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D

AILY
K
ANSAN
T
HE
U
NIVERSITY
The student voice since 1904
monday, february 7, 2011 www.kansan.com volume 123 issue 88
By Jonathan Shorman
jshorman@kansan.com
Vandals apparently broke apart a
menorah that sat outside the Chabad
Center for Jewish Life, 1203 W. 19th
St., this weekend, said Rabbi Zalman
Tiechtel, co-director of the center.
The six-foot-high metal menorah
was broken into two pieces horizon-
tally and many of the branches were
taken from the site, Tiechtel said. He
said he believes the incident was van-
dalism and not a hate crime.
Tiechtel also said because of the
large size of the menorah and because
it is made of metal and would be diffi-
cult to break apart, several individuals
were probably involved.
Lawrence police said damage was
estimated at $1,000. Police believe the
incident occurred some time between
6 p.m. Friday and 6:45 p.m. Saturday.
The center hopes to recover the
menorah and law enforcement is
involved, Tiechtel said. However, a
campaign is also underway to raise
money for a bigger, brighter, better
menorah.
Our approach is very positive,
Tiechtel said.
The KU Chabad website includes
information about the campaign for
a new menorah and a form to allow
individuals to donate.
The Menorah represents commu-
nity, bringing people together, accord-
ing to the site. Therefore we want this
effort to be done together. Let this be
the Community Menorah, something
that encompasses the hearts of hun-
dreds of Jayhawks.
Editedby HelenMubarak
Shauna Blackmon
sblickmon@kansan.com
Nothing is more terrifying for
most students than putting in
four years of hard work, count-
less hours of studying, and thou-
sands of dollars into a college
education, just to find out that it
might have been for nothing.
The research from
Academically Adrift: Limited
Learning on College Campuses,
by sociologists Richard Arum
from New York University
and Josipa Roksa from the
University of Virginia, involved
more than 2,300 undergradu-
ates and found that 36 percent
of college students show no sig-
nificant improvement in criti-
cal thinking, complex reasoning
and writing by the time they
graduate.
Matt Melvin, the assistant
vice provost for student success,
doesnt see this as a problem for
the University of Kansas.
On average, the curricular
and co-curricular experience
provided to an engaged student
provides them with an opportu-
nity to develop skills necessary
to succeed in the new work envi-
ronment, Melvin said.
Cody Alley, a junior from
Lawrence, is in the UKanTeach
program and helped teach a
class at Central Jr. High his first
year at the University. He said
that while his experience teach-
ing was only a glimpse into the
real world, the hands on expe-
rience provided him with the
basic skills he would need in the
work place.
While some students may still
be lacking a few skills, employ-
ers in the area are usually
impressed with KU graduates.
Kristin Gibbar, the Global staff-
ing manager at Black and Veatch
Bring on the queso
Above: AndrewDickinson a senior fromOlathe, and
Kevin Bajaj a junior fromLawrence watch the Super
Bowl at Jefersons Restaurant, 743 Massachusetts
St. Were rooting for the Steelers because one of our
buddies is a Packers fanjoked Dickinson.
Right: Rachel Kraig, Chicago, Ill., senior, Leah Levy,
Chicago, Ill., senior, Katherine Andrews Manhattan
freshman, and Alan Ginsberg, Great Neck, N.Y.
senior, have mix reactions of the Steelers touchdown
during the frst half of sunday nights Super Bowl.
Ginsberg hosted the party at his apartment where
he and his friends enjoyed watching the game and
commercials, as well as eating plenty of party snacks to
further the enjoy the game.
AcAdemics
crime
Limited
learning
not true
for KU
grads
Vandals damage six-foot menorah at Chabad Center for Jewish Life
Travis Young/KANSAN
A vandalized menorah sits outside the Chabad Center for Jewish Life, 1203 W. 19th St. The six-
foot-high metal menorah was damaged sometime this weekend.
super Bowl wAtch pArties
See AcAdemics oN
pAge 3A
All contents, unless stated otherwise, 2011 The University Daily Kansan
Classifieds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6A
Crossword. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4A
Cryptoquips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4A
Opinion. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .5A
Sports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1B
Sudoku. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4A
WeATHeR
Cloudy
24 9
weather.com
today
Snow
13 7
tuesday
Cloudy
20 -3
wednesday
INDeX
NFL | 3B
Read
moRe
about
the
game
get youR
CoLLeCtIbLe PosteR

4B-5B
tune Into LIve
Chat on
kansan.Com at
7 P.m. foR
PRe-game taLk.
kansan.com/
8 P.m.
esPn
aLLen fIeLdhouse
MeNS BASKeTBALL
Ashleigh Lee/KANSAN
Chris Bronsn/KANSAN
graphic by Ben pirotte/KANSAN
KANSAN.COM / the uniVersitY dAilY KAnsAn / MONdAy, februAry 7, 2011 / news / 3A
By anGElIQuE
mcnauGhton
amcnaughton@kansan.com
State officials and family
members of victims involved in
hit-and-run fatalities say stricter
punishment is needed for drivers
who flee the scene of an accident,
especially in a college town like
Lawrence.
District Attorney Charles
Branson, along with family
members of victims in Lawrence,
presented testimony supporting
House Bill 2044 to legislators in
Topeka on Jan. 27.
The House Corrections and
Juvenile Justice Committee will
work on the bill and Chairwoman
Pat Colloton said she hopes the
bill will come out of committee on
Monday or Tuesday in order to be
heard on the house floor.
House Bill 2044 increases the
penalties for leaving the scene of
an accident where great bodily
harm or injury occurs.
If this bill
can deter driv-
ers who have
hit someone
from leaving
their victims on
the side of the
road without
aid, seemingly a
more egregious
crime than the
accident itself,
then it may save
lives and deserves your support,
Jeffrey Stolz said. Stolzs wifes
20-year-old sister Rachel Leek was
killed while riding her bicycle in
2009.
Branson said he can look back
at several instances during the last
few years where someones left the
scene of a fatality accident and
there was proof that they were
possibly driving under the influ-
ence. But once they flee the scene,
Branson said, they rob the state
the chance of trying to build proof
of intoxication at the time of the
accident.
Ryan Kanost, a 2006 Lawrence
senior, was walking with a group
of friends crossing Kentucky Street
in a crosswalk late one night in
September 2006. A car struck
Ryan in the crosswalk killing
him and fled, according to tes-
timony provided by Branson given
by Ryans father, Michael Kanost
to legislators.
The driver who killed Ryan had
been drinking heavily and when
he left the bar that night, one of
his friends tried to prevent him
from driving. After the accident
and without rendering help to
Ryan, he drove back to the bar
where he told his friends some-
thing bad had happened, accord-
ing to Kanost.
The driver was sentenced to 90
days in jail, with work release.
From 2004 to 2008, hit-and-run
accidents averaged 9.2 percent of
all accidents in Kansas, accord-
ing to the Kansas Department of
Transportation. Thirty-five acci-
dents resulted
in death.
The cur-
rent law,
some believe,
provides an
incentive for
intoxicated
drivers to leave
the scene of an
accident rather
than face the
consequences
of a driving under the influence
conviction.
Theyre weighing their
options, if you will, Branson said.
Under the law, someone who
leaves the scene of an injury
accident is charged with a level
10 persons felony. In essence,
that means that someone with
no criminal history is looking at
probation.
House Bill 2044 increases
the penalty from a level 10 to
a level eight persons felony,
which increases the time that a
person can be sentenced to jail.
Ultimately, the discretion will still
lie with the courts and the judge,
based on the circumstances of the
case.
The big change though, Branson
said, is if an injury or death
occurs.
This bill increases the severity
of the crime and if the bill passes,
the person would have the pos-
sibility of serving 32 months in
prison.
Branson said ultimately his
hopes for the bill are twofold.
He hopes this will take the
incentives out of fleeing the scene
and encourage people to seek
medical assistance.
House Democratic Leader Paul
Davis of Lawrence said,Weve
unfortunately had a lot of tragic
instances here in Douglas County
and several family members of vic-
tims pointed out to me that they
thought there was a real deficiency
in the law whereby people who
have usually been driving drunk
and have killed someone are not
being punished to the degree they
ought to be.
Ryan Crums father Thomas
Crum was killed in 2008 in a hit-
and-run accident and spoke out
in support.
As lawmakers, sometimes you
need to force people to do the
right thing, Crum said. This is
one of those times.
Edited by Brittany Nelson
Stricter law enforcements
for hit-and-run ofenders
As lawmakers, some-
times you need to force
people to do the right
thing.
ryAN CruM
Son of a hit-and-run victim
In the story Alternative breaks ofer an afordable experience on
page 3A of the feb. 4 newspaper, Julia barnard was reported as co-
ordinating all 13 breaks this semester. The Alternative Spring breaks
are coordinated by both barnard and Stephanie Jian, with direction
from Whitney bloom and Aleese Kopf. In addition, the photo under
the Catalina Island headline was taken in Central Park in New york
City. The university daily Kansan regrets these errors.
correction
crime
in Overland Park, said that of all
the schools they recruit from in
the Kansas City area, on average
they see the best results from the
University.
KU students are good at the
technical side as far as their spe-
cific discipline, Gibbar said.
Phyllis Stevens, the human
resources manager at Bernstein-
Rein, a large advertising com-
pany in Kansas City, Mo., has
similar views of KU graduates.
She said overall the quality of
applicants she received from the
University was pretty high. The
one problem Stevens encoun-
ters, not specifically from the
University but recent graduates
across the board, was that stu-
dent lacked skills in attention to
the small details such as spelling
and professionalism, or the soft
skills.
While the Limited Learning
study paints an unflattering
image of college students, it is
not critical thinking and writ-
ing skills that seem to be the
main problem for KU students.
Kathryn Nemeth Tuttle, assistant
vice provost for student success,
said that in order to help distin-
guish oneself, students should
take academically challenging
courses and stay engaged.
Edited by Samantha Collins
ACADeMICS (Continued from 1A)
Name/KANSAN
Newresearch shows that some college students do not possess the necessary skills to succeed in
the workforce. Sociologists says college students lack coplex reading and writing skills.
KU Student Health Services

