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REPORT OF THE 12th MEETING ON THE NATIONAL FOCAL POINT FOR THE ASEAN COCOA CLUB (ACC) ON ASEAN

COOPERATION AND JOINT APPROACHES IN AGRICULTURE AND FOREST PRODUCTS PROMOTION SCHEME 1314 May 2009 Renaissance Kuala Lumpur Hotel, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

INTRODUCTION 1. The 12th Meeting of the National Focal Point for the ASEAN Cocoa Club (ACC) on ASEAN Cooperation and Joint Approaches in Agriculture and Forest Products Promotion Scheme was held on 1314 May 2009 at the Renaissance Kuala Lumpur Hotel, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. 2. The Meeting was attended by 44 delegates from the government and private sectors of Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore and Viet Nam. The list of the delegates appears in Annex 1. OPENING CEREMONY Welcoming Remarks of the Chairman of the ASEAN Cocoa Club (ACC) 3. The Chairman of the ACC, Dato' Dr. Azhar Ismail, Director General of the Malaysian Cocoa Board (MCB) expressed his appreciation and gratitude to the Deputy Minister of Ministry of Plantation Industries and Commodities, Malaysia for officiating the 12 th Meeting of the National Focal Point for the ASEAN Cocoa Club (ACC) on the ASEAN Cooperation and Joint Approaches in Agriculture and Forest Products Promotion Scheme.

4. He also extended his warmest welcome to the delegates from Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore and Viet Nam to the 12 th Meeting o f the National Focal Points for ASEAN Cocoa Club (ACC) on ASEAN Cooperation and Joint Approaches in Agriculture and Forest Products Promotion Scheme and thanked all delegates for attending the Meeting. 5. He recalled the formation of the ACC is to enhance collaborative efforts among ASEAN member countries in strengthening the Intra-ASEAN trade on cocoa and cocoa products in the international market as well as to collectively overcome tariff and non-tariff barriers (NTBs) and unfair trade practices imposed by the importing countries. 6. He highlighted that as a whole, the ASEAN has been an important source of not only cocoa beans but also semi-processed cocoa products such as cocoa liquor, cocoa butter, cocoa cake and cocoa powder for chocolate manufacturers and confectioneries all over the world. ASEAN contributed about 16% to the total world cocoa production and about 14% to the total world cocoa grinding in 2008/09. Despite that, the ASEAN countries are still facing many challenges such as the stringent requirements imposed on food safety by the EU and Japan as well as the Maximum Residue Limits (MRLs) permitted on cocoa of which is technically impossible to comply. Besides that, most of the importing countries have been implementing their own food safety standards which are not inline with the CODEX Standard. Therefore, the ASEAN countries as a group should request that the importing countries to use the CODEX Standard as reference for food safety regulations. Coupled with that, the current economic slowdown that is facing the world also has disrupted the global demand for cocoa products. Therefore, the ASEAN members need to work closely together to review the current activities carried by the ACC, where a new strategic area of cooperation need to be formulated that could address issues and problems facing the cocoa industries in ASEAN member countries. 7. He also emphasized that the ACC members need to be actively and fully involved in the activities being carried out so that they could be successfully implemented and benefited the ACC members. Previously, only Malaysia and Indonesia were the two countries that are actively involved in hosting the ACC Meetings as well as in the implementation of the ACC programmes. 8. He also mentioned that having a full quorum would provide more inputs on the programmes and areas of cooperation to be implemented by the ACC. The welcoming speech of the Chairman of the ACC appears in Annex 2. Opening Address of the Deputy Minister, Ministry of Plantation Industries and Commodities, Malaysia 9. Yang Berhormat Datuk Hamzah Zainuddin, Deputy Minister, Ministry of Plantation Industries and Commodities, Malaysia declared open the 12 th Meeting of the National Focal Points for the ASEAN Cocoa Club (ACC) on ASEAN Cooperation and Joint Approaches in Agriculture and Forest Products Promotion Scheme.

