is
just perfect for us, the promoter
said.
Trainer Christopher Tepora, who
was with Casimero in Argentina
and was among those ganged upon
by supporters of Lazarte after the
ght, said: If he won in Argentina,
why cant we do it in Mexico?
Gello-ani conceded that it was
hard to promote a title ght in the
Philippines and he had to defend
his title in Mexico.
He has to ght. Hes been stag-
nant for so many months, said
Gello-Ani of Casimero, whose
last ght against Lazarte was held
on Feb. 10, 2012.
ANGELES CITY--Not even the
bad weather could stop former
marathon king Julius Sermona
and Merdeliza Dizu from topping
the fourth leg of the 36th National
Milo Marathon held Sunday. Over
6,150 registered runners partici-
pated in the race leg, as Angeles
City hosted the narathon elims for
the rst time.
Sermona, a former member of
the Philippine team, deed the
heavy downpour and crafted a
time of 1:13:02 to lead several
other runners into the National
Finals on Dec. 9 at the Mall of
Asia grounds in Pasay City. Hav-
ing won two silver medals in the
5,000-m and 10,000-m run in the
Bangkok Southeast Asian Games
in 2007, the 34-year-old Sermona
is one of the fastest runners in this
years nals. He established his
personal best of 2:21:53 when he
dominated the 42-k track of the
30th MILO Marathon National
Finals in 2006.
Sermona claims that training
for the qualifying race is his foun-
dation for the nals.
I focused on endurance train-
ing, road running, a once-a-week
work out, and hard training, he
said. For the nals, I plan to in-
crease the volume and intensity
of my routine. I plan to run a few
short-distance divisional races
and add about 5 to 10-k to my
training as well.
My goal is to win the nals.
I want to defeat the Kenyans in
the open division, which is why I
hope to avoid injuries, he added.
Completing the top three cast
in the mens 21-k category are
Quisay Alley with 1:14:11 in
second place and Ryan Mendoza
with 1:17:32 in third place.
Not to be outdone, Merdeliza
Dizu stamped class when she
outraced fellow veteran Geralden
Sealza in the nal 200 meters to
top the womens division. Sealza
settled for second place with a
clocking of 1:37:21, followed by
Marychiel Minas-Morales with a
time of 1:42:04.
YO Shen Chang and Ge Zi Yu
shared top honors in the Class A
division even as Andre and Luis
Yuchengco topped their respec-
tive divisions in the recent fth
leg of the International Contain-
er Terminal Services Inc.-JGFP
School Season Golf Tournament
conducted by The Junior Golf-
ers League at the Capitol Hills
Golf and Country Club in Que-
zon City.
Yo tallied 90 points counting
the best two (50 and 40) of three
rounds to beat Joseph Orbito by
four in the boys 15-17 years
class, while Ge posted rounds of
37 and 48 for an 85 and a six-
point win over Alexandra Tan
in the girls side of the tourney
sponsored by the ICTSI.
Andre Yuchengco rallied with
a 42 in his nal round to edge
Riggs Illescas by one with a 79
total in boys Class D, while
Luis claimed the boys Class E
in runaway fashion after a 42-
35-77.
Carlos Packing, Marc Cor-
rales and Lucas Hodreal were
the other boys winners, while
Ge was joined by Annika Cedo,
Kristine Torralba, Laila Barro,
Tea Gonzaga and Dang dela Paz
as champions in the girls com-
petition.
The top nishers
Class A: Boys-90 Yo Shen
Chang 50-40, 86 Joseph Orbito
32-48; Girls-85 Ge Zi Yu 37-48,
79 Alexandra Tan 41-38
Class B: Boys-100 Carlos
Packing 52-48, 91 Joaquin Ig-
nacio 44-47
81 Karl Tolentino 44-42;
Girls-78 Annika Cedo 39-39
Class C: Boys-97 Marc Cor-
rales 51-46, 75 Nathan Kawpeng
30-45
46 Paqo Barro 27-19; Girls-84
Kristine Torralba 41-43, 76
Kayla Nocum 37-39, 14 Abigail
Lee 8-6
Class D: Boys-79 Andre
Yuchengco 37-42, 78 Riggs Il-
lescas 39-39, 54 Jethro Abalos
29-25; Girls-43 Laila Barro 21-
22, 12 Angela Lee 5-7
Class E: Boys- 77 Luis
Yuchengco 42-35, 64 Jan Micro
Camaya 30-34, 63 Garri Nolas-
co 31-32; Girls-24 Tea Yonzaga
12-12, 13 Sophia Magbitangi
6-7
Class F: Boys-56 Lucas Ho-
dreal 29-27, 49 Kirk dela Torre
23-26, 48 Vince Tiamsic 22-26;
5 Dang dela Paz 1-4
By Peter Atencio
THE University of Perpetual
Help Altas are keeping their
ngers crossed that they will be
able to hold their ground against
the Jose Rizal University Heavy
Bombers at 6 p.m. today at The
Arena in San Juan.
Altas coach Aric del Rosario
said his wards are red up and
inspired with their good fortune
in the 88th National Collegiate
Athletic Association mens bas-
ketball tournament.
The Altas share the lead with
the San Beda Red Lions at 4-1
after they put away the College
of St. Benilde Blazers, 84-64,
last Thursday.
Hindi ko ine-expect ito, kasi
noong sa Fr. Martin Summer
Cup at noong FilOil-Flying V
pre-season, nilalampaso kami.
Ngayon, maganda ang umpisa.
Na-inspired sila. Nakita nila
na kailangan na silang pumuk-
pok, said Del Rosario.
The Heavy Bombers, accord-
ing Del Rosario, are deadly with
their trapping defense.
But he feels that any trapping
defense can be solved and over-
come by a determined team.
The San Sebastian Stags, who
dealt the Heavy Bombers a 101-
88 blasting last week, meet the
Lyceum Pirates a 4 p.m.
The Stags share third spot
with JRU with the same 3-1
record.
Greg Slaughter, who had another monster game of
14 points and 13 rebounds, scored on a putback off a
Tonino Gonzaga miss as the Eagles built a huge 61-
36 lead at the 8:02 mark of the third period.
The Bulldogs cut the decit to 17, but the Eagles,
learning the lessons of their second-half meltdown
in their 70-71 loss the University of Santo Tomas,
regrouped to put the game under control. A jumper
by Nico Salva gave Ateneo its biggest lead, 87-60.
The concentration on the last two days was just to
keep our focus for 40 minutes. We played very well
against UST for 20 minutes, and the we came out sec-
ond half really relaxed and we didnt play good defense
and offense, said Eagles mentor Norman Black. We
just wanted to play a complete 40 minutes. Luckily, we
were able to get that done, he added.
Ateneo, which grabbed a 2-1 record, now has won nine
straight over NU since the 2008 season, while NU slipped
into a tie with the Tigers at fourth place with a 1-1 slate.
Reigning most valuable player Bobby Ray Parks
Adamson Universitys Sheila Pineda (center) and Paulina
Soriano display the 2012 Petron Ladies Beach Volleyball
Tournament championship trophy awarded to them by
organizer Tisha Abundo (left). ROMAN PROSPERO
Pesky defense. Marqus Blakely (left) of B-MEG is hounded by Rain or Shines Jervy Cruz in Game 1 of their
teams PBA Governors Cup titular showdown at the Smart-Araneta Coliseum. SONNY ESPIRITU
Games Thursday (Araneta Coliseum)
2 p.m. UP vs NU; 4 p.m. Adamson vs FEU
ATENEO bounced back
from a stunning loss, send-
ing pre-tournament favorite
National University reeling
in an 89-65 Blue Eagle rout
last night in the University
Athletic Association of the
Philippines seniors basket-
ball tournament at the Mall
of Asia Arena.
led NU with 22 points, seven rebounds and four as-
sists before fouling out for the rst time in his col-
legiate career midway in the fourth period.
Meanwhile, Terrence Romeo scored only 10
points, but it was his defensive plays, which carried
the Far Eastern University Tamaraws to a 48-46 vic-
tory over the undermanned La Salle Green Archers.
The 511 Romeo came in the way of Mark Tallos
nal attempt as the clock winded down in the last
12.8 seconds. He later kept Almond Vosotros from a
connecting with a triple as time expired.
Romeo found himself taking charge in defense
with rookie big man Anthony Hargrove in foul trou-
ble late in the game. He struggled on offense as he
missed all ve three-point attempts, but he doggedly
harassed Tallo and kept him from making a decent
shot right after teammate Arvie Bringas bungled two
attempts at the stripe.
The Tams, who were out-rebounded, 40-49, post-
ed their second straight win to grab the lead, while
the Green Archers absorbed their rst setback in
three matches in a tie with the Eagles.
Arvie Bringas is not in shape. Malaki talaga ang
kailangan sa defense. Kulang kami. Lalo na sa re-
bounding, said Tamaraws coach Robert Flores.
Michael Tolomia chipped in seven points, the same
total of Hargrove, including a jumper with 47.6 sec-
onds left which allowed the Tams to stay in front.
La Salle had a chance to move in front after 10
lead changes, or force another tie with a three-pointer
after three deadlocks, but rookie Jeron Teng missed a
jumper from the left. Peter Atencio
Business
Manila Standard TODAY
JULY 23, 2012 MONDAY
B1
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
Ray S. Eano, Editor extrastory2000@gmail.com
Roderick T. dela Cruz, Assistant Editor
IN BRIEF
PSE COMPOSITE INDEX
Closing July 20, 2012
OIL
PRICES
TODAY
P584-P695
LPG/11-kg tank
P47.15-P53.07
Unleaded Gasoline
P38.40-P41.05
Diesel
P40.30-P52.20
Kerosene
P27.20-P31.00
Auto LPG
FOREI GN EXCHANGE RATE
Currency Unit US Dollar Peso
United States Dollar 1.000000 41.6750
Japan Yen 0.012723 0.5302
UK Pound 1.572600 65.5381
Hong Kong Dollar 0.128937 5.3734
Switzerland Franc 1.022495 42.6125
Canada Dollar 0.992654 41.3689
Singapore Dollar 0.797957 33.2549
Australia Dollar 1.041124 43.3888
Bahrain Dinar 2.652661 110.5496
Saudi Arabia Rial 0.266660 11.1131
Brunei Dollar 0.794786 33.1227
Indonesia Rupiah 0.000106 0.0044
Thailand Baht 0.031461 1.3184
UAE Dirham 0.272264 11.3466
Euro Euro 1.227900 51.1727
Korea Won 0.000879 0.0366
China Yuan 0.156902 6.5389
India Rupee 0.018129 0.7555
Malaysia Ringgit 0.317561 13.2344
NewZealand Dollar 0.802182 3.1565
Taiwan Dollar 0.033358 1.3902
Source: PDS Bridge
Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas
Friday, July 20, 2012
PESO-DOLLAR RATE
40
42
44
46
48
P41.860
CLOSE
Closing JULY 20, 2012
5,210.89
21.52
VOLUME 860.530M
HIGH P41.750 LOW P41.920AVERAGE P41.845
5200
4460
3720
2980
2240
1500
1200
AirAsia stresses need
for low-cost terminal 7 firms joining FTI
auction in August
Napocor eyes P17-b fund
to operate off-grid plants
Balance Sheet
As of JUNE 30, 2012
PRI NCI PAL OFFI CERS
HENRY T. PELAEZ
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT-
COUNTRY MANAGER
MARY ROSE S. TIAMSON
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT-
RELATIONSHIP MANAGER
MA. RITA K. DE LA VEGA
COUNTRY COMPLIANCE MANAGER
REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES )
) S.S.

I/We HENRY T. PELAEZ and MA. CHRISTINAJ. DEL CARMEN of the above-mentioned bank do solemnly swear that all matters
set forth in the above statement of condition are true and correct to the best of my/our knowledge and belief.

_______________________________ _______________________________

(Sgd) HENRY T. PELAEZ (Sgd) MA. CHRISTINA J. DEL CARMEN
SVP - Country Manager VP - Manager
Finance-Philippines

SUBSCRIBED AND SWORN to before me this July 20, 2012 at affants exhibiting to their Residence Certifcate No. 14239314
issued in Manila on January 07, 2012 and Residence Certifcate No. 03278362 issued in Quezon City on January 20, 2012 respectively.
The affants also exhibited their Passport Numbers XX5027665 dated November 23, 2009 and XX2924640 dated February 03, 2009.

(Sgd) ATTY. ARCHIBALD R. RELLOSA
Notary Public
Until Dec. 31, 2013
Doc. No. 258 PTR NO. 3184588, Makati City
Book No. CXV BP No. 867717, Pasig City
Page No. 52 Roll No. 4375
Series of 2012
MEMBER: PDIC
ASSETS AMOUNT

Cash and Cash tems 14,200,732.52
Due from Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas 6,797,820,317.85
Due from Other Banks 5,006,453,323.35
Financial Assets at Fair Value through Proft or Loss 42,622,437.63
Available-for-Sale Financial Assets-Net -
Held-to-Maturity (HTM) Financial Assets-Net -
Unquoted Debt Securities Classifed as Loans-Net -
nvestments in Non-Marketable Equity Security-Net 4,712,600.00
Loans and Receivables-Net 4,366,919,280.84
Loans to Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas -
Interbank Loans Receivable -
Loans and Receivables - Others 432,419,284.84
Loans and Receivables Arising from RA/CA/PR/SLB 3,940,000,000.00
General Loan Loss Provision 5,500,004.00
Other Financial Assets 8,051,888.68
Equity Investment in Subsidiaries, Associates and Joint Ventures-Net -
Bank Premises, Furniture, Fixture and Equipment-Net 9,638,524.73
Real and Other Properties Acquired - Net -
Non-Current Assets Held for Sale -
Other Assets-Net 19,036,789.63
Net Due from Head Offce/Branches/Agencies Abroad -

TOTAL ASSETS 16,269,455,895.24

LIABILITIES

Financial Liabilities at Fair Value through Proft or Loss 41,276,096.01
Deposit Liabilities 12,928,740,700.14
Due to Other Banks -
Bills Payable -
a) BSP - (Rediscounting and Other Advances) -
b) Interbank Loans Payable -
c) Other Deposit Substitute -
d) Others -
Bonds Payable - Net -
Unsecured Subordinated Debt - Net -
Redeemable Preferred Shares -
Special Time Deposit -
Due to BSP 732,357.65
Other Financial Liabilities 236,144,268.30
Other Liabilities 331,932,655.94
Net Due to Head Offce/Branches/Agencies (Philippine branch of a foreign bank) 2,133,683,112.01

TOTAL LIABILITIES 15,672,509,190.04

STOCKHOLDERS EQUITY

Capital Stock -
Other Capital Accounts -
Retained Earnings -
Assigned Capital 596,946,705.20

TOTAL STOCKHOLDERS EQUITY 596,946,705.20

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STACKHOLDERS EQUITY 16,269,455,895.24

CONTINGENT ACCOUNTS

Guarantees Issued -
Financial Standby Letters of Credit -
Performance Standby Letters of Credit 110,432,170.10
Commercial Letters of Credit
Trade Related Guarantees -
Commitments 31,932,539.14
Spot Foreign Exchange Contracts 741,900,678.81
Securities Held Under Custodianship by Bank Proper -
Trust Department Accounts -
a) Trust and Agency Accounts -
b) Unit Investment Trust Fund (UITF) -
c) Other Trust and Fiduciary Accounts -
Derivatives 3,880,281,515.57
Others 2,602,016,379.42

TOTAL CONTINGENT ACCOUNTS 7,366,563,283.04


HEAD OFFICE OF FOREIGN BANKS
(BANKAMERICA CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES)
As of December 31, 2011
(In Millions)

PAD-N CAPTAL $ 156,621
SURPLUS AND PROFTS $ 60,520
TOTAL DEPOSTS $ 1,033,041
TOTAL RESOURCES $ 2,129,046

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Non-Performing Loans (NPLs) -
Ratio of Non-Performing Loans to Total Loan Portfolio (NPL to TLP) -
Classifed Loans and Other Risk Assets 6,655,115.17
Specifc Provision for Loan Losses -
Return on Equity (ROE) -11.70
DOSR Loans and Receivables 27,542,992.47
Ratio of DOSR Loans and Receivables to TLP 6.37
Past Due DOSRI Loans and receivables -
Ratio of Past Due DOSRI Loans and receivables to TLP -
Compliance with Magna Carta -
a. 8% Small Enterprises 0.00
b. 2% for Medium Enterprises 0.00
Capital Adequacy Ratio ( CAR for Solo Basis) under Circular No. 538 -
or Circular No. 280, as applicable -
a. Tier 1 (Solo Basis) 43.48
b. Total ( Solo Basis) 43.57
Deferred Charges Not yet Written Down -
Unbooked Allowance for Probable Losses on Financial Instruments Received -
Equity placement. Ayala Land Inc., the countrys biggest listed property company, raised P13.6 billion from one
of the largest overnight placements in the country and the biggest by a real estate rm in Southeast Asia since 2005.
A bell-ringing ceremony capped the landmark capital-raising activity at the Philippine Stock Exchange Friday. Shown
during the ceremony (from left) are Ayala Land treasurer Augusto Bengzon; Ayala Land chief nance ofcer Jaime
Ysmael; Ayala Land president and chief executive Antonino Aquino; Ayala Land chairman Fernando Zobel de Ayala;
PSE chairman Jose Pardo; PSE directors Eusebio Tanco and Alejandro Yu; and PSE chief operating ofcer Roel Refran.
By Lailany P. Gomez
PHILIPPINES AirAsia Inc., the
countrys newest budget carrier,
is opposing governments plan
to shelve the proposed P12-
billion budget terminal at the
Clark free port.
The government earlier
announced the construction
of a budget terminal at the
Clark International Airport that
would handle at least 10 million
passengers a year, as the operating
facility could not handle the inux
of travelers in Central Luzon.
AirAsia chief executive
Marianne Hontiveros said the
requirements of budget airlines
were different from those of
legacy carriers.
They told us they are going to
give us low-cost terminal so we
dont have to pay for all the extra
benets the legacy carriers want,
such as aero bridges, lounges
and all that. The maintenance
cost for an airport for legacy
carriers will be higher, and for us
[budget carriers] every savings
is passed on as low fares to the
passengers. So the simpler the
model for the better, Hontiveros
told reporters at the sidelines
of the launching of AirAsias
maiden ight to Macau from its
hub in Clark.
Clark International Airport
Corp. earlier said it was exploring
the possibility of constructing a
big legacy, or one combined with
budget, terminal and even planned
to send a team to the US to look at
the global trends..
Besides AirAsia, other local
airlines that operate in Clark
are Cebu Pacic, South East
Asian Airlines, Airphil Express
and ZestAir, while foreign
carriers include Dragonair, Jin
Air, Asiana Airlines and Tiger
Airways.
By Maria Bernadette Lunas
SEVEN major property
developers will try to
outbid each other, when
the government holds
the public auction for 74
hectares of prime property
at the 103-hectare Food
Terminal Inc. complex in
Taguig City on Aug. 8.
The Privatization and Management Ofce
said the auction was expected to raise at least
P10.2 billion for the government. Proceeds
from the sale will go to the Comprehensive
Agrarian Reform Program and the Agriculture
Department.
The PMO said seven companies attended
the pre-bid conference held at the FTI main
ofce on Friday, when the parameters of the
sale such as the minimum target selling price
and pre-qualication requirements were
discussed.
The companies include Ayala Land Inc.,
Century Properties Group Inc., Empire East
Land, Filinvest Land Inc., Robinsons Land
Corp., Rockwell Land Corp. and SM Land Inc.
The PMO said the plan was to sell 74
hectares of the industrial complex at the
base price of P10.248 billion. It said bids
below the base price would be automatically
disqualied.
Submission and opening of the bids will
be held at the 6th oor conference room of
PMO on Gamboa Street, Legaspi Village,
Makati City on Aug. 8 at 11:30 a.m.
The PMO said the development of
the property was expected to generate a
surge in economic activities in the area,
improve transportation linkages and boost
employment opportunities.
It said to minimize delays and complete
the transaction seamlessly, it would conduct
a workshop to help the bidders prepare for
the submission of bid envelopes to prevent
technical violations.
Two-envelope bidding procedures will
be used, wherein participants will submit
their technical proposal apart from the price
proposal. This will enable the government
assess the bids based on their technical
standards without citing the offered price.
Following the last failed bidding of the
103-hectare FTI complex in October 2009,
the government has been working diligently
to design a plan that would optimize the
use of the parcel, said PMO chief Karen
Singson.
Bidders were given bid packets detailing
the asset specic
bidding rules to ensure
a transparent and
competitive bidding
process.
By Alena Mae S. Flores
CASH-STRAPPED National Power
Corp. needs P17.14 billion next
year to nance the operation of 534
generating units with a combined
capacity of 278.398 megawatts in 221
off-grid areas around the country.
For 2013, Napocors requirements
to pursue electrication will require
P17.136 billion, which covers power
generation, transmission activities,
including fuel, subsidies, [operations
and maintenance], some capital
investment and personal services,
Napocor president Froilan Tampinco
said.
Napocor requires funding of around
P15 billion for its Small Power Utilities
Group operations this year. Congress
approves Napocors SPUG operations
annually.
Napocor is set to upgrade power
plants with a combined capacity of
4.425 MW at cost of P79.4 million to
meet demand and spend some P295.55
million for transmission projects in
Palawan, Mindoro and Catandunes.
The SPUG operation is composed
of 277 land-based diesel power plants,
one hydroelectric station, one hybrid
wind turbine farm and 11 mobile barges
serving 221 island grids, including
eight isolated ones, serving 3,947
barangays in 216 municipalities.
Napocors SPUG has 51 customers
consisting of 44 electric cooperatives
and seven local government units.
Tampinco said Napocor would
pursue plans to reduce the cost of
fuel.
We have received proposals for
making diesel [and] bunker to make
them more efcient. There are new
technologies. This is something that
will allow us to save on fuel expenses,
he said.
Napocor has been subsidizing the
cost of fuel in the off-grid areas as
part of its mandate under the Electric
Power Reform Act of 2001.
We cannot incur losses all the
time. We want to spur the necessary
economic activity that will allow the
people to pay the cost of electricity,
he said.
Asean gas pipeline
THE government has revived its
interest in the Trans-Asean gas pipe-
line, which will create access to the
abundant supply of natural gas from
Indonesia.
Indonesia is saying they are go-
ing to put up a lot of gas by 2016,
so they are also interested in nding
ways to sell their gas, Energy Sec-
retary Jose Rene Almendras said.
Were interested in that [pipeline]
discussion because we know that nat-
ural gas is the way to go, he said.
The possibility of a Brunei to
Palawan natural gas pipeline was
rst raised in 2005 during one of
the meetings of the Association of
Southeast Asian Nations.
The Palawan to Brunei gas pipeline
is estimated to cover about 1,000 kilo-
meters or double that of the Malam-
paya gas pipeline to Batangas.
Almendras said another option
is to link the pipeline to Mindanao,
where the region can take advantage
of the natural gas for fuel, power and
industries. Alena Mae S. Flores
Handicraft problem
THE rising cost of doing business
in Metro Manila has forced a num-
ber of handicraft rms to relocate
to the provinces, an ofcial of the
Philippine Chamber of Handicraft
Industries Inc. said.
PCHI president Dennis Orlina
said these manufacturers considered
it a suicide to continue operating
in the metropolis, which has the
highest cost of electricity, water and
labor.
We can be more competitive
[in the provinces]. It is a lot easier
to monitor operations in a cheaper
work environment, Orlina said.
Orlina said relocating to the prov-
inces could cut their operation cost
by as much as 20 percent. Handi-
craft companies preferred to relocate
in the Cottage Industry Technology
Centers in the provinces. The Philip-
pine Economic Zone Authority has
recently accredited CITC as an eco-
nomic zone. Julito G. Rada
AVANTE-GUARDE spiritual writers continue to
pursue the renewal dreams of Vatican Council II.
Today, their newstream ideas create a tension between
traditional Church teachings and contemporary
hermeneutics relevant to spiritual experience.
Adult spirituality
Andrew Gonzalez views an adult believer as
someone who has gured things out for himself
based on his experience of life and the sacred in human
existence. His beliefs and values are self-determined
and have become a source of liberation. He believes
certain principles and events on the basis of his own
convictions and no longer based on what others have
said. He acts and lives his life accordingly, respecting
traditions and even Church ofcial teachings, but
transcending them based on his own conviction and
commitments. Hence, an adult believer is no longer
a blind-obedient Christian.
In a focused group discussion, my MBA Gen X
and Y students from 17 Catholic parishes in Metro
Manila showed preference for homilies that are
attuned to modern times, adapting to the changing
culture, and respecting other peoples preferences.
They expressed adverse reaction to homilies that are
pegged to biblical context with no relevance to their
personal and professional life. Thus, they prefer a
Eucharistic celebration for specic age groups; they
desire freedom in exploring a meaningful spirituality;
and they are in search for an authentic experience that
is beyond Sunday mass compliance.
Personalist spirituality
James Ebners personalist yes theology may help us
understand the spirituality of Gen X and Y. His theology
simplies God as Mystery Present in every personal
life experience. As such, this theology is appropriate to
us who are highly relational. Our pakikipagkapwa is
a cultural metaphor of God as Mystery Present in our
interpersonal dialogue and it allows our kalooban to
have an immediate experience of the divine.
For example, Alvin Quirong, a young Catholic
believer, relates why a third something between
God and him is not necessary. He says, I dont go
to church; I dont pray the rosary; I dont pray the
novena. What I do is study the Bible [and] spread
the Gospel. For him, a true Christian works hard
at work because this is also an act of worshipyour
talent is Gods gift to you, what you do with your
talents is your gift to God.
God as Mystery Present makes it less necessary for
a go-between God and the believer. The experience of
His presence is immediate; one becomes aware of the
divine implicitly deciphered as truth, suffering, joy,
etc. and explicitly understood as the sacred through
an invitation to say Yes to life challenges. Christine
Page believes that once each of us is able to tap into
our higher wisdom then there will be less need for
the middle man, such as those found within religious
organizations, who for so long have been the mediator
between the Creator and ourselves.
Lasallian spirituality
Br. Alvaro Echevarria, FSC, superior general
of the De La Salle Brothers, describes Lasallian
spirituality as an action moment to know the reality
and to respond to the needs of that reality. Thus,
every moment in a world of work can be sanctied
by invoking, Let us remember that we are in the
Holy Presence of God. And every action thereafter
becomes sacred by declaring, I will continue, O
my God, to do all my actions for the love of you.
The buttery effect of this Lasallian spirituality
practised for 100 years in the Philippines has to be
empirically veried in business corporations and
government institutions where Lasallians serve for
God and country.
Human race spirituality
In a global environment, corporate members may
consider the human race church model of Ebner
as spirituality framework. Here, Catholic and
non-Catholics are subsumed and it is operational
whenever a person says an authentic Yes to self,
others and the Other [God]. The Catholic Church,
distinguished by its adherence to the Pope, is
not the center of Gods plan and not the ordinary
means of salvation, according to Ebner. Rather, the
Human Race Church includes ordinary people who
live at their best ethical lives and, according to Karl
Rahner, are anonymous Christians.
In alignment with Ebner and Rahner is Schlette
who considers the great religions as the normal
or ordinary way to salvation and not the Catholic
Church. Radically, John Hick proposes a Copernican
revolution for Christian theology to renounce its
claims for religious superiority and exclusivity to
be genuinely plural.
In a global workplace, managers are invited to
be sensitive to the varied religious afliations of
corporate members and human race spirituality
serves as a practical framework to embrace
Abrahamic, Sinic, and Vedic cultures within a
unied human race church perspective.
Sacralizing the workplace
Schleck reminds us that the vocation to which
God calls us is simply [being] a man [person] who
is on the way to being restored in his [her] normal
human nature. Before, we used to say that the human
culminates in being a Christian; but now we say
that the Christian culminates in being human. We
conclude that humanism, which shows an unlimited
concern to continually discover truth, beauty and
goodness and develop ones ultimate potential, is
Christianity without all the proper names.
Thus, humanistic management and the prominence
of the social teachings of the Church signify how a
corporate member is expected to be living not only the
ethical code but also ultimately mirror spirituality in
the workplace. In doing so, anthropocentric theology
considers his/her behavior in a spiritual realm.
But one need not express a religious, and even
pious, conversation about God, the saints and the
scriptures in the workplace. After all, The Word
of God is not only recorded in scriptures and
proclaimed in the community, it also addresses us
through people and the experiences of life itself.
Gabriel Moran tells us that All of creation speaks
of God and that God is revealed in the letting be of
being, that is, in things simply being themselves.
Conclusion
Thus, managers who plan, lead, organize, and
control, are sacralizing the workplace. Team
problem-solving and decision-making as a creative
exercises manifest team spirit and, more importantly,
the Spirit of wisdom if the session was convened
in His name. The Lasallian Holy Presence of God
formula asks the Spirit to make all human activity
truly spiritual in the workplace. Thus, the managers
fulll Cardinal Tuskers reminder that being-in-
business is calling, a vocation summoned by God.