(785) 864-9573
Contributing to Student Success

enroll@ku.edu
785-864-5823
online.ku.edu/udk
110747
ENROLL &
START ANYTIME!
Online Courses
with KU Independent Study
s3ELFPACEDFORmEXIBILITY
s4AKESIXMONTHSTOCOMPLETE
s'ENERAL%DREQUIREMENTS
s!LTERNATIVETOCLOSEDCLASSES
We offer more than 120 courses
delivered online, keeping you on
track to graduate in four years.

4ALKTO9OUR!DVISOR
340 Fraser | 864-4121
www.psych.ku.edu/psych_clinic/
Counseling Servicesfor
Lawrence & KU
Paid for by KU
2A / NEWS / mondAy, februAry 7, 2011 / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / kAnsAn.com
QUOTE OF THE DAY
The best thing about the future is
that it comes one day at a time.
AbrahamLincoln
FACT OF THE DAY
In 2030 world population will reach
8.3 billion people.
U.S. Census Bureau
Monday, February 7, 2011
Featured
content
kansan.com
Photo galleries
This Thursday is the last
day to drop a class online,
and the last day to cancel
a class. check registrar.
ku.edu for details.
The Jayhawks two-day dual with Iowa
state ended successfully with the Jayhawks
winning the meet 195-99.
kus Wind and Jazz ensembles took the stage
at the Lied center saturday night.
MONDAY
February 7
WEDNESDAY
February 9
THURSDAY
February 10
n The society of open-minded Atheists and
Agnostics and the James randi educational
foundation will host a discussion entitled Actual
events: Teaching critical Thinking and Inspiring
Awe by examining Whats real with guest speak-
er michael blanford, biologist and director of
educational programs at Jref. The event will be
at 7 p.m. in the relay room of the burge union.
n The sabatini multicultural resource
center will be hosting the Tunnel of
oppression interactive program from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the kansas union.
TUESDAY
February 8
FRIDAY
February 11
Whats going on?
n suA will host a Valentines day open House
from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on level 4 of the kansas
union. The event is free.
n The International Law society, Islamic Law
students Association and the Public Interest Law
society will co-sponsor a symposium on human
rights. The symposium will be all day in Green
Hall, room 203.
n suA will host an open mic night at The studio
at Hashinger Hall from 7 to 9 p.m. The event is
free.
SATURDAY
February 12
SUNDAY
February 13
nsuA will host free cosmic bowling at the
Jaybowl on level one of the kansas union from
10 p.m. to 1 a.m.
nA series of plays created by undergraduates
will be presented from 2:30 to 4 p.m. at the Wil-
liam Inge memorial Theatre in murphy Hall.
ET CETERA
The university daily kansan is the student newspaper of the university of
kansas. The first copy is paid through the student activity fee. Additional
copies of The kansan are 50 cents. subscriptions can be purchased at the
kansan business office, 2051A dole Human development center, 1000
sunnyside dr., Lawrence, kan., 66045.
The university daily kansan (Issn 0746-4967) is published daily during the
school year except saturday, sunday, fall break, spring break and exams and
weekly during the summer session excluding holidays. Annual subscriptions
by mail are $250 plus tax. student subscriptions are paid through the student
activity fee. send address changes to The university daily kansan, 2051A dole
Human development center, 1000 sunnyside dr., Lawrence, kan., 66045.
kJHk is the
student voice in
radio. each day
there is news,
music, sports, talk
shows and other content made
for students, by students.
Whether its rock n roll or reg-
gae, sports or special events,
kJHk 90.7 is for you.
MEDIA PARTNERS
check out kansan.
com or kuJH-TV
on knology of
kansas channel 31
in Lawrence for more on what youve
read in todays kansan and other
news. updates from the newsroom
air at noon, 1 p.m., 2 p.m., and 3 p.m.
The student-produced news airs live
at 4 p.m. and again at 5 p.m., 6 p.m.,
every monday through friday. Also see
kuJHs website at tv.ku.edu.
STAYING CONNECTED
WITH THE KANSAN
Get the latest news and give us
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san_news, or become a fan of
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CONTACT US
Tell us your news.
contact nick Gerik, Alex Garrison,
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Gier, michael Holtz or Aleese kopf
at (785) 864-4810 or editor@kansan.
com. follow The kansan on Twitter at
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kansan newsroom
2000 dole Human development
center
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(785) 864-4810
Please recycle this newspaper
Photos by Chris Neal/KANSAN Photos by Chris Bronson/KANSAN
www.kansan.com/photos/galleries/
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KANSAN.COM / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / MONdAy, februAry 7, 2011 / NEWS / 3A
BY ANGELIQUE
MCNAUGHTON
amcnaughton@kansan.com
State officials and family
members of victims involved in
hit-and-run fatalities say stricter
punishment is needed for drivers
who flee the scene of an accident,
especially in a college town like
Lawrence.
District Attorney Charles
Branson, along with family
members of victims in Lawrence,
presented testimony supporting
House Bill 2044 to legislators in
Topeka on Jan. 27.
The House Corrections and
Juvenile Justice Committee will
work on the bill and Chairwoman
Pat Colloton said she hopes the
bill will come out of committee on
Monday or Tuesday in order to be
heard on the house floor.
House Bill 2044 increases the
penalties for leaving the scene of
an accident where great bodily
harm or injury occurs.
If this bill
can deter driv-
ers who have
hit someone
from leaving
their victims on
the side of the
road without
aid, seemingly a
more egregious
crime than the
accident itself,
then it may save
lives and deserves your support,
Jeffrey Stolz said. Stolzs wifes
20-year-old sister Rachel Leek was
killed while riding her bicycle in
2009.
Branson said he can look back
at several instances during the last
few years where someones left the
scene of a fatality accident and
there was proof that they were
possibly driving under the influ-
ence. But once they flee the scene,
Branson said, they rob the state
the chance of trying to build proof
of intoxication at the time of the
accident.
Ryan Kanost, a 2006 Lawrence
senior, was walking with a group
of friends crossing Kentucky Street
in a crosswalk late one night in
September 2006. A car struck
Ryan in the crosswalk killing
him and fled, according to tes-
timony provided by Branson given
by Ryans father, Michael Kanost
to legislators.
The driver who killed Ryan had
been drinking heavily and when
he left the bar that night, one of
his friends tried to prevent him
from driving. After the accident
and without rendering help to
Ryan, he drove back to the bar
where he told his friends some-
thing bad had happened, accord-
ing to Kanost.
The driver was sentenced to 90
days in jail, with work release.
From 2004 to 2008, hit-and-run
accidents averaged 9.2 percent of
all accidents in Kansas, accord-
ing to the Kansas Department of
Transportation. Thirty-five acci-
dents resulted
in death.
The cur-
rent law,
some believe,
provides an
incentive for
intoxicated
drivers to leave
the scene of an
accident rather
than face the
consequences
of a driving under the influence
conviction.
Theyre weighing their
options, if you will, Branson said.
Under the law, someone who
leaves the scene of an injury
accident is charged with a level
10 persons felony. In essence,
that means that someone with
no criminal history is looking at
probation.
House Bill 2044 increases
the penalty from a level 10 to
a level eight persons felony,
which increases the time that a
person can be sentenced to jail.
Ultimately, the discretion will still
lie with the courts and the judge,
based on the circumstances of the
case.
The big change though, Branson
said, is if an injury or death
occurs.
This bill increases the severity
of the crime and if the bill passes,
the person would have the pos-
sibility of serving 32 months in
prison.
Branson said ultimately his
hopes for the bill are twofold.
He hopes this will take the
incentives out of fleeing the scene
and encourage people to seek
medical assistance.
House Democratic Leader Paul
Davis of Lawrence said,Weve
unfortunately had a lot of tragic
instances here in Douglas County
and several family members of vic-
tims pointed out to me that they
thought there was a real deficiency
in the law whereby people who
have usually been driving drunk
and have killed someone are not
being punished to the degree they
ought to be.
Ryan Crums father Thomas
Crum was killed in 2008 in a hit-
and-run accident and spoke out
in support.
As lawmakers, sometimes you
need to force people to do the
right thing, Crum said. This is
one of those times.
Edited by Brittany Nelson
Stricter law enforcements
for hit-and-run ofenders
As lawmakers, some-
times you need to force
people to do the right
thing.
ryAN CruM
Son of a hit-and-run victim
In the story Alternative breaks ofer an afordable experience on
page 3A of the feb. 4 newspaper, Julia barnard was reported as co-
ordinating all 13 breaks this semester. The Alternative Spring breaks
are coordinated by both barnard and Stephanie Jian, with direction
from Whitney bloom and Aleese Kopf. In addition, the photo under
the Catalina Island headline was taken in Central Park in New york
City. The university daily Kansan regrets these errors.
CoRRECTIoN
CRImE
in Overland Park, said that of all
the schools they recruit from in
the Kansas City area, on average
they see the best results from the
University.
KU students are good at the
technical side as far as their spe-
cific discipline, Gibbar said.
Phyllis Stevens, the human
resources manager at Bernstein-
Rein, a large advertising com-
pany in Kansas City, Mo., has
similar views of KU graduates.
She said overall the quality of
applicants she received from the
University was pretty high. The
one problem Stevens encoun-
ters, not specifically from the
University but recent graduates
across the board, was that stu-
dent lacked skills in attention to
the small details such as spelling
and professionalism, or the soft
skills.
While the Limited Learning
study paints an unflattering
image of college students, it is
not critical thinking and writ-
ing skills that seem to be the
main problem for KU students.
Kathryn Nemeth Tuttle, assistant
vice provost for student success,
said that in order to help distin-
guish oneself, students should
take academically challenging
courses and stay engaged.
Edited by Samantha Collins
ACADEMICS (Continued from 1A)
Name/KANSAN
Newresearch shows that some college students do not possess the necessary skills to succeed in
the workforce. Sociologists says college students lack coplex reading and writing skills.
KU Student Health Services