10. In his opening address, he extended a very warm welcome to the delegates from Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore and Viet Nam to the ACC Meeting and thanked all delegates for attending the Meeting. 11. He highlighted the situation of the cocoa industry in ASEAN countries, which ranked as the third largest grower and producer of cocoa beans in the world and the largest in Asia and Oceania region. The cocoa production of the ASEAN countries in 2008/09 is estimated at 547,900 tonnes, accounted about 16% of the total world cocoa production. In terms of grindings, the total grinding is estimated at 520,000 tonnes, accounting for about 14% of the world total in 2008/09. The ASEAN countries are the largest cocoa processors in Asia and Oceania region, contributing about 72% of the total cocoa grindings in this region. 12. He also highlighted that despite the ASEAN cocoa have attained significant recognition in the global market, the marketing of cocoa also has increasingly become more complex as the countries engaged not only in cocoa beans trading, but subsequently marketing of other cocoa products. On top of that, the cocoa processing industries in the Asia and Oceania including the ASEAN member countries are also suffering severely from the economic downturn. The falling demand for ingredients for chocolate has temporarily affected the grinding activities particularly in Indonesia and Malaysia. The International Cocoa Organization (ICCO) forecasted that the cocoa processing activities in the Asia and Oceania region will decline by over 10% to about 719,000 tonnes in 2008/09. 13. He emphasized the importance of the ACC as one of the platforms for the ASEAN countries to work closely together during this difficult time of economic crisis in coming up with policies and strategies not only to overcome issues and problems facing the cocoa industries, but also to provide greater power in facing challenges to further strengthen and enhance further the Intra-ASEAN trade on cocoa and cocoa products. Therefore, to ensure its effectiveness, every member of the ASEAN countries has to give their full participation, commitment and cooperation. The full text of his speech appears in Annex 3. AGENDA ITEM 1: OPENING REMARKS 14. The Chairman of the ACC, Dato' Dr. Azhar Ismail, Director General of the Malaysian Cocoa Board (MCB) welcomed delegates from Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore and Viet Nam to the 12 th Meeting of the National Focal Point for the ASEAN Cocoa Club (ACC) on ASEAN Cooperation and Joint Approaches in Agriculture and Forest Products Promotion Scheme and thanked all delegates for attending the Meeting. 15. In his opening remarks, the Chairman of the ACC highlighted on the present economic situation and challenges faced by the ASEAN members and urged the members to work together to ensure the cocoa products produced from the nation is of the best quality and meeting the international standard.

AGENDA ITEM 2: ELECTION OF CHAIRMAN AND VICE-CHAIRMAN 16. Dato Dr. Azhar Ismail, Director General of the MCB was unanimously elected as the Chairman of the 12 th ACC Meeting and Mr. Aung Myint from Myanmar was e lected as the ViceChairman. AGENDA ITEM 3: ADOPTION OF AGENDA 17. The Meeting adopted the Agenda of the 12 th ACC Meeting as appears in Annex 4. AGENDA ITEM 4: BUSINESS ARRANGEMENTS 18. The Meeting was held in plenary. AGENDA ITEM 5: DEVELOPMENT OF THE COCOA INDUSTRY IN MALAYSIA 19. Malaysia presented a paper on the development of the cocoa industry in Malaysia that covered the status of the Malaysian Cocoa Industry in 2008 and tariff rates as of 1 st January 2009. 20. In 2008, Malaysia was reported to have 19,976 hectares planted with cocoa. The production of dry cocoa beans was estimated at 27,976 tonnes while the total grindings was estimated at 323,653 tonnes. The total export earnings for cocoa and cocoa products was RM 3.35 billion. 21. He also informed the Meeting the tariff rates for cocoa beans and cocoa products in Malaysia as of 1 st January 2009 for the Most Favoured Nations (MFN) and Common Effective Preferential Tariff (CEPT) rates are between 0%-15% and 0%5%, respectively. AGENDA ITEM 6: MATTERS ARISING FROM THE PRESPOM-30th AMAF, 20-21 OCTOBER 2008; SOM-8TH AMAF PLUS THREE, 22nd OCTOBER 2008; 30th AMAF, 23rd OCTOBER 2008 AND 8th AMAF PLUS THREE, 24th OCTOBER 2008, HANOI VIETNAM 22. In the absence of the ASEAN Secretariat, Malaysia presented the report on these meetings in relation to cocoa and cocoa products. 23. The Meeting took note on the report on these meetings, in particular the development of finalizing the revised Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) under the Joint Committee on ASEAN Cooperation in Agriculture and Forest Products Promotion Scheme. The existing MoU will expire on the 27 th October 2009. The final draft should have been circulated to members of the meeting. The final version of the MoU will be submitted to the AMAF Meeting in October 2009 for endorsement. 24. The Meeting took note on the report of these meetings as provided by the ASEAN Secretariat. The full report on these Meetings appears in Annex 5.