Dr. Emiliano T. Hudtohan teaches at the


Management and Organization Department Ramon
V. del Rosario Sr. College of Business of De La Salle
University, Manila; Graduate School of De La Salle
Araneta University, Malabon; Far Eastern University-
Makati; and Graduate School of Social Development,
Philippine Womens University, Manila. He holds a
doctorate in religious and values formation from De La
Salle University. For comments, address to dr.eth2008@
gmail.com and visit emilianohudtohan.com.
Business
ManilaStandardToday
extrastory2000@gmail.com
JULY 23, 2012 MONDAY
B2
Newstream spirituality in the workplace
M
S
T
WEEKLY STOCKS REVIEW
JULY 16-20, 2012 JULY 9-13, 2012
STOCKS CLOSE VOLUME VALUE CLOSE VOLUME VALUE
FINANCIAL
Banco de Oro Unibank Inc. 63.85 12,387,110 784,562,103.50 62.15 12,026,860 750,360,937.00
Bank of PI 73.00 5,931,060 433,462,510.50 72.05 5,577,050 413,011,782.50
Bankard, Inc. 0.71 207,000 148,990.00 0.71 109,000 77,330.00
China Bank 487.00 22,300 10,875,928.00 490.00 10,990 5,372,840.00
COL Financial 22.75 622,600 13,977,720.00 22.4 175,500 3,999,050.00
Eastwest Bank 18.72 8,260,100 155,454,442.00 18.64 4,957,200 92,471,304.00
Filipino Fund Inc. 10.24 15,000 159,410 10.14 17,100 182,924
First Metro Inv. 79.95 5,110 400,735.50 80 6,490 526,483.00
I-Remit Inc. 2.47 270,000 637,540.00 2.59 287,000 744,670.00
Manulife Fin. Corp. 451.20 370 167,088.00 452.00 320 144,604.00
Maybank ATR KE 37 14,500 338,415.00 37.8 11,300 427,105.00
Metrobank 95.50 10,708,620 1,048,543,505.50 95.00 9,307,770 875,263,185.50
Natl Reinsurance Corp. 1.97 33,305,500 66,847,920.00 1.98 4,603,000 9,122,410.00
Phil Bank of Comm 65.50 6,860 448,940.00 66.00 6,620 439,050.00
Phil. National Bank 73.90 1,109,560 81,012,134.50 73.10 943,030 69,432,429.00
Phil. Savings Bank 86.00 4,180 343,506.00 86.00 23,570 2,027,020.00
PSE Inc. 356 41,040 14,668,148.00 360 135,330 47,371,394.00
RCBC `A 44.1 2,005,500.00 88,609,370.00 43.95 1,207,440.00 92,392,355.00
Security Bank 140 5,517,530 774,053,961.00 138 2,468,490 344,234,074.00
Sun Life Financial 910.00 2,870 2,608,775.00 950.00 90 83,850.00
Union Bank 99.80 1,108,680 110,848,557.00 100.00 716,800 72,168,575.00
Vantage Equities 1.72 6,051,000 10,408,230.00 1.72 374,000 657,840.00
INDUSTRIAL
Aboitiz Power Corp. 34.55 13,364,700 457,142,375.00 33.95 4,793,100 163,271,790.00
Agrinurture Inc. 8.8 304,400 2,700,123.00 8.49 403,800 3,448,100.00
Alaska Milk Corp. 19.5 41,400 746,142.00 15.24 33,800 514,708.00
Alliance Tuna Intl Inc. 1.41 567,000 808,520.00 1.46 559,000 799,420.00
Alphaland Corp. 29.4 5,200 152,390.00 29.25 7,400 213,575.00
Alsons Cons. 1.43 5,488,000 7,860,350.00 1.46 55,492,000 81,504,830.00
Asiabest Group 30.2 634,500 20,076,890.00 33.95 1,458,600 52,041,885.00
Bogo Medellin 60.00 42,300 2,370,000.00 61.20 40 2,448.00
C. Azuc De Tarlac 15.10 7,000 105,790.00 15.12 7,000 105,128.00
Calapan Venture 2.38 47,000 112,160.00 2.45 49,000 113,150.00
Conc. Aggr. `A 80.00 10 800.00
Chemrez Technologies Inc. 2.55 879,000 3,171,630.00 2.60 1,064,000 2,819,530.00
Cirtek Holdings (Chips) 9.38 149,700 1,362,997.00 9.05 135,400 1,207,228.00
Energy Devt. Corp. (EDC) 6.14 50,021,400 305,905,980.00 6.13 48,628,000 293,494,845.00
EEI 6.57 9,880,200 67,778,819.00 6.86 20,618,200 135,564,540.00
Euro-Med Lab. 1.70 39,000 66,300.00
Federal Chemicals 9.65 16,700 160,924.00 9.85 40,800 405,182.00
First Gen Corp. 18.04 19,455,400 350,637,576.00 17.84 10,953,200 193,477,160.00
First Holdings A 76.5 5,773,040 451,634,824.50 76.9 3,996,680 261,841,275.50
Ginebra San Miguel Inc. 20.60 146,100 3,029,980.00 20.85 10,060,000 211,259,725.00
Greenergy 0.0150 513,000,000 7,278,000.00 0.0160 533,600,000 8,013,300.00
Holcim Philippines Inc. 11.60 926,500 10,964,932.00 11.80 778,300 9,238,264.00
Integ. Micro-Electronics 4.09 308,000 1,260,470.00 4.08 1,759,000 7,173,190.00
Ionics Inc 0.620 1,384,000 184,790,740.00 0.710 1,343,000 971,110.00
Jollibee Foods Corp. 105.80 1,668,780 175,144,492.00 104.00 1,522,810 156,424,849.00
Lafarge Rep 8.85 194,800 1,697,519.00 8.8 53,600 455,812.00
Liberty Flour 41.00 11,100 475,900.00 45.00 49,170 433,380.00
LMG Chemicals 2.02 12,164,000 24,651,270.00 2.02 44,643,000 93,001,370.00
Mabuhay Vinyl Corp. 1.49 3,000 4,470.00 1.5 78,000 115,320.00
Manchester Intl. A 2.73 98,000 279,880.00 2.99 1,292,000 3,641,810.00
Manchester Intl. B 3 16,000 48,000.00 3.1 546,000 1,570,040.00
Manila Water Co. Inc. 25.4 15,486,100 397,167,685.00 25.5 7,593,400 193,733,065.00
Mariwasa MFG. Inc. 3.43 14,000 46,920.00 2.91 14,000 40,170.00
Megawide 16.20 1,316,600 21,197,606.00 16.78 951,100 16,126,098.00
Mla. Elect. Co `A 265.00 1,017,390 264,710,588.00 251.40 434,330 111,089,470.00
Pancake House Inc. 11 3,200 35,000.00
Pepsi-Cola Products Phil. 2.9 15,385,000 44,152,860.00 2.82 4,483,000 13,648,290.00
Petron Corporation 10.10 12,949,100 130,928,436.00 10.12 15,941,300 161,291,348.00
Phinma Corporation 10.50 11,800 126,986.00 10.60 33,400 353,680.00
Phoenix Petroleum Phils. 8.85 2,082,700 18,458,062.00 8.88 1,496,800 13,101,605.00
RFM Corporation 3.32 4,011,000 13,767,780.00 3.60 13,266,000 45,239,840.00
Roxas and Co. 2.25 2,000 4,500.00
Salcon Power Corp. 5.2 65,400 349,803.00 5.25 267,700 1,560,364.00
San Miguel Brewery Inc. 33.80 1,139,500 38,171,780.00 33.30 1,814,600 59,418,240.00
San Miguel Corp `A 114.00 1,623,700 231,602,392.00 114.00 2,277,160 404,891,532.00
Seacem 1.90 53,575,000 106,105,260.00 1.95 146,053,000 275,733,570.00
Splash Corporation 1.83 340,000 614,950.00 1.81 773,000 1,413,400.00
Swift Foods, Inc. 0.143 67,670,000 10,258,280.00 0.145 20,710,000 2,757,340.00
Tanduay Holdings 4.51 10,712,000 48,088,670.00 4.47 6,009,000 26,899,490.00
TKC Steel Corp. 2.20 654,000 1,372,470.00 2.20 37,000 78,600.00
Trans-Asia Oil 1.21 3,398,400 7,880,160.00 1.24 4,538,000 5,616,890.00
Universal Robina 59.45 10,015,210 612,027,096.00 62.00 11,150,900 694,218,308.50
Victorias Milling 1.17 11,619,000 14,163,030.00 1.28 11,123,000 14,376,310.00
Vitarich Corp. 0.610 1,696,000 1,062,600.00 0.640 3,542,000 2,238,700.00
Vivant Corp. 9.00 17,200 168,036.00 10.48 21,600 221,058.00
Vulcan Indl. 0.94 296,000 288,600.00 0.99 344,000 330,660.00
HOLDING FIRMS
Abacus Cons. `A 0.93 253,264,000 233,388,290.00 0.96 146,421,000 129,032,120.00
Aboitiz Equity 48.50 2,927,000 141,250,360.00 47.90 4,404,400 212,523,270.00
Alcorn Gold Res. 0.0170 435,300,000 7,400,100.00 0.0160 15,600,000 249,900.00
Alliance Global Inc. 11.56 59,823,800 705,675,086.00 11.68 69,730,600 807,052,020.00
Anglo Holdings A 1.99 1,136,000 2,267,140.00 2.00 882,000 1,764,550.00
Anscor `A 4.70 357,000 1,707,790.00 4.71 103,000 478,970.00
Asia Amalgamated A 5.19 311,200 1,598,758.00 5.00 566,500 2,846,552.00
ATN Holdings A 2.19 535,000 1,159,370.00 2.38 1,777,000 4,259,970.00
Ayala Corp `A 429.8 5,547,980 2,444,554,568.00 455 1,767,480 814,023,582.00
DMCI Holdings 57.90 16,639,710 978,644,647.50 58.10 7,396,520 434,777,350.50
F&J Prince A 2.66 76,000 207,390.00 2.95 135,000 361,640.00
Filinvest Dev. Corp. 4.07 2,138,000 8,556,620.00 4.00 322,000 448,062,485.00
Forum Pacic 0.255 6,300,000 1,744,510.00 0.220 120,000 24,600.00
GT Capital 538 1,350,670 724,901,895.00 535 1,508,280 786,474,315.00
House of Inv. 5.06 574,800 2,869,889.00 4.88 561,000 2,707,030.00
JG Summit Holdings 32.05 11,553,000 372,123,835.00 32.70 9,768,900 319,815,900.00
Jolliville Holdings 2.88 1,000 2,880.00 2.87 25,000 71,750.00
Lopez Holdings Corp. 5.8 7,536,900 44,337,647.00 5.94 6,088,200 36,286,511.00
Lodestar Invt. Holdg.Corp. 1.13 19,358,000 22,409,740.00 1.21 38,093,000 46,632,870.00
Mabuhay Holdings `A 0.485 581,000 304,780.00 0.530 3,645,000 1,906,130.00
Marcventures Hldgs., Inc. 2.54 6,387,000 16,007,020.00 2.54 7,882,000 20,409,250.00
Metro Pacic Inv. Corp. 4.20 102,041,000 428,360,640.00 4.21 63,498,000 265,317,900.00
Minerales Industrias Corp. 5.39 301,000 1,601,837.00 5.38 674,000 3,707,557.00
MJCI Investments Inc. 6.25 89,900 565,237.00 6.69 251,600 1,417,105.00
Pacica `A 0.0560 24,560,000 1,401,570.00 0.0580 119,580,000 7,032,550.00
Prime Media Hldg 1.340 124,000 176,000.00 1.660 428,000 674,410.00
Prime Orion 0.490 1,180,000 554,100.00 0.470 1,720,000 806,900.00
Republic Glass A 2.12 7,000 14,830.00 2.11 7,000 14,770.00
Seafront `A 1.55 181,000 288,050.00 1.55 8,000 11,800.00
Sinophil Corp. 0.335 3,210,000 1,075,700.00 0.345 2,490,000 847,650.00
SM Investments Inc. 718.00 1,129,330 820,106,580.00 725.00 969,860 711,791,245.00
Solid Group Inc. 1.50 5,478,000 8,259,080.00 1.46 3,710,000 5,278,130.00
South China Res. Inc. 1.18 262,000 313,760.00 1.22 285,000 347,700.00
Transgrid 450.00 330 147,900.00 450.00 40 17,600.00
Unioil Res. & Hldgs 0.2500 740,000 184,300.00 0.2600 3,390,000 916,650.00
Wellex Industries 0.3250 6,060,000 1,977,550.00 0.3400 3,960,000 1,340,450.00
Zeus Holdings 0.455 14,900,000 7,015,000.00 0.495 54,293,000 29,627,995.00
P R O P E R T Y
Anchor Land Holdings Inc. 21.40 19,600 406,780.00 22.20 4,200 91,640.00
A. Brown Co., Inc. 2.52 116,000 296,380.00 2.56 228,000 587,050.00
Araneta Prop `A 0.610 228,000 143,130.00 0.630 734,000 474,700.00
Arthaland Corp. 0.175 8,120,000 1,463,650.00
Ayala Land `B 20.45 56,451,200 1,165,093,830.00 20.65 144,698,700 2,992,774,280.00
Belle Corp. `A 5.03 14,781,400 74,669,508.00 5.07 35,290,900 178,863,259.00
Cebu Holdings 5.72 368,000 2,122,874.00 5.7 335,200 1,897,316.00
Cebu Prop. `A 5 30,900 154,374.00 5 30,000 150,000.00
Centennial City 1.43 5,379,000 7,869,440.00 1.51 7,362,000 10,876,600.00
City & Land Dev. 2.50 151,000 381,100.00 2.65 116,000 298,200.00
Cityland Dev. `A 1.24 137,000 168,130.00 1.20 184,000 219,550.00
Crown Equities Inc. 0.077 30,000 2,310.00 0.076 960,000 71,580.00
Cyber Bay Corp. 0.83 12,415,000 10,561,880.00 0.79 1,892,000 1,505,980.00
Empire East Land 0.860 651,386,000 390,886,490.00 0.800 27,721,000 21,856,320.00
Ever Gotesco 0.185 4,940,000 959,550.00 0.180 230,000 39,360.00
Global-Estate 2.01 42,450,000 88,644,710.00 2.07 56,876,000 117,042,970.00
Filinvest Land,Inc. 1.29 48,674,000 63,390,890.00 1.30 103,439,000 133,234,670.00
Highlands Prime 1.72 75,000 127,960.00 1.74 56,000 99,600.00
Interport `A 1.28 990,000 1,270,430.00 1.36 10,228,000 13,520,180.00
Keppel Properties 1.98 41,000 82,950.00
Megaworld Corp. 2.15 333,441,000 730,322,190.00 2.22 325,166,000 719,074,040.00
MRC Allied Ind. 0.1640 12,610,000 2,054,870.00 0.1620 37,000,000 6,152,000.00
Phil. Estates Corp. 0.6600 11,699,000 7,693,990.00 0.6700 21,255,000 14,211,840.00
Phil. Realty `A 0.460 340,000 153,200.00 0.450 440,000 208,000.00
Phil. Tob. Flue Cur & Redry 14.58 100 1,458.00 14.58 9,100 132,680.00
Primex Corp. 3.43 475,000 1,680,530.00 3.30 2,100,000 8,199,050.00
Robinsons Land `B 18.46 23,799,800 435,739,426.00 18.20 17,113,200 304,008,464.00
Rockwell 3.17 1,831,000 5,728,580.00 3.44 1,668,000 5,566,140.00
Shang Properties Inc. 2.58 1,030,000 2,632,110.00 2.56 675,000 1,701,220.00
SM Development `A 6.19 17,320,000 107,245,432.00 6.13 6,410,300 39,404,967.00
SM Prime Holdings 13.60 41,653,700 560,320,302.00 13.38 60,274,400 779,947,498.00
Sta. Lucia Land Inc. 0.7 3,009,000 2,050,770.00 0.69 2,978,000 2,012,530.00
Starmalls 4.04 1,395,000 5,578,640.00 4.15 1,433,000 5,858,450.00
Suntrust Home Dev. Inc. 0.520 4,474,000 2,374,100.00 0.540 530,000 290,250.00
Vista Land & Lifescapes 4.160 15,290,000 62,334,870.00 4.080 32,051,000 130,995,420.00
S E R V I C E S
2GO Group 1.9 10,000 19,000.00
ABS-CBN 36 3,042,100 181,784,089.00 36.6 73,200 2,679,245.00
Acesite Hotel 1.63 13,032,000 24,868,050.00 2.5 4,563,000 11,771,570.00
APC Group, Inc. 0.630 46,991,000 29,550,100.00 0.690 1,153,000 759,640.00
Asian Terminals Inc. 9.3 185,200 1,682,386.00 9 220,100 1,981,350.00
Bloomberry 9.88 60,819,300 612,856,565.00 10.40 63,649,300 671,488,966.00
Boulevard Holdings 0.1320 80,190,000 11,064,300.00 0.1390 49,500,000 6,971,000.00
Calata Corp. 8.73 3,149,200 28,260,145.00 9.4 12,404,400 124,049,859.00
Cebu Air Inc. (5J) 67.70 1,423,820 97,203,751.50 68.50 1,368,140 93,711,129.50
Centro Esc. Univ. 10.48 9,500 99,560.00 9.96 9,100 90,196.00
DFNN Inc. 5.90 478,600 2,767,404.00 6.10 434,600 2,629,056.00
Easy Call Common 2.54 15,000 38,100.00 3.01 14,000 42,290.00
FEUI 980 3,100 3,068,500.00 990 5,325 5,327,750.00
Globalports 29 100 2,900.00
Globe Telecom 1135.00 448,985 511,234,910.00 1121.00 252,725 283,198,135.00
GMA Network Inc. 10.10 2,272,700 22,990,022.00 10.30 3,756,100 39,042,708.00
I.C.T.S.I. 71.7 9,332,590 664,075,440.00 70.85 4,379,830 312,340,535.00
Information Capital Tech. 0.440 12,720,000 6,007,450.00 0.400 1,710,000 696,200.00
IPeople Inc. `A 6.65 26,500 180,245.00 6.68 206,200 1,411,767.00
IP Converge 2.45 3,141,000 7,285,490.00 2.28 12,295,000 28,735,370.00
IP E-Game Ventures Inc. 0.039 224,000,000 8,655,800.00 0.038 74,700,000 2,833,000.00
IPVG Corp. 1.07 913,000 962,280.00 1.06 1,291,000 1,382,380.00
Island Info 0.0500 21,600,000 1,049,800.00 0.0500 16,880,000 843,670.00
ISM Communications 2.8500 771,000 2,183,070.00 3.0000 19,000 56,160.00
JTH Davies Holdings Inc. 2.44 128,000 314,070.00 2.45 43,000 109,130.00
Leisure & Resorts 8.58 12,733,500 111,797,702.00 8.54 31,724,400 267,600,926.00
Liberty Telecom 2.73 193,000 530,030.00 2.85 171,000 480,740.00
Macroasia Corp. 2.80 367,000 1,028,330.00 2.90 1,000 2,900.00
Manila Broadcasting 3.30 1,000 3,300.00
Manila Bulletin 0.75 743,000 547,290.00 0.74 1,148,000 858,950.00
Manila Jockey 2.5 7,810,000 19,477,570.00 2.32 4,150,000 9,545,750.00
Metro Pacic Tollways 7.00 500 3,500.00 7.00 12,800 89,552.00
Pacic Online Sys. Corp. 14.3 35,300 500,376.00 14.6 32,400 470,482.00
PAL Holdings Inc. 7.27 144,100 1,052,731 7.31 80,600 593,665
Paxys Inc. 3 3,032,000 9,168,040.00 3.06 4,135,000 12,565,460.00
Phil. Racing Club 9.5 1,152,000 10,946,190.00 9.5 1,005,200 9,548,620.00
Phil. Seven Corp. 60.00 3,052,740 183,068,507.00 61.00 312,810 18,637,361.00
Philweb.Com Inc. 14.84 9,936,600 143,449,226.00 14.02 11,035,000 145,602,742.00
PLDT Common 2716.00 609,600 1,665,949,530.00 2700.00 556,605 1,508,401,460.00
PremiereHorizon 0.320 7,400,000 2,426,000.00 0.315 4,120,000 1,299,700.00
Puregold 26.60 20,531,900 549,776,570.00 26.70 44,344,200 1,216,855,835.00
Touch Solutions 3.7 13,000 48,100.00 3.69 1,000 3,690.00
Transpacic Broadcast 2.73 5,000 12,490.00
Waterfront Phils. 0.435 1,380,000 594,450.00 0.425 690,000 301,100.00
MINING & OIL
Abra Mining 0.0041 448,000,000 1,814,000.00 0.0041 277,000,000 1,168,000.00
Apex `A 5.00 1,100,300 5,515,164.00 5.20 1,033,700 5,486,603.00
Apex `B 5.00 1,790,800 9,462,215.00 5.02 188,000 947,250.00
Atlas Cons. `A 17.52 2,761,400 49,017,294.00 17.48 3,215,300 56,587,422.00
Atok-Big Wedge `A 29.15 1,500 41,825.00 29.70 16,600 484,665.00
Basic Energy Corp. 0.255 14,260,000 3,678,100.00 0.265 4,540,000 1,181,150.00
Benguet Corp `A 23.15 17,300 400,935.00 24 32,800 773,730.00
Benguet Corp `B 23.35 12,900 304,090.00 24.1 13,200 321,720.00
Century Peak Metals Hldgs 1.29 1,250,000 1,616,350.00 1.29 877,000 1,156,360.00
Dizon 31.80 2,391,700 78,789,070.00 33.70 7,303,100 256,292,395.00
Geograce Res. Phil. Inc. 0.61 153,961,000 96,286,820.00 0.7 17,790,000 12,504,120.00
Lepanto `A 1.270 122,458,000 153,511,570.00 1.290 283,530,000 388,772,300.00
Lepanto `B 1.330 54,325,000 71,543,210.00 1.390 137,732,000 199,529,120.00
Manila Mining `A 0.0680 788,240,000 53,605,890.00 0.0710 1,318,550,000 95,882,490.00
Manila Mining `B 0.0680 204,730,000 14,218,920.00 0.0720 628,520,000 46,880,140.00
Nickelasia 28 2,311,700 68,019,050.00 29.7 1,074,800 32,297,710.00
Nihao Mineral Resources 9.88 3,496,200 34,918,866.00 10.18 22,960,000 235,475,945.00
Omico 0.7000 509,000 359,600.00 0.7600 215,000 154,610.00
Oriental Peninsula Res. 5.050 5,248,600 26,724,294.00 5.290 5,983,000 32,735,323.00
Oriental Pet. `A 0.0180 527,900,000 9,507,100.00 0.0180 106,100,000 1,942,600.00
Oriental Pet. `B 0.0190 49,600,000 941,700.00 0.0200 184,800,000 3,537,900.00
Petroenergy Res. Corp. 6.00 118,400 611,229.00 6.05 48,600 292,520.00
Philex `A 21.40 14,121,400 311,126,590.00 23.15 9,478,300 221,760,630.00
PhilexPetroleum 38.55 5,259,000 213,755,405.00 45.9 2,550,000 114,508,015.00
Philodrill Corp. `A 0.051 2,251,670,000 115,343,310.00 0.053 4,325,970,000 233,585,250.00
Semirara Corp. 220.00 1,145,720 260,277,222.00 221.20 834,730 182,730,712.00
United Paragon 0.0170 522,420,000 9,108,900.00 0.0180 302,700,000 5,530,400.00
PREFERRED
ABS-CBN Holdings Corp. 34 1,635,400 55,838,185.00 35.6 231,300 8,370,315.00
Ayala Corp. Pref `A 555 1,480 815,140.00 545 3,880 2,111,720.00
First Gen F 100 90,000 9,070,000.00 101 10,000 1,010,000.00
First Gen G 102 38,210 3,886,035.00 102.5 75,940 7,753,945.00
First Phil. Hldgs.-Pref. 103.9 399,910 41,514,970.00 103.40 820 84,163.00
GMA Holdings Inc. 10.08 12,486,100 16,842,552.00 10.28 5,307,600 54,863,274.00
PCOR-Preferred 110.2 102,270 11,257,403.00 110.1 123,340 13,566,750.00
SMC Preferred 1 74.9 42,500 3,184,450.00 75.3 21,660 1,634,030.00
SMPFC Preferred 1020 11,950 12,146,700.00 1017 39,395 40,144,945.00
Swift Pref 1.14 278,000 315,440.00 1.12 135,000 153,220.00
WARRANTS & BONDS
Megaworld Corp. Warrants 1.18 1,690,000 2,077,640.00 1.24 3,123,000 3,771,530.00
Megaworld Corp. Warrants2 1.2 40,000 48,000.00
S M E
Makati Fin. Corp. 3.6 3,000 10,800.00
SONA expected
to boost stocks
DR. EMILIANO T.
HUDTOHAN
GREEN LIGHT
WEEKLY MOST TRADED
STOCKS VOLUME
Philodrill Corp. `A 2,251,670,000
Manila Mining `A 788,240,000
Empire East Land 651,386,000
Oriental Pet. `A 527,900,000
United Paragon 522,420,000
Greenergy 513,000,000
Abra Mining 448,000,000
Alcorn Gold Res. 435,300,000
Megaworld Corp. 333,441,000
Abacus Cons. `A 253,264,000
STOCKS VALUE
Ayala Corp `A 2,444,554,568.00
PLDT Common 1,665,949,530.00
Ayala Land `B 1,165,093,830.00
Metrobank 1,048,543,505.50
DMCI Holdings 978,644,647.50
SM Investments Inc. 820,106,580.00
Banco de Oro Unibank Inc. 784,562,103.50
Security Bank 774,053,961.00
Megaworld Corp. 730,322,190.00
GT Capital 724,901,895.00
By Julito G. Rada
THE stock market is expected to draw
strength from the message of President
Benigno Aquino III in his State-of-the-Na-
tion Address today as well as the release
of corporate earnings reports this week.
Astro del Castillo, managing
director of stock brokerage rm
First Grade Finance Inc., said the
news on the local front coupled
with corporate earnings report
would affect market sentiment
this week.
The attitude of the market
is biased towards surge this
week, but would still depend on
domestic news and corporate
earnings reports, Del Castillo
said.
Local shares rebounded on
Friday after a three-day decline,
as investors renewed their
interest on property companies
which were on expansion mode
this year. Some of the rms that
registered gains were Robinsons
Land Corp., Ayala Land Inc.,
SM Prime Holdings Inc. and
Megaworld Corp.
The Philippine Stock
Exchange index, the 30-company
benchmark, rose 21 points, or 0.4
percent to close at 5,210.89 on
Friday while the heavier index,
representing all shares, also
added 14 points, or 0.4 percent,
to 3,459.02.
Del Castillo said the market
could trade within a range of 5,200
points and 5,300 points this week.
What the traders are expecting
the President to say in his Sona is
if we are really moving forward. I
hope his speech will be inspiring,
Del Castillo said.
We hope to hear from him that
one of his priorities will be the new
mining policy which was recently
announced. We hope he persuades
the Congress to pass a new law on
mining, he said.
Del Castillo said concerns
overseas could also affect the
sentiment of the market especially
whats going on in the US and
China.
Investors are in the lookout
for further moves by China to
stimulate its sluggish economic
growth. They also wait for
US Federal Reserve to unveil
additional pro-growth measures.
Business
ManilaStandardToday extrastory2000@gmail.com JULY 23, 2012 MONDAY
B3
Govt to award 8 oil, gas deals
Coal Asia
offers IPO
shares at
par value
John Hay firm asked
to post P736-m bond
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
Republic of the Philippines
Department of Public Works and Highways
OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT ENGINEER
loilo 2nd District Engineering Offce
Balabag, Dumangas, Iloilo
(MST-July 23, 2012)
I NVI TATI ON TO BI D
The Iloilo 2
nd
District Engineering Ofce through its Bids and Awards Committee
(BAC), invites contractors to apply to bid for the following contract(s):
Contract ID: 12GG0052
Contract Name: Repair/Rehabilitation/Improvement of Bga. Bante-Bga.
Polot-an Btac. Nuevo Road KO276+700-KO278+900,
w/exceptions, Net Length 652.5 L.M.
Location: Pototan ,Iloilo
Brief Description: Reblocking of 652.5 L.M. road as per approved POW,
plans and specifcations.
Approved Budget for the Contract (ABC): P 9,900,000.00
Duration: One Hundred Fifty (150) Calendar Days
Cost of Bidding Documents: P 10,000.00
Procurement will be conducted through open competitive bidding procedures in
accordance with R.A. 9184 and its Revised Implementing Rules and Regulations.
To bid for this contract, a contractor must submit two (2) copies of Letter of
Intent (LOI), purchase bid documents and must meet the following major criteria: (a)
prior registration with DPWH, (b) Filipino citizen or 75% Filipino owned partnership,
corporation, cooperative, or joint venture, (c) with PCAB license applicable to the
type and cost of this contract, (d) completion of a similar contract costing at least
50% of ABC within a period of 10 years, and (e) Net Financial Contracting Capacity
at least equal to ABC, or credit line commitment at least equal to 10% of ABC. The
BAC will use non-discretionary pass/fail criteria in the eligibility check and preliminary
examination of bids.

Unregistered contractors, however, shall submit their applications for registration
to the DPWH-POCW Central Offce before the deadline for the receipt of LO. The
DPWH-POCW Central Offce will only process contractor's applications for registration
with complete requirements and issue the Contractor's Certifcate of Registration
(CRC). Registration forms may be downloaded at the DPWH website www.dpwh.
gov.ph.
The signifcant times and deadlines of procurement activities are shown below:
BAC Activities Schedule
1. Issuance of Bidding Documents July 19 to August 09, 2012
2. Pre-Bid Conference July 27, 2012 @ 10:00 AM
3. Deadline of Receipt of LOI from
Prospective Bidders
August 03, 2012 not later than 12:00 noon
4. Receipt of Bids August 09, 2012 not later than 10:00AM
5. Opening of Bids August 09, 2012 @ 10:00AM
The BAC will issue hard copies of Bidding Documents (BD's) at loilo 2
nd
District
Engineering Offce, Balabag, Dumangas, loilo, upon payment of a non-refundable
fee of the corresponding Cost of Bidding Documents for each contract. Prospective
bidders may also download the BD's from the DPWH website, if available. Prospective
bidders that will download the BD's from the DPWH website shall pay the said fees
on or before the submission of their bid Documents. Bids must be accompanied by
a bid security, in the amount and acceptable form, as stated in Section 27.2 of the
Revised IRR.

Prospective bidders shall submit their duly accomplished forms as specifed in
the BD's in two (2) separate sealed bid envelopes to the (BAC) Bids and Awards
Committee. The frst envelope shall contain the technical component of the bid, which
shall include a copy of the CRC. The second envelope shall contain the fnancial
component of the bid. Contract will be awarded to the Lowest Calculated Responsive
Bid as determined in the bid evaluation and post-qualifcation.
The Iloilo 2
nd
District Engineering Offce, pursuant to Section 41 of R.A. 9184 and
its Revised Implementing Rules and Regulations, reserves the right to reject any
and all bids, declare a failure of bidding, annul the bidding process anytime before
Contract Award, or not award the Contract without incurring any liability to the affected
bidders, in the following situations: a) If there is a prima facie evidence of collusion
between appropriate public offcers or employees of the procuring entity, or between
the BAC and any of the bidders, or if the collusion is between or among the bidders
themselves, or between a bidder and a third party, including any act which restricts,
suppresses or nullifes or tends to restrict, suppress or nullify competition; b) For any
justifable and reasonable ground where the award of the contract will not redound
to the beneft of the GOP, as follows: (i) if the physical and economic conditions have
signifcantly changed so as to render the project no longer economically, fnancially,
or technically feasible, as determined by the Head of the Procuring Entity; (ii) if the
project is no longer necessary . as determined by the Head of the Procuring Entity;
and (iii) if the source of funds for the project has been withheld or reduced through
no fault of the procuring entity.
(Sgd.) TOMAS B. DEPRA
Engineer III
BAC Chairman

NOTED:
(Sgd.) NILO B. GAVIA
OIC-District Engineer
Republic of the Philippines
Province of Bataan
City of Balanga
BIDS AND AWARDS COMMITTEE OFFICE
(MST-July 23, 2012)
The Provincial Government of Bataan, through the General Fund Projects
1
intends
to apply the below listed projects w/ corresponding Approved Budget of the Contract
(ABC). Bids received in excess of the ABC shall be automatically rejected at bid
opening.
Name of Project Approved Budget of the
Contract (ABC)
1. Supply and Delivery of One (1) unit Generator Set
(350KVA, Three Phase 60HZ)) for Capitol & SP Building
Of the Provincial Government of Bataan =P=2,051,800.00
The Provincial Government of Bataan now invites bids for the above listed
Procurement. Completion of works is required on or before the maturity date
stipulated on contract. Bidders should have completed, within Ten (10) years from
the date of submission and receipt of bids, a contract similar to the Project. The
description of an eligible bidder is contained in the Bidding Documents, particularly,
in Section II. Instructions to Bidders.
Bidding will be conducted through open competitive bidding procedures using
non-discretionary pass/fail criterion as specifed in the mplementing Rules and
Regulations (IRR) of Republic Act 9184 (RA 9184), otherwise known as the
"Government Procurement Reform Act.
Bidding is open to all interested bidders, whether local or foreign, subject to the
conditions for eligibility provided in the Implementing Rules and Regulations (IRR)
of Republic Act (RA) 9184, otherwise known as the "Government Procurement
Reform Act.
nterested bidders may obtain further information from Offce of Bataan Bids &
Awards Committee and inspect the Bidding Documents from 8:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
at the same offce.
Bid documents will be available only to eligible bidders upon payment of a non-
refundable amount of =P= 500.00 for ABC amounting from =P= 499,999.99 and
below, =P= 1,000.00 for ABC amounting =P= 500,000.00-=P= 1,499,999.99
=P= 2,000.00 for ABC amounting from =P= 1,500,000.00 =P=2,499,999.99;
=P= 3,000.00 for ABC amounting from=P= 2,500,000.00 =P= 3,499,999.99;
=P=4,000.00 for ABC amounting from =P= 3,500,000.00 =P= 4,499,999.99;
=P= 5,000.00 for ABC amounting from =P= 4,500,000.00 above to the Offce of
the Provincial Treasurer.
The Provincial Government of Bataan will hold a Pre-Bid Conference on July 20,
2012 at 10:00 A.M at Provincial BAC Offce, PEO Capitol Compound, Balanga City,
Bataan, which shall be open only to all interested parties who have purchased the
Bidding Documents.
Bids must be delivered on or before August 1, 2012 at 2:00 p.m. at Provincial BAC
Offce, PEO Capitol Compound, Balanga City, Bataan. All bids must be accompanied
by a bid security in any of the acceptable forms and in the amount stated on IRR
of RA 9184.
Bids will be opened in the presence of the bidders' representatives who choose
to attend opening of Bids at Bataan BAC Offce. Late bids shall not be accepted.
In case of the above dates is declared a special Non-Working Holidays, it will
automatically reset on the next working days.
Other necessary information deemed relevant by the Provincial Government of Bataan
Activities Schedule
1. Advertisement/Posting of Invitation to Bid July 13-19, 2012
2. Eligibility Check Refer to date of Opening of Bids
3. Issuance and availability of Bidding Documents July 13-August 1, 2012
4. Request for Clarifcation July 23, 2012
5. Opening of Bids August 1, 2012
The Provincial Government of Bataan reserves the right to accept or reject any bid, to
annul the bidding process, and to reject all bids at any time prior to contract award,
without thereby incurring any liability to the affected bidder or bidders.
For further information, please refer to:
Engr. Fernando E. Tanciongco
Provincial BAC / PEO Bataan
Provincial BAC / PEO Offce, Capitol Compound,
Balanga City, Bataan
047-237-9316
bac@bataan.gov.ph
(Sgd.) ENRICO T. YUZON
BAC CHAIRMAN
INVITATION TO BID
NO. GOODS-011-2012
(MST-July 23, 2012)
Republic of the Philippines
Department of Public Works and Highways
Regional Offce No. V-A
Batangas 3rd District Engineering Ofce
Tanauan City
I NVI TATI ON TO BI D
The Department of Public Works and Highways - Batangas 3
rd
District Engineering
Offce, Tanauan City through its Bids and Awards Committee (BAC), invites contractors
to bid for the following contract(s):
1. Contract ID : 12DC0081
Contract Name : Installation/Application/Construction of Safety
Devices along Tanauan-Talisay-Tagaytay Road,
K0068+000 K0085+763 with exceptions
Contract Location : Tanauan City, Batangas
Scope of Work : Road Signs (Warning, Regulatory, Informatory,
Hazard Markers)
Approved Budget
for the Contract (ABC) : Php8,000,000.00
Contract Duration : 90 cd
2. Contract ID : 12DC0082
Contract Name : Installation/Application/Construction of Safety
Devices along Talisay-Laurel-Agoncillo Road,
K0081+-224 to K0086+000 with exceptions
Contract Location : Tanauan City, Batangas
Scope of Work : Road Signs (Warning, Regulatory, Informatory,
Hazard Markers)
Approved Budget
for the Contract (ABC) : Php2,000,000.00
Contract Duration : 30 cd
Bidding will be conducted through open competitive bidding procedures in accordance
with the Revised Implementing Rules and Regulations of Republic Act No. 9184.
To bid for the contract, a contractor must submit two (2) copies of Letter of Intent (LOI)
and must meet the following major criteria: (a) prior registration with DPWH, (b) Filipino
citizen or 75% Filipino-owned partnership, corporation, cooperative, or joint venture
with PCAB license applicable to the type and cost of the contract, (c) completion of a
similar contract costing at least 50% of ABC within a period of ten (10) years, and (d)
Net Financial Contracting Capacity at least equal to ABC, or credit line commitment
for at least equal to 10% of the ABC. The BAC will use non-discretionary pass/fail
criteria in the eligibility check and preliminary examination of bids.
The signifcant times and deadlines of procurement activities are shown below:
Procurement Activities Dates/Deadlines
1. Receipt of LO's from Prospective Bidders July 20-August 2, 2012
2. Issuance of Bidding Documents to Registered
Contractors
July 20-August 9, 2012
3. Pre-Bid Conference July 27, 2012 @ 10:00AM
4. Receipt of Bids Deadline: August 9, 2012 until 2:00PM
5. Opening of Bids August 9, 2012 after 2:00PM
Unregistered contractors, however, shall submit their applications for registration to the
DPWH-Procurement Offce for Civil Works (DPWH-POCW) Central Offce before the
deadline set for receipt of LO's. The DPWH-POCW Central Offce will only process
contractor's applications, with complete requirements, for registration and to be issued
the Contractor's Certifcate of Registration (CRC).
Prospective bidders shall submit their duly accomplished forms as specifed in the
Bidding Documents (BD'S) in two (2) separate sealed bid envelopes to the BAC
Chairman, DPWH-Batangas 3
rd
District Engineering Offce. The frst envelope shall
contain the technical component of the bid, including the eligibility requirements. The
second envelope shall contain the fnancial component of the bid. Contract will be
awarded to the Lowest Calculated Responsive Bid as determined in the bid evaluation
and post-qualifcation.
Prospective bidders may download the Registration Form from the DPWH website
www.dpwh.gov.ph. The BAC will issue hard copies of Bid Documents at DPWH-
Batangas 3
rd
District Engineering Offce, Tanauan City upon payment of non-refundable
fees per D.O. 52 Series of 2011:
Contract Reference Number Cost of Bid Documents (Php)
12DC0081 10,000.00
12DC0082 2,000.00
Interested contractors are also required to present the originals of their PCAB License
and Contractor's Registration Certifcate to the BAC for authentication.
The DPWH-Batangas 3
rd
District Engineering Offce reserves the right to accept of
reject any bid and to annul the bidding process anytime before the Contract Award,
without thereby incurring any liability to the affected Bidder or Bidders.