(785) 864-9573
Contributing to Student Success

enroll@ku.edu
785-864-5823
online.ku.edu/udk
110747
ENROLL &
START ANYTIME!
Online Courses
with KU Independent Study
s3ELFPACEDFORmEXIBILITY
s4AKESIXMONTHSTOCOMPLETE
s'ENERAL%DREQUIREMENTS
s!LTERNATIVETOCLOSEDCLASSES
We offer more than 120 courses
delivered online, keeping you on
track to graduate in four years.

4ALKTO9OUR!DVISOR
340 Fraser | 864-4121
www.psych.ku.edu/psych_clinic/
Counseling Servicesfor
Lawrence & KU
Paid for by KU
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4A / ENTERTAINMENT / mondAy, februAry 7, 2011 / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / kAnsAn.com
10 is the easiest day, 0 the most
challenging.
HoRoScopES
ARIES (March21-April 19)
Today is a 9
This may be your best monday this
year, so far. everything lines up for
you today in love, work and com-
munication. dont forget to breathe.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
Today is a 7
Theres light at the end of the tunnel
(and its not the oncoming train).
keep looking for new opportuni-
ties in your career. youll be nicely
surprised.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21)
Today is a 7
When the road seems too steep,
just climb one rock at a time, until
youve reach the top of the moun-
tain. The future looks brighter from
the ridge.
cANcER (June 22-July 22)
Today is an8
Love is in the air, although it may
not seem to be cooperating today.
Patience is really a virtue. focus
instead on work challenges, and
wait for the right moment.
LEo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Today is a 6
If your mind wanders to exotic
places, maybe its time to actually
go there, or to add some adventure
to your daily routine. ride a bike to
work. Take an unexpected detour.
VIRGo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Today is a 6
spend frugally today. you may
get disappointed in love. Let go of
Valentines day expectations. Love
the people around you, and things
open up.
LIbRA (Sept. 23-oct. 22)
Today is a 6
relationships are especially
important today. you may discover
new romance, even in an existing
relationship. Take time out to really
appreciate this.
ScoRpIo (oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Today is an8
dont let all this activity cause you to
lose your focus at work. eat healthy
fresh food, move the kinks out of
your body and settle back to it.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Today is a 5
If it was that simple, youd play all
day ... but youre worried that theres
too much going on. Its all part of
the game, and it all works out.
cApRIcoRN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Today is a 6
Work smarter at home. use ideas
from family members, both
younger and older. Take a deep
breath and think it through. dexter-
ity handles the problem.
AqUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Today is an8
keep exploring. Writing a diary can
be very helpful. dont waste your
time with gossip. your ideas de-
serve better. Look into publishing
your words.
pIScES (Feb. 19-March20)
Today is a 7
dont make expensive promises
now. focus on your work, placing
one brick at a time, and eventu-
ally youll reap the benefts. rome
wasnt built in a day.
All puzzles King Features
MoNKEYzILLA
Nicholas Sambaluk
Kevin Cook
THE NExT pANEL
oDD NEwS
TEcHNoLoGY
Cow in Arkansas
gives birth to
rare set of triplets
JONESBORO, Ark. Guess it
runs in the family: A descendant
of an Arkansas cow famed for
giving birth to triplets multiple
times has birthed her own set of
triplets.
Rancher David Jones tells the
Jonesboro Sun his mixed-breed
cow named Nosy Rosy gave
birth to the triplets on Jan. 25.
According to Oklahoma State
University researchers, beef cat-
tle have triplets in one of about
105,000 pregnancies.
Jones says he named Nosy Rosys
calves Larry, Curly and Moe.
Nosy Rosy is the great-grand-
daughter of a Charolais-mix cow
named Faith who had four sets
of triplets. Nosy Rosy was a trip-
let, as was the calves father, who
descended from the same blood-
line. Jones says that almost guar-
anteed Nosy Rosy would have a
multiple birth.
Facebook now accessible
on various airlines in Feb.
Mcclatchy-tribune
For those of you who just cant
wait for your next status update,
Facebook will now be accessible
even when youre in the air
traveling by plane.
Perhaps your update will go
something like this: I am about
30,000 feet in the air, passing over
DisneyWorld. Please dont rob my
house.
AirTran Airways, Alaska
Airlines, American Airlines, Delta,
United Airlines, U.S. Airways and
Virgin America are among the
airlines offering Facebook access
while in flight, thanks to a deal
with Gogo Inflight Internet. The
service will be free for the month
of February.
If you want to access other
websites, youll have to cough up
cash. Fees start at $4.95 for short
flights and can go up to $12.95 for
longer flights.
USA Today reports that
Facebook is the most-visited site
via Gogo, which serves 1,100
commercial aircraft or about
3,800 flights a day.
T
he recent death of Lisa
Robinson at the mere age of
43 highlights the importance
of womens heart health. February is
National Heart Awareness Month. As a
female college student, I am constantly
reminded about my health and safety:
breast cancer, human papillomavirus
leading to cervical cancer, and the
dangers of domestic violence and abusive
relationships are just some of these
concerns. These topics are all vital, but
never has heart health been stressed as
significant at my age.
According to the National Heart
Association, cardiovascular disease is
still the No. 1 killer of women. NHA
also said while one in 33 women has
a chance of dying from breast cancer,
one in three will die from heart disease
without prevention.
Luckily, heart disease is also the No. 1
most preventable disease in this country.
Eighty percent of these cardiac ailments
may be prevented if the right life choices
are made.
Both women and men can develop
plaque in their large coronary arteries.
This causes them to narrow, which
eventually creates a blockage because
blood cannot pass through. However,
it is hard to detect plaque during an
angiogram. The plaque forms a thin
layer in the lumen rather than lumpy
blocks, so blood still flows evenly.
Women, on the other hand, are more
likely to develop heart disease in the tiny
arteries also known as micro vessels. If
enough micro vessels are under stress,
the outcome is the same as a blocked
artery.
So,why go RED?
Because the life decisions we make
now will be carried out in our future.
A solid foundation for minimizing