AGENDA ITEM 7: MATTERS ARISING FROM THE 15th MEETING OF THE JOINT COMITTEE ON ASEAN COOPERATION AND JOINT APPROACHES IN AGRICULTURE AND FOREST PRODUCTS PROMOTION SCHEME, 22-23 JULY 2008, BANDAR SERI BEGAWAN, BRUNEI DARUSSALAM 25. In the absence of the ASEAN Secretariat, Malaysia presented the report on this meeting in relation to cocoa and cocoa products. 26. The Meeting took note that the outcomes of the 11 th and 12 th ACC Meetings were reported at the 15 th Meeting of Joint Committee on ASEAN Cooperation in Agriculture and Forest Products Promotion Scheme, held on 22 23 July 2008 in Brunei Darussalam. 27. With regards to the proposal by the ACC to change the group name from ASEAN Cocoa Club to ASEAN Cocoa Council, the proposal was not approved by the 15 th Meeting on Joint Committee on ASEAN Cooperation in Agriculture and Forest Products Promotion Scheme. The Meeting was of the view that the term Council in ASEAN generally refers to high level bodies such as AFTA Council, ASEAN Economic Community Council and recommended not to use this term for product-specific bodies such as the ACC. 28. With regards to the proposed logo to be used for communication purpose, the ASEAN Secretariat was requested to consult with its Public Affairs Office. After consultation, the ASEAN logo in general could be used since ACC is recognized as an ASEAN related body. 29. With regard to the progress made in finalization of the MoU on ASEAN Cooperation in Agriculture and Forest Products Promotion Scheme, the MOU is still under negotiation and it is expected to be finalized at the 16 th Meeting of Joint Committee on ASEAN Cooperation in Agriculture and Forest Products Promotion Scheme to be held in July 2009 in Cambodia. The signing of the new MOU is expected at the 31 st AMAF Meeting to be held in October 2009 in Brunei Darussalam when the current MoU expires. AGENDA ITEM 8: ENHANCEMENT OF INTERNATIONAL COMPETITIVENESS OF ASEAN COCOA 8.1 Formulation of ASEAN Cocoa Contract 30. The ACC Secretariat recapitulated the decision reached at the 11 th ACC Meeting of the National Focal Point for ASEAN Cocoa Club (ACC) on ASEAN Cooperation and Joint Approaches in Agriculture and Forest Products Promotion Scheme held on 26 27 June 2008 at the Hotel Majestic Saigon, Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam, where the Meeting agreed that the private sector from Indonesia would take the lead in drafting the regional contract. In the event of the unavailability of the private sector of Indonesia to carry out this task, Indonesia had to notify the ACC Secretariat on this matter so that, the ACC Secretariat could find a volunteer from the private sector of other ASEAN Member countries to take over the task. 31. The Meeting was informed that Indonesia was not in favour of organizing the ASEAN Cocoa Contract Meeting, and both Thailand and the Philippines

volunteered to host the Meeting. Since the offer from Thailand came first, the ACC Secretariat had ever since worked closely with Thailand to organize two meetings to discuss the ASEAN Cocoa Contract. The first meeting was scheduled on the 1314 January 2009 and the second meeting to be held on the 1718 March 2009 at Bangkok, Thailand. 32. The two meetings scheduled on 13 14 January 2009 and 17 18 March 2009 at Bangkok, Thailand had to be cancelled due to poor response by the other ASEAN member countries including Indonesia, who is the appointed Chairman of the ASEAN Cocoa Contract Working Group . The success for adoption of the ASEAN Cocoa Contract requires full commitment from member countries. 33. No more meeting on the ASEAN Cocoa Contract was initiated by the ACC Secretariat as the 12 th ACC Meeting was fast approaching on the 1314 May 2009 at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. 34. The Cocoa Association of Asia (CAA) informed the Meeting that the final version of the cocoa contract had been completed covering market rules and arbitration and forwarded to the ACC Secretariat. The CAA planned to have a soft launch on the contract and would invite all stakeholders in the industry. 35. Indonesia, as the Chairman of the Working Group on ASEAN Cocoa Contract, proposed the agenda on the formulation of the ASEAN cocoa contract to be dropped from any ACC future meetings. 36. The Meeting agreed that the agenda on the formulation of the ASEAN Cocoa Contract to be dropped from the ACC Meeting. However, the cocoa contract could be further discussed by the private sector at their own discretions. 8.2 Tariff and NonTariff Barriers on Cocoa Beans and Cocoa Products 37. The Meeting took note on the progress report on the implementation of the CEPT Scheme among the ASEAN member countries presented by the ACC Secretariat. 38. The ACC Secretariat reported that by 2009, nine member countries namely Brunei, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Viet Nam had reduced their import tariffs on cocoa beans and products to 05% except for Cambodia that remains between 520%. Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar and Viet Nam (CLMV) were allowed to have longer period of tariff reduction up to 2015. Currently, Myanmar, Lao PDR and Viet Nam are ahead of the schedule. The latest matrix CEPT reduction schedule on cocoa and cocoa products for each of the ASEAN member countries and the ASEAN member countries general tariff schedule on cocoa and cocoa products are as Annex 6 and Annex 7. 39. The Meeting was also informed on the progress of the Free Trade Area (FTA) between ASEAN and other countries. 40. The following Framework Agreement on Comprehensive Economic Cooperation had been concluded and came into force: ASEANChina ASEANKorea