(Sgd.) FERNANDO A. LANDICHO
Chairman, Bids and Awards Committee
Tel. No. (043)7785134, Fax No. (043)7780738
Noted:
(Sgd.) EUGENE M. BATALAO
District Engineer
HARALD Tomintz, chairman
of Coal Asia Holdings Inc.,
said the companys planned
initial public offering will
afford the investing public an
opportunity to buy shares at
the same price as Coal Asias
incorporators.
The company plans to list
800 million shares on the
Philippine Stock Exchanges
rst board by the fourth
quarter of 2012.
Tomintz, an Austrian
national, was invited to join
Coal Asia due to his wealth
of experience stemming from
his past association with
Semirara Coal Corp., prior to
its privatization in 1997.
Coal Asia has drawn interest
from potential strategic
and nancial investors like
the power generation and
cement industries as well
as investment funds, which
want to own a stake in Coal
Asia as a means to ensure
continuous supply of coal
and possibly hedge against
another potential signicant
runup in coal prices.
The company is keen
on ensuring the timely
development of its high-
grade bituminous coal mines
that are strategically located
in Mindanao, where there is
a rush to establish critically
needed power capacity.
Coal Asia plans to supply
steam-grade coal to cement
plants, canneries, and
manufacturing plants that
have converted their diesel-
powered plants into coal-
powered plants to mitigate
costs. It has also bagged off-
take contracts both here and
abroad.
THE Bases Conversion and De-
velopment Authority welcomed
the decision of the Baguio Re-
gional Trial Court ordering
Camp John Hay Development
Corp. to post a P736-million
bond to put in effect the writ of
preliminary injunction led by
the John Hay lessee.
With the order, the court re-
jected the P31-million offer
made by CJHDevco to prevent
a government takeover of its
leased properties in John Hay,
and upheld the original amount
of the bond to protect govern-
ments interest.
BCDA president and chief ex-
ecutive Arnel Paciano Casanova
said the court order conrmed
the validity of the arbitration
clause in the contract and di-
rected both parties to observe
the provision. It did not touch
on the merits of the case.
The arbitration clause in our con-
tract does not in any way impinge
upon or prevent the BCDAfrom ex-
ercising its rights, Casanova said.
He added there was nothing in
the order of the court that said
BCDA could not exercise rem-
edies under the contract and ex-
isting laws.
Casanova said the same court
order also directed CJHDevco
to post a P736-million bond to
avail of injunctive relief. With-
out that, there will be no injunc-
tive relief that would be extend-
ed to CJHDevco, he said.
What is clear is that this is
not a victory for CJHDevco but
a victory of BCDA because they
are required to post a bond, Ca-
sanova said. Once CJHDevco
posts the bond, it will demon-
strate that they have the nan-
cial capability to pay its lease
obligations.
CJHDevcos outstanding
obligations to the government
stood at P3 billion as of June
2012. Payment of the bond will
contradict CJHDevcos earlier
claim that nancial losses pre-
vented it from settling its lease
obligation.
We are doubtful that CJH-
Devco will post the bond as it
would likely betray itself, Ca-
sanova said.
By Alena Mae S. Flores
THE government will announce the win-
ning bidders of eight exploration contracts
in September, Energy Secretary Jose Rene
Almendras said over the weekend.
Were close to nishing the eval-
uation of the rst eight. We may be
able to announce results within 60
days. Theres a procedural require-
ment to review, Almendras said.
The Energy Department received
16 bids from local and international
rms during the opening of the bids
for the 15 oil and gas blocks under
the Philippine Energy Contracting
Round 4 in April.
Twelve of the 15 blocks were
offered to investors in April, but
only eight of them received bids
from the prequalied companies.
Meanwhile, the three remaining
areas will be offered on July 31.
After they passed the rst
review, theres a second, then a
third one to get a different per-
spective. We promised a level
playing eld with this selection
process, Almendras said.
Almendras said only bidders
that were able to comply with the
requirements would be awarded
the contracts.
There might be those that will
not be awarded because they lack
submission. We may have to re-
bid [some contracts] because
some of the bidders may cry foul.
You have to comply, in order to
be accepted, he said.
Area 1 in Cagayan, for example,
received three bids from Black Swan
Resources, Frontier Oil Co. and
Planet Gas Ltd. but the three compa-
nies failed to fully comply with the
requirements of the department.
Only one bidder, Clean Rock
Renewable Energy Resources,
submitted a bid for Area 2 in
Central Luzon, but it was also re-
jected for non-compliance.
Area 7 in Mindoro Cuyo basin
received a bid from NorAsian En-
ergy Philippines Inc., the local unit
of Australian rm Otto Energy Ltd.
but its bid was also rejected.
The government accepted the
bid of Forum Pacic Inc. for
Area 10 in East Palawan and the
separated bids of Forum Pacic
and Helios Mining and Energy
for Area 11 in Cotabato.
Area 12 also in Cotabato re-
ceived a bid from three companies
of which two were accepted. Dil
Moro Energy Corp. and Min En-
ergy Pty. Ltd. were accepted while
Monte Oro Resources Energy
Inc.s bid was rejected.
The department accepted the
bid of Loyz Oil Pte. Ltd. for Area
14 in East Palawan.
Meanwhile, Area 15 in the
Sulu Sea drew the most bids of
which three were found to have
complied with the requirements.
The department accepted the
bids of The Philodrill Corp. and
Philex Petroleum Corp.; Mitra
Energy Ltd. (with Kuwait For-
eign Petroleum Co. and Tap Oil)
and Forum Pacic but rejected
the bid of NorAsian.
LONDONMedia mogul
Rupert Murdoch has resigned as
a director of a number of News
Corp. boards overseeing his
Britain newspapers, a spokesman
conrmed Saturday. He also
quit from some of the media
companys subsidiary boards in
the United States.
Murdoch stepped down
this past week as a director of
NI Group, Times Newspaper
Holdings and News Corp.
Investments in the UK, said
Daisy Dunlop, spokesman for
News Corp.s British arm, News
International. The companies
oversee The Sun, The Times and
The Sunday Times.
It was not immediately
clear which of News Corp.s
US boards Murdoch had left.
Britains Telegraph newspaper,
which rst reported the news
late Saturday, said those details
had not yet been disclosed by
the US Securities and Exchange
Commission.
News International sought
to play down the signicance
of the resignations, saying
in a statement that this is
nothing more than a corporate
housecleaning exercise prior to
the company split.
That was a reference to
News Corp.s announcement
June 28 that it would separate
its publishing business, which
includes The Wall Street Journal,
from its much more protable
media and entertainment
businessforming two distinct,
publicly-traded companies.
Under those proposed changes,
Murdoch, 81, will chair both
of the companies, although he
would continue as chief executive
of the media and entertainment
company only.
Saturdays announcement
suggests that Murdoch may
be distancing himself from his
British newspaper interests,
which have been shaken to the
core by a widespread phone
hacking scandal.
The scandal erupted anew
last year when it emerged
that Murdochs now-defunct
News of the World tabloid
had systematically hacked
voice mails of politicians and
celebrities. The revelations have
rocked Britains establishment
and triggered three parallel
police investigations that have
resulted in more than 40 arrests.
Illegal eavesdropping allegations
at the News of the World led
to the resignation of Rebekah
Brooks, then-CEO of News
International, who has been
accused of perverting justice in
the scandal.
Murdoch and his son, James,
both had to testify in front of a
parliamentary committee probing
the allegations. The committee
declared the elder Murdoch unt
to run an international business.
James Murdoch had already
resigned as chairman of News
International. AP
Murdoch quits newspaper boards
B4 | MONDAY, July 23, 2012
Republic of the Philippines
Department of Trade and Industry
BUREAU OF PRODUCT STANDARDS
~
ManilaStandar dTODAY
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL STANDARD PNS IEC 60968:2012
(IEC published 1999)
ICS 29.140.30
Self-ballasted lamps for general lighting services - Safety requirements
National Foreword
This Philippine National Standard is identical with the International Electrotechnical
Commission IEC 60968:1999 - Self-ballasted lamps for general lighting services - Safety
requirements. It was approved for adoption as a Philippine National Standard by the
Bureau of Product Standards upon the recommendation of the Technical Committee
Lamps and Related Equipment (BPS/TC 4).
Within the text of the standard, the following are the minimal editorial changes:
a) the decimal comma shall be interpreted as a decimal point to be consistent with
existing convention on our number format
b) the words International Standard shall mean National Standard.
This standard cancels and replaces PNS IEC 968:2006 (IEC published 1988, 1st edition).
INTERNATIONAL ELECTROTECHNICAL COMMISSION
____________
SELF-BALLASTED LAMPS FOR GENERAL LIGHTING SERVICES -
Safety requirements
FOREWORD
1) The IEC (International Electrotechnical Commission) is a worldwide organization for
standardization comprising all national electrotechnical committees (IEC National
Committees). The object of the IEC is to promote international co-operation on all
questions concerning standardization in the electrical and electronic felds. To this
end and in addition to other activities, the IEC publishes International Standards.
Their preparation is entrusted to technical committees; any IEC National Committee
interested in the subject dealt with may participate in this preparatory work.
International, governmental and non-governmental organizations liaising with
the IEC also participate in this preparation. The IEC collaborates closely with the
International Organization for Standardization (ISO) in accordance with conditions
determined by agreement between the two organizations.
2) The formal decisions or agreements of the IEC on technical matters express, as nearly
as possible, an international consensus of opinion on the relevant subjects since each
technical committee has representation from all interested National Committees.
3) The documents produced have the form of recommendations for international use and
are published in the form of standards, technical specifcations, technical reports or
guides and they are accepted by the National Committees in that sense.
4) In order to promote international unifcation, IEC National Committees undertake to
apply IEC International Standards transparently to the maximum extent possible in their
national and regional standards. Any divergence between the IEC Standard and the
corresponding national or regional standard shall be clearly indicated in the latter.
5) The IEC provides no marking procedure to indicate its approval and cannot be rendered
responsible for any equipment declared to be in conformity with one of its standards.
6) Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this International
Standard may be the subject of patent rights. The IEC shall not be held responsible
for identifying any or all such patent rights.
International Standard IEC 60968 has been prepared by subcommittee 34A: Lamps, of
IEC technical committee 34: Lamps and related equipment.
This consolidated version of IEC 60968 consists of the frst edition (1988) [documents
34A(CO)366 and 34A(CO)418], its amendment 1 (1991) [documents 34A(CO)459+489
and 34A(CO)520+552] and its amendment 2 (1999) [documents 34A/874/FDIS and
34A/888/RVD].
The technical content is therefore identical to the base edition and its amendments and
has been prepared for user convenience.
It bears the edition number 1.2.
A vertical line in the margin shows where the base publication has been modifed by
amendments 1 and 2.
In this standard, the following print types are used:
- Requirements proper: in roman type.
- Test specifcations: in italic type.
- Explanatory matter: in smaller roman type.
The following IEC publications are quoted in this standard:
60061: Lamp caps and holders together with gauges for the control of
interchangeability and safety
60061-1: Part 1: Lamp caps
60061-3: Part 3: Gauges
60238:1982, Edison screw lampholders
60360:1987, Standard method of measurement of lamp cap temperature rise
60695-2-1:1980, Fire hazard testing, Part 2: Test methods, Glow-wire test and guidance
SELF-BALLASTED LAMPS FOR GENERAL LIGHTING SERVICES -
Safety requirements
1 Scope
This standard specifes the safety and interchangeability requirements, together with
the test methods and conditions, required to show compliance of tubular fuorescent
and other gas-discharge lamps with integrated means for controlling starting and stable
operation (self-ballasted lamps), intended for domestic and similar general lighting
purposes, having:
- a rated wattage up to 60 W;
- a rated voltage of 100 V to 250 V;
- Edison screw or bayonet caps.
The requirements of this standard relate only to type testing.
Recommendations for whole product testing or batch testing are under consideration.
2 Defnitions
For the purposes of this standard the following defnitions apply:
2.1 Self-ballasted lamp - A unit which cannot be dismantled without being permanently
damaged, provided with a lamp cap and incorporating a light source and any additional
elements necessary for starting and stable operation of the light source.
2.2 Type - Lamps that, independent of the type of cap, are identical in photometric and
electrical rating.
2.3 Rated voltage - The voltage or voltage range marked on the lamp.
2.4 Rated wattage - The wattage marked on the lamp.
2.5 Rated frequency - The frequency marked on the lamp.
2.6 Cap temperature rise (t
s
) - The surface temperature rise (above ambient) of a
standard test lampholder ftted to the lamp, when measured in accordance with the standard
method described in IEC 60360.
2.7 Live part - A conductive part which may cause an electric shock in normal use.
2.8 Type test - Atest or series of tests made on a type test sample for the purpose of checking
compliance of the design of a given product with the requirements of the relevant standard.
2.9 Type test sample - A sample consisting of one or more similar units submitted by the
manufacturer or responsible vendor for the purpose of the type test.
3 General requirement and general test requirements
3.1 Self-ballasted lamps shall be so designed and constructed that in normal use they
function reliably and cause no danger to the user or surroundings.
In general, compliance is checked by carrying out all the tests specifed.
3.2 All measurements unless otherwise specifed, are carried out at rated voltage and
frequency and in a draught-proof room at (25 1) C.
If lamps are marked with a voltage range, rated voltage is taken as the mean of the
voltage range marked.
3.3 Self-ballasted lamps are non repairable, factory sealed units. They shall not be
opened for any tests. In the case of doubt based on the inspection of the lamp and
the examination of the circuit diagram, and in agreement with the manufacturer or
responsible vendor, lamps specially prepared so that a fault condition can be simulated
shall be submitted for testing (see clause 12).
4 Marking
4.1 Lamps shall be clearly and durably marked with the following mandatory markings:
1) Mark of origin (this may take the form of a trade mark, the manufacturers name or
the name of the responsible vendor).
2) Rated voltage or voltage range (marked V or volts).
3) Rated wattage (marked W or watts).
4) Rated frequency (marked in Hz).
4.2 In addition the following information shall be given by the lamp manufacturer either
on the lamp or packing or in installation instructions:
1) Lamp current.
2) Burning position if restricted.
3) For lamps with a weight signifcantly higher than that of the lamps for which they are
a replacement, attention should be drawn to the fact that the increased weight may
reduce the mechanical stability of certain luminaires.
4) Special conditions or restrictions which shall be observed for lamp operation, for
example, operation in dimming circuits. Where lamps are not suitable for dimming,
the following symbol may be used:

IEC 928/99
4.3 Compliance is checked by the following:
1) Presence and legibility of the marking required in 4.1 - by visual inspection.
2) The durability of the marking is checked by trying to remove it by rubbing lightly for
15 s with a piece of cloth soaked with water and, after drying, for a further 15 s with
a piece of cloth soaked with hexane. The marking shall be legible after the test.
3) Availability of information required in 4.2 - by visual inspection.
5 Interchangeability
5.1 Interchangeability shall be ensured by the use of caps in accordance with IEC 60061-1.
5.2 Compliance of the combination of cap and bulb is checked by the use of gauges for
checking the dimensions controlling interchangeability in accordance with table 1.
The gauges are those shown in the standard sheet included in IEC 60061-3.
5.3 Self-ballasted lamps, when capped either B22d or E27 shall have a mass not exceeding
1 kg and shall not impart a bending moment, at the lampholder, of more than 2 Nm.
Compliance shall be checked by measurement.
Table 1 - Interchangeability gauges and lamp cap dimensions
Lamp cap Cap dimensions to be checked
by the gauge
Gauge sheet No. from
IEC 60061-3
B22d
or
B15d
A max. and A min.
D1 max.
N min
Diametrical position of the pins
Insertion in lampholder
Retention in lampholder
7006-10
and
7006-11
7006-4A
7006-4B
E27 Max. dimensions of the screw thread
Min. major diameter of the screw thread
Contact making
7006-27B
7006-28A
7006-50
E26 Max. dimensions of the screw thread
Max. major diameter of the screw thread
7006-27D
7006-27E
E14 Max. dimensions of the screw thread
Min. major diameter of the screw thread
Contact making
7006-27F
7006-28B
7006-54
6 Protection against electric shock
Self-ballasted lamps shall be so constructed that, without any additional enclosure in the form
of a luminaire, no internal metal parts or live metal parts of the lamp cap are accessible when
the lamp is installed in a lampholder according to IEC 60238.
Compliance is checked by means of the test fnger specifed in fgure 1, if necessary, with a
force of 10 N.
Lamps with Edison screw caps shall be so designed that they comply with the requirements
for inaccessibility for general lighting service (GLS) lamps.
Compliance is checked with the aid of a gauge in accordance with the current edition of
IEC 60061-3, sheet 7006-51A for E27 caps and sheet 7006-55 for E14 caps.
NOTE Requirements for E26 caps are under consideration.
Lamps with B22 or B15 caps are subject to the same requirements as normal incandescent
lamps with this cap.
External metal parts other than current-carrying metal parts of the cap shall not be or become
live. For testing, any movable conductive material shall be placed in the most onerous
position without using a tool.
Compliance is checked by means of the insulation resistance and electric strength test (see clause 7).
7 Insulation resistance and electric strength after humidity treatment
Insulation resistance and electric strength shall be adequate between current-carrying metal
parts of the lamp and accessible parts of the lamp.
7.1 Insulation resistance
The lamp shall be conditioned for 48 h in a cabinet containing air with a relative humidity
between 91 % and 95 %. The temperature of the air is maintained within 1 C of any
convenient value between 20 C and 30 C.
Insulation resistance shall be measured in the humidity cabinet with a d.c. voltage of
approximately 500 V, 1 min after application of the voltage. The insulation resistance between
current-carrying metal parts of the cap and accessible parts of the lamp (accessible parts of
insulating material are covered with metal foil) shall be not less than 4 M.
NOTE The insulation resistance of bayonet caps between shell and contacts is under consideration.
7.2 Electric strength
Immediately after the insulation resistance test, the same parts as specifed above shall
withstand a voltage test for 1 min with an a.c. voltage as follows:
- ES caps: between accessible parts and parts of screw caps (accessible parts of
insulating material are covered with metal foil):
type HV (220 V to 250 V): 4 000 V r.m.s.
type BV (100 V to 120 V): 2U + 1 000 V
Value U = rated voltage.
During the test the eyelet and the shell of the cap are short-circuited.
Initially no more than half the prescribed voltage is applied. It is then gradually raised
to the full value.
No fash-over or breakdown shall occur during the test. Measurements shall be carried
out in the humidity cabinet.
NOTE The distance between the foil and the current-carrying parts is under consideration.
- Bayonet caps: between shell and contacts (under consideration).
8 Mechanical strength
Torsion resistance
The cap shall remain frmly attached to the bulb or that part of the lamp which is used for
screwing the lamp in or out when subjected to the torque levels listed below.
B22d............ 3 Nm
B15d............ 1,15 Nm
E26 and E27....... 3 Nm
E14... 1,15 Nm
The test is made by means of the test holders shown in fgures 2 and 3.
The torque shall not be applied suddenly, but shall be increased continuously from zero to
the specifed value.
In the case of uncemented caps, relative movement between cap and bulb is permitted
provided it does not exceed 10.
After the mechanical strength test the sample shall comply with the requirements of
accessibility (see clause 6).
9 Cap temperature rise
The cap temperature rise ts of the complete lamp during run-up, stabilization period and
after stabilization shall not exceed the values mentioned below when measured under the
conditions specifed in IEC 60360:
B22d............... 125 K
B15d............... 120 K
E27 ................ 120 K
E14.............. 120 K
E26 ............. under consideration
Measurement shall be carried out at rated voltage. If the lamp is marked with a voltage range
it shall be measured at the mean voltage of that range, provided the limits of the voltage
range do not differ by more than 2,5 % from the mean voltage. For lamps with a wider range,
the measurement shall be made at the highest value of the range.
10 Resistance to heat
Self-ballasted lamps shall be suffciently resistant to heat. External parts of insulating material
providing protection against electric shock, and parts of insulating material retaining live parts
in position shall be suffciently resistant to heat.
Compliance is checked by subjecting the parts to a ball-pressure test by means of the
apparatus shown in fgure 4.
The test is made in a heating cabinet at a temperature of (25 5) C in excess of the
operating temperature of the relevant part according to clause 9, with a minimum of 125 C
for parts retaining live parts in position and 80 C* for other parts. The surface of the part to be
tested is placed in the horizontal position and a steel ball of 5 mm diameter pressed against
this surface with a force of 20 N.
The test load and the supporting means are placed within the heating cabinet for a suffcient
time to ensure that they have attained the stabilized testing temperature before the test
commences.
The part to be tested is placed in the heating cabinet, for a period of 10 min, before the test
load is applied.
____________
* Under consideration.
If the surface under test bends, the part where the ball presses is supported. For this purpose
if the test cannot be made on the complete specimen, a suitable part may be cut from it.
The specimen shall be at least 2,5 mm thick, but if such a thickness is not available on the
specimen then two or more pieces are placed together.
After 1 hour the ball is removed from the specimen which is then immersed for 10 s in cold
water for cooling down to approximately room temperature. The diameter of the impression
is measured, and shall not exceed 2 mm.
In the event of curved surfaces the shorter axis is measured if the indent is elliptical.
In case of doubt, the depth of the impression is measured and the diameter calculated using
the formula = 2 p (5 - p), in which p = depth of impression.
The test is not made on parts of ceramic material.
11 Resistance to fame and ignition
Parts of insulating material retaining live parts in position and external parts of insulating
material providing protection against electric shock, are subjected to the glow-wire test in
accordance with IEC 60695-2-1, subject to the following details:
- The test specimen is a complete lamp. It may be necessary to take away parts of the
lamp to perform the test, but care is taken to ensure that the test conditions are not
signifcantly different from those occurring in normal use.
- The test specimen is mounted on the carriage and pressed against the glow-wire tip with
a force of 1 N, preferably 15 mm, or more, from the upper edge, into the centre of the
surface to be tested. The penetration of the glow-wire into the specimen is mechanically
limited to 7 mm.
If it is not possible to make the test on a specimen as described above because the
specimen is too small, the above test is made on a separate specimen of the same
material, 30 mm square and with a thickness equal to the smallest thickness of the
specimen.
- The temperature of the tip of the glow-wire is 650 C. After 30 s the specimen is
withdrawn from contact with the glow-wire tip.
The glow-wire temperature and heating current are constant for 1 min prior to
commencing the test. Care is taken to ensure that heat radiation does not infuence the
specimen during this period. The glow-wire tip temperature is measured by means of a
sheathed fne-wire thermocouple constructed and calibrated as described in IEC 60695-
2-1.
- Any fame or glowing of the specimen shall extinguish within 30 s of withdrawing the
glow-wire, and any faming drop shall not ignite a piece of the tissue paper, spread out
horizontally 200 5 mm below the specimen.
The test is not made on parts of ceramic material.
12 Fault conditions
The lamps shall not impair safety when operated under fault conditions which may occur
during the intended use.
Each of the following fault conditions is applied in turn, as well as any other associated fault
conditions that may arise from it as logical consequences. Only one component at a time is
subjected to a fault condition.
a) In a switch-start circuit, the starter is short-circuited.
b) Short-circuit across capacitors.
c) The lamp does not start, because one of the cathodes is broken.
d) The lamp does not start, although the cathode circuits are intact (de-activated lamp).
e) The lamp operates, but one of the cathodes is de-activated or broken (rectifying effect).
f) Opening or bridging other points in the circuit where the diagram indicates that such a fault
condition may impair safety.
Examination of the lamp and its circuit diagram will generally show the fault conditions which
should be applied. These are applied in sequence in the order that is most convenient.
The manufacturer or responsible vendor shall submit a specially prepared lamp with the
relevant fault condition, where possible in such a way that by operating a switch outside
the lamp the fault condition is introduced.
Components or devices in which a short-circuit does not occur shall not be bridged. Similarly,
components or devices in which an open circuit cannot occur shall not be interrupted.
Manufacturers or responsible vendors shall produce evidence that the components
behave in a way that does not impair safety, for instance, by showing compliance with
the relevant specifcation.
In the case of fault conditions a), b) or f), compliance is checked by operating the sample free
burning at room temperature and at a voltage between 90 % and 110 % of the rated voltage
or, in case of a voltage range, at a voltage between 90 % and 110 % of the mean voltage of
that range until stable conditions have been reached, then introducing the fault condition.
In the case of fault conditions c), d) or e), the same operating conditions apply but the fault
condition is introduced at the start of the test.
The sample is then tested a further 8 h. During this test it shall not catch fre, or produce
fammable gases and live parts shall not become accessible.
To check if gases liberated from component parts are fammable or not, a test with a high-
frequency spark generator is made.
To check if accessible parts have become live, a test in accordance with clause 6 is made. The
insulation resistance (see 7.1) is checked with a d.c. voltage of approximately 1 000 V.
267/83
Linear dimensions in millimetres
Tolerances on dimensions without specifc tolerance:
0
on angles: -10
on linear dimensions:
0
up to 25 mm: -0,05
over 25 mm: +0,2
Material of fnger: e.g. heat-treated steel
+10
Both joints of this fnger may be bent through an angle of 90 0 , but in one and the same
direction only.
Using the pin and groove solution is only one of the possible approaches in order to limit
the bending angle to 90. For this reason dimensions and tolerances of these details are
not given in the drawing. The actual design must ensure a 90bending angle with a 0 to
+10 tolerance.
Figure 1 - Standard test fnger
Dimensions in millimetres
The drawing is intended only to illustrate the essential dimensions of the holder.
0125/73
Dimensions E15 E22 E27 Tolerance
C 20,0 32,0 32,0 Min.
K 11,5 11,0 11,0 + 0,3
O 12,0 23,0 23,0 + 0,1
S 7,0 12,0 12,0 Min.
Thread to be in accordance with holder threads of IEC 60061.
Figure 2 - Holder for torsion test on lamps with screw caps
IEC 929/99
Dimensions B14
mm
B22
mm
Tolerance
mm
A 15,27 22,27 +0,03
B 19,0 19,0 Min.
C 21,0 28,0 Min.
D 9,5 9,5 Min.
E 3,0 3,0 +0,17
G 18,3 24,6 0,3
H 9,0 12,15 Min.
K 12,7 12,7 0,3
R 1,5 1,5 Approx

NOTE The drawing illustrates the essential dimensions of the holder which need only be
checked if doubt arises from the application of the test.
a These slots shall be symmetrical on centre line.
Figure 3 - Holder for torque test on lamps with bayonet caps
IEC 060/82
Figure 4 Ball-pressure apparatus
BUREAU OF PRODUCT STANDARDS
Department of Trade and Industry
Technical Committee 04 - Lamps and Related Equipment
Chairman Vice Chairman
1 Roberto C. Cristobal 2 Go Kien Koc
Philips Electronics and Lighting Inc. Federation of Electrical and Electronics
Suppliers and Manufacturers of
Members the Philippines, Inc.
Associations:
3 Edwin Rondillos 9 Samson Chiong
Philippine Lighting Industry Association Eagle Electric of the Philippines
4 Arthur A. Lopez 10 Jimmy B. Ong
Institute of Integrated Electrical Kopez Manufacturing
Engineers Foundation
11 Gem J. Tan
5 Julius M. Labrador Fuji Haya AIM
Electronics Industries Association
of the Philippines, Inc. 12 KathieTardio
Philips Electronics and Lighting Inc.
Academe:
6 Arjun G. Ansay Government Agencies Concerned/
Technological University of the Philippines Testing Institutions:

Manufacturers/Industry:
13 Genesis A. Ramos
7 William Santiago Ronald Tahanlangit*
Fox Electronics Manufacturing DOE - Lighting and Appliance Testing
Laboratory
8 Gideon Tan
Yu Eng Kao 14 Eusebio Manuel B. Urbanor, Jr.
Bureau of Product Standards
Technical Offcer Testing Center
16 Avelino T. Molina, Jr.
Bureau of Product Standards - Standards 15 Samson D. Paden
Development Division Bureau of Product Standards - Product
Certifcation Division
* Alternate
B P S
BUREAU OF PRODUCT STANDARDS
your partner in quality
The use of the PS Certifcation Mark is governed by the
provisions of Department Administrative Order No. 01 series of
1997 Revised Rules and Regulations Concerning the Philippine
Standard (PS) Quality and / or Safety Certifcation Mark Scheme
by the Bureau of Product Standards. This mark on a product/
container is an assurance by the manufacturer/producer that
the product conforms with the requirements of a Philippine
standard. Details of conditions under which a license to use the
PS Certifcation Mark may be granted can be obtained from the
Bureau of Product Standards, Department of Trade and Industry,
361 Sen. Gil J. Puyat Avenue, Makati City.
_______________________________________________________________________
(MST-July 23, & 30, 2012)
MONDAY, JULY 23, 2012 | B5
Republic of the Philippines
Department of Trade and Industry
BUREAU OF PRODUCT STANDARDS
BPS
BUREAU OF PRODUCT STANDARDS
your partner in quality
The use of the PS Certifcation Mark is governed by the provisions of
Department Administrative Order No. 01 series of 1997 Revised Rules and
Regulations Concerning the Philippine Standard (PS) Quality and / or Safety
Certifcation Mark Scheme by the Bureau of Product Standards. This mark
on a product/container is an assurance by the manufacturer/producer that
the product conforms with the requirements of a Philippine standard. Details
of conditions under which a license to use the PS Certifcation Mark may be
granted can be obtained from the Bureau of Product Standards, Department
of Trade and Industry, 361 Sen. Gil J. Puyat Avenue, Makati City.
_______________________________________________________________________
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL STANDARD PNS IEC 60598-2-20:2010
(IEC published 2010)
ICS 29.140.40
Luminaires Part 2-20: Particular requirements Lighting chains
National Foreword
This Philippine National Standard is identical with the International Electrotechnical Commission
IEC 60598-2-20:2010 Luminaires Part 2-20: Particular requirements Lighting chains. It was
approved for adoption as a Philippine National Standard by the Bureau of Product Standards upon
the recommendation of the Technical Committee on Lamps and Related Equipment (BPS/TC 4).
This standard cancels and replaces PNS 189:2000.
Within the text of the standard, the following are the minimal editorial changes:
a) the decimal comma shall be interpreted as a decimal point to be consistent with existing
convention on our number format
b) the words International Standard shall mean National Standard.
INTERNATIONAL ELECTROTECHNICAL COMMISSION
_________________
LUMINAIRES
Part 2-20: Particular requirements Lighting chains
FOREWORD
1) The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) is a worldwide organization for
standardization comprising all national electrotechnical committees (IEC National Committees).
The object of IEC is to promote international co-operation on all questions concerning
standardization in the electrical and electronic felds. To this end and in addition to other activities,
IEC publishes International Standards, Technical Specifcations, Technical Reports, Publicly
Available Specifcations (PAS) and Guides (hereafter referred to as IEC Publication(s)). Their
preparation is entrusted to technical committees; any IEC National Committee interested in the
subject dealt with may participate in this preparatory work. International, governmental and
nongovernmental organizations liaising with the IEC also participate in this preparation. IEC
collaborates closely with the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) in accordance
with conditions determined by agreement between the two organizations.
2) The formal decisions or agreements of IEC on technical matters express, as nearly as possible,
an international consensus of opinion on the relevant subjects since each technical committee
has representation from all interested IEC National Committees.
3) IEC Publications have the form of recommendations for international use and are accepted by
IEC National Committees in that sense. While all reasonable efforts are made to ensure that the
technical content of IEC Publications is accurate, IEC cannot be held responsible for the way in
which they are used or for any misinterpretation by any end user.
4) In order to promote international uniformity, IEC National Committees undertake to apply
IEC Publications transparently to the maximum extent possible in their national and regional
publications. Any divergence between any IEC Publication and the corresponding national or
regional publication shall be clearly indicated in the latter.
5) IEC itself does not provide any attestation of conformity. Independent certifcation bodies provide
conformity assessment services and, in some areas, access to IEC marks of conformity. IEC is
not responsible for any services carried out by independent certifcation bodies.
6) All users should ensure that they have the latest edition of this publication.
7) No liability shall attach to IEC or its directors, employees, servants or agents including individual
experts and members of its technical committees and IEC National Committees for any personal
injury, property damage or other damage of any nature whatsoever, whether direct or indirect,
or for costs (including legal fees) and expenses arising out of the publication, use of, or reliance
upon, this IEC Publication or any other IEC Publications.
8) Attention is drawn to the Normative references cited in this publication. Use of the referenced
publications is indispensable for the correct application of this publication.
9) Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this IEC Publication may be the
subject of patent rights. IEC shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent rights.
International Standard IEC 60598-2-20 has been prepared by subcommittee 34D: Luminaires, of IEC
technical committee 34: Lamps and related equipment
This third edition cancels and replaces the second edition published in 1996, its Amendment 1 (1998),
its Amendment 2 (2002) and the interpretation sheets of March 2001 (1) and July 2003 (2 and 3). This
third edition is based on the second edition, its Amendments 1 and 2 and the interpretation sheets of
March 2001 (1) and July 2003 (2 and 3) and incorporates some changes relating to 20.7.15. This third
edition constitutes a minor revision.
This publication is intended to be read in conjunction with IEC 60598-1: Luminaires Part 1: General
requirements and tests. It was established on the basis of the seventh edition (2008) of that standard.
The text of this standard is based on the following documents:
FDIS Report on voting
34D/946/FDIS 34D/955/RVD
Full information on the voting for the approval of this standard can be found in the report on voting
indicated in the above table.
This publication has been drafted in accordance with the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2.
NOTE In this standard, the following print types are used:
requirements: in roman type;
test specifcations: in italic type;
notes: in small roman type.
The following differences exist in the countries indicated below:
20.11.1: In the USA, the requirements for the cables are different.
A list of all parts of the IEC 60598 series, under the general title: Luminaires, can be found on the
IEC website.
The committee has decided that the contents of this publication will remain unchanged until the
stability date indicated on the IEC web site under http://webstore.iec.ch in the data related to the
specifc publication. At this date, the publication will be
reconfrmed,
withdrawn,
replaced by a revised edition, or
amended.
LUMINAIRES
Part 2-20: Particular requirements Lighting chains
20.1 Scope
This part of IEC 60598 specifes requirements for lighting chains ftted with series- or parallel or a
combination of series/parallel-connected incandescent lamps for use either indoors or outdoors on
supply voltages not exceeding 250 V.
NOTE 1 A Christmas tree chain is an example of a lighting chain ftted with series or series/parallel
connected lamps.
A chain for illuminating ski-tracks or promenades is an example of a lighting chain ftted with parallel
connected lamps.
NOTE 2 For lighting chains ftted with lampholders of the push-in type, the appropriate requirements
of this part of IEC 60598 apply.
NOTE 3 In some countries, the term strings is used instead of chains.
NOTE 4 For lighting chains with non-standardised lamps (e.g. lamps of the push-in type) the lamps
are regarded as a part of the lighting chain and consequently included in the testing (and thereby in
the certifcate, if any).
20.2 Normative references
The following referenced documents are indispensable for the application of this document. For dated
references, only the edition cited applies. For undated references, the latest edition of the referenced
document (including any amendments) applies.
IEC 60083, Plugs and socket-outlets for domestic and similar general use standardized in member
countries of IEC
IEC 60227 (all parts), Polyvinyl chloride insulated cables of rated voltages up to and including 450/750 V
IEC 60238:2004, Edison screw lampholders
1)
Amendment 1 (2008)
IEC 60245 (all parts), Rubber insulated cables Rated voltages up to and including 450/750 V
IEC 60529, Degrees of protection provided by enclosures (IP Code)
IEC 60598-1:2008, Luminaires Part 1: General requirements and tests
IEC 60811-3-1:1985, Common test methods for insulating and sheathing materials of electric cables
Part 3: Methods specifc to PVC compounds Section One: Pressure test at high temperature Tests
for resistance to cracking
Amendment 1 (1994)
Amendment 2 (2001)
IEC 61184, Bayonet lampholders
___________
1)
There exists a consolidated edition 8.1 (2008) that comprises IEC 60238 (2004) and its Amendment 1 (2008).
IEC 61347-2-11, Safety of lamp controlgear Part 2-11: Particular requirements for miscellaneous
electronic circuits used with luminaires
20.3 General test requirements
The provisions of section 0 of IEC 60598-1 apply. The tests described in each appropriate section of
IEC 60598-1 shall be carried out in the order listed in this part of IEC 60598
20.4 Defnitions
For the purposes of this document, the defnitions given in section 1 of IEC 60598-1 apply together
with the following defnitions.
20.4.1 lighting chain - luminaire comprising an assembly of series-connected lampholders,
parallel-connected lampholders or series/parallel-connected lampholders and interconnecting
insulated conductors
NOTE 1 For lighting chains with non-standardised lamps (e.g. lamps of the push-in type) the lamps
are regarded as part of the chain.
NOTE 2 For lighting chains with non-removable lamps, the lamps are regarded as part of the chain.
NOTE 3 A lighting chain may incorporate control devices (e.g. fasher units, see 20.7.16).
20.4.2 sealed chain - a lighting chain enclosed in a rigid or fexible insulating translucent pipe or
tube, sealed at the ends and having no joints
20.5 Classifcation of luminaires
Luminaires shall be classifed in accordance with the provisions of section 2 of IEC 60598-1 together
with the requirements of 20.5.1 and 20.5.2.
NOTE As lighting chains are mandatorily required to be suitable for mounting on normally fammable
surfaces they do not require F marking nor provision of a warning notice.
20.5.1 According to the type of protection against electric shock, lighting chains shall be
classifed as Class II or Class III.
20.5.2 According to the degree of protection against dust and moisture, lighting chains for outdoor
use shall be classifed as of rain-proof, splash-proof, jet-proof or watertight construction.
20.6 Marking
The provisions of section 3 of IEC 60598-1 apply together with the requirements of 20.6.1 and 20.6.2.
20.6.1 The following information shall be marked on the lighting chains.
a) Lighting chains shall be marked with the type reference or the electrical data of the lamps and
with the rated voltage of the complete chain. Where it is impractical to mark this information on
the lighting chain, the information shall be marked on a durable nonremovable sleeve or label
ftted to the cable.
b) Lighting chains shall be accompanied by the substance of the following warnings:
1) do not remove or insert lamps while the chain is connected to the supply;
2) for series-connected lamps, replace failed lamps immediately by lamps of the same rated
voltage and wattage to prevent overheating; this requirement does not apply to sealed chains;
3) do not connect the chain to the supply while it is in the packing unless the packing has been
adapted for display purposes;
4) for series-connected lamps where fused lamps are used to ensure compliance with 20.13.3
hereafter, do not replace a fused lamp with a non-fused lamp [see item e)].
5) ensure all lampholders are ftted with a lamp.
c) Ordinary lighting chains shall additionally be accompanied by the substance of the following
information:
FOR INDOOR USE ONLY
Lighting chains which rely on gaskets to provide the specifed degree of protection against dust
and moisture shall additionally be accompanied by the substance of the following information:
WARNING THIS LIGHTING CHAIN MUST NOT
BE USED WITHOUT ALL GASKETS BEING IN PLACE
b) Lighting chains not intended for interconnection shall in addition be accompanied by the
substance of the following warning:
Do not connect this chain electrically to another chain.
c) Lighting chains ftted with fused lamps to ensure compliance with 20.13.3 shall be accompanied
by information indicating the means for identifcation of fused lamps (see 20.6.3).
NOTE For the purpose of this subclause, a fused lamp is a lamp designed so as to break the
circuit in the event of an overcurrent either by means of a separate fuse incorporated within the
lamp or by any other means e.g. a special flament.
f) Lighting chains with non-standardised lamps shall be accompanied by information indicating
that replacement lamps must be of the same type as delivered or of a type specifed by the
manufacturer (see 20.6.2).
g) Lighting chains provided with non-replaceable lamps shall be accompanied by the information
that the lamps are not replaceable.
The information required under items b)3), f) and g) shall be indicated on the packing.
20.6.2 The following information shall be marked on the lampholder or on the cable, or on a durable
non-removable sleeve or label ftted to the cable.
a) Mark of origin (this may take the form of a trade mark, the manufacturers identifcation mark or the
name of the responsible vendor).
b) Symbol for class II or class III, if applicable.
c) Marking for degree of protection against dust and moisture, if applicable, or warning that the chain is
for indoor use only.
d) Rated voltage of class III chains.
e) Voltage and wattage of replacement lamps.
f) Use only replacement lamps of the same kind provided with this lighting chain.
20.6.3 Fused lamps used to ensure compliance with 20.13.3 shall have a suitable means of
identifcation, such as a special colour.
20.7 Construction
The provisions of section 4 of IEC 60598-1 apply together with the requirements of 20.7.1 to 20.7.16.
20.7.1 Edison screw lampholders E10, E14 and E27 shall meet the requirements of IEC 60238.
Bayonet lampholders shall meet the requirements of IEC 61184.
In lighting chains where non-standardised lamps (e.g. lamps of the push-in type) are used, the lamps are
regarded as parts of the lighting chain and tested accordingly.
E5 and similar small lampholders of the push-in type shall meet the requirements of the appropriate
clauses of IEC 60238.
In lighting chains ftted with parallel-connected lamps, E27 and B22 lampholders with insulation piercing
contacts shall meet the requirements listed in this part of IEC 60598.
20.7.2 Clause 4.6 of section 4 of IEC 60598-1 referring to terminal block does not apply.
20.7.3 Clause 4.7 of section 4 of IEC 60598-1 referring to terminals and supply connections applies
together with the following requirement:
The method of connection of wiring, external or internal, to components of chains shall give reliable
electrical contact over the service life of the component.
Compliance is checked by inspection and by carrying out the tests of this standard.
20.7.4 Only 4.11.4 and 4.11.5 of 4.11 of section 4 of IEC 60598-1, referring to electrical connections and
current-carrying parts, apply.
20.7.5 Gaskets used to provide the specifed degree of protection against dust and moisture of lighting
chains for outdoor use shall be weather resistant. Such gaskets shall remain in place on the chain when
the lamp is removed and shall ft tightly round the inserted lamp.
Compliance shall be checked by inspection and by manual test.
No requirements are specifed at present for checking the weather resistance of gaskets.
20.7.6 Compliance with the mechanical strength requirements of Clause 4.13 of section 4 of IEC 60598-
1 for Edison screw lampholders, and small lampholders of the push-in type shall be checked by the tests
given in Clause 15 of IEC 60238.
The tests are made on three samples of the lampholder without the lamp inserted. After the test, the
relevant compliance requirements of Clause 4.13 of section 4 of IEC 60598-1 shall be met.
20.7.7 E5 and E10 lampholders and similar small lampholders of the push-in type shall be used only if
the rated voltage of each lamp does not exceed:
for E5 and similar small lampholders 25 V;
for series connected E10 and similar small lampholders 60 V;
for parallel connected E10 lampholders 250 V.
Compliance is checked by inspection.
20.7.8 For lighting chains ftted with series-connected lamps, resistors, if any, for bridging the lamp
flaments shall be contained within the lamps. The protection against electric shock and fre shall not be
impaired when these resistors are functioning.
Compliance is checked by inspection and, where appropriate, by a test during which the flaments of the
lamps are interrupted.
20.7.9 Flasher units forming an integral part of the lighting chain, shall be enclosed in nonfammable
insulating material; they shall be securely fxed to the cable of the chain.
Compliance is checked by inspection and, for the non-fammability of the insulating material, by the test of 20.16.
20.7.10 No requirement.
20.7.11 Lampholders for replaceable push-in lamps shall have a body of insulating material.
Compliance is checked by inspection.
20.7.12 The lamp (bulb) glass of push-in lamps shall not rotate in relation to the lamp cap and the lamp
cap shall not rotate in relation to the lampholder.
Compliance is checked by applying a torque of 0,025 Nm for 1 min between the glass envelope and the
lampholder. No displacement shall then occur between the parts during the test.
20.7.13 Replaceable push-in type lamps shall remain in the seated position when the lamp is subjected to
a pull force of up to 3 N. Replaceable push-in type lamps shall make electrical contact with the lampholder
contacts by applying a push-in force of between 3 N and 10 N (under consideration). Withdrawal of the lamp
from the holder shall be effected when subjected to a pull force of between 3 N and 10 N (under consideration).
Non-replaceable lamps shall withstand a pull force of 10 N + 1 N during which the lamp shall remain
seated and shall not have become unsafe.
During each application of the specifed forces, no damage shall occur impairing safety and in particular
no breakage or separation of the lamp glass envelope from the lamp cap shall take place.
Compliance is checked on a new sample by manual test, by measurement of the forces and by inspection.
The sample is then placed in an oven at a temperature of 120 C + 5 C for 2 h (under consideration)
following which it is allowed to cool down to room temperature.
The sample is then re-submitted to the same tests, requirements and compliance criteria as those
specifed for the sample before the heating treatment.
20.7.14 Sealed lighting chains shall have adequate mechanical strength.
For rigid sealed lighting chains, compliance is checked by subjecting the pipe 45 times to each of the
following tests carried out in turn:
a) a pull of 60 N, the stress being applied to the ends of the pipe, without jerks, for 1 min;
b) a torque of 0,15 Nm, the stress being applied to the ends of the pipe in the most unfavorable direction
(alternatively in cases of doubt) without jerks for 1 min.
For fexible sealed lighting chains, compliance is checked by the tests of a) and b) above followed by the
additional test below:
Test:
Wind the pipe on a cylinder of 250 mm diameter with a pull of 60 N for the number of
operations and at the ambient temperature given below:
for chains having an IP number up to and including 20 10 times at 25 C + 5 C
for chains having an IP number over 20 10 times at 25 C + 5 C
followed by
10 times at 15 C + 5 C
After the test, the pipe shall show no damage affecting the safety of the chain and shall comply with the
electric strength test of Clause 20.15 applied between live parts and the body.
NOTE 1 Failure of lamps during the test is permitted.
NOTE 2 An example of a test device suitable for winding a fexible pipe is given in Figure 3.
20.7.15 The lamp bulbs in lighting chains shall meet the mechanical requirements of Subclause 4.13.1 of
IEC 60598-1 using an impact energy of 0,2 Nm when:
a) the lamps are non-removable;
or
b) the lamps are non-standardized and parallel connected.
20.7.16 Any electronic control device (e.g. fasher units) shall, in addition to the requirements of this
standard, comply with the requirements of IEC 61347-2-11.
Compliance is checked by carrying out the relevant tests.
20.8 Creepage distances and clearances
The provisions of section 11 of IEC 60598-1 apply except that for Edison screw lampholders and small
lampholders of the push-in type, Clause 17 of IEC 60238 applies.
20.9 Provisions for earthing
The provisions of section 7 of IEC 60598-1 do not apply.
20.10 Terminals
The provisions of section 15 of IEC 60598-1 apply.
20.11 External and internal wiring
20.11.1 Subclause 5.2.2 of section 5 of IEC 60598-1 does not apply. Internal and external cables of
lighting chains shall not be lighter than the following (see Table 1):
Table 1 Characteristics of the lighting chains
For Class II ordinary lighting chains and ordinary sealed chains 60227 IEC 43
60227 IEC 52*
For Class II chains other than ordinary, using series-connected lampholders 60245 IEC 57*
For Class II chains other than ordinary, using parallel-connected lampholders and
the connection cable for sealed lighting chains other than ordinary
60245 IEC 57*
For Class II chains other than ordinary, where the length of cable between the
point of supply and the nearest lampholder exceeds 3 m for that part of the cable
60245 IEC 66
For Class III chains and parts of chains supplied by SELV and with a maximum
rated wattage exceeding 50 W
60227 IEC 42*
For Class III chains and parts of chains supplied by SELV and with a maximum
rated wattage not exceeding 50 W
Insulation according to
5.3.1 of 60598-1
* The cable may consist of a single core cable provided with a two-layer insulation corresponding to the
specifed standard sheet.
Compliance is checked by inspection, measurement and by calculation.
The nominal cross-sectional area of the conductors shall not be less than the following values:
a) 0,5 mm
2
for class II lighting chains with E5 or E10 lampholders or other small lampholders;
b) 0,75 mm
2
for class II lighting chains with E14, E27, B15 or B22 lampholders and ftted with series
connected lamps;
c) 1,5 mm
2
for class II lighting chains with E14, E27, B15 or B22 lampholders and ftted with parallel
connected lamps;
d) 0,5 mm
2
for class III chains and parts of chains supplied by SELV and with a maximum rated wattage
exceeding 50 W;
e) 0,4 mm
2
for class III chains and parts of chains supplied by SELV and with a maximum rated wattage
not exceeding 50 W;
f) 1 mm
2
for the cable between the plug and a sealed chain without joints;
g) 1,5 mm
2
for the cable between the plug and a sealed chain with joints.
If the maximum rated wattage of class III lighting chains and parts of chains supplied by SELV is less
than 50 W, then the conductors of the internal and external cables may have a crosssectional area of
0,4 mm
2
or less provided that the current-carrying capacity and the mechanical properties are adequate.
If the maximum rated wattage exceeds 50 W, the cables shall comply with 60227 IEC 42 (see asterisk
above). If the wattage is less than 50 W, the insulation of the cables shall comply with the requirements
of 5.3.1 of IEC 60598-1.
For sealed chains, the internal conductors may have a cross-sectional area of 0,4 mm
2
or less provided the
current-carrying capacity and the mechanical properties are adequate. In addition, conductors without insulation
are accepted provided adequate precautions have been taken to ensure maintenance of the minimum creepage
distances and clearances and compliance with the requirements of 5.3.1 of IEC 60598-1.
Compliance is checked by inspection, measurement and calculation.
In the USA, cables shall:
have a minimum insulation thickness of 0,762 mm;
have a minimum fame rating of VW-1;
be UV rated;
have a temperature rating of 105 C;
be rated for indoor and/or outdoor use.
20.11.2 For lighting chains incorporating a single-core cable, the test described in 5.2.10.3 of section 5 of
IEC 60598-1 is made in the following way.
The cable is subjected 50 times to a pull of 30 N. The torque test is not made.
20.11.3 Plugs of lighting chains shall meet the requirements of IEC 60083.
Lighting chains for outdoor use shall either be provided with a splash-proof plug or be suitable for
permanent connection to fxed wiring by means of a junction box.
The length of the cable between the plug and the frst lampholder shall be not less than 1,5 m.
Compliance is checked by measurement.
NOTE 1 Lampholders in a non-rewirable lighting chain ftted with parallel-connected lamps may be
connected to a fat cable by means of pin contacts or edge contacts, which penetrate the insulation of the
cable and provide electric contact with the conductors.
NOTE 2 National rules in some countries do not permit plugs in accordance with IEC 60083.
20.12 Protection against electric shock
The provisions of section 8 of IEC 60598-1 apply together with the requirements of 20.12.1 to 20.12.3.
20.12.1 For lighting chains with means for retaining lamps other than E10 or larger lampholders, the
protection against electric shock shall be at least equivalent to that required for lighting chains provided
with E10 lampholders.
If the plug of a lighting chain incorporates a means for disconnecting one end of the chain to facilitate
installation, the connector ftted at the end of the cable shall have an entry such that the diameter of the
opening and the distance from the front to live parts are equal to the corresponding dimensions specifed
in Figure 1. The two parts of the connector shall not separate when subjected to a pull force of 10 N.
For metal parts of lampholders and for the cap of bayonet lamps, compliance shall be checked by a test
with the standard test fnger specifed in IEC 60529.
A lamp with the longest commercially available lamp-cap shall be inserted when the inaccessibility of
bayonet lamp-caps is checked.
NOTE The gasket referred to in 20.7.5 may serve as protection against accidental contact with the cap
of a lamp with a bayonet cap.
For plugs incorporating means for disconnecting one end of the chain, the degree of protection against
electric shock shall be such that it is not possible to touch the contact piece with the standard test
fnger specifed in IEC 60529. In general, the contact piece is a pin ftted in the body of the plug, the
pin being shrouded by the body of the plug or otherwise protected.
20.12.2 Lighting chains shall not electrify tinsel or other metallic decorations with which they are used.
Compliance shall be checked by means of a fat probe, 0,5 mm thick and 8 mm wide, with a rounded tip
having a radius of 4 mm. It shall not be possible to touch live parts with this probe, when it is applied in any
position with a force not exceeding 0,5 N, the chain being ftted with the lamps with which it is delivered.
20.12.3 Lampholder contact shall be reliably secured in the lampholder body by means other than
friction to avoid such a displacement of the lampholder contacts that live parts of the chain become
accessible. An example of an adequate securing method is by the provision of ears on the contacts
of the lampholder.
Compliance is checked by inspection and by the following test.
Six lampholders are heated for 7 h according to the requirements of Clause 12.3 of section 12 of IEC
60598-1 in an orientation to reach the highest temperature. After the lampholders have cooled down
to room temperature, the incandescent lamps are removed and a force of 15 N is applied for 1 min
to each of the conductors connected. Following this, a force of 30 N is applied for 1 min to the two
conductors together. The forces are applied at a distance of 3 mm + 0,8 mm from the insertion points
in the lampholder so as to try to move the contacts from the lampholders.
During the test, the contacts shall not move more than 0,8 mm. An example of a device suitable for
this test is shown in Figure 2.
Dimensions in millimetres
IEC 289/10
Figure 1 Example of a suitable connection for lighting chains
Dimensions in millimetres
IEC 290/10
Figure 2 Example of test device suitable for checking security of lampholder contacts
Dimensions in millimetre
IEC 291/10
Key
1) Diameter of wooden cylinder.
2) Distance between the fxing point of the fexible pipe and the weight prior to commencement of the test.
Figure 3 Example of test device suitable for winding a fexible pipe
20.13 Endurance tests and thermal tests
The provisions of section 12 of IEC 60598-1 apply together with the requirements of 20.13.1 to 20.13.3.
Luminaires with an IP classifcation greater than IP20 shall be subjected to the relevant tests of
Clauses 12.4, 12.5 and 12.6 of section 12 of IEC 60598-1 after the test(s) of Clause 9.2 but before the
test(s) of Clause 9.3 of section 9 of IEC 60598-1 specifed in Clause 20.14 of this part of IEC 60598.
20.13.1 The requirements of item d) of 12.3.1 and item d) of 12.4.1 of section 12 of IEC 60598-1 are
replaced by the following:
The tests are carried out at a voltage such that the wattage is equal to 1,05 times the wattage
measured when the lighting chain is supplied at the rated voltage.
20.13.2 The requirements of item e) of 12.3.1 and item g) of 12.4.1 of section 12 of IEC 60598-1 apply
except that lamps for sealed chains are not replaced.
20.13.3 The operation of devices for bridging the lamp flament, where ftted in accordance with
20.7.8, shall not cause any part of the lighting chain to attain a temperature which would impair safety.
Compliance is checked by causing the bridging device to operate successively on each lamp, the lamp
not being replaced. The temperature of the component parts of the lighting chain shall be allowed to
stabilize before each bridging device is made to operate. The temperature of lampholders and cables
shall not exceed the appropriate values given in Tables 12.1 and 12.2 of IEC 60598-1.
If a protective device (e.g. a fused lamp) operates during the test, the highest temperatures reached
shall be taken as the fnal temperatures.
20.14 Resistance to dust and moisture
The provisions of section 9 of IEC 60598-1 apply together with the following requirement. For
luminaires with an IP classifcation greater than IP20 the order of the tests specifed in section 9 of IEC
60598-1 shall be as specifed in 20.13 of this part of IEC 60598.
Lighting chains are completely assembled ready for use, appropriate lamps are inserted and the lampholders
are positioned at random during the test described in Clause 9.2 of section 9 of IEC 60598-1.
20.15 Insulation resistance and electric strength
The provisions of section 10 of IEC 60598-1 apply.
20.16 Resistance to heat, fre and tracking
The provisions of section 13 of IEC 60598-1 apply, except that:
for fexible pipes of sealed chains the test of 13.2.1 is replaced by the test of Clause 8 of IEC
60811-3-1.
Annex A
(informative)
Tumbling barrel test
(Applicable to class II lighting chains only.)
No requirement.
Bibliography
IEC 61347-1, Lamp controlgear Part 1: General and safety requirements
BUREAU OF PRODUCTS STANDARDS
Department of Trade and Industry
Technical Committee 04 Lamps and Related Equipment
Chairman
1 Roberto C. Cristobal 2 Go Kien Koc
Philippine National Committee of IEC Federation of Electrical and Electronics
Suppliers and Manufacturers of
Members the Philippines, Inc.
Associations:
3 Edwin Rondillos 9 Gideon Tan
Edward Lao* Yu Eng Kao
Philippine Lighting Industry Association
10 Samson Chiong
4 Arthur A. Lopez Eagle Electric of the Philippines
Institute of Integrated Electrical
Engineers of the Philippines 11 Jimmy B. Ong
Kopez Manufacturing
5 Julius M. Labrador
Electronics Industries Association 12 Gem J. Tan
of the Philippines, Inc. / Labtech Fuji Haya AIM
6 Noli Hernandez Government Agencies Concerned/
Semiconductor and Electronics Industries Testing Institutions:
in the Phils., Inc.
13 Genesis A. Ramos
Academe: Miguel Trenuela*
DOE Lighting and Appliance Testing
7 Arjun G. Ansay Laboratory
Technological University of the Philippines
14 Eusebio Manuel B. Urbano, Jr.
Manufactureres/Industry: Bureau of Product Standards Testing Center
8 William Santiago 15 Samson D. Paden
Fox Electronics Manufacturing Bureau of Product Standards Product
Certifcation Division
Project Manager
16 Avelino T. Molina, Jr.
Bureau of Product Standards Standards
Development Division
* Alternate
ManilaStandar dTODAY
(MST-July 23, & 30, 2012)
B6 | MONDAY, July 23, 2012
Republic of the Philippines
Department of Trade and Industry
BUREAU OF PRODUCT STANDARDS
ManilaStandar dTODAY
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL STANDARD PNS 136:2000
ICS 21.060.50
Steel wire nails - Specifcation
Foreword
This Philippine National Standard Specifcation for steel
wire nails, PNS 136, was prepared by the Sub-committee on
Long Products of the Technical Committee on Steel, BPS/
TC 11/ SC 01 of the Bureau of Product Standards.
This edition cancels and replaces PNS 136:1987,
Amendment 01:1991 and Amendment 02:1992. The revision
of this standard includes the request of the Philippine Nail
Manufacturers Association to use only the 25 kilograms
carton packaging and to disallow the use of wooden boxes
for environmental reasons and to lessen pilferage.
In the preparation of this standard, JIS A 5508:1992, the
Japanese Industrial Standard for nails was considered.
1 Scope
This standard specifes the requirements for common and
fnishing steel wire nails.
2 Reference
PNS 77:1991, Amendment 01:1991 - Carbon steel wire nails
- Specifcation contains provision which through reference
in this text form part of this national standard. At the time of
publication of this standard, the edition indicated was valid.
3 Defnitions
For the purpose of this standard, the following defnitions
apply:
3.1 brad head - a small-diameter, deep, circular, barrel-
shaped head with fat or concavely cupped top surface, for
counter-sinking where concealment of head is important
3.2 common nail - a regular stock nail having a bright,
plain shank and with a fat head and medium diamond
shaped point
3.3 fnishing nail - a regular stock nail having a slender,
bright shank with a fat or cupped brad head and medium
diamond shaped point
3.4 fat head- a circular head with a fat top surface, in which
the bearing surface of the head is parallel to the top surface
3.5 nail - a pointed piece of metal cut to size from wire
generally with head intended to be struck by a hammer,
used for driving into or through wood or other materials to
hold two or more pieces together
4 Manufacturing process
Nails shall be manufactured from wires which are cold drawn
from carbon steel wires.
5 Materials
5.1 Chemical composition - Nails shall be manufactured
from low carbon steel wires conforming to PNS 77 by the
cold drawn process.
5.2 Tensile strength - The ultimate tensile strength of the
wire shall conform to table 1.
Table 1 - Tensile strength
Wire diameter
mm
Tensile strength
MPa
1.50 - 2.15
2.45 - 3.05
3.40 - 4.20
4.60 - 6.60
735 - 1280
685 - 1130
590 - 1030
540 - 930
6 Types
Steel wire nails shall be of the following types:
a) Type 1 - Common nail
b) Type 2 - Finishing nail
7 General requirements
7.1 The wire nails shall be thoroughly polished, free from
rust, faws, cracks and any other injurious defects.
7.2 The common nail shall have a swaged round head,
with upper face checkered, with a suitable slant on the lower
face set with four to six notches (depending on the length)
on the neck, with a point cut down into a tetrahedral prism
and polished.
7.3 The description of constituent parts of round wire nails
shall be as shown in fgures 1 and 2.
7.4 The relation between the constituent parts of steel wire
nails shall conform to the following formula in table 2.
Table 2 - Relation of constituent parts of steel wire nails
Common nails Finishing nails
D = 1.8d D = 1.4d
S = d S is equal or greater than d
= 120-150 -
a = or less than 30 a = or less than 30
d = d
where
D is the diameter of head
d is the diameter of shank (wire diameter)
S is the length of nail point
is the angle of head
d is the diameter of fat surface of fnishing nail
a is the angle of nail point
NOTE The relation between wire diameter (d), length (L) and
thickness (h) is determined by agreement between supplier
and purchaser.
7.5 The upper face of common nails shall be perpendicular
to the center line of the shank and free from noticeable
eccentricity.
7.6 The dimension of common nails shall be as specifed in
table 3.
7.7 The dimension of fnishing nails shall be as specifed in
table 4.
8 Tolerances
8.1 The tolerances on length and diameter of common nails
and fnishing nails shall be given in tables 3 and 4 respectively.
8.2 The bend of shank of common and fnishing nails shall
not be more than 0.7 percent against the length (L).
8.3 Eccentricity of the center of nail head shall not be
more than 12 percent d from axis of the shank. However, for
diameter of 2.00 mm and less, this shall not be more than 14
percent.
9 Sampling and inspection
9.1 All nails of the same type and size presented at one time
shall be considered a lot for purpose of inspection, sampling
and acceptance.
9.2 A random sampling of nails shall be taken from each lot
offered for inspection for visual and dimensional characteristics,
with lot acceptance based on the requirements specifed in
table 5.
9.3 A random sample of nails shall be taken from each
inspection lot in accordance with table 6 and shall be subjected
to the physical test specifed in 9.2.
Figure 1 - Common wire nail
Figure 2 - Finishing nail
Table 3 - Dimension of common nail
Dimensions in millimetre
Designation
Length Diameter
Nominal Tolerance Nominal Tolerance
25 x 1.85 25 2.0 1.85 0.05
32 x 2.10 32 2.5 2.10 0.06
38 x 2.40 38 2.5 2.40 0.06
50 x 2.75 50 3.5 2.75 0.06
65 x 3.40 65 4.0 3.40 0.08
75 x 4.20 75 4.5 4.20 0.10
100 x 5.15 100 6.0 5.15 0.10
125 x 6.05 125 7.0 6.05 0.13
150 x 6.60 150 7.5 6.60 0.13
Table 4 - Dimension of fnishing nail
Dimensions in millimetre
Designation
Length Diameter
Nominal Tolerance Nominal Tolerance
25 x 1.65 25 2.0 1.65 0.05
32 x 1.85 32 2.5 1.85 0.05
38 x 2.10 38 2.5 2.10 0.06
50 x 2.40 50 3.5 2.40 0.06
65 x 2.75 65 4.0 2.75 0.06
75 x 3.40 75 4.5 3.40 0.08
Table 5 - Sampling for visual and dimensional
requirements
Lot size Random
sample size
Total test
pieces
Acceptance
No. of boxes No. of boxes No. of nails Maximum
allowable
failure, pieces
2 - 40 2 15 1
41 - 110 3 25 1
111 - 300 5 35 2
301- 500 7 50 3
501 - 1 300 10 75 4
1 301 - 3 200 15 110 6
3 201 - 8 000 25 150 8
8 001 and over 35 225 11
Table 6 - Sampling for bend test
Lot size Random
sample size
Total test
pieces
Acceptance
No. of boxes No. of boxes No. of nails Maximum
allowable
failure, pieces
2 - 40 2 20 1
41 - 110 3 20 1
111 - 300 5 20 1
301- 500 7 20 1
501 - 1 300 10 20 1
1 301 - 3 200 15 30 2
3 201 - 8 000 25 50 2
8 001 and over 35 70 3
10 Method of tests
10.1 Visual and dimensional test - Each sample nail
taken at random in accordance with table 5 shall be visually
and dimensionally checked to verify conformance to the
requirements as to size, fnish, workmanship and material.
Non-conformity to the dimensional tolerances and faulty
shape shall be considered major defects, corrosion, poor
fnish and others shall be considered minor defects.
NOTE 1 Major defect is a defect that is likely to result in
failure or to reduce materially the usability of the
considered product for its intended purpose.
NOTE 2 Minor defect is a defect that is not likely to reduce
materially the usability of the considered product
for its intended purpose, or that is a departure from
established specifcations having little bearing on
the effective use or operation of this product.
10.2 Bend test
10.2.1 Test piece - The test piece shall be either the
wire used in the nail manufacture or the manufactured nail
(common or fnishing nail).
10.2.2 Procedure - Bend test shall be performed by any
hand or power device that will perform the test piece closely
about a mandrel with an internal radius equivalent to the
diameter of the test piece, with sides parallel and without
causing any damage to the nail surface. No faws, cracks, or
other defects shall be present on the test piece after the test.
11 Packaging and labelling
11.1 Double wall corrugated carbon boxes with suitable
strength shall be used for packaging.
11.2 The boxes must be arranged compactly and sealed
by either glue, staple or tape. After being sealed, the boxes
shall be enclosed with a durable shrinkable plastic.
11.3 The net weight per box shall be 25 kg 0.5 kg.
11.4 Individual boxes shall be marked with the following:
a) Type of nail
b) Brand name or logo
c) Length and diameter, in mm
d) Net weight, 25 kg
e) Name and address of the manufacturer
f) Year and date of manufacture
g) The number of this standard, PNS 136
BUREAU OF PRODUCT STANDARDS
Department of Trade and Industry
Technical Committee 11 - Steel
Sub-Committee 1 - Steel (Long)
Chairman
1 Napoleon G. Co
Philippine Constructors Association, Inc.
Members
Academe:
2 Hubert Palpal-latoc 6 Roberto M. Cola
Mapua Institute of Technology Philippine Iron and
Steel, Inc.
Associations: Testing Institution:
3 Marcelo Co 7 Randy R. Rufno
G.I. Wire Association Non-destructive Testing
Laboratory
4 Ricardo Yu Philippine Geoanalytics
Phillippine Nail Manufacturers
Association Government Agency:

8 Reginald P. Viray
Manufacturers: Metals Industry Research
and Development Center
5 Wellington Tong
Philippine Iron and Steel Institute
Project Offcer
9 Samson D. Paden
Bureau of Product Standards
BPS
BUREAU OF PRODUCT STANDARDS
your partner in product quality and safety
_____________________________________________
The use of the PS Certifcation Mark is governed by the provisions of
Department Administrative Order No. 01 series of 1997 Revised Rules
and Regulations Concerning the Philippine Standard (PS) Quality and / or
Safety Certifcation Mark Scheme by the Bureau of Product Standards.
This mark on a product/container is an assurance by the manufacturer/
producer that the product conforms with the requirements of a Philippine
standard. Details of conditions under which a license to use the PS
Certifcation Mark may be granted can be obtained from the Bureau of
Product Standards, Department of Trade and Industry, 361 Sen. Gil J.
Puyat Avenue, Makati City.
(MST-July 23, & 30, 2012)
MONDAY, July 23, 2012 | B7 ManilaStandar dTODAY
Republic of the Philippines
Department of Trade and Industry
BUREAU OF PRODUCT STANDARDS
~
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL STANDARD PNS 113:2005
ICS 77.140.65
Specifcation for low carbon steel wires Plain/annealed/zinc-coated
Foreword
This Philippine National Standard Specifcation for low carbon steel wires -
Plain/annealed/zinc-coated was prepared by the Bureau of Product Standards
Technical Committee on Steel, BPS/TC 11. This standard replaces PNS 113:1987
- Low carbon steel wires for ordinary use - Specifcation.
This standard covers three types of low carbon steel wires, namely: plain,
annealed, and zinc-coated/galvanized. General requirements such as the
manufacturing process, materials, wire diameters and tolerances, mechanical
properties, and testing are specifed in this Standard.
In the preparation of this standard, the following standards were considered:
JIS G 3532-2000, Low Carbon Steel Wires
JIS G 3547-1993, Zinc-Coated Low Carbon Steel Wires
BIRMINGHAM WIRE GAUGE (BWG) Standard Metric Series for Basic
Diameter of Wire
Specifcation for low carbon steel wires - Plain/annealed/zinc-coated
1 Scope
This standard specifes the requirements for low carbon steel wires for application
as (1) plain wire, (2) annealed wire, and (3) zinc-coated / galvanized wire, and
not intended for structural applications.
2 Normative References
The titles of the standards publications referred to in this standard are listed on
the inside back cover.
3 Defnitions
For the purposes of this standard, the following defnitions apply:
3.1 ordinary low carbon steel wire - a steel wire of circular cross-section,
produced from wire rod conforming to PNS 77/Amd. 01 that has been drawn and
thus, cold worked
3.2 plain low carbon steel wire - an ordinary low carbon steel wire of circular
cross-section with smooth surface
3.3 annealed low carbon steel wire - an ordinary low carbon steel wire that has
been annealed after cold working
3.4 zinc-coated low carbon steel wire - an ordinary low carbon steel wire
annealed and coated with zinc either by hot-dipped or electrolytic galvanizing
3.5 lot - a lot shall refer to steel wires of the same type and of the same size,
whether in reference to the same production batch or as presented for the
purpose of inspection, sampling, and acceptance
4 Types and manufacturing methods
The types and manufacturing methods of wires shall be as specifed in Table 1.
5 Materials
Wires shall be manufactured from wire rods conforming to PNS 77/Amd. 01.

Table 1 Types and manufacturing methods of wires
Type/Class Manufacturing methods
Plain low carbon steel
wire
Cold-working (by drawing) of wire rods specifed in
PNS 77/Amd. 01
Annealed low carbon
steel wire
Heat treatment of wire by annealing after cold-
drawing of ordinary low carbon steel wire
Zinc-coated low carbon
steel wire (Electrolytic
galvanized / Hot-dipped
galvanized) Classes 1 to
4
Zinc coating (i.e., galvanizing) of annealed low
carbon steel wires, whether further drawn or
otherwise
6 Chemical composition
The chemical composition of low carbon wire rods shall conform to Table 2.
Table 2 Low carbon steel chemical composition, ranges, and limits
Grade
No.
Chemical composition limits
Carbon
(Maximum)
Manganese
(Maximum)
Phosphorus
(Maximum)
Sulfur
(Maximum)
1005 0.06 0.35 0.040 0.050
1006 0.08 0.25 to 0.40 0.040 0.050
1008 0.10 0.30 to 0.50 0.040 0.050
1010 0.08 to 0.13 0.30 to 0.60 0.040 0.050
1012 0.10 to 0.15 0.30 to 0.60 0.040 0.050
1013 0.11 to 0.16 0.50 to 0.80 0.040 0.050
1015 0.13 to 0.18 0.30 to 0.60 0.040 0.050
1016 0.13 to 0.18 0.60 to 0.90 0.040 0.050
1017 0.15 to 0.20 0.30 to 0.60 0.040 0.050
1018 0.15 to 0.20 0.60 to 0.90 0.040 0.050
1019 0.15 to 0.20 0.70 to 1.00 0.040 0.050
1020 0.18 to 0.23 0.30 to 0.60 0.040 0.050
1021 0.18 to 0.23 0.60 to 0.90 0.040 0.050
1022 0.18 to 0.23 0.70 to 1.00 0.040 0.050
1023 0.20 to 0.25 0.30 to 0.70 0.040 0.050
NOTE 1 For Silicon, the following limits and ranges are commonly specifed:
For grades 1005 to 1013, the silicon content shall not exceed 0.10 percent.
For grades 1015 to 1023, the silicon content shall be specifable according
to the following levels: (1) not to exceed 0.10 percent, (2) 0.10 to 0.20
percent, or (3) 0.15 to 0.30 percent.
NOTE 2 When required, copper is specifed as an added element and shall
not exceed 0.40 percent.
7 Standard wire diameters, tolerances, and mass
7.1 Wire types and applicable wire diameter
According to the method of manufacture and intended use, wire is categorized
into two types, namely: 1) ordinary low carbon steel wires and 2) annealed low
carbon steel wires. Applicable wire diameters are given in Table 3.
Table 3 - Wire types and applicable wire diameter
Unit: millimetres
Wire type Cross section Applicable wire
diameter
a
Example of
application
Ordinary low carbon
steel wire
Round
0.10 up to 13.0 For general purpose
Annealed low
carbon
steel wire
0.10 up to 13.0 For general purpose
and for wire fabrics
a
The range of diameters shown in this table represents (1) the closest
equivalents to the BWG, and (2) are those predominantly found in the
market.
7.2 Standard wire diameters shall conform to Table 4.
Table 4 - Standard gauges and wire diameter
Unit: millimetres
Wire
gauge
a
Wire
diameter
Wire
gauge
a
Wire
diameter
Wire
gauge
a
Wire
diameter
Wire
gauge
a
Wire
diameter
36 0.10 25 0.51 14 2.11 3 6.58
35 0.13 24 0.56 13 2.41 2 7.21
34 0.18 23 0.64 12 2.77 1 7.62
33 0.20 22 0.71 11 3.05 1-0 8.64
32 0.23 21 0.81 10 3.40 2-0 9.65
31 0.25 20 0.89 9 3.76 3-0 10.80
30 0.30 19 1.07 8 4.19 4-0 11.53
29 0.33 18 1.25 7 4.57 5-0 12.00
28 0.36 17 1.47 6 5.16 6-0 12.70
27 0.41 16 1.65 5 5.59 7-0 13.00
26 0.46 15 1.83 4 6.05
a
Wire gauges follow the Birmingham Wire Gauge (BWG) system for steel
wire, whereas the wire diameters refect and follow the closest metric
conversion.
7.3 Tolerances on wire diameters of all types of low carbon steel wires before
galvanizing shall conform to Table 5.
Table 5 Tolerances of wire diameters for low carbon steel wires
for classes 1, 2 , and 3 zinc-coating only
Unit: millimetres
Wire diameter Tolerance
0.10 to 0.36 0.01
0.41 to 0.56 0.02
0.64 to 0.81 0.03
0.89 to 2.11 0.05
2.41 to 3.05 0.06
3.40 to 4.19 0.08
4.57 to 6.05 0.10
6.58 to 13.00 0.13
7.4 Tolerances for wire diameters of zinc-coated class 4 low carbon steel wires
(before galvanizing) shall conform to Table 6.
Table 6 Tolerances of wire diameters for low carbon steel wires
for class 4 zinc-coating only
Unit: millimetres
Wire diameter Tolerance
0.10 to 0.36 + 0.02 /-0.01
0.41 to 0.56 0.02
0.64 to 0.81 0.03
0.89 to 1.65 0.05
1.83 to 2.11 0.06
2.41 to 3.40 0.08
3.76 to 5.16 0.10
5.59 to 6.05 0.13
6.58 to 8.64 0.15
9.65 to 13.00 0.16
7.5 The standard coil weight of wires shall conform to Table 7.
Table 7 Coil weight
Wire diameter
(mm)
Minimum weight per coil (kg) Tolerance
(kg per coil)
0.10 to 0.51 10.00 0. 10
0.56 to 1.07 25.00 0. 20
1.25 to 6.05 35.00 0. 30
6.58 to 13.00 As agreed between buyer and
seller
0.50
8 Mechanical properties
All low carbon steel wires shall conform to the mechanical properties specifed in
Table 8.
Table 8 Mechanical properties
Wire diameter,
mm
Tensile strength, MPa Number of twists
Plain low
carbon
steel wire
Annealed
low
carbon
steel wire
Zinc-
coated
low
carbon
steel wire
Annealed
low carbon
steel wire
Zinc-coated
low
carbon
steelwires
Class 3 Class 4
0.10 up to
0.89
5901270 260 590 290 540 52 49 49
1.07 47 44 44
1.25 41 37 37
1.47 35 31 31
1.65 32 28 28
1.83 61 57 49
2.11 55 52 44
2.41 48 44 38
2.77 5401130 42 39 33
3.05 36 34 28
3.40 33 30 26
3.76 4401030 30 27 24
4.19 27 24 21
4.57 24 22 19
5.16 390-930 22 20 17
5.59 20 18 15
6.05 17 15 13
6.58 14 12 11
7.21 14 12 11
7.62 11 9 8
8.64 13.00 320880 11 9 8
NOTE In the event of special orders, where the wire diameter is not found in Table
6, the wire must comply with the specifed mechanical properties applicable to
the next larger diameter in this table.
9 Physical appearance
Wires shall be free from harmful defects such as rust, faws, fssures and cracks
that are detrimental to practical use. For annealed steel wire, requirement for mill
scale shall not apply.
10 Mass of zinc coating
10.1 Mass of zinc coating for zinc-coated low carbon steel wires shall be as
specifed in Table 9.
10.2 In the winding test, classes 3 and 4 of zinc-coated low carbon steel wires
shall produce neither discernible crack nor peeling on their wound portions when
wound six turns or more in close contact around a mandrel of prescribed diameter
in accordance with the requirements of Table 9.
Table 9 Mass of zinc-coating, and diameter of mandrel used for winding
test
Wire
diameter
(D),
mm
Class 1 Class 2 Class 3 Class 4
Coating
mass test
Coating
mass test
Coating
mass test
Diameter
of mandrel
used for
winding
test
Coating
mass test
Diameter
of mandrel
used for
winding
test
Mass of
zinc-coating,
g/m,
minimum
Mass of
zinc-coating,
g/m,
minimum
Mass of
zinc-coating,
g/m,
minimum
Multiple of
wire
diameter
Mass of
zinc-coating,
g/m,
minimum
Multiple of
wire
diameter
0.10 to
0.81
20 30 NA NA NA NA
0.89 20 30 75 6 D 105 12 D
1.07 25 30 75 6 D 105 12 D
1.25 25 30 75 6 D 105 12 D
1.47 25 30 75 6 D 120 12 D
1.65 25 30 75 6 D 120 12 D
1.83 25 35 90 8 D 155 14 D
2.11 25 35 90 8 D 155 14 D
2.41 25 40 120 8 D 185 14 D
2.77 25 40 120 8 D 185 14 D
3.05 30 45 135 10 D 230 16 D
3.40 30 50 135 10 D 230 16 D
3.76 35 55 135 10 D 230 16 D
4.19 35 55 155 12 D 245 18 D
4.57 40 65 155 12 D 245 18 D
5.16 45 70 155 12 D 245 18 D
5.59 50 75 155 14 D 245 20 D
6.05 to
13.0
50 85 155 14 D 245 20 D
NOTE Mass of zinc coating and diameter of mandrel shall not apply to class 3
and class 4 wires.
11 Sampling and inspection
11.1 Random sampling shall be conducted by taking specimens from each lot
of steel wires in coils whether from the production line or as presented for quality
inspection.
11.2 Sampling shall be in accordance with the sampling criteria specifed in
Table 10.
11.3 Specimens shall be cut from individual coils to be used for testing.
11.4 Each specimen shall be subjected to inspection. Furthermore, each
specimen shall conform to requirements for physical appearance test, tensile test,
torsion test, mass of zinc -coating test for classes 1 to 4, plus the winding test in
the case of class 3 and class 4 zinc-coated wires.
Table 10 Sampling and acceptance criteria
Lot size Random sample size
No. of Coils
Acceptance
(maximum allowable
failures)
AQL = 10
2 15 2 1
16 25 3 1
26 90 5 1
91 150 8 2
151 280 13 3
281 500 20 5
501 1,200 32 7
1,201 3,200 50 10
3,201 10,000 80 14
10,001 and above 125 21
NOTE The inspection level specifed in this table is based on General
Inspection Level Iand AQL10 of Single Sampling Plans for normal inspection
found in PNS/ISO 2859-1:2004.
12 Test methods
12.1 Tests for mechanical properties
12.1.1 Tensile test
a) Test specimen preparation and method of test shall conform to relevant
provisions of PNS ISO 6892, and to test piece no. 9 of PNS JIS Z 2201.
Tests shall be carried out in accordance with PNS JIS Z 2241, and PNS ISO
6892 and results of tests shall conform to values specifed in Table 8.
b) When a specimen is tested for tensile strength and it fractures at a gripped
portion, the test shall be invalidated. A retest shall be performed provided the
specimen shall be taken from the same coil.
12.1.2 Torsion test
a) Wires subjected to the torsion test shall be frst straightened. This shall be
done either by hand, with the use of a wooden hammer or the like, and it shall
be cut to approximately 300 mm in length for use as the test specimen.
b) Both ends of the test specimen shall be gripped frmly at an interval of 200
mm and subsequently twisted to the specifed number of turns found in
Table 8. The test specimen shall be given suffcient tension to prevent it from
sagging.
c) The wire shall not break nor crack when turned to the specifed number of
twists.
d) In cases where a test piece fractures at a gripped portion during testing, the
test shall be invalidated. A retest shall be performed provided the specimen
shall be taken from the same coil.
12.2 Mass of zinc coating The test shall be performed in accordance with
the antimonychloride method specifed in PNS ISO 1460. Results shall conform
to values specifed in Table 9.
12.3 Winding test The winding test shall be performed in accordance with
PNS/JIS H 0401. Results shall conform to values specifed in Table 9.
12.4 Measurement of wire diameter
a) For a wire of a certain diameter, an arbitrary point shall be taken along a
specimen that is 300 mm long.
b) The maximum and minimum diameters at this point shall be taken.
c) The values of the readings shall conform to the values specifed in Table 5 and
Table 6.
13 Acceptance
A lot shall be accepted only if it meets all requirements specifed in -
a) Clause 9 (Physical Appearance),
b) Table 2 for chemical composition,
c) Tables 5, 6, and 7 for wire diameters and coil weights, and
d) Tables 8 and 9 for mechanical properties and mass of zinc coating.
14 Retest
A retest shall be allowed only under the following conditions:
a) Test equipment is found to be faulty;
b) Sample fails at the gripped portions (see above) ; or
c) Testing procedure is faulty.
15 Marking
Each coil shall be identifed with an identifcation tag. This identifcation tag must
contain the following information:
1) Name and address of manufacturer (both local and foreign);
2) Name and address of importer (in case of imported);
3) Wire type (plain, annealed, zinc-coated);
4) Zinc-coating mass: classes 1, 2, 3, 4;
5) Process (electrolytic or hot-dipped galvanized);
6) Wire diameter, mm;
7) Net weight per coil, kg;
8) Date of manufacture; and
9) Country of origin .`
References
The following standards contain provisions which through reference in this
text, constitute provisions of this standard. At the time of the publication, the
editions indicated were valid. All standards are subject to revision, and parties
to agreements based on these standards are encouraged to investigate the
possibility of applying the most recent editions of the standards indicated below.
PNS 77:1986/Amd. 01:1991, Carbon steel wire rods Specifcation
PNS ISO 2859-1:2004, Sampling procedures for inspection by attributes Part
1: Sampling schemes indexed by acceptance quality limit (AQL) for lot-by-lot
inspection
PNS ISO 6892:2004, Metallic Materials Tensile Testing at ambient temperature
PNS ISO 1460:2004, Metallic Coatings Hot Dip Galvanized Coatings on
Ferrous Materials-Gravimetric determination of the mass per unit area
PNS JIS G 3505:2005, Low Carbon Steel Wire Rods
PNS JIS Z 2201:2005, Test pieces for tensile test for metallic materials
PNS JIS Z 2241:2005 Method of tensile test for metallic materials
PNS JIS H 0401:2005 Methods of test for hot dip galvanized coatings
BUREAU OF PRODUCT STANDARDS
Department of Trade and Industry
Technical Committee 11 Steels
Chairman Vice-Chairman
1 Wellington Tong 2 Napoleon G. Co
Pag-Asa Steel Works, Philippines Constructors Association
Incorporated Incorporated
Members
Academe:
3 Eligia D. Clemente 7 Roberto M. Cola
University of the Philippines Philippine Iron and Steel Institute
Associations: Government Agencies:
4 Miriam Tamayo 8 Leilani del Prado
Association of Structural Construction Industry Authority
Engineers of the Phils. of the Philippines
5 Marcelo Co* 9 Iluminada de Guzman
Ricardo Yu** Bureau of Research and Standards
G.I. Wire Manufacturers Association
10 Samson D. Paden
6 Mariano Chan** Bureau of Product Standards
Philippine Nail Manufacturers
Association Testing Laboratory:
Project Manager 11 Rommel Saavedra**
Metals Industry Research and
12 Anne Daisy T. Omila Development Center
Bureau of Product Standards
* Convenor of the Sub-Committee on Wire rods, steel wires and wire products,
BPS TC 11/SC 2
** Member of Sub-Committee on Wire rods, steel wires and wire products, BPS
TC 11/SC 2
BPS
BUREAU OF PRODUCT STANDARDS
your partner in quality
The use of the PS Certifcation Mark is governed by the
provisions of Department Administrative Order No. 01 series of
1997 Revised Rules and Regulations Concerning the Philippine
Standard (PS) Quality and / or Safety Certifcation Mark Scheme
by the Bureau of Product Standards. This mark on a product/
container is an assurance by the manufacturer/producer that
the product conforms with the requirements of a Philippine
standard. Details of conditions under which a license to use the
PS Certifcation Mark may be granted can be obtained from the
Bureau of Product Standards, Department of Trade and Industry,
361 Sen. Gil J. Puyat Avenue, Makati City.
_______________________________________________________________________
(MST-July 23, & 30, 2012)
B8 | MONDAY, July 23, 2012
Republic of the Philippines
Department of Trade and Industry
BUREAU OF PRODUCT STANDARDS
~
ManilaStandar dTODAY
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL STANDARD PNS ISO 4427:2002
(ISO published 1996)
PWWA NM 201:2002
ICS 23.040.20
Polyethylene (PE) pipes for water supply Specifcations
National Foreword
This Philippine National Standard is adopted with modifcations from the
International Standard ISO 4427:1996, Polyethylene (PE) pipes for water supply
Specifcations. The review and endorsement of this standard was made by the
Plastic Pipe Sub-Committee on Polyethylene (PE) Pipe Group of the Technical
Standards Committee on Plastic Pipes of the Philippine Water Works Association
(PWWA). It was approved for adoption by the Bureau of Product Standards.
The adoption of this standard includes an amendment which contains the
modifcations made. These are on sub-clause 3.5, Tables 3 and 4, marking and
an inclusion of an informative Annex B.
This standard cancels and replaces PNS 55:1986, High density polyethylene
(PE) pipes for water supply - Specifcation.
Within the text of the standard, the following are the minimal editorial changes:
a) the decimal comma shall be interpreted as a decimal point to be consistent
with existing convention on our number format
b) the words International Standard shall mean National Standards.
PHILIPPINE NATIONAL STANDARD PNS ISO 4427:2002/AMD. 01:2002
PWWA NM 201:2002
Amendment
PNS ISO 4427:2002 was approved by the Bureau of Product Standards with the
following modifcations:
Clause/Sub-clause Modifcation
3.5 Effects on water quality of pipes Add Conformance of this provision shall
intended for the conveyance of be certifed by a testing institute accredited
water for human consumption. by the Bureau of Product Standards after
the last sentence.
Relative to 4.14 on smallest wall Replaces tables 3 and 4
thickness Tables 3 and 4
8 Marking Add the Bureau of Product Standards Q
check mark
the number of this PNS standard
Revise the last sentence to read:
The word potable water has to be included
if the pipe is intended for drinking water.
Annex Add as Annex B (informative) Manufacturers
Sampling.
Explanation:
In the calculation of Tables 3 and 4, a nominal pressure of 6.3 bar (0.63 MPa)
has been used.
Table 3 Polyethylene pipes with a design stress
s
of 8 MPa
Nominal
outside
diameter
d
n
Pipe series
1)
S 8 S 6.3 S 5
Standard dimension ratio
SDR 17 SDR 13.6 SDR 11
Nominal pressure PN
2)
for
s
= 8 MPa
PN 10 PN 12.5 PN 16
Nominal wall thickness, n
mm
16 - - 2.3
20 - - 2.3
25 - - 2.3
32 2.3 2.4 3.0
40 2.4 3.0 3.7
50 3.0 3.7 4.6
63 3.7 4.7 5.8
75 4.5 5.6 6.8
90 5.4 6.7 8.2
110 6.6 8.1 10.0
125 7.4 9.2 11.4
140 8.3 10.3 12.7
160 9.5 11.8 14.6
180 10.7 13.3 16.4
200 11.9 14.7 18.2
225 13.4 16.6 20.5
250 14.8 18.4 22.7
280 16.6 20.6 25.4
315 18.7 23.2 28.6
355 21.1 26.1 32.2
400 23.7 29.4 36.3
450 26.7 33.1 40.9
500 29.7 36.8 45.4
560 33.2 41.2 50.8
630 37.4 46.2 57.2
710 42.1 52.2 -
800 47.4 58.8 -
900 53.3 - -
1 000 59.3 - -
1) The pipe series number is derived from the ratio
s
is the design stress at
20C and PMS, is the maximum allowable operating pressure of the pipe
at 20C.
2) The nominal pressure PN corresponds to the maximum allowable
operating pressure PMS, in bars, of the pipe at 20C.
Table 4 Polyethylene pipes with a design stress s of 6.3 MPa
Pipe series 1)
Nominal
outside
diameter
d
n
Pipe series
1)
S 10 S 8 S 6.3 S 5 S4
Standard dimension ratio
SDR 21 SDR 17 SDR 13.6 SDR 11 SDR 9
Nominal pressure PN
2)
for
s
= 8 MPa
PN 6
3)
PN 8 PN 10 PN 12.5 PN 16
Nominal wall thickness,
n
mm
16 - - - - 2.3
20 - - - - 2.3
25 - - - 2.3 2.8
32 - 2.3 2.4 3.0 3.6
40 2.3 2.4 3.0 3.7 4.5
50 2.4 3.0 3.7 4.6 5.6
63 3.0 3.8 4.7 5.8 7.1
75 3.6 4.5 5.6 6.8 8.4
90 4.3 5.4 6.7 8.2 10.1
110 5.3 6.6 8.1 10.0 12.3
125 6.0 7.4 9.2 11.4 14.0
140 6.7 8.3 10.3 12.7 15.7
160 7.7 9.5 11.8 14.6 17.9
180 8.6 10.7 13.3 16.4 20.1
200 9.6 11.9 14.7 18.2 22.4
225 10.8 13.4 16.6 20.5 25.2
250 11.9 14.8 18.4 22.7 27.9
280 13.4 16.6 20.6 25.4 31.3
315 15.0 18.7 23.2 28.6 35.2
355 16.9 21.1 26.1 32.2 39.7
400 19.1 23.7 29.4 36.3 44.7
450 21.5 26.7 33.1 40.9 50.3
500 23.9 29.7 36.8 45.4 55.8
560 26.7 33.2 41.2 50.8 -
630 30.0 37.4 46.3 57.2 -
710 33.9 42.1 52.2 - -
800 38.1 47.4 58.8 - -
900 42.9 53.3 - - -
1 000 47.7 59.3 - - -
1 200 57.2 - - - -
1 400 - - - - -
1 600 - - - - -
1)
The pipe series number is derived from the ratio s is the design stress at 20C
and PMS, is the maximum allowable operating pressure of the pipe at 20C.
2)
The nominal pressure PN corresponds to the maximum allowable operating
pressure PMS, in bars, of the pipe at 20C.
3)
For calculation purposes, a nominal pressure of 6.3 bar (0.63 MPa) has been
used.
Annex B
(Informative)
Manufacturers Sampling
Sampling and Testing Schedule for Assessment of Compliance
Clause Requirements Minimum Frequency per
Extruder
4.1.2
4.3
3.1.2/3.1.3
General Requirements
Diameter and Wall Thickness
Length
Appearance
Per roll/hourly
Every 8 hours
Every 8 hours
3
3.2.1
3.3
3.5
3.7
3.7
Type Test
Material
Carbon Black
Weathering & Thermal Stability
Effect of Material on Water Quality
Density
Melt Flow Rate
Every 6 months or every
change of material brand/
pipe
- do -
- do -
- do -
- do -
- do -
3.6 MRS Test
10,000 hr test for master batches
Every change of material
Supplier/brand
5.1 Hydrostatic Strength
100 hr test
165 h test
1000 h test
Every 6 months or every
change in material brand
- do -
- do -
6.2 Quality Control Test
Longitudinal Reversion
Every 8 hours
Foreword
ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide federation
of national standards bodies (ISO member bodies) The work of preparing
International Standards is normally carried out through lSO technical committees.
Each member body interested in a subject for which a technical committee has
been established has the right to be represented on that committee. International
organizations, governmental and non-governmental in liaison with ISO, also
take part in the work. ISO collaborates closely with International Electrotechnical
Commission (IEC) on all matters of electrotechnical standardization.
Draft International Standards adopted by the technical committtees are circulated
to !he member bodies for voting. Publication as an InternationaI Standard requires
approval by at least 75 % of the member bodies casting a vote.
International Standard ISO 4427 was prepared by Technical Committee ISO/TC
138, Plastic Pipes, fttings and valves for the transport of fuids Subcommittee SC
2 Plastics pipes end fttings for water supplies.
Annex A forms an integral part of !his lnternational Standard.
1 Scope
This International Standard specifes the required properties of pipes made from
polyethylene (PE) to be used for buried water mains and services and for water
supply above ground both inside and outside buildings. In addition, it specifes
some general properties of the material from which these pipes are made,
including a classifcation scheme.
This International Standard applies to pipes with a nominal pressure of PN 3, 2,
PN 4, PN 6. PN 8. PN to. PN 12,5 and PN 16, and nominal outside diameters from
16 to 1 600 (see ISO 161-1), intended to be used for the conveyance of water
under pressure at temperatures between 00 and 40
o
C for general purposes as
well as for the supply of drinking water.
NOTE 1 - Some countries may require specifc colour identifcation for pipes
Intended for human consumption.
For temperatures between 20
o
C and 40
o
C, the working pressure factor given
in fgure 1 shall be applied. Provided that extrapolation results obtained in
accordance with ISO/TR 9080 show this to be possible.
It PE pipes are used above ground, they should preferable be physically protected
against UV light in accordance with recommended practice.
NOTE 2 - For information. certain requirements. fgures or remarks are given,
which have been extracted from appropriate International Standards.
2 Normative references
The following standards contain provisions which through reference in this text,
constitute provisions of this International Standard. At the time of publication, the
editions indicated were valid. All standards are subject to revision, and parties to
agreements based on this International Standard are encouraged to investigate
the possibility of applying the most recent editions of the standards indicated
below. Members of IEC and ISO maintain registers of currently valid International
Standards.
ISO 161-1:1996, Thermoplastics pipes for the conveyance of fuids - Nominal
outside diameters and nominal pressures - Part 1: Metric series
ISO 1133:1996, Plastics - Determination of the melt mass-fow rate (MFR) and the
melt voIume-fIow rate (MVR) of thermoplastics.
ISO 1167: 1996, Thermoplastics pipes for the conveyance of fuids- Resistance to
internal pressure - Test method
ISO 2505-1:1994, Thermoplastics pipes - Longitudinal reversion - Part 1:
Determination methods.
ISO 2505-2: 1994, Thermoplastic pipes- Longitudinal reversion - Part 2:
Determination parameters.
ISO 3126: 1974, Plastic pipes - Measurement of dimensions.
ISO 4065: 1996, Thermoplastics pipes - Universal wall thickness table.
ISO 4607: 1978, Plastics - Methods of exposure to natural weathering.
ISO 6259-1: -
1)
, Themoplastic pipes- Determination of tensile properties - Part 1:
General test method.
ISO 6259-3: -
1)
, Thermoplastic pipes- Determination of tensile properties - Part
3: PoIyoIefn pipes.
ISO 6964: 1986, PoIyolefn pipes and fttings - Determination of carbon black
content by calcination and pyrolysis - Test method and basic specifcation.
ISO/TR 9080: 1992, Thermoplastics pipes for the transport of fuids - Methods
of extrapolation of hydrostatic stress rupture data to determine the Iong-term
hydrostatic strength of thermoplastics pipe materials.
ISO 10837:1991, Determination of the thermal stability or polyethylene (PE) for
use in gas pipes and fttings.
ISO 11420: 1996, Method for the assessment of the degree of carbon black
dispersion in poIyolefn pipes, fttings and compounds.
ISO 11922-1:-
2)
, Thermoplastics pipes for the conveyance of fuids - Dimensions
and tolerances - Part 1: Metric series.
ISO 12162: 1995, Thermoplastics materials for pipes and fllings for pressure
applications - Classifcation and designation Overall service (design) coeffcient.
ISO 13761: 1996, Plastics pipes and fttings - Pressure reduction factors for
poIyethylene pipeline systems for use at temperatures above 20
o
C .
ISO 13949-
1)
, Method for the assessment of the degree of pigment dispersion in
poIyoIefn pipes, fttings and compounds.
Guidelines for drinking water quality, Volume 1: Recommendations, WHO,
Geneva, 1984.
EEC Council Directive of 15
th
July 1980 on the quality of water intended for
human consumption, Offcial Journal of the European Communities L229, pp
11 to 29.
_____________
1)
To be published.
2)
To be published (Revision of ISO 3606:1976, ISO 3607:1977, ISO 3608:1976
and ISO 3609:1977)
3 Material
3.1 Compounds
3.1.1 General
The pipes shall be manufactured from poIyethylene containing only those
antioxidants, UV stabilizers and pigments necessary for the manufacture of pipes
conforming to this specifcation and for its end use, including weldability when it
is possible. The pipes for drinking water shall be either black or blue or black with
blue stripes.
3.1.2 Black pipes
For black pipes, the carbon black content in the compound shall be (2, 25 0.25)
% by mass, when measured in accordance with ISO 6964.
3.1.3 Blue pipes and stripes
The use of the colour blue or black with blue stripes shall be specifed in
accordance with national requirements.
The material for the stripes shall be of the same type of resin as used in the base
compound for the pipe.
3.2 Dispersion of pigments In compounds
3.2.1 Dispersion of carbon black
When determined in accordance with ISO 11420, the dispersion of the carton
black shall be equal to or less than grade 3.
3.2.2 Dispersion of blue pigments
When determined in accordance with ISO 13949, the dispersion of blue pigments
shall be equal to or less than grade 3
3.3 Thermal stabliity
When determined In accordance with ISO/TR 10837, the induction time for materials
PE 63, PE 80 and PE 100 shall be either at least 20 min when tested at 200
o
C, or an
equivalent period when tested at 210
o
C, provided the equivalent is supported by a
clear correlation between results obtained at 200
o
C or 210
o
C, respectively.
In cases of dispute, the test temperature shall be 200
o
C.
3.4 Reworked material
Clean reworked material generated from a manufacturer's own production of pipe
in accordance with this specifcation may be used if it is derived from the same
resin as used for the relevant production.
3.5 Effects on water quality of pipes intended for the conveyance of water
for human consumption
When used under conditions for which they are designed, materials in contact with
or likely to come into contact with drinking water shall not constitute a toxic hazard,
shall not support microbial growth and shall not give rise to unpleasant taste or
odour, cloudiness or discoloration of the water
The concentrations of substances, chemicals and biological agents leached
from materials in contact with drinking water, and measurements of the relevant
organoleptic / physical parameters, shall not exceed the maximum values
recommended by the World Health Organization in its publication Guidelines for
drinking water quality, Volume 1 Recommendations, or as required by the EEC
Council Directive of 15 July 1980 on the quality of water intended for human
consumption, whichever is the more stringent in each case.
NOTE - Certain additional requirements may apply as required due to local water
quality and safety regulations.
3.6 Designation and classifcation
The compound shall be designated by the material type (e.g.PE 80) conforming to
the applicable level of minimum required strength (MRS) specifed in table 1, when
the lower confdence limit
LCL
for the compound is determined in accordance with
ISO/TR 9080 and this
LCL
is classifed in accordance with ISO 12162 to obtain
the MRS.
The validity of the designation shall be certifed by the compound manufacturer or
in the case of-master-batches by the pipe manufacturer.
The design stress
s
of a pipe shall be obtained by applying a design coeffcient C
of not less than 1,25 to the MRS value for the material.
NOTE - Engineers may wish to apply a greater design coeffcient in accordance with
ISO 12162, depending on operating conditions and environmental considerations.
Table 1 Designation of Material
Designation
of material
MRS at 50 years and 20
o
C
MPa
Maximum allowable hydrostatic
design stress,
s
MPa
PE 100
PE 80
PE 63
PE 40
PE 32
10
8
6,3
4
3,2
8
6,3
5
3,2
2,5
The relationship between MRS and
s
for venous design coeffcients is given in table 2.
Table 2 - Relationship between MRS,
s
, and design coeffcient C at 20
o
C
Hydrostatic design
stress of pipes,
s
MPa
Minimum required strength of material
MPa
10 8 6,3 4 3,2
Design coeffcient, C
8
6,3
5
4
3,2
2,5
1,25
1,6
2
2,5
3,2
-
1,25
1,6
2
2,5
3,2
1,25
1,6
2
2,5
1,25
1,6 1,25
3.7 Melt fow rate and density
The pipe manufacturer shall provide evidence of the density and the melt now rate
of the raw compound.
When measured in accordance with ISO 1133, the melt fow rate shall conform to
the following conditions:
a) the melt fow rate of the compound shall not deviate by more than 30%
from the value specifed by the manufacturer;
b) the change in MFR caused by processing, i.e. the difference between the
measured value for material from the pipe and the measured value for the
compound, shall not be more than 25%.
4 Geometrical characteristics
4.1 Dimensions of pipes: outside diameters, nominal pressures and wall
thicknesses
4.1.1 The dimensions of pipes shall be measured in accordance with ISO 3126.
4.1.2 Nominal outside diameters shall conform to ISO 161-1. The selected
nominal outside diameters and the wall thicknesses in accordance with the
selected nominal pressures are given in table 3 (
s
= 8 MPa), table 4 (
s
=
6,3 MPa), table 5 (
s
= 5 MPa) and table 6 (
s
= 2,5 MPa and 3,2 MPa)
4.1.3 The tolerances on the outside diameters shall be in accordance with ISO
11922-1. as follows:
grade A for normaI-toIerance (NT) pipes
grade B for close-tolerance (CT) pipes
Table 3 - Polyethylene Pipes with a design stress
s
of 8 MPa
Nominal
outside
diameter
d
n
Pipe series
1)
S 8 S 6.3 S 5
Standard Dimension ratio
SDR 17 SDR 13.6 SDR 11
Nominal pressure PN
2)
for
s
= 8 MPa
PN 10 PN 12,5 PN 16
Nominal wall thickness,
n
mm
32
40
50
63
75
90
110
125
140
160
180
200
225
250
280
315
355
400
450
500
560
630
710
800
900
1 000