your risk of heart disease is founded by
lowering both your blood pressure and
cholesterol numbers.
This is attainable by healthier diet
choices: stopping smoking, reducing
alcohol intake and exercising more.
I know we are stressed out college
students, but add some almonds, salmon
(omega three fatty acid), and blueberries
to your diet. Instead of taking the bus,
walk to class! Its better to work on
health improvements now then pay for
it later.
Keep wearing your pink, blue and
purple ribbons, but remember the red
ones as well. Maybe wear a nice red dress
when you go out. Wear your red lipstick.
Wear those red heels. Wear your red KU
gear. Go red for women.
Saha is a junior in neurobiology
from Overland Park.
O
Letter GuideLineS
Send letters to kansanopdesk@gmail.
com. Write LettertOtHe editOr in
the e-mail subject line.
Length: 300 words
The submission should include the
authors name, grade and hometown.
Find our full letter to the editor policy
online at kansan.com/letters.
how to submit A LEttER to thE EDitoR
nick Gerik, editor
864-4810 or ngerik@kansan.com
Alex Garrison, managing editor
864-4810 or agarrison@kansan.com
Kelly Stroda, managing editor
864-4810 or kstroda@kansan.com
d.M. Scott, opinion editor
864-4924 or dscott@kansan.com
Mandy Matney, associate opinion editor
864-4924 or mmatney@kansan.com
Carolyn Battle, business manager
864-4358 or cbattle@kansan.com
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864-4477 or jcassin@kansan.com
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adviser
864-7667 or mgibson@kansan.com
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864-7666 or jschlitt@kansan.com
tHe editOriAL BOArd
Members of The Kansan Editorial Board are Nick
Gerik, Alex Garrison, Kelly Stroda, D.M. Scott and
Mandy Matney.
contAct us
PAGe 5A tHe uniVerSitY dAiLY KAnSAn
As a young female student in the
heartland of America, I face complex
equality issues that often go unnoticed.
Not to discount these issues, but imag-
ine having to confront the most basic
inequalities every day.
And, imagine the government has
always accommodated such cultural
divisions.
Now, throw in a political revolution.
Egypt has a lot to be proud of as a
nation. Most obvious is the countrys
rich and interesting history, which
makes tourism an important element
of Egypts economy. It has stood as an
important ally to the United States and
Israel over the years. And, it has a gen-
eration of young people ready to stand
up for how they believe their country
should be governed.
Although women in Egypt can study
at universities, and many have actively
participated in the political unrest,
cultural traditions are still an obstacle
to womens equal standing in public
life.
According to a New York Times
article from last July, the recent shift
many Egyptian women have made t
public work has not resulted in any
kind of cultural liberation for women
in the country. In fact, this lack of
change has discouraged many women,
making the traditional, confining
home life seem more appealing.
This home life is not exactly the
equivalent to being a stay-at-home
mom in American society.
The World Economic Forum Global
Gender Gap Report rated Egypt
120th out of 128 in gender equality,
emphasizing problem areas of politi-
cal empowerment and genuine female
opportunity. In fact, the high unem-
ployment that has been one reason
for political unrest is significantly
affecting women (although unem-
ployed men in Egypt have been the
medias focusanother example of the
strong cultural gender dichotomy). It
is safe to assume that the disconcert-
ment with these problems has been an
impetus for female participation in the
revolution.
Though this may seem indicative of
progression toward gender equality,
the young women of Egypt must make
this a priority as they shift toward a
more democratic Egypt.
Though there have been whispers
that a democracy might actually slow
progress for womens rights, if women
stand their ground and demand that
their rights be taken into consideration
during the transition, it could be a
major victory for gender equality.
Cosby is a junior from Overland
Park majoring in political science
and english.
HuMAn riGHtS
Freeall
for
By Kelly CosBy
kcosby@kansan.com
By moniCa saha
msaha@kansan.com
opinion
apps.facebook.com/dailykansan
MOndAY, FeBruArY 7, 2011
America should measure progress diferently
POLitiCS
HeALtH
We, the Commission on the
Status of Women, would like to
respond to the recent advice column
about unplanned pregnancy. We
felt as though what presumably was
meant to be a humorous piece about
the male perspective of unplanned
pregnancy was instead inappropriate
and offensive.
First, let us say that the experience
of unplanned pregnancy is never
funny. Period. We, too, may have
chuckled at the antics of Seth Rogen
and Katherine Heigel in Knocked
Up, but these authors are no Seth
Rogen, Jason Segel and Jonah Hill,
and their piece is far from amusing.
Instead, it not only makes light of
but also debases what for hundreds
of women and men everyday is a
very serious issue.
While Kilgores good advice
does bother to note, This doesnt
suck as much for you as it does
for her, and even suggests that the
man might begrudgingly accept
the duties of fatherhood, both
Schumaker and Nichols abandon
any kind of respect for the experi-
ence of unplanned pregnancy with
their grossly offensive humor.
Shumaker suggests in his bad
advice that the reader simply ignore
his child and girlfriend, shirking his
legal responsibilities as a parent, a
suggestion made all the less humor-
ous by the fact that this actually
happens every day, leaving women
and children across the nation in
poverty.
But Nichols ugly advice, by
far, is the most offensive in its sug-
gestion that the reader might use
the market for human trafficking
to trade his child for a piece of
merchandise. Human trafficking,
too, happens daily right here in the
United States and is certainly no
laughing matter.
Such gross disrespect for the
experience of women and men
around the world (and on our cam-
pus) who experience the pain and
confusion of unplanned pregnancy
is appalling. We can only hope that
if faced with such a difficult issue
in their own lives these authors will
receive more compassion than they
offer.
The Commission on the Status of
Women at KU is a campus organiza-
tion that focuses on gender discrimi-
nation.
Signed, CSW president,
Meredith Pavicic, a senior from
Leawood.
Unwanted pregnancy is
never a joking matter
Go red for women to
prevent heart disease
Vote now at KAnSAn.COM/POLLS
T
h
e
P
o
l
l