The latest import tariffs schedule on cocoa beans and products of ASEAN China and ASEANKorea are as Annex 8and Annex 9, respectively. 41. The FTA ASEANAustralia/New Zealand had been concluded and expected to come into force on 1 st July 2009. The latest Australia/New ZealandASEAN import tariff schedule on cocoa beans and products is presented in Annex 10. 42. The FTA ASEANJapan had been concluded but expected to come into force in 2009. 43. The FTA between ASEANIndia had been on hold until the completion of the India national election. 44. The FTA between ASEANEuropean Union (EU) is still in discussion to develop the details of the modalities, work programme and time schedule for negotiating the ASEANEU Free Trade Area (AEUFTA). The Meeting requested that the FTA between ASEANEU should be resolved as soon as possible as the EU is the biggest market for ASEAN cocoa industry. The Most Favoured Nation (MFN) tariff schedule on cocoa beans and products in Japan, India and the EU is as Annex 11. 45. With regards to the EU MFN tariffs rate, the Meeting agreed that the ASEANEU negotiation team should request the detail of the variable cost included in the EU import tariffs schedule. 8.3 Technical Working Group on Food Safety (TWGFS) 46. Malaysia as the Chairman of the TWGFS informed the Meeting on the progress of the formation of the TWGFS. 47. The Meeting was informed that due to the delay in receiving nomination from some member countries and no nomination from other member countries even after sending out numerous reminders, Malaysia was not able to call for the meeting to discuss the drafting of the Terms of Reference (TOR) for the TWGFS. The full report of the TWGFS is as Annex 12. 48. The Chairman urged those ACC members that had not submitted their representative names to submit the information immediately so that the TWGFS could start planning and implementing her activities. 49. Indonesia nominated representatives for both technical and non-technical members as follows:o Technical Dr. Misnawi of Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute (ICCRI) and Mr. Wayan Danu of Indonesia Cocoa Industry Association. o Nontechnical Dr. Nyoman Oka Tridjaja of Ministry of Agriculture, Directorate General of Processing and Marketing of Agriculture Products Indonesia and Ms. Sri Sulasmi of Ministry of Agriculture Indonesia. 50. The Philippines and Viet Nam were requested to submit the nomination of their representatives for the TWGFS as soon as possible.