4,5
5,4
6,6
7,4
8,3
9,5
10,7
11,9
13,4
14,8
16,6
18,7
21,1
23,7
26,7
29,7
33,2
37,4
42,1
47,4
53,3
59,3

4,7
5,6
6,7
8,1
9,2
10,3
11,8
13,3
14,7
16,6
18,4
20,6
23,2
26,1
29,4
33,1
36,8
41,2
46,2
52,2
58,8

3,0
3,7
4,6
5,8
6,8
8,2
10,0
11,4
12,7
14,6
16,4
18,2
20,5
22,7
25,4
28,6
32,2
36,3
40,9
45,4
50,8
57,2

2)
The pipe series number is derived from the ratio
s
/
PMS
, where
s
is the
design stress at 20
o
C and
PMS
, is the maximum allowable operating pressure
of the pipe at 20
o
C.
2)
The nominal pressure PN corresponds to the maximum allowable operating
pressure P
PMS
, in bars, of the pipe at 20
o
C.
Table 4 - Polyethylene pipes with design stress
s
of 6,3 MPa
Nominal
outside
diameter
d
n
Pipe series
1)
S 10 S 8 S 6,3 S 5 S4
Standard dimension ratio
SDR 21 SDR 17 SDR 13.6 SDR 11 SDR 9
Nominal pressure PN
2)
for
s
= 8 MPa
PN 6
3)
PN 8 PN 10 PN 12,5 PN 16
Nominal wall thickness,
n
mm
16
20
25
32
40
50
63
75
90
110
125
140
160
180
200
225
250
280
315
355
400
450
500
560
630
710
800
900
1 000
1 200
1 400
1 600

4,3
5,3
6,0
6,7
7,7
8,6
9,6
10,8
11,9
13,4
15,0
16,9
19,1
21,5
23,9
26,7
30,0
33,9
38,1
42,9
47,7
57,2

4,5
5,4
6,6
7,4
8,3
9,5
10,7
11,9
13,4
14,8
16,6
18,7
21,1
23,7
26,7
29,7
33,2
37,4
42,1
47,4
53,3
59,3

4,7
5,6
6,7
8,1
9,2
10,3
11,8
13,3
14,7
16,6
18,4
20,6
23,2
26,1
29,4
33,1
36,8
41,2
46,3
52,2
58,8



2,3
3,0
3,7
4,6
5,8
6,8
8,2
10,0
11,4
12,7
14,6
16,4
18,2
20,5
22,7
25,4
28,6
32,2
36,3
40,9
45,4
50,8
57,2

2,3
2,3
2,8
3,6
4,5
5,6
7,1
8,4
10,1
12,3
14,0
15,7
17,9
20,1
22,4
25,2
27,9
31,3
35,2
39,7
44,7
50,3
55,8

1)
The pipe series number is derived from the ratio
s
/
PMS
where
s
is the
design stress at 20
o
C and
PMS
is the maximum allowable operating
pressure of the pipe at 20
o
C.
2)
The nominal pressure PN corresponds to the maximum allowable operating
pressure
PMS
, in bars, of the pipe at 20
o
C
3)
For calculation purposes, a nominal pressure of 6.3 bar (0.63 MPa) has
been used.
Table 5 - Polyethylene pipes with a design stress
s
of 5 MPa
Nominal
outside
diameter
d
n
Pipe series
1)
S 16 S 12,5 S 8,3 S 8 S 6,3 S 5 S 4 S 3,2
Standard dimension Ratio
SDR
33
SDR
26
SDR
17,6
SDR
17
SDR
13,6
SDR 11 SDR 9 SDR
7,4
Nominal pressure PN
2)
for
s
= 5 MPa
PN
3,2
PN 4 PN 6 PN 6,3 PN 8 PN 10 PN
12,5
PN 16
Nominal wall thickness,
n
mm
16
20
25
32
40
50
63
75
90
110
125
140
160
180
200
225
250
280
315
355
400
450
500
560
630
710
800
900
1 000
1 200
1 400
1 600

2,3
2,3
2,8
3,4
3,9
4,3
4,9
5,5
6,2
6,9
7,7
8,6
9,7
10,9
12,3
13,8
15,3
17,2
19,3
21,8
24,5
27,6
30,6
36,7
42,9
49,0

2,3
2,3
2,5
2,9
3,5
4,2
4,8
5,4
6,2
6,9
7,7
8,6
9,6
10,7
12,1
13,6
15,3
17,2
19,1
21,4
24,1
27,2
30,6
34,4
38,2
45,9
53,5
61,2

2,3
2,3
2,3
2,9
3,6
4,3
5,1
6,3
7,1
8,0
9,1
10,2
11,4
12,8
14,2
15,9
17,9
20,1
22,7
25,5
28,3
31,7
35,7
40,2
45,3
51,0
56,6

2,3
2,3
2,4
3,0
3,8
4,5
5,4
6,6
7,4
8,3
9,5
10,7
11,9
13,4
14,8
16,6
18,7
21,1
23,7
26,7
29,7
33,2
37.4
42,1
47,4
53,3
59,3

2,3
2,3
2,4
3,0
3,7
4,7
5,6
6,7
8,1
9,2
10,3
11,8
13,3
14,7
16,6
18,4
20,6
23,2
26,1
29,4
33,1
36,8
41,2
46,3
52,2
58,8

2,3
2,3
2,3
2,9
3,7
4,6
5,8
6,8
8,2
10,0
11,4
12,7
14,6
16,4
18,2
20,5
22,7
25,4
28,6
32,2
36,3
40,9
45,4
50,8
57,2

2,3
2,3
2,8
3,6
4,5
5,6
7,1
8,4
10,1
12,3
14,0
15,7
17,9
20,1
22,4
25,2
27,9
31,3
35,2
39,7
44,7
50,3
55,8

2,3
2,8
3,5
4,4
5,5
6,9
8,6
10,3
12,3
15,1
17,1
19,2
21,9
24,6
27,4
30,8
34,2
38,3
43,1
48,5
54,7
61,5

1) The pipe series numbers derived from the ratio


s
/
PMS
where
s
is the design
stress at 20
o
C and
PMS
is the maximum allowable operating pressure of the
pipe at 20
o
C.
2) The nominal pressure PN corresponds to the maximum allowable operating
pressure
PMS
in bars, of the pipe at 20
o
C.
Table 6 - Polyethylene pipes with a design stress
s
of 2,5 MPa and 3,2
MPa
Nominal
outside
diameter
d
n
Pipe series
1)
S 8 S 6,3 S 5 S 4 S 3,2 S 2,5
Standard dimension ratio
SDR 17 SDR
13,6
SDR 11 SDR 9 SDR
7,5
SDR 6
Nominal pressure PN
2)
for
s
= 2,5 MPa
PN 4 PN 6
3)
PN 10
Nominal pressure PN
2)
for
s
= 3,2 MPa
PN 4 PN 6
3)
PN 10
Nominal wall thickness,
n
mm
16
20
25
32
40
50
63
75
90
110

2,3
2,3
2,4
3,0
3,8
4,5
5,4
6,6

2,3
2,3
2,4
3,0
3,7
4,7
5,6
6,7
8,1

2,3
2,3
2,9
3,7
4,6
5,8
6,8
8,2
10,0
2,3
2,3
2,8
3,6
4,5
5,6
7,1
8,4
10,1
12,3
2,3
2,8
3,5
4,4
5,5
6,9
8,6
10,3
12,3
15,1
2,7
3,4
4,2
5,4
6,7
8,3
10,5
12,5
15,0
18,3
1) The pipe series numbers is derived from the ratio
s
/
PMS
where
s
is the
design stress at 20
o
C and
PMS
is the maximum allowable operating
pressure of the pipe at 20
o
C.
2) The nominal pressure PN corresponds to the maximum allowable operating
pressure
PMS
, in bars, of the pipe at 20
o
C.
3) For calculation purposes, a nominal pressure of 6,3 bar (0,63 MPa) has
been used.
4.1.4 The nominal wall thicknesses e
n
in accordance with ISO 4065 ( however,
for reasons of jointing techniques the smallest wall thickness is limited to 2,3 mm)
correspond to the selected nominal pressures given in table 3 (
s
= 8 MPa), table 4
(
s
= 6,3 MPa), Table 5 (
s
= 5 MPa and table 6 (
s
= 2,5 MPa and 3,2 MPa).
The tolerance on the minimum wall thickness permitted at any point e
y
,
min
,
corresponding to the nominal wall thickness e
n
, shall conform to ISO 11922-1
as follows:
grade T for e
y
,
min
< 16mm
grade U for e
y
,
min
> 16 mm
4.2 Ovality
The ovality of pipes at the manufacturer after extrusion but prior to coiling shall
conform to ISO 11922-1, as follows:
grade K for PE 32 and PE 40
grade N for PE 63, Pen 80 and PE 100
The minimum diameter of a drum for coiled pipe shall be 18 x d
n
and in any case
such that kinking of the pipe is prevented.
For coiled pipe, rerounding equipment may be necessary.
4.3 Length of pipe
The length of straight pipes and coils shall be not less than that agreed between
supplier and user.
4.4 Pressure reduction factors for PE pipeline systems for use at
temperature above 20
o
C
Figure 1 and table 7 shall be used for the derivation of reduction factors to apply
to obtain the maximum allowable operating pressure for elevated-temperature
operation of PE pipe and fttings. These are applicable to the supply of water and
other fuids which do not adversely affect the long-term properties of the PE material
at temperature up to 40
o
C. In order to determine the category in which a material
lies (i.e. type A, type B or type C), follow the instructions given in fgure 2.
NOTES:
1) The data used for the graph shown in fgure 1 and those given in table 7 have
been determined using the lowest (i.e. more unfavourable) values, rather than the
best-ft values, in the analysis, in accordance with ISO/TR 9080, of hydrostatic
stress rupture data for commercially available PE resins.
2) Higher factors and hence higher pressures may be applied to a material providing
the analysis in accordance with ISO/TR 9080 demonstrates that less reduction is
applicable.
3) A lifetime of 50 years is used as the basis for the classifcation of material in
accordance with ISO 12162. For long lifetimes, for instance 100 years, it is
necessary to consider to each case individually, taking into account the rules given
ISO/TR 9080. See also ISO 13761.

Temperature
o
C
Figure 1 Pressure reduction factor versus temperature, applicable to a
50-year lifetime
Table 7 Pressure reduction factors at temperature up to 40
o
C, applicable
to a 50-year lifetime
Material
Pressure reduction factor at
20
o
C 25
o
C 30
o
C 35
o
C 40
o
C
Type A 1 0.93 0.87 0.80 0.74
Type B 1 0.90 0.81 0.72 0.62
Type C 1 0.82 0.65 0.47 0.30
For operating temperatures
up to 30
o
C
Knee before
1/2 yr at 80
o
C
Type A
up to 30
o
C
NO NO

Knee before
1 yr at 80
o
C
Type A
up to 40
o
C
For operating temperature
up to 40
o
C
Type B
(PE 100, PE 80, PE 63)
or
Type C
(PE 50, PE 40, PE 32)

Figure 2 - Determination of Type of material


5 Mechanical characteristics
5.1 Hydrostatic strength
When tested in accordance with ISO 1167, the pipes shall conform the requirements
given in table 8.
Table 8 - Hydrostatic strength of pipes
Pipe material
Test stress
MPa
100 h at 20
o
C 165 h
1)
at 80
o
C 1 000 h at 80
o
C
PE 100
PE 80
PE 63
PE 40
PE 32
12,4
9,0
8,0
7,0
6,5
5,5
4,6
3,5
2,5
2,0
5,0
4,0
3,2
2,0
1,5
1) Only britte failures are taken into account (see 5.2).
5.2 Retest in cases of failure at 80C
A brittle fracture in less than 165 h shall constitute a failure.
If, in the 165 h test, a test piece fails in a ductile mode In less than 165 h, a retest shall be
performed at a lower stress. The new test stress, and the new minimum failure time, shall
be selected from the line through the stress time points given in table 9.
6 Physical characteristics
6.1 Thermal stability of pipes manufactured from PE 63, PE 80 and PE 100
When determined in accordance with ISO/TR 10837, the induction time for test
specimens taken from pipes manufactured from PE 63, PE 80 and PE 100 shall be
either at least 20 min when tested at 200
o
C, or an equivalent period when tasted
at 210
o
C, provided the equivalence is supported by a clear correlation between
results obtained at 200
o
C of 210
o
C, respectively. The test specimens shall be taken
from the inside surface of the pipe.
Table 9 - Hydrostatic strength at 80C Retest requirements
PE 32 PE 40 PE 63 PE 80 PE 100
Stress
MPa
Min
failure
time
h
Stress
MPa
Minimum
failure
time
h
Stress
MPa
Min
failure
time
h
Stress
MPa
Min
failure
time
h
Stress
MPa
Min
failure
time
h
2,0
1,9
1,8
1,7
1,6
1,5
165
227
319
456
667
1 000
2,5
2,4
2,3
2,2
2,1
2,0
165
230
323
463
675
1000
3,5
3,4
3,3
3,2
165
285
538
1000
4,6
4,5
4,4
4,3
4,2
4,1
4,0
165
219
283
394
533
727
1000
5,5
5,4
5,3
5,2
5,1
5,0
165
233
332
476
688
1000
-
6.2 Longitudinal reversion
When determined in accordance with ISO 2505-1, method A or B , using one of the
following temperatures, as applicable:
110
o
C + 2
o
C for PE 63, PE 80 and PE 100
or
100
o
C + 2
o
C for PE 32 and PE 40,
and the test times given in ISO 2505-2, the value of the longitudinal reversion shall
not be not greater than 3%.
For pipes with an outside diameter greater than 200 mm, longitudinally cut
segments may be used.
6.3 Weathering of non-black pipes
To determine the effect of weathering, pipes shall be exposed to outdoor conditions
in accordance with the procedure given in annex A.
After exposure to a total solar energy of at least 3,5 GJ/m
2
, the pipe shall conform
to the following requirements:
a) hydrostatic strength, when determined in accordance with 5.1 at 80
o
C for at
least 165h, shall be the minimum required;
b) the elongation at break, when determined in accordance with ISO 6259-1 and
ISO 6259-3, shall not be less than 350%;
c) the induction time, when measured in accordance with ISO/TR 10637 using a
test specimen taken from the outside surface of the pipe,shall be at least 10
min at 200
o
C.
7 Fusion compatibility
If pipes manufactured from PE 63, PE 80 or PE 100 are to be joined by butt
fusion or using electrofusion fttings mixing different pipe materials, the joints shall
conform to the requirements specifed in table 8 (80
o
C/165 h).
Compounds designated PE 63, PE 80 or PE 100 having an MFR (190
o
C/5 kg)
within the range 0,2 g/10 min to 1,3 g/10 min shall be considered compatible for
fusion to each other.
8 Marking
All pipes shall be indelibly marked at maximum intervals of 1 m.
The marking shall indicate at least the following information:
- the manufacturers name and/or trade mark;
- the dimensions (nominal outside diameter x nominal wall thickness);
- the outside-diameter tolerance (A or B);
- the designation of the pipe material (PE 100, PE 80, PE 63, PE 40 Of PE 32);
- the nominal pressure (PN);
- the pipe series (S or SDR) (optional);
- the production period (date or code);
- the number of this International Standard.

The word water may also be included if the pipes is intended for drinking
water.
Annex A
(normative)
Procedure for exposure to outdoor weathering
7)
A.1 Exposure aspects and site
Test racks and specimen fxtures shall be made from inert materials which will
not affect test results. When non-corrosive aluminum alloys, stainless steel or
ceramics have been have been found suitable. Brass, steel or copper not be used
in the vicinity of test specimens. The test site shall be equipped with instruments
to record the energy received and the ambient temperature.
The equipment shall be capable of supporting specimens of pipe such that the
exposed surface of the specimen is at 45
o
to the horizontal, facing towards the
equator. Normally, the exposure site shall be on open ground away from trees
and buildings. For exposure in the northern hemisphere, no obstruction, including
adjacent range in an easterly, southerly or westerly direction shall subtend
a vertical angle greater than 20
o
, or in a north direction greater than 45
o
. For
exposure in the southern hemisphere, corresponding provisions apply.
A.2 Test specimens
The test specimens shall be approximately 1 m long. They shall be selected
from the thinnest-wall pipes with random range of diameters. The batch of pipes
from which the specimens are selected shall conform to a requirements of this
International Standard.
A.3 Procedure
Mark each pipe specimen to identify it, and record the mounting position of each.
Expose the specimens to a total solar energy of at least 3,5 GJ/m
2
.
Then remove the specimens and test them in accordance with the provisions of
6.3. Where the specimen that tested includes only part of the pipe cross-section,
e.g. a tensile dumb-bell or part of the surface layer, it shall be taken from the
weathered crown of the exposed specimen.
___________
7
For additional information, see ISO 4607
PHILIPPINE WATER WORKS ASSOCIATION
Plastic Pipe Sub-Committee
Chairperson Vice-Chairman
1 Ana Marie A. Rojas 2 Rawlinson B. Dimayuga
Philaqua Consultants. Inc. Test Consultants, Inc.
Members
Associations:
3 Rafael P. Guevara 10 Nestor G. Lualhati
PVC Manufacturers Associations Metropolitan Waterworks and
of the Philippines Sewer age Sy s t em


Government Agencies: 11 Jesus N. Ramos
Joey V. Mamuyac
4 Serafn M. Garcia F.F. Cruz and Company
Department of Interior and Local Government
Professional Institution:
5 Lamberto L. Abrecea
Department of Public Works and Highways 12 Cesar L. Madriaga
Philippine Society of Sanitary
6 Anselmo L. Sang Tian Engineer
Butuan City Water District
Testing Institution
7 Nilda B. Adao
Bureau of Product Standards 13 Francisco A. Milan III
Industrial Technology Development
Consumers: institute

8 Rolando C. Palac Manufacturers:
Aramis A. de Leon
Manila Water Company, Inc. 14 Joel J. Delicana
Melvin G. Narvasa
9 Elmer S. Ceguera Liberty Commodities Corporations
Myrna R. Pedron
Maynilad Water Services, Inc. 15 Nathaniel M. Lapida
Lourdes M. Lacerna
Moldex Products, Inc.
16 Antonio W. Lim
Hydropipes Phils., Inc./ Hobas Phils., Inc
Secretariat
Philippines Water Works Association
Polyethylene (PE) Pipe Group
Team Leadership Assistant Team Leadership
1 Joel J. Delicana 2 Pat I. Hernandez
Liberty Commodities Corporations Jhaymarts Corporation
Members
3 Eugene G. Dolorito 6 Ruel F. Abila
Plastic City Industrial Corporation Lourdes M. Lacerna
Moldex Products, Inc.
4 Armando H. Julva
Atlanta Industries, Inc. 7 Ramon R. Pastor
Italit Construction & Development
5 Juanito N. Mercado Corporation
Good Year Steel Pipe Corporation
8 Nilda B. Adao
Bureau of Product Standards