W
e
e
k
l
y
How do you feel
about Valentines day?
Letter tO tHe editOr
Revolution must consider womens rights
I
n his State of the Union address,
President Obama said that we
have never measured prog-
ress by the yardstick of profits and
economy alone, but that we measure
progress by the success of our people,
by the jobs they can find and the qual-
ity of life those jobs offer and by the
opportunities for a better life that we
pass on to our children.
While we may appreciate Obamas
inspirational optimism, the fact is that
the train wreck of our collective action
exposes our countrys rigid yardstick of
profit and economy.
It sounds better when we call our
financial motivations quality of
life improvements, but lets face it,
Americans value progress in dollars.
Quality of life means access to
money that can be exchanged for any-
thing we need or want. Success is a job
that enables us to buy a huge house, a
sexy car and to maximize the diagonal
dimension of our television set.
If we really measured progress by
the equitable access to employment,
how would we explain the 7.3 percent
discrepancy in unemployment rates
for whites (8.5 percent) and African
Americans (15.8 percent)?
If we measured progress by the qual-
ity of life that those jobs offer, how
would we explain the millions of work-
ing Americans who do not have access
to health insurance?
And if we measured progress by the
better life we plan to provide future
generations, how could we justify leav-
ing our children a $14 trillion debt, a
planet raped of resources full of dirty
air?
Legitimate quality of life consid-
erations would require us to pursue
progress in areas that we currently
struggle to measure, areas such as
social justice, environmental steward-
ship and realistic, fiscal responsibility.
The truth is that we have been
ignoring the full scope of our human
value system, and we are beginning
to realize the physical, emotional and
spiritual consequences of that neglect.
We have been forced to make choic-
es between company profits and envi-
ronmental protection, between what is
profitable for us and what respects the
rights of others.
These choices put us in countless
psychological and emotional conflicts
that force us to compromise our values
in order to meet financial goals. We
do care about our local community
and global environment but societal
expectations equate financial achieve-
ment with personal responsibility and
success.
The good news is that we have the
opportunity to change the rules.
More and more people are choosing
to operate according to a new system
that honors the full range of human
values. This new set of values doesnt
ask us to sacrifice financial security. It
simply gives us permission to consider
social justice and environmental stew-
ardship as well.
For those of us preparing to enter
the professional world, this shift pres-
ents an opportunity to use our talents
for more than ensuring our bosses six,
or nowadays, nine figure salaries.
It represents an opportunity to
consider the things we care about
and work toward the goals that truly
inspire, motivate and excite us.
Handshy is a frst-year MBA stu-
dent from Lawrence.
By Raeanne handshy
rhandshy@kansan.com
Stop trying to hook up on FFA. Go
out, get drunk, get laid. Ready ...
Break!

Im excited to see how much Doug
Funnys ego swells when he gets
back to town.

Highlight of my weekend: building a
snow couch.

Did you know Queen Victoria
smoked weed to help with cramps?
Later, Midol!

Getting laid would be so much
easier if I had a girlfriend.

How to make sure your date doesnt
become your girlfriend? The rules
for dating are the same as the rules
for Gremlins.

Its sad cause your love is like a bus;
I may miss you, but I know more will
come.

If people are going to consistently
use FFA to hook up, then the rest of
us reserve the right to butt into their
relationship. It IS a public forum,
after all.

You know hes a true gentleman
when he lets you take the frst hit.
Thats class.

It isnt even a month into the new
semester and O Chem has already
destroyed my soul. Awesome.

Ive decided to be a drug dealer like
White Mike in the flm Twelve.

EMILIO!!!!!

My greatest drunk skill is being able
to convince women to go to strip
clubs with me.

Its saying something when the
thing you miss most from your past
relationship is the free weed.

Last week, my one-night-stand
turned into a TWO night/three-day-
stand thanks to the snowstorm.
Worse? Or better? You decide.

My mouth tastes like shame.

Dear Pandora, what do Taking Back
Sunday and Blues Traveler have in
common? Fix this.

I feel as though my promiscuity
and drunken antics have made me
ofcially unmarriable.
When a crime breaks out, all the
cute girls shout ... Get the Good
Lookin Guy. Book him, Good Lookin!
I cannot believe that you just
quoted Boy Meets World. Coolest.
Person. Ever!

Girls pants just keep getting tighter.
Jeans, pants, leggings, light colored
leggings ... I cant wait till girls start
going to class in their underwear
and say its in style.
This new iPod app for a virtual
aquarium has helped me fulfll my
life-long dream of being a marine
biologist.



6A / NEWS / MONDAY, februArY 7, 2011 / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / kANsAN.cOM
1) David Wasescha, a senior from
Stillwater, Minn., plays the bass
during Saturday nights Wind and Jazz
concert at the Lied Center. Wasescha
is one of four members of the Jazz
ensembles rhythm section, which has
the drums, bass, guitar, and piano.
2) Taylor Babb, a junior for Garden
City, plays the drums for the KU Jazz
ensemble Saturday night at the Lied
Center. The Jazz ensemble played
three songs before turning it over to
the Wind ensemble for the remainder
of the night.
3) Tommy Johnson, a graduate stu-
dent from Lawrence, plays a trumpet
solo during the Jazz portion of the KU
Wind and Jazz concert Saturday night
at the Lied Center. Johnson was one
of two trumpet players who played
solos during the Jazz portion of the
concert.
4) Quin Jackson, a senior from
Overland Park, performs a solo on
his saxophone Saturday night at the
Lied Center. Jackson is one of fve
saxophone players in the KU Jazz
ensemble.
3
Photos by Chris Neal/KANSAN
1 2
4
Lied
Center:
Wind,
Jazz
concert
mUSIc
PAID INTERNET
off deposit
2 & 3 Bedroom $750-$840
Chase Court
1942 Stewert Ave.
Great Campus
Locations
Applecroft
Abbotts Corner
Chamberlain Court
Melrose Court
Ocho Court
785-843-8220
chasecourt@sunflower.com