8.4 ASEAN Cocoa Club (ACC) SubCommittee on Bean Quality 51. Indonesia as the Chairman of the ACC SubCommittee on Bean Quality presented the status report of this SubCommittee. 52. The Meeting took note on t he earlier appointed membership of the ACC Sub Committee on Bean Quality. The members has been revised and comprised of the followings:o Mr. Cahya Ismayadi (Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute (ICCRI) Chairman o Mr. Lukas Jasman (PT Bumi Tangerang, Indonesia) o Mr. Zulhefi Sikumbang ( Indonesian Cocoa Association (ASKINDO) ) o Mr. Halim Razak ( Indonesian Cocoa Association (ASKINDO) ) o Mr. Ng Boon Yeap (Cocoa Manufacturers Group (CMG), Malaysia) o Mr. Tey How Keong (JB Cocoa Sdn. Bhd., Malaysia) o Mr. Tuan Haji Omar Hj Tompang (Malaysian Cocoa Board (MCB), Malaysia) o Mr. Yeong Chye (ADM Cocoa, Singapore) o Ms. Jeniffer Aguilar (T.P. Food Processing Corporation, the Philippines) 53. Other member countries were also urged to submit the name of their representatives. 54. The Meeting took note on the result of the 2009 annual survey on cocoa bean quality and demand status in SouthEast Asia carried out by the CAA covering the following areas: Fermented beans Sources of fermented beans Usage of West African beans Quality Control and enforcement Ranking of quality parameters of fermented beans used in South-East Asia. The full report of this survey is as Annex 13 . AGENDA ITEM 9: ENHANCEMENT OF ASEAN COOPERATION AND JOINT APPROACHES IN INTERNATIONAL AND REGIONAL ISSUES 9.1 Codex Committee on Cocoa Products and Chocolate 55. Malaysia presented the progress of the Joint FAO/WHO Food Standard Programme Codex Alimentrius Commission at the 3 rd Session of the Codex Committee on contaminants in Foods, the 41 st Session of the Codex Committee on Food Additives and the 41 st Session of the Codex Committee on Pesticides Residues (CCPR). The full reports of these meetings are as Annex 14 , Annex 15 and Annex 16 . 56. The Meeting was informed that under CODEX, there is no MRL for 2,4D Amine for cocoa on the ground that 2,4D Amine is not recommended for cocoa. 57. The Meeting expressed concern on the issue of 2,4D Amine in cocoa and cocoa products raised by the importing countries as well as the ACC member countries. As such, the members were urged to take necessary remedial action on this

matter such as to exclude 2,4D Amine from the list of recommended chemical for cocoa and implementing effective Good Agriculture Practices (GAP). AGENDA ITEM 10: DEVELOPMENT, ACCELERATION OF TRANSFER AND ADOPTION OF NEW TECHNOLOGIES 10.1 Proposed Trials on Selected Cocoa Progenies in Selected ASEAN Regions 58. The Meeting took note of the progress reports of the hybrid trial carried by the Malaysian Cocoa Board (MCB) and Indonesian Cocoa and Coffee Research Institute (ICCRI). The full reports of the trial are as Annex 17 and Annex 18. 59. Indonesia reported that she received 10 hybrids from Malaysia. The hybrids that showed precocity were 1M, 8M, HKW2 and HKW16. 60. Malaysia reported that the Joint Progeny Trials started in 2004 with the main objective was to develop superior planting materials that were tolerance to the cocoa pod borer (CPB). The most vigorous hybrid was TSH 858 x KW 165 which had the biggest stem girth size with the highest increment, while none of the hybrids out yielded the control progeny. 10.2 ASEAN Cocoa Club (ACC) Database 61. The Meeting took note on the status report of the ACC Database presented by the ACC Secretariat. The status report of the ACC Database is as Annex 19 . 62. The Meeting recognized the importance to establish a complete and updated cocoa database for the ASEAN region as an important source of information required for international negotiations. The statistic would also indicate the competitiveness and could be used to strengthen the ASEAN position as a regional group. 63. The ACC Secretariat informed the Meeting that the ACC Database homepage had been in existence for 12 years, the information is still incomplete although member countries had been numerously reminded. 64. The member countries were urged to submit their requested information to the ACC Secretariat before 30th May 2009. AGENDA ITEM 11: ENHANCEMENT OF PRIVATE SECTOR INVOLVEMENT 11. 1 Cocoa Association of Asia (CAA) 65. The Meeting took note on the activities carried out by the CAA presented by the representative of the CAA as follows:i. Joint cooperation on a sustainable cocoa production with the Indonesian Cocoa Association (ASKINDO) and government agencies to work out a comprehensive plan to train farmers on GAP and quality control, provide market access to farmers to sell their cocoa and accelerate replanting of cocoa in Indonesia. ii. The organization of workshop to tackle CPB in Papua New Guinea funded by the Dutch government. The association was also invited as an advisory