MONDAY, July 23, 2012 | B9
(MST-July 23, & 30, 2012)
BPS
BUREAU OF PRODUCT STANDARDS
your partner in product quality and safety
_____________________________________________
The use of the PS Certifcation Mark is governed by the provisions of
Department Administrative Order No. 01 series of 1997 Revised Rules
and Regulations Concerning the Philippine Standard (PS) Quality and / or
Safety Certifcation Mark Scheme by the Bureau of Product Standards.
This mark on a product/container is an assurance by the manufacturer/
producer that the product conforms with the requirements of a Philippine
standard. Details of conditions under which a license to use the PS
Certifcation Mark may be granted can be obtained from the Bureau of
Product Standards, Department of Trade and Industry, 361 Sen. Gil J.
Puyat Avenue, Makati City.
Type A
Type B
Type C
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ManilaStandar dTODAY
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
JULY 23, 2012 MONDAY
B10
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
Manila Standard TODAY
Provinces
Edited by Leo A. Estonilo www.manilastandardtoday.comleoestonilo@gmail.com
Autonomy drive comes full circle
Cebu Park District rising
SALUD Express health lane launched
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
UNIVERSITY OF THE PHILIPPINES MANILA
The Health Sciences Center
Taft Avenue, Manila
Tel. # 554-8400 loc. 3025/3026; 526-4359
e-mail Address: bac1.upm@gmail.com
INVITATION TO BID
(MST-July 23, 2012)
1. The University of the Philippines Manila (UPM) hereby invites UPM-PGH registered
suppliers and interested parties to participate in the bidding for the supply of the following
commodities as funded by UPM and PGH Fund 164, 184, and 648-101:
Description Contract Duration Approved
Budget
Dropping/Opening
until 9:00 AM
/10:00 AM
Supply of Motor Vehicle, Pick
Up Truck (Double Cab)
Single Bid only 1,800,000.00 20 August 2012
Suppl y of 2 uni ts Motor
Vehicle,(SUV)
Single Bid only 2,400,000,00 20 August 2012
Medical Supplies for Cath
Lab (Direct Contracting)
September 2012-
August2013
26.021,108.65 20 August 2012
Various Equipment for MRL Single Bid only 791,100.00 20 August 2012
2. Interested parties not registered with UPM-PGH can secure application for registration
at the BAC 1 Secretariat, Purchasing Offce, PGH, any time during offce hours.
3. Prospective bidders should have undertaken a similar project within the last two (2) years
amounting to at least 50% of Approved Budget for the Contract. The Eligibility Check/
Screening as well as the Preliminary Examination of Bids shall use non-discretionary
"pass/fail criteria. Post-qualifcation of the lowest calculated responsive bid shall be
conducted.
4. All particulars relative to Eligibility Statement and Screening, Bid Security, Performance
Security, Pre-Bidding Conference, Evaluation of Bids, Post-Qualifcation and Award of
Contract shall be governed by the pertinent provisions of R.A. 9184 and its Implementing
Rules and Regulations.
5. Application for Eligibility and bidding documents containing general conditions and
specifcations including the schedule of pre-bid conference shall be issued starting 23
July 2012 at the PGH Purchasing Offce any time during offce hours upon payment of
a non-refundable amount to be determined upon issuance to the UP Manila Cashiers
Offce. A Pre-bid Conference is scheduled on 06 August 2012, 10:00 o'clock in the
morning at the Bidding Room, Purchasing Offce, PGH.
6. Sealed bids in duplicate copies of the respective commodities shall be received on or
before 9:00 A.M. of 20 August 2012, at the UP Manila nternal Audit Offce, 8
th
Floor,
Central Block Building. PGH, Manila. Late bids will not be accepted.
7. Sealed bids will be opened on 20 August 2012 at 10:00 A.M. at the Bidding Room,
Purchasing Offce, 2
nd
Floor, Right Service Wing Bldg., near Ward 8, Philippine General
Hospital, Taft Avenue, Manila by the Bids and Awards Committee I in the presence of
the attending bidders.
8. The University of the Philippines Manila hereby reserves the right to reject any/and or
all proposals, or to waive any formality therein and/or accept the bids or not to make an
award as may be considered most advantageous to UP Manila.
9. For further information, prospective bidders may call the BAC - 1 Secretariat and look
for Mrs. Taresita T. Venturina at Tel. Nos, (02) 554-8400. local 2257, 2250.
(Sgd.) Dean VICENTE O.MEDINA, III, D.DM, Ph.D.,
Chair, Bids and Awards Committee I
REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES
NATIONAL CAPITAL JUDICIAL REGION
REGIONAL TRIAL COURT
BRANCH 173-MANILA
IN THE MATTER OF CORRECTION
OF ENTRY IN THE BIRTH CERTIFICATE
OF CARNATION C. ENCARNACION that
her gender in her Certifcate of birth
particularly entry No. 2 thereof be corrected
from male to female
CARNATION ENCARNACION y CO.
Petitioner.
- versus - SP. PROC NO. 11-126218
THE LOCAL CIVIL REGISTRAR OF
MANILA, NATIONAL STATISTICS
OFFICE, and all other persons who
may have any claim or interest,
Respondents.
x ----------------------------------------------x
O R D E R
Through a veri fi ed peti ti on, peti ti oner CARNATION
ENCARNACION y CO thru counsel, seek to correct the entry in
her Certifcate of Live Birth to appear as, to wit:
FROM TO
MALE FEMALE
Finding the petition to be suffcient in form and substance
the hearing of this petition is hereby set on August 13, 2012 at
2:00 o'clock in the afternoon. All interested parties are hereby
notifed of the said hearing and are ordered to show cause why
the petition should not be granted.
Let copy of this Order be published, at the expense of the
petitioner, once a week for three (3) consecutive weeks in a
newspaper of general circulation to be selected by raffe purcuant
to P.D. 1079.
Furnish the Offce of the Solicitor General and the Civil Registrar
of Manila with the copies of the petition and of this Order.
SO ORDERED.
Manila Philippines, September 26, 2011
(Sgd.) ARMANDO A. YANGA
Judge (MST-July 16, 23 & 30, 2012)
LEGAZPI CITYAlbay
Governor Joey Salceda
led the launch of SALUD
Express for maternal and
child care, a key componeent
of the provinces millenium
development goal for health.
Some 147 representatives
from transport groups, health
providers and facilities, and
national and local government
health ofces, pledged support
to the cause and signed an
agreement.
Salceda said SALUD
Express, coined from the
Spanish word for health, would
function under the strategy
of Whole of government,
Whole of Society for MDG
achievement.
Board Member Herbert
Borja, chairman of the
Committee on Health of the
Sangguniang Panlalawigan,
led the July 11 launch.
A l b a y s
maternal death
rate of 58 for
every 100,000
child-bearing
mothers was
below the
national rate of
221, Salceda
noted.
S A L U D
Express is
supported by
the United Nations Population
Fund and the Private Sector
Mobilization for Family
Health Project Phase 2 under
the Maternal and Neonatal
Child Health and Nutrition
strategy.
Albay had attained its MDG
targets last year, ahead of
the 2015 global
deadline. Such
performance in
MDG can only be
sustained if the
entire community
and the whole
g o v e r n m e n t
ma c h i n e r y - -
local, national,
civilian and
mi l i t a r ya r e
e f f e c t i v e l y
mobilized, Salceda said.
He said program organizers
see the transport groups as key
players in propagating and
disseminating information
on health programs such as
immunization, prenatal care,
and family planning, among
others.
The group can also play
a key role in the SALUD
EXPRESS priority lane,
providing a faster, safer
and convenient transport to
patients to medical clinics,
especially in emergency cases,
he added.
The launch was attended
by representatives from
the Center for Health
Development, Department
of Labor and Employment,
Land Transformation
Franchising and Regulatory
Board, Land Transportation
Ofce, and the Maritime
Industry Authority.
By Dexter A. See

BAGUIO CITYTo Mountain
Province Governor Leonard Mayaen
and his fellow executives, the clamor
for autonomy has come full circle 25
years later in the term President Benigno
Aquino III, reckoning his mother, the
late President Corazon Aquino and
the late rebel leader Conrado Balweg
signed a pact that shaped the Cordillera
Aministrative Region.
Leaders here renewed their call
on the palace to certify counter-
part bills in Congress to realize a
full-edged autonomous entity.
The silver jubilation was high-
lighted by the turnover of the
unity gong by Apayao Rep.
Eleanor Bulut-Begtang and Gov.
Elias Bulut Jr. to Baguio City
Mayor Mauricio Domogan to
renew the call for self-determi-
nation.
The gong symbolizes the re-
gions unity because it is played
in chants, dances and festivals in
the different tribes in the high-
land.
Regional director John Cas-
taneda, of the Cordillera ofce
of the Department of the Interior
and Local Government, said the
gong travelled around 1,500 ki-
lometers around the region in a
peace relay to symbolize the one-
ness of indigenous people in their
desire to adnimister their affairs
particlarly over their resources
that have long served other re-
gions in the lawlands.
The Cory administration is-
sued Executive Order 220 on
July 15, 1987 to create the CAR
composed of Abra, Benguet and
Mountain Province and Baguio
City from Region I and Ifugao,
Kalinga and Apayao from Re-
gion II under Section 15 Article
10 of the Constitution.
During the CAR foundation
day program held at the Bagu-
io Convention Center Sunday,
Rep. Begtang, Bulut, Domogan,
Benguet Gov. Nestor Fongwan,
Ifugao Gov. Eugene Balitang,
Mayaen and Kalinga Acting Gov.
Allen Jesse Mangaoang made a
common appeal for unity.
We want our region intact in
case we become autonomous so
that we will be able to preserve
and protect our distinct although
diverse culture and traditions,
Bulut told Manila Standard.
Fongwan said grassroots con-
sultations in 13 towns were under
way with emphasis on the pros
and cons of autonomy.
Balitang challenged Cordil-
lerans to have the wisdom that
Ifugaoes possess since they are
just awaiting the schedule of the
plebiscite for the approved au-
tonomy law and they will go for
it.
Mayaen said Mountain Prov-
ince is the center of the Cordillera
where historic events that led to
the creation of CAR emanated,
recalling the Aquino-Balweg
peace pact was signed at Mount
Data Hotel in Mount Data, Bau-
ko town.
CEBU CITYAyala Land
predient Tony Aquino, also
Cebu Holdings chairman, said
a live-work-play positioning
is the game-changing key to the
primacy of Cebu IT Park and
Cebu Business Park rolled into
one mixed-used hub.
Given that both commercial
squares are geographically
aligned and strategically
located at the heart of the city,
addressing them as a single
destination will solidify and
strengthen their potential as
business centers, he said.
Mirroring the synergy of both
parks will practically provide
a larger environment for BPOs
and even for other businesses
that will spur growth in the
region.
With an expected 20 percent
increase in the 50,000 workforce,
the business parks, among the
most sought-after addresses in the
region, are being amalgamated
to be addressed as the Cebu
Park District with ALI and
Cebu Holdings at the forefront
of a P10-billion redelopment
project.
With the rising number of
commercial conglomerates,
Cebu Park District is further
bolstering its urban convenience,
thus, more CBD developments
and amenities must be endowed,
according to Aquino.
There is already an existing
lifestyle destination in the
areaAyala Center Cebu, he
said. This dening lifestyle
centerpiece is set to expand in
the coming years, not only in
terms of shopping, dining and
entertainment, but even with
residential towers and hotel that
will be integrated in its overall
masterplan.
Aquino living space makes the
Cebu Park District worth calling
it home for good.
Only Ayala Land Premier
managed to integrate its
residential tower, 1016
Residences, in City Sports
Club Cebu while Alveo Lands
Solinea complements Cebus
resort vibe by having stylish
living spaces and well-appointed
amenities, he said. Avida,
on the other hand, furthers the
living options through a multi-
tower residential complex that
are in close proximity to the
business and lifestyle centers in
the district.
Cebu Park District is also
bringing open and lush breathing
spaces to provide places to
relax and to highlight the
developments family-friendly
impressions amid the usually
busy setting of a cityscape.
Smart list-up. Smart Communications donated over P700,000 worth of prepaid load cards as the Parish
Pastoral Council for Responsible Voting-Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao Coalition, accredited by
the Commission on Elections as its Citizens Arm for the new general voters registration held in the region,
following the annulment of the ARMM Book of Voters. The group used mobile phones to monitor 1,056
registration centers to cover two million registrants. Smart Consumer Division Head Noel Lorenzana (2nd
from right) joins PPCRV National Chairman Henrietta de Villa during the turnover witnessed by lawyer
. Rene Baez (left), Smarts administration and materials management head with Mon Isberto, Smarts
Public Affairs chief.
Education Secretary Br. Armin
Luistro FSC said a series of mall
exhibits to raise awareness on
the K-to-12 curriculum reform
program starting next week.
With the interactive exhibit,
we hope the public would
understand how our GO!
Education program could help
provide solutions to increase
the competency of our public
school teachers, improve our
basic education curriculum to
be at par with global standards
and build more classrooms and
other learning facilities with the
help of both public and private
partners, he said.
The department has partnered
with the Australian Agency for
International Development, United
States Agency for International
Development and the Philippine
Business for Education for the
exhibit which will also visit SM
Davao, SM Cebu, SM Manila, SM
Bacoor, SM Pampanga, SM Iloilo
and SM Mall of Asia after its launch
in SM North on July 27.
The exhibit will be divided into
three walk-through sections. Go!
Teachers! tackles the problems,
existing policies and solutions
to produce highly competent
teachers; Go! K to 12! offers a
look at the new basic education
curriculum and what it aims to
achieve while Go! Classroom!
talks about addressing the
problem of classroom shortages,
other school infrastructure and
sanitation facilities.
During the exhibit kick-off,
GO! Education ambassadors
will expound on the features and
benets of the K-to-12 program.
Public school teacher Lou
Sabrina Ongkiko of the Culiat
Elementary School in Quezon City
will talk about teacher training,
mother of ve Peachie Flaviano
will answer parents concerns on
the two additional years of high
school while Education Assistant
Regional Director Diosdado San
Antonio will discuss how the
government promotes the public-
private partnership scheme to
build much needed classrooms.
K-to-12
exhibit
to open
New building. House Assistant Minority Leader and Leyte 1st district Rep. Ferdinand Martin FM
Romualdez (4th left) is joined by Barangay Chairman Reynaldo Creer (5th left) at the inauguration of
the Barangay Tugop Multipurpose Building worth P700,000.00 in Tanuan together with District Engineer
Angel Sia, Councilor Edith Govenciong, Councilor Ina Jimenez and other ofcers. VER S. NOVENO
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
Lush
GOES
color
#lovemy
Manila Standard TODAY
fashion beauty health wellness
standardlifestyle@gmail.com
W
H
A
T

S
I
N
S
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D
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Gianna Maniego, Editor
Dinna Chan Vasquez, Assistant Editor
JULY 23, 2012 MONDAY
C1
CLEOPATRAS
BEAUTY SECRETS
YoucanuseDeadSeamud,
saidtobelegendarybeauty
Cleopatrasbeautysecret, to
achieveradiant skin.
THIS piece shows the seemingly
stark contrast between two events
I recently attended, although both
were pleasantly engaging and de-
nitely a fun way to spend leisure
hours after a very long day!
Old friends
Oliver Goldsmith, an Anglo-Irish
author best known for his novel, The
Vicar of Wakeeld, once said, I love
everything thats old - old friends, old
times, old manners, old books, old
wine.
Something old, something new
Our class picture(seated, from left) Ginny
Banaag, Cynthia Serrano, Peggy Angeles, Malu
Francisco, Melvyn Cruz; (standing, from left) Raffy
Camus, BobZ and David de Padua
Malu tackling her nth crustacean
(check pile of empty shells beside
her), as Raffy looks on.
Some members of the former Hyatt Regency Sales Team,
(from left) BobZ, Malu, Peggy, Raffy, Cynthia, Ginny, and
Melvyn) getting ready to feast on home-cooked delights.
Neptunes bounty
Malu demonstrates how to burn
off calories, with her rib-tickling
upper body exercises
Leading the ribbon-cutting ceremony to formally open
Robinsons Land Corporations newest ventures are (from
left) RLC director, vice chairman and chief executive
ofcer Lance Gokongwei, Tacloban City councilor
Cristina Gonzales-Romualdez, the father of Tacloban,
former Tacloban City mayor Bejo Romualdez, Tacloban
City mayor Alfred Romualdez, RLC president and chief
operating ofcer Frederick Go and Robinsons Malls
general manager Arlene Magtibay.
(Standing, from left) Robinsons
Land Corporations Ditas Taleon,
Lulay Alano, Melody Joson and
Marigold Garcia with (seated
from left) Frederick Go, Grace Lee
and councilor Cristina Gonzales-
Romualdez.
(From left) The father
of Tacloban, former
Tacloban City mayor
Bejo Romualdez, Arlene
Magtibay, Maria Lolita
Mate and RLC vice
president Lulay Alano
Well, not too long ago, I had a most wonderful Satur-
day evening with old friends, reminiscing on old times,
observing old manners, while sipping old wine. It was the
birthday dinner of Peggy Angeles at
her well-entrenched abode in Pasig,
strategically perched on a hillside,
overlooking a glittering section of the
metropolis. Aside from Peggy, I was
with Melvyn Cruz, Ginny Banaag,
David de Padua, Cynthia Serrano,
Raffy Camus, and Malu Francisco.
There were only eight of us that
night, all former members of the Sales
Team of the defunct Hyatt Regency
Manila, but it seemed like there were
a hundred, as boisterous laughter re-
verberated non-stop in Peggys living
room and dining room. This is actually
expected every time we, former Hyatt
colleagues, get together. Recalling all
the fun times we had while trying to
sell every single room of the hotel dur-
ing those extremely challenging years
of the Aquino assassination, never fail
to spark a laughing frenzy.
Of course, it also helped that Peg-
gy served us super-yummy home
cooked dinner t for royalty! The
caloric spread was made even
more sinful with to-die-for des-
sert that had us all craving for more.
There was just so much to eat, so
much fun, so much to talk about
we even forgot to trick Peggy into
admitting her age, but then again,
that would have been an exercise in
futility.
New leisure spot
Bustling Tacloban city
is now catching up with
the rest of the Visayas in
becoming a commercial
and tourism hub, and that
could be the reason why
Robinsons Land Corpora-
tion (RLC) inaugurated
Robinsons Place Taclo-
bans The Annex and its
gohotels.ph Tacloban, the
easy-on-the-pocket lo-
cal hotel chain thats now
becoming popular among
budget travelers.
To formally open both
establishments, a ribbon-
cutting ceremony was
held, presided over by
RLC president and chief
executive ofcer Fred-
erick Go, director, vice-
chairman, and deputy
chief executive ofcer
Lance Gokongwei, and
Tacloban mayor Alfred
Romualdez who was ac-
companied by his bride
Cristina, and former Ta-
cloban mayor Bejo Ro-
mualdez.
The new leisure spot
houses international brand
boutiques, specialty stores
and dining outlets, plus cin-
emas, including the citys
first 3D theater. On the other
hand, the 98-room gohotels.
ph offers affordable, safe,
clean accommodations for
the busy traveler.
----------O----------
YOUR WEEKEND
CHUCKLE:
YAWN: The only time
a married man ever gets
to open his mouth without
consequences.
----------O----------
For feedback, Im at
bobzozobrado@gmail.com
By Dinna Chan Vasquez
On July 21, Lush launched its rst proper foray into the
cosmetic world with 30 shades spread across three catago-
ries --liquid lipstick, cream eyeshadow and liquid eye liners.
As you all know, Lush is strongly opposed to ani-
mal testing and all products within the cosmetic line
are vegan. All the products have virtually no preserva-
tives, said Ida Cruz, Stores Specialists Inc. merchan-
dising manager for Lush during the Philippine media
launch of the collection.
Emotional Br illiance
The novel idea behind the cosmetics line, which is
called Emotional Brilliance, is that it uses color and key
words to be describe how we are currently feeling. The
line is less about wearing makeup thats in-season or
someone elses vision of whats on trend. Emotional Bril-
liance works as a way to wear something thats designed
for you - you choose colors and words that are signicant
to you and your needs and you wear them to get that point
across. Its the power of suggestion its enough that you
believe in it, you will then start to behave a certain way.
Spin the Emotional Brilliance Colour Wheel to get
your personalized color reading--you choose the three
colors that stand out to you at that time and these colors
are linked to certain words that reveal a little bit about
your current state of mind.
For instance, I chose Passionate, a fuchsia; Believe, a
reddish fuchsia; and Strong, a re engine red. It is not
surprising that all three are lipsticks.
According to Rowena Bird, Lush co-founder and in-
ventor of Emotional Brilliance, the order in which you
choose the colours reveals your current state of mind.
1. Your rst color choice symbolises your strength or
weakness;
2. Your second resonates with your primary subcon-
scious need;
3. Your third choice represents your talent, the thing
t h a t will help you to achieve that subconscious need.
I love lipstick, but why wasnt one great color ever
enough, why was I drawn to a particular one on different
days or even sometimes feel the need to change colour
part way through a day? After chatting with like mind-
ed lipstick junkies, it struck us that it wasnt about what
clothes we were wearing but more about how we were
feeling and so the idea was born, said Bird.
Lush has worked with renowned Harley Street strate-
gic behavioral therapist Lady Kennedy, who specializes
in changing peoples behaviour and attitudes, for the list
of words. They are words Kennedy uses in her therapy
session to alter perceptions and change behaviour. She
specializes in mind care and working on your emotional
state, where she takes someone from one state of mind
and delivers them in another. The Emotional Brilliance
range brings this form of exclusive mind therapy to the
High Street through the art of color.
Liquid Lips uses a super softening base, which is a simple
blend of organic jojoba oil, candelilla wax and rose wax. All
are intensely skin softening and soothing and they also carry
pigment incredibly well. Lips will be brilliantly colored and
left soft, smooth and deeply moisturized.
Clever packaging
Independent and Fantasy are the two Liquid Eyeliners
in the range that have a no-smudge, stay put formula. As
soon as you apply, the formula sets and is incredibly long
lasting. Its made with a base of eyebright infusion, which
is a herb with an ancient tradition of use for the eyes.
The other eyeliners are made with the same base as the
cream eyeshadows, which doesnt set straight away so
you have time to blend. These beautiful colors are there-
fore easy to use to create a softer look if required. The
eyecreams can be bold and colourful or less dramatic as
the base softens easily into the skin. The base is a sooth-
ing rose petal infusion and skin-softening almond and jo-
joba oils, so will really care for this most sensitive area.
Theres also glycerine to help carry the color beautifully
over the eye. The cupuacu butter helps to set the colour
pigment nicely, so these eyeshadows and eyeliners offer
beautiful colour that stays in place and lasts and lasts.
The Emotional Brilliance line arrives in clear
glass bottles with no additional packaging. Every-
thing is recyclable except for the brush. The bot-
tles are also much larger than the typical cosmetic
container which typically hold 2g of product, while
Lush gives a generous 8g of product.
There are four supplementary products to com-
plete the line and collectively, they are known as
Desert Island. Skin Tints are cream-based highlight-
ers/bronzers that can be mixed in with moisturizer
or used on its own; Emotional Brilliance Translucent
Powder is a smooth translucent powder that will
instantly set foundation, soak up oil and prevent
eye makeup from smudging; while Eyes Right
Mascara is a gentle, natural-looking mascara
that comes in the cutest little vial.
In the Philippines, Lush is exclusively dis-
tributed by Stores Specialists Inc. and is lo-
cated at Glorietta 4, Shangri-La Plaza Mall,
Greenbelt 3, Mall of Asia, and Bonifacio
High Street, TriNoma, SM the Block,
Alabang Town Center. You may
also visit www.lush.com.ph
YOU will know you are near a Lush store when you
smell it. Whether you love or hate that smell, there
is no doubt that this British beauty company, which
offers handmade bath and body and skin care
products, is a brand that cannot
be ignored.
HAIR CARE
FOR REAL WOMEN
Youdont havetobea
supermodel tohavebeautiful
andhealthyhair, thanksto
Dovesno-nonsenseapproach
tobeauty.
FULL
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
ANSWER
TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE
ANSWER TOMORROW
63 __ Fine Day: 1963
hit
64 *Deltas aptly named
monthly
66 Fly the coop
67 Stud
68 Assays
69 Like some looks
70 Put up
71 Sorority letters
Down
1 River of Tuscany
2 Joanie Loves Chachi
co-star
3 Hearer of final appeals
4 __Kosh BGosh
5 Comeback
6 Go to and fro
7 Post-op program
8 Maine campus town
9 Promotes
10 Immigrants subj.
11 Excessive
12 I nvasi ve Japanese
vine
13 Prevent legally
18 What ad libbers ignore
22 Overabundance
24 Star
Across
1 Loathe
6 Poke into
11 Blue Hawaii prop
14 Rear
15 Hous t on hoc k ey
team
16 Frat letters
17 *Pl ace f or af t er -
dinner courses
LOS ANGELES
TIMES
CROSSWORD
19 Banned pesticide
20 Magic show reaction
21 Lots
22 Omert author
23 Mystery wri ter John
Dickson __
25 *Repress
27 Double-__: puzzle type
30 German pronoun
31 When many Lyon Lions
are born
32 Brownish purple
35 Certain commuters aid
39 Utter
40 See 33- Down, and
word t hat can precede
the end of the answers to
starred clues
42 Grinder
43 Uncredited actor
45 Yani Tsengs org.
46 Ho me o f Mi a mi
University
47 Neighbor of Leb.
49 Neverending
51 *Skating exhibitions
56 Fertile Crescent land
57 Musty
58 Butter sources
60 American rival: Abbr.
26 My country, __...
27 Horn, for one
28 Gravy thickener
29 Ringlet
33 Wi t h a nd a nd
40-Across, emi ssi ons-
reducing method whose
first word (this answer)
can follow the start of the
answers to starred clues
34 Sidle
36 Burger follower
37 Nessun dorma, e.g.
38 Combine, as assets
41 Using (up)
44 Fireplace powder
48 Chair on a porch
50 Fake
51 Fan club focuses
52 Towpath locale
53 Shes not for you
54 What di d I do t o
deserve this?
55 Poison plant
59 Harangue
61 Architectural pier
62 More, to a minimalist
64 El l e, ac r os s t he
Atlantic
65 Bit of a snore?
MONDAY C2
JULY 23, 2012
Gianna Maniego, Editor
Dinna Chan Vasquez, Assistant Editor
ManilaStandardToday
#lovemy
standardlifestyle@gmail.com
fashion beauty health wellness
Jericho Cosmetics Dead Sea mineral
contents replenish skins nutrients
and revive its youthful glow.
WOMEN the world over
look up to iconic beauties
for their awless looks.
When it comes to awless
skin, Filipinas can take a
cue from Egypts legendary
Queen Cleopatr a, who has
famously set the standards
for regal beauty.
Legend has it iconic
beauty relied on minerals
from the Dead Sea, for her
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Jericho Cosmetics is sold
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By Dinna Chan Vasquez
THERE are about 177 hair care brands in the
Philippines. In 2011, there were 292 new hair
advertisements. Some 18 television commer-
cials were being aired every day, all promising
long, straight and silky hair.
Dove Hair brand manager Car lo Isla points out that a survey
showed that 19 percent of women are not satised with their hair.
The real
skinny
bitch
for real
WOMEN
"Hair problems of women include damage, brittleness, frizz and limp-
ness," says Isla.
Dove takes pride in being the brand of choice of real women. Dove
Hair's new TVC showing a short-haired Angel Jacob is proof of this.
Jacob, a model and actress, sports very short hair and is of a certain age.
Isla says Dove Hair Care focuses more on developing their prod-
ucts to give women from different walks of life what they need to
feel beautiful. To continue its mission of providing superior care
to womens locks, Dove Hair got real ladies who excel in different
elds as they bear witness to the brands latest breakthrough.
Some of the ladies who attest to the brands promise are lawyer Karen
Jimeno, Project Pink founder Lara Melissa de Leon Joseph, and nutri-
onist Nadine Tengco.
This is the product that really works and you dont have to use so
much time just to make your hair beautiful, says Jimeno, whose bad hair
habit is leaving the house with her hair wet.
My hair is important to me, so it is also important that I choose the
right product, says Joseph,
a breast cancer survivor.
When I rst got the
call, I thought to myself,
Is my hair that bad?,
Tengco says with a laugh,
But after trying it, Ill
denitely continue using
it because I get quality
without the price tag.
Amazing products
Adding to the list of
real women who have ex-
perienced Dove Hair are
entrepreneur Kai Lim,
StartART project founder
and artist Nikki Luna, Mercato Centrale founder Vanessa Ledesma,
business development manager Amanda Lapus, health advocate Isa-
bel Roces, image enhancement speaker Patty Betita, Philippine Tatler
editor-at-large Mia Borromeo, accessories designer Nicole Whisen-
hunt, triathlete Ani de Leon, stylist Bea Constantino, DJ Delamar
Arias and Youtube sensation Ashley Rivera aka Petra Mahalimuyak.
There are many things to love about Dove Hair products.
The new Dove Damage
Therapy shampoo has patent-
ed micro moisture serum and
ber actives that penetrate
porous hair and strengthen
the hair strands from within
unlike other products on the
market that work only on the
surface. Isla likened other
hair products to vulcanizing
a at tire, which is a tempo-
rary measure.
"We are the only brand in
the world that goes inside the
hair and heals it from the in-
side, he explains.
The new Dove Damage
Therapy daily treatment condi-
tioner is an intense nourishing
conditioner that reconstructs
hair deep inside and prevents
split ends and breakage.
It effectively nourishes the
hair to bring back its moisture,
leaving it looking healthy, soft
and smooth, without weighing
it down," says Isla.
By Ed Biado
WHEN her Sports
Illustrated cover
came out in Febru-
ary, America fell in
loveand lust
with Kate Upton.
Suddenly, she was the
model of the moment.
What made her stand out
is the fact that shes a little
curvier than other models
today and is much like a
pinup girl from decades
past. Her thriving modeling
career is certainly a refresh-
ing and welcome development.
For women, she repre-
sents a healthy body im-
age (which is something
lacking in the fashion/
modeling world) and, for
men, she personies an
intimate fantasy come to
life (because its a widely accepted fact that
guys dont want their ladies to be stick-thin).
But early last month,an anonymous blogger
who goes by the pseudonym Skinny Gurl
posted an entry on www.skinnygossip.com that
spoke unkindly of Upton. She lamented, Has
fashion become this? Well we know it hasnt,
so lets not pretend this is fashion, pertaining
to a recent runway show that featured Upton
in a bikini. She looks thick, vulgar, almost
pornographicand she is a solid 30 lbs too
heavy for this outt.
The blog compared Upton to a cow, called
her a little piggie and said the model, who
stands 5-foot-11 and measures 36-25-34,
had huge thighs, no waist, big fat oppy
boobs [and] terrible body denition, which
made her look lazy [and] lardy. The post
ended with, This girl belongs deep in the
gutter of American commercialismso
dont get any crazy ideas about her being a
fashion model, OK?
People like Skinny Gurl are precisely the
reason that our generation is so obsessed with
dieting and extreme weight loss. Her blog has
eating disorder written all over it (Starving
Tips of the Day, really?). In her own twisted
mind, beauty is synonymous to hungry and
emaciated, preferably less than 90 lbs.
Reading her most recent blog entry, Some
Changes, shed some light on her disturbing
points of view. Turns out, Skinny Gurl is a
thin person who was so frustrated by people
telling her how thin she was. And based on her
personal observations, no one is telling over-
weight people how fat they were. She called
this a double standard and that made her up-
set. Her response was to create a blog to call
out and insult everyone who does not t her
crazy denition of beauty.
So this is all because of her own insecuri-
ties and her own body issues? What the hell,
Skinny Gurl? Step away from the keyboard
and go see your shrink for an emergency
session right away. And please do grab a
Big Mac on your way out. You need to eat.
Lawyer Karen Jimeno
Hair
Amanda Lapus
care
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
JULY 23, 2012 MONDAY
C3
Classifeds
ManilaStandardToday
adv.mst@gmail.com
Page Compositor: Diana Keyser Punzalan
Republic of the Philippines
Department of Public Works and Highways
OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT ENGINEER
Misamis Occidental 2
nd
District Engineering Offce
Tangub City
(MST-July 23, 2012)
I NVI TATI ON TO BI D
The Bids and Awards Committee (BAC) of the Misamis Occidental 2
nd