Sunrise Place
Spacious, Remodeled homes
View plans, pricing,
and amenities @
sunriseapartments.com
or call 841-8400
g
Apartments and Townhomes
Sunrise Village
2, 3, & 4 Bedroom
Models Available
TRY KANSAN
CLASSIFIEDS
Students:
Buy 1 week
Get 3 weeks FREE!
785 864 4358
hawkchalk.com
classieds@kansan.com
*Waterfront
*Art
*Tennis
*Land Sports
SUMMER IN MAINE
Males and females
Meet new friends! Travel!
Teach your favorite activity.
June to August. Residential.
Enjoy our website. Apply online.
TRIPP LAKE CAMP for Girls:
1-800-997-4347
www.tripplakecamp.com
Summer Lease (1 Month Free)
Brand New 4 BR, 3 BA, Close to football
stadium, all appliances. Call
785-841-3849
Personal care attendant/ Needed for
young woman w/ autism in Lawrence.
Various shifts available.
Call 785-266-5307
Babysitter. In our home. Experience re-
quired and need reliable transportation.
785-856-5518
Bambinos Immediate Openings for bar-
tenders and servers. Apply in person at
our new location 1540 Wakarusa Dr.
BARTENDING. UP TO $300/DAY. NO
EXPERIENCE NECESSARY. TRAIN-
ING AVAILABLE. 800-965-6520 EXT
108.
Basehor Community Library is
accepting applications for a PT position
of Childrens Services- Birth to Five.
Scheduled hours of 20-30 hours per
week include some evenings and
weekends. Complete job description
and application can be found at
www.basehorlibrary.org. 913-724-2828
EOE
Carlos OKellys is Now Hiring servers
and kitchen.Day availability is a must.
Please apply within at 707 W. 23rd St.
Camp Raintree is looking for experi-
enced, mature camp counselors to work
full-time in our summer day camp. Appli-
cants must have had comparable experi-
ence in a camp environment working
with children ages 6-12. Call 843-6800.
Growing Medical Supply company look-
ing for someone for Data Entry M-Thrs.
From 5-8 pm. Pay $10 depending on
availability and experience. Need imme-
diately. Please e-mail Greg at ges@-
surepointmedical.com.
City of Lawrence
The City Managers Offce has an intern-
ship opportunity preferred for a second
year Master of Public Admin student.
The internship is a one year full-time po-
sition. The intern will assist w/various
projects throughout the organization.
Must hv excellent communication & MS
Offce skills. One or more years of prior
part time work experience in an adminis-
trative or offce setting is highly desir-
able Must pass bk ground ck, post-offer
physical and drug screening. Salary is
$35,257 w/time off benefts. Apply by
02/10/2011.
To Apply Go To
www.LawrenceKs.org/Jobs
EOE M/F/D
Enjoy working in a fast-paced, highly
productive, value-driven environment?
If so, Northwestern Mutual Financial Net-
work is the place for you. For more infor-
mation call Bethany Scothorn at 785-
856-2136 or email at bethany.-
scothorn@nmfn.com
Make a DIFFERENCE! Be a CAMP
COUNSELOR! Friendly Pines Camp, in
the cool mountains of Prescott, AZ, is hir-
ing for the 2011 season, May 21 - July
28. We offer 30+ activities including
horseback riding, waterskiing, climbing,
canoeing, target sports, ropes course
and more. Competitve salary, room and
board included. To apply, go to www.-
friendlypines.com or contact Sylvia at 1-
888-281-CAMP. Be a part of something
AMAZING, and have the summer of a
lifetime!
Opportunities for Smiling Faces!!
We are hiring for All FOH & HOH Hourly
Positions at our New Restaurant in
Kansas City, KS! Interviews: Feb. 10th
Feb. 24th
Mon Sun / 10am-4pm
Apply in Person!
10700 Parallel Parkway
Kansas City, KS 66109
We offer excellent benefts, fexible
sched-
ules and opportunities to make great $$.
Energy, Enthusiasm, Sharp appearance,
positive attitude, & promptness required!
EOE
STUDENTPAYOUTS.COM
Paid Survey Takers Needed in
Lawrence.
100% FREE to Join! Click on Surveys.
Paid Internships
with Northwestern Mutual
Lawrence offce 785-856-2136
Sun Resorts Tanning seeks part time-
sales staff. Apply in person at 15th and
Kasold or at www.sunresorts.net No
phone calls.
2 BR 1 BA - kitchen all amentities
included, W/D, 1 car garage, duplex
785-841-8744 Available NOW $800/mo
No pets
3,5,6, and 7 BR houses avail. Aug.
2011. Walk to campus. 785-842-6618.
rainbowworks1@yahoo.com
The Lawrence Public Library has an
opening for a part-time security offcer.
Responsible for patrolling the library and
grounds, greeting and interacting with
patrons, and correcting behavioral
issues. Communicates with police and
fre/medical as needed. Assists with
severe weather, fre alarm and other
emergency drills and events. Position is
approximately 24 hours per week, with
hours currently on Saturday morning,
Sunday afternoon, and Monday and
Wednesday afternoon and evening.
Previous knowledge of and experience
in security and self defense required.
Beginning $10.00 hourly wage, sick and
vacation leave. For more information
and to apply, visit www.lawrencepublicli-
brary.org/about/jobs.html EOE
2 BR - has wood foors, DW, & W/D
hookups. 917 Lousiana. Close to cam-
pus and downtown! $650/mo. Water
paid. Avail. now. 785-393-6443
3-4 BRs Available August. Hardwood
foors. W/D. Central Air. Next to cam-
pus. 1001, 1005, 1012, 1023 Illinois
Street. 913-683-8198 $1080-$1700 a
month
Available August
3 BR, close to KU, appliances.
Call 785-841-3849
3/4 BR Homes. Avail. August 1. Great
Location, Ample Parking, excellent
condition. 785-760-0144
AVAIL Aug or June, 4 BR or 3 BR, 3
bath, near KU, great cond., W/D, D/W, all
appliances. Call, must see
785-841-3849.
Michigan Street Apartment. 1 BR
upstairs apartment. Off street parking
Will be available March 1st. 838-9515
Fall Semester Lease: Aug. - Dec.
4 BR, 3 BA, 2 Car Garage, near KU
Call (785) 841-3849
NOW LEASING FOR FALL!
Highpointe, Downtown and Campus
Locations
Studios, 1, 2 & 3 Bedrooms
2001 W. 6th St., Lawrence
785-841-8468
www.frstmanagementinc.com
Parkway Commons: Townhomes,
houses and luxury apartments.
Garages, pool, w/d, gym. Leasing for
fall. 842-3280. 3601 Clinton Pkwy
Saddlebrook & Overland Pointe
2BR Luxury Townhomes for Summer/Fall
2BA, 2 car attached garages
785-832-8200
Part-time receptionist needed. Must
have good driving record. May fll out
application or bring resume to 1530 Bob
Billings Parkway Suite A.
ANNOUNCEMENTS JOBS HOUSING JOBS
JOBS
JOBS
HOUSING
HOUSING
KANSAN.COM / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / MONdAy, februAry 7, 2011 / NEWS / 7A
BY Laura Sather
lsather@kansan.com

Four more low-income hous-
ing units will go up in Lawrence
thanks to a $475,000 grant given
to the City of Lawrence. With the
help of the organization Tenants to
Homeowners, the city has set one
of the four locations at a vacant lot
at 2123 Rhode Island. The other
three remain up in the air.
Margene Swarts, assistant direc-
tor for Development Services for
the city, said the city may make
entirely new buildings for the
units, or it may just refurbish old
buildings. She also said the hous-
ing will be geared more toward
families, but thats not to say that
students cant live there.
Some students are families,
Swarts said. That doesnt neces-
sary preclude them.
City council members raised a
concern in the city commission
meeting last week, saying that in a
two-bedroom unit, four students
may try to squeeze in to reduce
rent. Swarts said that since these
units are geared toward families,
that idea hasnt been an issue.
Rebecca Buford, execu-
tive director for Tenants to
Homeowners, said the organi-
zation only owns land east of
Massachusetts Street, making
these properties farther from cam-
pus and less likely to see a problem
with students squeezing people in.
She also said she hopes the
families who rent these properties
will own them; the goal of these
properties is to help families make
a transition into homeownership.
When you talk about low-
income housing, that freaks people
out. It freaks neighbors out,
Buford said. Were talking about
workforce housing.
Tenants in these proper-
ties would have to meet certain
income eligibility requirements.
The tenants in one property will
have to make 50 percent of the
annual average income of Douglas
County, while the other three
properties will require tenants to
make 80 percent of that number.
The actual monetary value of
those figures depends on how big
the families are that rent the units.
Buford said students are more
than welcome to rent these prop-
erties as well, as long as they meet
the requirements. She also said the
properties will be especially help-
ful for recent graduates looking for
a more permanent place to live.
She said the first propertys
construction could begin as early
as March and be rentable by the
summer.
Edited by Becca Harsch
HOUSING
Ben Pirotte/KANSAN
The vacant lot at 2123 Rhode Island is the future site for a housing project subsidized by the city. With the help of the organizationTenants to Homeowners, there are three other sites for the project that remain up in the air. While
the project is geared more toward families, Margaret Swarts, assistant director for Development Services for the city, said it would be open to students as well.
WHO: The City of Lawrence and Tenants to
Homeowners
WHAT: The city will build four low-income housing
units.
WHEN: Construction is expected to begin this spring,
and units may be available to rent by the summer.
WHERE: The frst site is a vacant lot at 2123 rhode Is-
land. Three more units will be built at properties east
of Massachussetts Street.
WHY: The goal of the properties is to help families
make a transition into ownership.
COST: The project will be funded by a $475,000 grant.
Lawrence builds low-income housing
THE HOUSING
pLAN
www.ContinuingEd.ku.edu (keyword: testprep) I-4-11
GRE