partner in another CPB Project to be funded by the Australian Centre of International Agriculture Research (ACIAR). iii. On food safety, the CAA carried out an evaluation on 2,4D herbicide contamination in cocoa beans and products based on the customers feedback that some of their products received were found to have exceeded the intended limit of 2,4D Amine to be imposed by the Japanese. The full report of the CAA activities is as Annex 20. 11. 2 Indonesia Cocoa Commission (ICC) 66. The Meeting took note of the formation of the Indonesia Cocoa Board (ICB) reported by Indonesia. 67. The ICB is a body which is legalized by the Decree of Minister of Agriculture on the 5 th January 2006. The ICB was launched on the 29th October 2008 in Bali, Indonesia with the following objectives:a) To develop synergy among cocoa stakeholders and the related institution to improve competitiveness, valued, stallholders needs and sustainability of Indonesian cocoa agribusiness. b) To develop communicational and consultation with the Government, to provide recommendations, advise, comments in formulating National Policies and Regulations on Indonesian agribusiness cocoa development. c) To develop cooperation and coordination with organizations/institutions both international and domestically which relates to agribusiness cocoa development. 68. With the establishment of the ICB, the Indonesia Cocoa Commission was dissolved by the decree of the Minister of Agriculture in March 2009. The full report of the ICC is as Annex 21. AGENDA ITEM 12: OTHER MATTERS 12.1 ASEAN Cocoa Club National Focal Point 69. The current status of the National Focal Points was presented by the ACC Secretariat. The focal points of Malaysia, Myanmar, Singapore and Thailand had been updated by the ACC Secretariat. 70. The member countries were urged to update their focal points consisting of minimum two (2) focal points representing the public and private sectors for each member countries to the ACC Secretariat when necessary. The status report of the National Focal Points for 2009 is as Annex 22. 12.2 Cocoa Manufacturers Group Malaysia (CMG) Industry Development 71. CMG highlighted the members will continue to strike hard on the grinding despite significant challenges in recent time due to the changes in the industry structure and inverted terminal prices. 72. CMG also informed that there is closed to one million metric tonnes installed capacity in Asia. Most of the grinders sourced their fermented beans from the African region. However, due to the increasing installed capacity in African

countries, sourcing of the beans from the African region will become more difficult in future. As such, there are huge opportunities for member countries to improve their beans production with emphasize on the quality. 73. Judging from the market response, CMG also revealed that there was large increase of cocoa products consumption in Asia. Coupled with the high growth of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in Asian countries, such as China and India, it indicates that ASEAN need to be self content for cocoa need. As such, there is huge market for cocoa beans and member countries were urged to promote more cocoa planting in their countries. 12.3 The Philippines Cocoa Development Status 74. The Meeting took note on the information on the Philippines cocoa development as presented by the Philippines. 75. The Meeting was informed that the new Philippines standard for cocoa beans namely The Philippines National Standard For Cocoa PNS/BAFS No 58:2008 has been approved in 2007. 76. The Meeting was also informed on the progress of the implementation of the Success Alliance Program launched on 27 th October 2006. The program is funded by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) as a three year project under the USDA Food for Progress that aims to train trainers and smallholder farmers on cocoa production, post harvest processing, pest and diseases management and marketing through the farmer field school (FFS) methodology and participatory extension methods. The areas covered included Davao region, Western Mindanao, Panay Island, South Luzon and Palawan Island. 77. A total of 14,320 farmers had enrolled in the program and 9,064 had graduated. The total farmer field school conducted was 4,585 and has formed 359 cocoa clubs. A total of 79 nurseries contracted to supply 926,000 seedlings distributed to 4,471 cocoa farmers. There are 73 bud wood gardens all over the Philippines. 78. A total of 23 units of pod shredders for organic compose production were distributed. 6,371,600 pod sleeves with pod sleeving device and set of tools were also distributed. 79. As for post harvest, funding and technical assistance for the rehabilitation of 5 existing fermentation and drying facilities were extended. The program also supported 6 sites with construction of solar dryers and fermentation boxes. AGENDA 13: DATE AND VENUE OF THE NEXT MEETING 80. The Meeting agreed that the 13 th Meeting of the ACC on the ASEAN Cooperation and Joint Approaches in Agriculture and Forest Products Promotion Scheme to be held in Myanmar. The ACC Secretariat will confirm with Myanmar on the date and venue of the meeting.

AGENDA 14: ADOPTION OF THE REPORT 81. The Meeting unanimously adopted the Report of the 12 th Meeting of the ACC on the ASEAN Cooperation and Joint Approaches in Agriculture and Forest Products Promotion Scheme held on 1314 May 2009 at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 82. The Chairman of the ACC expressed his gratitude and thanks to all delegates for their active participation in the meeting. 83. The delegation of Indonesia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore and Viet Nam expressed their sincere appreciation to the government of Malaysia for their warm hospitality accorded to them and the excellent arrangements made for the meeting. 84. The meeting was held in the traditional spirit of ASEAN cordiality and solidarity. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 14 th May 2009