District Engineering Offce, Tangub City, invites contractors to apply to bid
for the projects:
Contract ID : 12KJ0049
Name of Project : Rehab/Reconstruction/Upgrading of Damaged
Paved National Road
Location : Ozamiz-Pagadian Road K1687+600-K1688+000
Brief Description : Upgrade to Concrete (280mm)
Approved Budget For the Contract : P 6,097,420.00
Contract Duration : Forty-Five (45) CD
Cost of Plans & Bid Documents : P 10,000.00
The BAC will conduct the procurement process in accordance with the
Revised Implementing Rules and Regulations of R.A. 9184. Bids received in
excess of the ABC shall be automatically rejected at the opening of bid.
To bid for this contract, a contractor must submit a Letter of Intent (LOI),
purchase bid documents and must meet the following major criteria: (a) prior
registration with DPWH, (b) Filipino citizen or 75% Filipino-owned partnership,
corporation, cooperative, or joint venture, (c) with PCAB license applicable to
the type and cost of this contract, (d) completion of a similar contract costing at
least 50% of ABC within a period of 10 years, and (e) Net Financial Contracting
Capacity at least equal to the ABC, or credit line commitment for at least 10% of
ABC. The BAC will use non-discretionary pass/fail criteria in the eligibility check
and preliminary examination of bids.
Unregistered contractors, however, shall submit their applications for regis-
tration, to the DPWH-POCW Central Offce before the deadline for the receipt of
LOI. The DPWH-POCW Central Offce will only process contractors applications
for registration with complete requirements and issue the Contractors Certifcate
of Registration (CRC). Registration Forms may be downloaded at the DPWH
website www.dpwh.gov.ph.
The signifcant times and deadlines of procurement activities are shown
below:
Activities Schedule
1. Issuance of Bidding Documents July 19, 2012 to August 9, 2012
2. Pre-Bid Conference July 27, 2012 at 10:00 AM
3. Deadline of Receipt of LOI from Prospective Bidders August 03, 2012
4. Receipt of Bids August 09, 2012 until 10:00 AM
5. Opening of Bids August 09, 2012 at 02:00 PM
The BAC will issue hard copies of Bidding Documents (BDs) at DPWH-
Misamis Occidental 2
nd
District Engineering Offce, Tangub City, upon
payment of a non-refundable fee as stated above. Prospective bidders may also
download the BDs from the DPWH website, if available. Prospective bidders
that will download the BDs from the DPWH website shall pay the said fees on
or before the submission of their bids Documents. The Pre-Bid Conference shall
be open only to interested parties who have purchased the BDs. Bids must ac-
companied by a bid security, in the amount and acceptable form, as stated in
Section 27.2 of the Revised IRR.
Prospective bidders shall submit their duly accomplished forms as specifed
in the BDs in two (2) separate sealed bid envelopes to the BAC Chairman. The
frst envelope shall contain the technical component of the bid, which shall include
a copy of the CRC. The second envelope shall contain the fnancial component
of the bid. Contract will be awarded to the Lowest Calculated Responsive Bid
as determined in the bid evaluation and post-qualifcation.
The DPWH-Misamis Occidental 2
nd
District Engineering Offce, Tan-
gub City reserves the right to accept or reject any bid and to annul the bidding
process at anytime prior contract award, without incurring any liability to the
affected bidder/s.
(Sgd.) RAMISIS JAIMAR Y. BICOY
Engineer III
BAC-Chairman
NOTED:
(Sgd.) DARIO C. PUSOD
OIC-District Engineer
Republic of the Philippines
Department of Public Works and Highways
OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT ENGINEER
Misamis Occidental 2
nd
District Engineering Offce
Tangub City
(MST-July 23, 2012)
I NVI TATI ON TO BI D
The Bids and Awards Committee (BAC) of the Misamis Occidental 2
nd
District
Engineering Offce, Tangub City, invites contractors to apply to bid for the projects:
[1] Contract ID : 12KJ0056
Name of Project : Rehab/Reconst/Replacement/Retrofitting of
Existing Permanent Bridges
Location : Migcanaway Bridge along Ozamiz-Pagadian Road
Brief Description : Replacement
Approved Budget For the Contract P 18,333,000.00
Contract Duration : One Hundred Sixty (150) CD
Cost of Plans & Bid Documents P 10,000.00
[2] Contract ID : 12KJ0057
Name of Project : Rehab/Reconst/Replacement/Retrofitting of
Existing Permanent Bridges
Location : Dimalooc Bridge along Ozamiz-Pagadian Road
Brief Description : Rehabilitation/Strengthening
Approved Budget For the Contract P 16,296,000.00
Contract Duration : One Hundred Fifty (150) CD
Cost of Plans & Bid Documents P 10,000.00
[3] Contract ID : 12KJ0058
Name of Project : Rehab/Reconst/Replacement/Retrofitting of
Existing Permanent Bridges
Location : Colupan Bridge along Ozamiz-Oroquieta Road
Brief Description : Replacement
Approved Budget For the Contract P 6,952,960.00
Contract Duration : One Hundred Forty (140) CD
Cost of Plans & Bid Documents P 10,000.00
The BAC will conduct the procurement process in accordance with the Revised
Implementing Rules and Regulations of R.A. 9184. Bids received in excess of the
ABC shall be automatically rejected at the opening of bid.
To bid for this contract, a contractor must submit a Letter of Intent (LOI), purchase
bid documents and must meet the following major criteria: (a) prior registration with
DPWH, (b) Filipino citizen or 75% Filipino-owned partnership, corporation, cooperative,
or joint venture, (c) with PCAB license applicable to the type and cost of this contract,
(d) completion of a similar contract costing at least 50% of ABC within a period of 10
years, and (e) Net Financial Contracting Capacity at least equal to the ABC, or credit
line commitment for at least 10% of ABC. The BAC will use non-discretionary pass/
fail criteria in the eligibility check and preliminary examination of bids.
Unregistered contractors, however, shall submit their applications for registration,
to the DPWH-POCW Central Offce before the deadline for the receipt of LOI.
The DPWH-POCW Central Offce will only process contractors applications for
registration with complete requirements and issue the Contractors Certifcate of
Registration (CRC). Registration Forms may be downloaded at the DPWH website
www.dpwh.gov.ph.
The signifcant times and deadlines of procurement activities are shown below:
Activities Schedule
1. Issuance of Bidding Documents July 19, 2012 to August 9, 2012
2. Pre-Bid Conference July 27, 2012 at 10:00 AM
3. Deadline of Receipt of LOI from Prospective
Bidders
August 03, 2012
4. Receipt of Bids August 09, 2012 until 10:00 AM
5. Opening of Bids August 09, 2012 at 02:00 PM
The BAC will issue hard copies of Bidding Documents (BDs) at DPWH-Misamis
Occidental 2
nd
District Engineering Offce, Tangub City, upon payment of a non-
refundable fee as stated above. Prospective bidders may also download the BDs
from the DPWH website, if available. Prospective bidders that will download the BDs
from the DPWH website shall pay the said fees on or before the submission of their
bids Documents. The Pre-Bid Conference shall be open only to interested parties who
have purchased the BDs. Bids must accompanied by a bid security, in the amount
and acceptable form, as stated in Section 27.2 of the Revised IRR.
Prospective bidders shall submit their duly accomplished forms as specifed in
the BDs in two (2) separate sealed bid envelopes to the BAC Chairman. The frst
envelope shall contain the technical component of the bid, which shall include a copy
of the CRC. The second envelope shall contain the fnancial component of the bid.
Contract will be awarded to the Lowest Calculated Responsive Bid as determined in
the bid evaluation and post-qualifcation.
The DPWH-Mi sami s Occi dental 2
nd
District Engineering Offce, Tangub
City reserves the right to accept or reject any bid and to annul the bidding process
at anytime prior contract award, without incurring any liability to the affected bidder/s.
(Sgd.) RAMISIS JAIMAR Y. BICOY
Engineer III
BAC-Chairman
NOTED:
(Sgd.) DARIO C. PUSOD
OIC-District Engineer
Republic of the Philippines
Department of Public Works and Highways
OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT ENGINEER
Misamis Occidental 2
nd
District Engineering Offce
Tangub City
(MST-July 23, 2012)
I NVI TATI ON TO BI D
The Bids and Awards Committee (BAC) of the Misamis Occidental 2
nd
District
Engineering Offce, Tangub City, invites contractors to apply to bid for the projects:
[1] Contract ID : 12KJ0043
Name of Project : Preventive Maintenance
Location : Ozami z-Pagadi an Road K1674+124 -
K1676+000
Brief Description : A-Overlay 100mm with corrections
Approved Budget For the Contract : P 25,074,500.00
Contract Duration : One Hundred Twenty (120) CD
Cost of Plans & Bid Documents : P 20,000.00
[2] Contract ID : 12KJ0044
Name of Project : Preventive Maintenance
Location : Ozami z-Pagadi an Road K1676+000 -
K1678+000
Brief Description : A-Overlay 50mm with corrections
Approved Budget For the Contract : P 14,240,570.00
Contract Duration : Ninety (90) CD
Cost of Plans & Bid Documents : P 10,000.00
[3] Contract ID : 12KJ0045
Name of Project : Preventive Maintenance
Location : Ozami z-Oroqui et a Road K1717+000 -
K1717+640
Brief Description : C-Overlay 50mm with corrections
Approved Budget For the Contract : P 5,259,340.00
Contract Duration : Forty-Five (45) CD
Cost of Plans & Bid Documents : P 10,000.00
The BAC will conduct the procurement process in accordance with the Revised
Implementing Rules and Regulations of R.A. 9184. Bids received in excess of the
ABC shall be automatically rejected at the opening of bid.
To bid for this contract, a contractor must submit a Letter of Intent (LOI), purchase
bid documents and must meet the following major criteria: (a) prior registration with
DPWH, (b) Filipino citizen or 75% Filipino-owned partnership, corporation, cooperative,
or joint venture, (c) with PCAB license applicable to the type and cost of this contract,
(d) completion of a similar contract costing at least 50% of ABC within a period of 10
years, and (e) Net Financial Contracting Capacity at least equal to the ABC, or credit
line commitment for at least 10% of ABC. The BAC will use non-discretionary pass/
fail criteria in the eligibility check and preliminary examination of bids.
Unregistered contractors, however, shall submit their applications for registration, to the
DPWH-POCW Central Offce before the deadline for the receipt of LOI. The DPWH-
POCW Central Offce will only process contractors applications for registration with
complete requirements and issue the Contractors Certifcate of Registration (CRC).
Registration Forms may be downloaded at the DPWH website www.dpwh.gov.ph.
The signifcant times and deadlines of procurement activities are shown below:
Activities Schedule
1. Issuance of Bidding Documents July 19, 2012 to August 9, 2012
2. Pre-Bid Conference July 27, 2012 at 10:00 AM
3. Deadline of Receipt of LOI from
Prospective Bidders
August 03, 2012
4. Receipt of Bids August 09, 2012 until 10:00 AM
5. Opening of Bids August 09, 2012 at 02:00 PM
The BAC will issue hard copies of Bidding Documents (BDs) at DPWH-Misamis
Occidental 2
nd
District Engineering Offce, Tangub City, upon payment of a non-
refundable fee as stated above. Prospective bidders may also download the BDs
from the DPWH website, if available. Prospective bidders that will download the BDs
from the DPWH website shall pay the said fees on or before the submission of their
bids Documents. The Pre-Bid Conference shall be open only to interested parties who
have purchased the BDs. Bids must accompanied by a bid security, in the amount
and acceptable form, as stated in Section 27.2 of the Revised IRR.
Prospective bidders shall submit their duly accomplished forms as specifed in the BDs
in two (2) separate sealed bid envelopes to the BAC Chairman. The frst envelope
shall contain the technical component of the bid, which shall include a copy of the
CRC. The second envelope shall contain the fnancial component of the bid. Contract
will be awarded to the Lowest Calculated Responsive Bid as determined in the bid
evaluation and post-qualifcation.
The DPWH-Misamis Occidental 2
nd
District Engineering Offce, Tangub City
reserves the right to accept or reject any bid and to annul the bidding process at
anytime prior contract award, without incurring any liability to the affected bidder/s.
(Sgd.) RAMISIS JAIMAR Y. BICOY
Engineer III
BAC-Chairman
NOTED:
(Sgd.) DARIO C. PUSOD
OIC-District Engineer
Republic of the Philippines
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS AND HIGHWAYS
OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT ENGINEER
Batanes District Engineering Offce
Basco, Batanes
RE-I NVI TATI ON TO APPLY FOR ELI GI BI LI TY AND TO BI D
(MST-July 23, 2012)
The Department of Public Works & Highways, Batanes District Engineering
Offce, through its Bids and Awards Committee (BAC), invites prospective
suppliers/bidders to apply for eligibility and to bid for the following project:

1 Contract ID : 12BA0024- Goods
Contract Name : Installation/Application/Construction
of Road Safety Devices Along BAsco-
mahatao-Ivana-Uyugan-Imnajbu Road
Batan Island and San Vicente-Savidug-
Chavayan- Sumnanga Nakanmuan-
SanVicente
Contract Location : Batan & Sabtang, Batanes
Approved Budget for the
Contract (ABC) : P 7,459,204.10
Delivery period : 45 CD upon receipt of approved Purchase
Order
Procurement will be conducted through open competitive bidding procedures
in accordance with R.A. 9184 and its Revised Implementing Rules and
Regulations.
To bid for this contract, a bidder must meet the following criteria: (a) prior
registration with DPWH, (b) Filipino Citizen/sole proprietorship, corporations/
partnership/ cooperatives/ organizations with at least sixty percent (60%)
interest of outstanding capital stock belongs to the citizens of the Philippines,
(c) completed similar contract whose value must be at least 50% of the ABC
within a period of three(3) years, and (d) Net Financial Contracting Capacity
at least equal to ABC, or credit line commitment at least equal to 10% of ABC.
The BAC will use non-discretionary pass/fail criteria in the eligibility check and
preliminary examinations of bids.
Interested unregistered suppliers/bidders, however, shall submit their applications
for registration to the BAC for Goods, Secretariat, DPWH Central Offce seven(7)
calendar days before the deadline for the submission and opening of bids. The
BAC for Goods, DPWH Central Offce will only process suppliers applications for
registration with complete requirements, and issue the Suppliers Registration
Certifcate (SRC). Registration forms may be secured from the secretariat, BAC
for Goods Offce, Ground Floor, DPWH Central Offce.
The signifcant times and deadlines of procurement activities are shown below:
1. Issuance of Bidding Documents July 19, 2012 August 10, 2012
2. Pre-Bid conference July 25, 2012; 9:00 A.M.
3. Receipt of Bids August 10, 2012 Deadline: 9:00 AM
4. Opening of Bids August 10, 2012 Time : 10:00 AM
The BAC will issue hard copies of Bidding Documents (BDs) at BAC for Goods
Secretariat, DPWH Batanes District Engineering Offce Administrative
Building Motorpol Compound, from 8:00 A.M. to 5:00PM of July 19, 2012 to
August 10, 2012 upon payment of non-refundable fee of one thousand pesos
(Php 1,000.00). Prospective Bidders may also download the BDs, if available,
from the DPWH website and shall pay the said fees on or before the submission
of their Bid Documents. Bids must be accompanied by a bid security, in the
amount and form, as stated in Section 27.2 of the Revised IRR.
Prospective Bidders shall submit their duly accomplished forms as specifed in
the BDs in two(2) separate sealed envelopes to the BAC Chairman. The frst
envelope shall contain the technical component of the bid, which shall include
the eligibility requirements. The second envelope shall contain the fnancial
component of the bid. Contract will be awarded to the Lowest Calculated
responsive Bid as determined in the bid evaluation and post-qualifcation.
The Department of Public Works & Highways reserves the right to accept or
reject any or all bids and to annul the bidding process any time before Contract
award, without incurring any liability to the affected bidders.

(Sgd.) ARISTEO G. GALAROSA
BAC Chairman
Noted:
(Sgd.) ALEXANDER D. NOLA, CESE
District Engineer
Republic of the Philippines
Department of Public Works and Highways
OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT ENGINEER
Misamis Occidental 2
nd
District Engineering Offce
Tangub City
I NVI TATI ON TO BI D
(MST-July 23 & 25, 2012)
The Bids and Awards Committee (BAC) of the Misamis Occidental
2
nd
District Engineering Offce, Tangub City, invites contractors to
apply to bid for the projects:
[1] Contract ID : 12KJ0051
Name of Project : Widening/Improvement of Ozamiz-
Oroquieta Road
Location : Clarin-Sinacaban Section K1705+979 -
K1721+184 with exceptions
Brief Description : Widening of Road
Approved Budget For the Contract P 27,616,870.00
Contract Duration : One Hundred Thirty (130) CD
Cost of Plans & Bid Documents : P 20,000.00
[2] Contract ID : 12KJ0052
Name of Project : Road Leading to Tourism Destination
(Upgrading of Road)
Location : Brgy. Banglay, Tangub City to Brgy. Gala,
Ozamiz City
Brief Description : Upgrading of Road (from Gravel to
Concrete)
Approved Budget For the Contract P 29,100,000.00
Contract Duration : One Hundred Forty (140) CD
Cost of Plans & Bid Documents P 20,000.00
[3] Contract ID : 12KJ0053
Name of Project : Road Leading to Tourism Destination
(Upgrading of Road)
Location : Road Leading to Bokagan Hill, Ozamiz
City
Brief Description : Upgrading of Road (from Gravel to
Concrete)
Approved Budget For the Contract P 38,800,000.00
Contract Duration : One Hundred Fifty (150) CD
Cost of Plans & Bid Documents P 20,000.00
[4] Contract ID : 12KJ0054
Name of Project : Road Leading to Tourism Destination
(Upgrading of Road)
Location : Sta. Maria-Capalaran Road, Tangub City
Brief Description : Upgrading of Road (from Gravel to
Concrete)
Approved Budget For the Contract P 29,100,000.00
Contract Duration : One Hundred Forty (140) CD
Cost of Plans & Bid Documents P 20,000.00
[5] Contract ID : 12KJ0055
Name of Project : Road Leading to Tourism Destination
(Upgrading of Road)
Location : Capalaran-Villaba Road, Tangub City
Brief Description : Upgrading of Road (from Gravel to
Concrete)
Approved Budget For the Contract P 15,520,000.00
Contract Duration : Ninety (90) CD
Cost of Plans & Bid Documents P 10,000.00
The BAC will conduct the procurement process in accordance with
the Revised Implementing Rules and Regulations of R.A. 9184. Bids
received in excess of the ABC shall be automatically rejected at the
opening of bid.
To bid for this contract, a contractor must submit a Letter of Intent
(LOI), purchase bid documents and must meet the following major
criteria: (a) prior registration with DPWH, (b) Filipino citizen or 75%
Filipino-owned partnership, corporation, cooperative, or joint venture,
(c) with PCAB license applicable to the type and cost of this contract,
(d) completion of a similar contract costing at least 50% of ABC within a
period of 10 years, and (e) Net Financial Contracting Capacity at least
equal to the ABC, or credit line commitment for at least 10% of ABC. The
BAC will use non-discretionary pass/fail criteria in the eligibility check
and preliminary examination of bids.
Unregistered contractors, however, shall submit their applications for
registration, to the DPWH-POCW Central Offce before the deadline for
the receipt of LOI. The DPWH-POCW Central Offce will only process
contractors applications for registration with complete requirements and
issue the Contractors Certifcate of Registration (CRC). Registration
Forms may be downloaded at the DPWH website www.dpwh.gov.ph.
The signifcant times and deadlines of procurement activities are
shown below:
Activities Schedule
1. Issuance of Bidding Documents July 19, 2012 to August 9, 2012
2. Pre-Bid Conference July 27, 2012 at 10:00 AM
3. Deadline of Receipt of LOI from
Prospective Bidders
August 03, 2012
4. Receipt of Bids August 09, 2012 until 10:00 AM
5. Opening of Bids August 09, 2012 at 02:00 PM
The BAC will issue hard copies of Bidding Documents (BDs) at
DPWH-Misamis Occidental 2
nd
District Engineering Offce, Tangub
City, upon payment of a non-refundable fee as stated above. Prospective
bidders may also download the BDs from the DPWH website, if available.
Prospective bidders that will download the BDs from the DPWH
website shall pay the said fees on or before the submission of their bids
Documents. The Pre-Bid Conference shall be open only to interested
parties who have purchased the BDs. Bids must accompanied by a bid
security, in the amount and acceptable form, as stated in Section 27.2
of the Revised IRR.
Prospective bidders shall submit their duly accomplished forms as
specifed in the BDs in two (2) separate sealed bid envelopes to the BAC
Chairman. The frst envelope shall contain the technical component of the
bid, which shall include a copy of the CRC. The second envelope shall
contain the fnancial component of the bid. Contract will be awarded to the
Lowest Calculated Responsive Bid as determined in the bid evaluation
and post-qualifcation.
The DPWH-Misamis Occidental 2
nd
District Engineering Offce,
Tangub City reserves the right to accept or reject any bid and to annul
the bidding process at anytime prior contract award, without incurring
any liability to the affected bidder/s.
(Sgd.) RAMISIS JAIMAR Y. BICOY
Engineer III
BAC-Chairman
NOTED:
(Sgd.) DARIO C. PUSOD
OIC-District Engineer
EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES CORPORATION
II-B Sunrise Drive, Brgy. Bagong Lipunan ng Crame
Cubao, Quezon City
Notice of Stockholders' Meeting
To All ERC Stockholders:
Please be informed that the Annual Stockholders' Meeting
of the Educational Resources Corporation shall be held
on July 28, 2012 at 12:00 noon at the Barrio Fiesta EDSA
Mandaluyong City to elect the directors of the Corporation
to take up the following matters
1. Election of new directors for the incoming fscal year;
2. Report of the President; and
3 Other relevant matters
Please be guided accordingly
(Sgd.) Atty. LACANDOLA S. LEAO
Corporate Secretary
(MST-July 20 & 23, 2012)
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
JULY 16, 2012 MONDAY
C4
Isah V. Red, Editor standard.showbiz@gmail.com
showbitz
Manila Standard TODAY
ISAH V.
RED
SIMPLY RED
JOSEPH
PETER GONZALES
SHTICKS
By Nickie Wang

OVER 12000 fans ocked to the
SM Mall of Asia Arena on July 11 to
watch rap superstar Nicki Minaj in
her only Southeast Asian pit stop of
the Pink Friday Concert Tour.
Fans of the 29-year-old art-
ist impressed each
other arriving at the
venue dressed up in
all shades of pink
and even imitating
their idols infamous
eccentric do. True
enough, even Nicki
herself confessed how
she deeply appreciat-
ed the warm welcome
she received from her
Filipino fans
Youre going to
be in my heart for-
ever, this place re-
minds me so much
of Trinidad. Its ab-
solutely beautiful.
Earlier when I look
at the Manila Bay
it reminded me of
Trinidad, the singer said stirring
the crowd to a hysterical frenzy.
To her command, the very much
willing audience danced, jumped
up and down their seats turning the
concert venue into a big rave party, a
mass shindig if you will, most espe-
cially when she performed Starships
culled from her latest album, and the
worldwide monster hit, Super Bass.
Manila can you make some noise
for yourself? Youve been wonderful
tonight, she repeatedly told the au-
dience and set the mood of the entire
show by asking, Did you guys come
here to party?
Earlier, at exactly 8 p.m., fans
had lined up to nd their seats in
the Arena but the show started a
few minutes after 9 p.m.
As soon as the lights beamed to-
wards the stage and the curtains raised,
the crowd welcomed Nicki Minaj, in
a black robe, with eardrum splitting
cheers. The venue almost felt like there
was a quake when she opened the show
singing Romans Revenge.
The concert was divided into three
sets each featuring the rap singer in
different fake blonde and blue locks.
Every time she emerges from the
backstage she impresses the crowd
with her tongue-lashing rap skills.
Nickis every number was accom-
panied by her sensual dance moves
and her signature doe-eyed glances.
For some with keen ears, Nickis vo-
cal talent was not that superb. Most of
her performances were
highly enhanced with
digital effects. But thats
forgivable as she is more
of a rapper to begin
with.
The curvaceous
r a ppe r - s ongwr i t e r
charmed the audience
with her chart-friendly
hits Pound the Alarm,
Bottoms Up, Hold
Yuh and with her club-
thumping records Turn
Me On and Where
Them Girls At, her
song with David Guetta
and Flo Rida.
She ended her
80-minute concert like
the way she opened
itwith a bangwhile
fans were dancing and playing with
tons of confetti in the air. Her energy
level did not drop at any point and
was very grateful to the responsive
crowd throughout the entire show.
Amid the absence of an encore,
Nicki did not disappoint her Filipino
fans. When everyone was shouting
We want more! the rapper, who was
already in her pink bathrobe, came out
of the backstage and blew the crowd a
few kisses and gestures of thank you.
The Trinidad-born artist quickly
became global music phenomenon
when she released Pink Friday in
November 2010. The debut album
became an instant hit peaking at no.1
on the US Billboard 200 and was cer-
tied Platinum after four weeks of its
release. Her success extends for her
distinction of being the rst female
solo artist to have seven singles on
Billboard 100 at the same time.
Nicki has also successfully col-
laborated with huge music artists
like Mariah Carey, Usher, Chris-
tina Aguilera, Rihanna and Kanye
West, to name a few.
Minajs Philippine gig was cour-
tesy of Globe Telecoms.
Ate Vi in a scream lm
Nicki Minaj paints MOA
Arena pink
BATANGAS Governor Vilma Santos-
Recto has a new movie under Star Cinema.
It is The Healing.
Its a horror project directed by Chito
Rono. Im with Kim Chiu, Janice de Bel-
en and Pokwang, she says.
Many wonder why she opted to do a horror vehicle for
her silver screen comeback.
I was asked many times regarding that and my answer
was, Why not? My last lm was In My Life and it was
a heavy drama. Perhaps, I am looking for something new
for me to feel challenged again. I guess Ive done almost
every role on screen.
So I personally requested Direk Chito to come up with a
good horror project for me. Everyone knows how excellent
he is when it comes to this genre. True enough, I am so happy
with the turnout. I was always excited reporting to the set.
The Star for all Season personally picked Kim to play
one of the movies pivotal roles.
Remember when she made a guest appearance on my
anniversary special in ABS-CBN a few years ago? She
impressed me when she re-enacted my part in Broken
Marriage. I saw in her the rawness of an actor.
Kim delivered in The Healing. Her acting further ma-
tured. I can assure the public that this movie is something
new for the two of us so they better watch.
Did she nd it hard doing horror?
Of course, its a totally different arena. For one, my role
is very physical. There are a lot of chas-
ing scenes, which I havent done for a long
time. But even if it werent that easy, it was
all worth it when I watched the nished
product.
The movie coincides with her 50
th
year
in showbiz.
BB in The Enchanted Garden
BB Gandanghari is happy with his participation in TV
5s The Enchanted Garden along with Ruffa Gutierrez,
Alice Dixson, Rufa Mae Quinto and Alex Gonzaga.
So whats his role in the Kapatids new fantasy-drama?
I play a geisha who owns a spa. I hold the key to the
enchanted garden. Actually, I play dual roles here. Apart
from the geisha part, I would also play a straight male back
in the enchanted garden as Zoren Legaspis twin brother.
Ha-ha-ha! Isnt it interesting?
Speaking of Zoren, how does he anticipate his future
scenes with him?
Well, it must be fun, dont you think so? Anyway, he
is handsome so its just okay if hes my twin brother in the
story. Ha-ha-ha! But kidding aside, Im looking forward to
doing scenes with him in the coming taping days.
Now that hes visible in the limelight, questions about
Carmina Villarroel are inevitable.
Well, all I can say is Im happy for her. I can see that shes
happy with her family life. She deserves it, BB states.
Whether its his mysterious looks,
his brawny physique or his awesome
smarts, theres no denying that Benja-
min Alves is the face to watch out for.
The 23-year old Alves is not just
in for his good looks, but also for his
brains. He majored in English Litera-
ture at University of Guam, gradu-
ated with honorssumma cum laude.
Wow, thats heavy, as the kids in the
80s would exclaim.
Yet, hes no newbie. In fact, when
he turned 18 and had been in the busi-
ness already, although using a differ-
ent screen name.
I had to nish school, I felt, he
said when I talked to him a few weeks
ago. I even felt I wasnt cut out to be in
show business, although Id still want to
go modeling once in a while.
If he decided against making a
comeback, he would certainly be
teaching college students and immers-
ing them in the works of William
Shakespeare and E. E.Cummings.
I was planning on becoming an
English professor at a university some-
where. I love to write, I love reading
other peoples writing and their devel-
opment as writers.
Benjamin certainly also loves acting.
I have this passion for the craft which
I think sets me apart from all the other
artists today. Though Im not saying
that they dont love the thing, I have this
desire in me to learn everything about
it. Even the process and all other techni-
calities involved with it.
He wants to focus on drama.
Dreaming to portray a variety of char-
acters, from romantic to angst driven
to split personality.
So, what do we expect from the
guy?
He said rather humbly, I dont
want to create a very high expectations
among you, but this I promise that what-
ever role GMA Network and other pro-
duction outts give me, Ill try my best
to portray them the best I can.
Hes currently in an upcoming hor-
ror lm, Guni-Guni. He is paired with
Lovi Poe. Its really great to work
with her, very pretty, professional.
Aside from Lovi, he dreams to be
paired with Sarah Lahbati, Carla
Abellana and Marian Rivera and
looks up to great actors like Piolo
Pascual (his uncle), Dennis Trillo,
and Christopher de Leon.
He signed with GMA Artist Cen-
ter hoping the talent agency would be
able to make something out of him.
In the meantime, watch him evey
Sunday, lunchtime, in Party Pilipinas on
GMA Network. And in the days to come,
expect him to grace the small screen more
often as becomes more entrenched into
the pool of GMAs top leading men.

You are not alone
Thats the mantra of the newest
GMA Network family drama Hindi
Ka Mag-iisa, which took over the time
slot occupied by Hiram Na Puso.
Jennylyn Mercado breathes life to
the character of Elisa Santos.
She returns to afternoon drama, just
like what she had done before this in
Paano Bang Mangarap, Gumapang
Ka Sa Lusak, and Little Star.
Playing her leading men are Sid
Lucero as Andrew and Frank Mag-
alona as Mark. Many are looking
forward to watching the new love tri-
angle of Jennylyn, Frank and Sid.
Also in the cast are Angelu De
Leon as Jordana, Carl Guevarra as
Dennis, Crystal Reyes as Angelica,
Saab Magalona as Celine, and Joey
Paras as Mimi.
Also appearing in the series are
Lloyd Samartino as Bernard Monte-
negro, Liza Lorena as Dona Asuncion
Montenegro, and Glydel Mercado as
Maita Montenegro.
The series focuses on Elisa (Jenny-
lyn), who at a very young age, learned
and experienced all the hardships in life.
Elisas life will change when she
meets her young sister, Angelica
(Crystal). She learns that she is men-
tally challenged..
Andrew falls for Elisa. Hell help and
teach Elisa to outgrow her insecurities,
fears and worries when it comes to love.
Hindi Ka Na Mag-iisa airs right after
Eat Bulaga on GMA Afternoon Prime.

Together forever
Renz Velerio, Benedict Campos,
Enzo Pineda and Steven Silva are all
in for Together Forever, a youth-ori-
ented series starring Julie Anne San
Jose and Elmo Magalona.
Renz, a child actor who started ap-
pearing in TV commercials when he
was just three years old, had been in
Futbolilits and Bantatay.
This year he is gaining more
grounds as host for My Chubby World
Big Adventure.
In this series he is Raz Trinidad,
Elmos younger brother.
Benedict was the Prince Charming
in Grazilda with Glaiza de Castro.
Enzo, a StarStruck avenger, has
been showing his different talents in
his regular stint in Party Pilipinas and
his funny, quirky side in the talk show
Startalk.
Steven, the Ultimate Male Survivor
of StarStruck V, has become a multi-tal-
ent act. He is also a singer, a chef, and a
football player (from team Socceroo FC
in the UFL Second Division). A couple
of years back he was Achilles in Ang
Babaeng Hinugot Sa Aking Tadyang
and appeared as guest in Diva. He por-
trayed a role named Boy Luis in the ac-
claimed lm The Road.
Renz is playing Elmos younger
brother and Enzo their half brother.
Benedict and Steven are part of the
love triangle with Janine Guttierez.
Young TV director Roderick Lin-
dayag says, I am very glad these kids
are having fun while taping for our epi-
sodes shown every Sunday after Party
Pilipinas on GMA. Otherwise, this
would have been a great burden for me.
Now, we know why the audience
love the Sunday light romantic drama.

Gapuzs Whispers
From The Heart
Educator Ray Gapuz is best known
as the founder of Gapuz Review
Center.
He is also gifted with a singing
voice. Listen to his album, Whispers
From The Heart.
Comprised by well-chosen and
superbly interpreted tracks, the al-
bum illustrates Gapuzs strong tenor
and sensitive reading of Bakit Miss
Kita, the promotional single that has
been dominating radio and resonates
deeply in the hearts of OFWs and their
families and friends.
The Greatest Love of All, origi-
nally by George Benson now ren-
dered as duet between Gapuz and his
six-year-old nephew, Owie; Kung
Kailan, an original song that pierces
the heart with its message of showing
love before its too late; What Kind
Of Fool Am I; Ill Be There and
Huwag Ka Lang Mawawala are the
other tracks in the album.
Gapuz offers his insights on the
songs through music videos included
in the album. Some feature celebrities,
like Miss Universe runner-up Maria
Venus Raj and Gloria Romero.
Whispers From The Heart was
released with a coffee table book au-
thored by Gapuz, The Exit.
Gapuz poured his heart out for the
album.
Though he has yet to fully promote
the album, Whispers From The Heart is
fast reaching the Gold Record mark.
Seemingly a man with the Midas
Touch, Gapuz, remains humble in
expressing his goal in making the al-
bum. I was not thinking of making
good sales from the album nor turn-
ing myself into the next big star when
I did this. I was just following.. .the
whispers from my heart.
New kid
on the Kapuso block
GMA Network is heavily promoting a new
face these days. And hes no ordinary guy. In
fact, he seems special, really.
Jennylyn Mercado
Trinidadian-born American
rapper-singer Nicki MInaj
Benjamin Alves
joins Kapuso