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Noon to 4:00 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011
5th Floor, Kansas Union
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SUCCESS
Engineering
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Dress Professionally Bring Your Resume www.ecc.ku.edu
Make a Good
Impression
Dress Professionally Dress Professiona y e Bring Your Resume e
BY Nicole WeNtliNg
nwentling@kansan.com
Dr. Marigold Linton, director
of American Indian Outreach
at the University of Kansas,
was awarded the Presidential
Award for Excellence in Science,
Mathematics and Engineering
Mentoring (PAESMEM).
The White House established
this award to recognize mentors
who expand the participation
of underrepresented groups in
the sciences. According to the
National Science Foundation, the
awardees are those who serve
as exemplars to their colleagues
and are leaders in the national
effort to more fully develop the
Nations human resources in sci-
ence, technology, engineering,
and mathematics.
Linton received the PAESMEM
for creating a method to help sci-
ence students at Haskell Indian
Nations University make the
transition to the University.
Throughout the past 12 years,
Linton has written grant pro-
posals for the project that have
resulted in $14 million in fund-
ing.
Lintons project receives
grants from Bridges to
Baccalaureate, Initiative for
Maximizing Student Diversity
(IMSD), Research Initiative for
Scientific Enhancement (RISE),
Post-Baccalaureate Research
Education Program (PREP), and
the Institutional Research and
Academic Career Development
A w a r d s
(IRACDA).
Because of
these grants,
Haskell stu-
dents receive
tutoring, skill
e n h a n c e -
ment and the
opportunity to
participate in
research expe-
riences in KU
l abor at or i es .
The grants also
allow Haskell
faculty to
receive graduate training.
The Post-Baccalaureate
Research Education Program
grant targets Haskell students
who are not quite ready for grad-
uate school and prepares them to
succeed in grad school. Through
this grant the students improve
on writing and math skills,
receive leadership training, and
gain experience in a research
mentors laboratory.
At first, Linton worked with
students and faculty, and wrote
all of the proposals on her own.
She now has 20 partners at both
the University and Haskell who
aid her in running the program.
I continue
to help devel-
op the propos-
als that fund
the programs,
she said.
This year,
11 winners of
the PAESMEM
w e r e
a nnounc e d.
Each of the
a w a r d e e s
will receive
a $25,000
grant that
will benefit
their projects, as well as a com-
memorative presidential cer-
tificate. The recipients traveled
to Washington, D.C., and were
presented the award. Each gave
a presentation about their work
and was given a tour of the west
wing of the White House. Linton
was able to invite four guests to
the ceremony. She invited her
husband, Dr. Robert Barnhill, as
well as two of her colleagues,
associate director of the
Office for Diversity and Science
Training Dr. Estela Gavosto
and director of the Office for
Diversity in Science Training Dr.
James Orr.
Dr. Linton is a very talented
individual with a special talent
for conceptualizing ideas for
training students in the sciences.
She is honest, direct, and a plea-
sure to work with, Orr said.
While in Washington, D.C.,
Linton also had the opportunity
to meet President Barack Obama
and Vice President Joe Biden.
As we walked down the cor-
ridor to the Oval Office, Vice
President Biden shook each of
our hands in a very gracious
way, Linton said. We were
lined up and introduced to the
President at the door of the Oval
Office.
The trip concluded on
Thursday, Jan. 27, when Linton
accepted the PAESMEM from
the director of the National
Science Foundation and the
Presidents national science advi-
sor, Dr.Subra Suresh.
Linton returned to the KU and
Haskell to continue the work she
began years ago. She said she felt
fortunate to have the opportu-
nity to help her community.
My heart is gladdened to see
young people succeed, especially
those who have had few advan-
tages, she said. Every success,
large or small, is something that
I cherish.
Edited by Emily Soetaert
8A / NEWS / MONDAY, FebruArY 7, 2011 / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / kANsAN.cOM
Contribued photo
Dr. Marigold Linton, director of American Indian Outreach at KU, receives the PAESMEMaward at a
ceremony inWashington, D.C. onThursday. President Barack Obama presented the award at a cer-
emony before the one shown here. To Dr. Lintons left is Dr.Subra Suresh, director of the National
Science Foundation. To her right is Dr. John P. Holdren, assistant to the President for Science and
Technology, and director of the Ofce of Science andTechnology Policy.
With a strong infuence
of Chinese international students attending the University of Kansas, it
is no surprise that a grand celebration was planned for this years New
Year celebration. Since the Chinese have traditionally had a diferent
method for computing the seasons and their calendar, the Chinese
NewYear falls at a diferent time than Jan. 1. This years Chinese New
Year was Feb. 3. The Chinese Students and Scholars Friendship Asso-
ciation (CSSFA) celebrated in the Kansas Union on Saturday, Feb. 5 by
having a talent show in Woodruf Auditorium. While the main event
was mainly in Chinese, some events were also translated into English,
as the crowd was open to everyone. Tickets to the showand the dinner
that followed were able to be purchased the week before.
CHINESE NEW YEAR
CELEBRATION
AWARD
Faculty member receives award for promoting science
Photos by Ben Pirotte/KANSAN
1
2
3
4 5
Josie Ho, a senior fromMacau, China, performs Love Finds Its Way.The song was sung in Mandarin Chinese.
Stephanie Roberts, a junior fromHays, is fed sushi fromTryyaki during a game that involved the audience. The game required three people: two were blindfolded and one had to feed the
other sushi. The third, who could see, directed the feeding process. A fewtimes during the show, there were games that involved the audience. Winners were awarded prizes fromsome of the
festivals sponsors.
GuWen, a sophomore fromNantong, China and Zhu Zengfeng, a sophomore fromBeijing, performXiangsheng, a traditional Chinese comedic crosstalk routine. The language, rich in puns and
usually very sarcastic, involves two or more participants who create a fast-paced banter. Performers cover topics relevant to the time, such as Chinese real estate and money trends, like in this
performance.
Qiyn Jiang, an Applied English Center student fromWuxi, China, and Jessica Benson, a sophomore fromLeawood, attended the show, here marveling at theFish for Alldance, (picture #5).
Pan Dongni, a senior fromXian, China, performs a traditional dance entitledFish for All. Multiple dancers dressed as fsh and danced in a fuid motion, mimicking fsh.
1
2
3
4
5
Dr. Linton is a very
talented individual with a
special talent for concep-
tualizing ideas for training
students in the sciences.
She is honest, direct, and
a pleasure to work with.
Dr. JAMes Or
this is a job
SportS
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
monday, February 7, 2011 www.kansan.com PaGe 1b
The Green Bay Packers earned their fourth Super Bowl title after beating the Pittsburgh Steelers, 31-25, on Sunday. The win marked
the Packersfrst Super Bowl title in 14 years.
Packers win Super Bowl, 31-25
Super Bowl | 3B
Change of PaCe
New tactics required
After Nebraskas slow play,
Missouri offers different style
Howard ting/KANSAN
Junior guardTyshawnTaylor puts up a feld goal against the Nebraska Huskers Saturday afternoon in Bob Devaney Sports Center at Lincoln, Neb. Taylor
fnished the game with 6 points, 5 assists, and 3 total rebounds.
Womens basketball
Mike Gunnoe/KANSAN FIle pHoto
Sophomore guard Angel Goodrich passes the ball to a teammate in the game against Colorado Wednesday. Goodrich recorded a career high 14
assists in the loss at Texas Saturday.
Jayhawks stay positive despite loss to Longhorns
Commentary
Kansas
smashes
trends
A
warning to the opposition:
your teams safe haven is
no longer safe. Not with
the Jayhawks who turn tendencies
into dust.
Kansas rolled into Lincoln,
Neb., this weekend prepared to
challenge, statistically speaking,
the best defense in the Big 12
Conference. Going into the game,
Nebraska allowed 57.5 points per
game to its opponents and was
14-0 at home in the Bob Devaney
Sports Center. But those statistics
didnt include the Kansas outlier.
The Jayhawks hardly showed up
when coach Doc Sadler and his
Cornhuskers visited Lawrence on
Jan. 15. Kansas snuck away with a
63-60 victory, but coach Bill Self
said that Nebraska was the supe-
rior team.
On Saturday, Kansas was able
to use its lackluster showing in
January as a reference point for
motivation. The result: an 86-66
victory in Nebraskas house. Forget
about stout defense and that clean
slate at home.
To score 80 points on a Doc-
coached team in their building
means you probably played pretty
good offense, Self said.
Kansas sunk shots whether they
were wide open or contested. It just
didnt matter; they were all drop-
ping on Saturday. Senior guards
Brady Morningstar and Tyrel Reed
kept up with their prowess by the
perimeter. Junior forward Markieff
Morris punished defenders in the
paint or behind the three-point
line, where he drained all three
of his attempts. Such a diverse
and persistent attack dizzied the
Cornhuskers.
It was very frustrating because you
work so hard to get back into it and
then they make you pay, Nebraska
senior guard Lance Jeter said.
But trend-smashing is nothing
new with this years team. The
Jayhawks have routinely displaced
their foes calling cards. Take the
85-65 victory at Baylor on Jan. 17,
for example.
Less than two weeks after Baylor
senior guard LaceDarius Dunn
torched Morgan State with 43
points, Kansas held him to just 13.
You have to give Kansas a lot
of credit for coming out and really
punching us in the face, Baylor
coach Scott Drew said.
Then there was the 88-66 victory
on Feb. 1 at Texas Tech. Despite
the fact that the Red Raiders usu-
ally hover in the bottom of the
Big 12 standings, Self had never
won in Lubbock, Texas. Then five
Jayhawks posted double figures in
scoring and Self had his victory at
the United Sprint Arena.
They were just dead like zom-
bies, Texas Tech coach Pat Knight
said of his players after the loss.
These are the actions of a title
contending team. The Jayhawks
are punching people in the face,
metaphorically speaking. Theyre
making zombies out of basketball
players. Sure, even the finest teams
trip here and there on their paths
to glory. But if the Jayhawks keep
breaking their challengers back-
bone, such as scoring 86 points
against the defensive-centric
Cornhuskers, they could stand atop
the highest plateau.
You cant control if the ball goes
in or out, Nebraska junior guard
Brandon Richardson said. You just
have to leave it on the floor and at the
end of the day live with the result.
Edited by Samantha Collins
By max rothman
mrothman@kansan.com
By tIm DWyEr
tdwyer@kansan.com
There are plenty of ways to
describe Missouri: balanced,
deep, fast, athletic, talented,
uptempo. There are plenty of
ways to describe Kansas, too:
balanced, deep, fast, athletic,
talented, uptempo.
But theres more to it than
that. The Jayhawks have a
way of adjusting to the tempo
of whatever team they play.
Because of the variance of their
depth Kansas has half-court
guards like Tyrel Reed and
Brady Morningstar and pres-
sure guys like Tyshawn Taylor
and Josh Selby, who is doubtful
for Monday they can play
at any tempo and be relatively
comfortable doing so.
We know Tyshawns our
fast point
g u a r d ,
M a r c u s
Morris said
about the
d i f f e r e nt
abilities of
the guards.
I think of
Brady as
our more
subtle, get open shots point
guard. Hes a smart player.
The Tigers, on the other
hand, are built for speed, and
they are at their best when
theyre running. Statistically,
eight of their nine worst offen-
sive performances have come
when they play a slower-than-
average game for them. Their
average, for comparisons sake,
is almost three possessions
per game faster than anyone
else in the conference, and
nine possessions faster than
the Jayhawks last opponent,
Nebraska.
The Jayhawks played bril-
liantly against Nebraskas suf-
focating defense and snails
tempo, led by Morningstars 19
points and six assists.
Offensively, thats as good
as we can execute, Bill Self
said after the victory.
Taylor may be more suited
to run with the Tigers, though,
considering that hes the
Jayhawks fast point guard.
But the Jayhawks wont have a
problem with running. Bill Self
said theyd like it even more.
This is going to be a fun
game, Self said, because both
teams play fast. We always
want to play fast. Its going to
be a game with a lot of posses-
sions, and the kids love playing
in games like that.
The biggest concern for Self
and the Jayhawks, though,
is the transition game that
Missouri loves so much.
Coach talks about that all
the time, Taylor said, how
bad we are at it.
Its not
that Kansas
lacks the
pers onnel ,
Self insists,
but that the
players, for
some rea-
son, arent
making the
plays. The
safe money is on the problem
that Self identified early in the
season Kansas guards, par-
ticularly Taylor and Selby, are
wild.
Were all out of control,
Self said. We run over peo-
ple more than any team in
the country probably. I think
against K-State they attempt-
ed seven charges in transition
and got four or five of them.
It wasnt just Josh (Selby), it
was everybody, we have to do
a better job of staying under
control.
Edited by Emily Soetaert
By KathLEEn GIEr
kgier@kansan.com
AUSTIN, Texas Sophomore
guard Angel Goodrich broke
her career assists record against
Texas on Saturday with 14 assists,
allowing access for the Jayhawks
in the paint.
She played awesome tonight,
sophomore forward Carolyn
Davis said. She was being
aggressive and drawing defense
and then dropping the ball down
low.
Goodrichs help was not
enough for the Jayhawks, who fell
behind in nearly every other stat,
from free throws to rebounds.
Kansas fell 80-68 to Texas in
Austin, dropping to 15-8 in the
season and 2-7 in conference
play.
Davis led Kansas with 18 points
on 8-11 shooting. She added six
rebounds in only 20 minutes of
play. Sophomore guard Monica
Engelman and junior forward
Aishah Sutherland joined Davis
in double figures with 10 and 12
points, respectively.
The Jayhawks faced foul trou-
ble early and ended up recording
23 fouls for the game. Davis said
most of the fouls were because of
little mistakes.
We were not being smart and
disciplined, Davis said.
Senior guard Marisha
Brown fouled out, while Davis
and senior forward Krysten
Boogaard ended the game with
four fouls apiece.
The Longhorns shot 18-24
from the free-throw line, which
allowed them to keep the
Jayhawks at a distance, only
shooting 6-12. They also found
success from beyond the arc, hit-
ting eight 3-pointers compared
with four by Kansas.
The Jayhawks were out-
rebounded 44-33 during the
game, highlighted by a 17-9
differential on the offensive
boards.
They were going to the boards
hard and we werent matching
their intensity, Davis said.
Kansas will return home in a
couple days to practice before
hosting Iowa State on Wednesday
at 7 p.m.
Despite the loss, Davis is still
positive about the games to
come this season.
We still have a lot of confi-
dence in ourselves, Davis said.
We are just going to try to keep
moving forward.
Edited by Amanda Sorell
We have to do a bet-
ter job of staying under
control.
Bill Self
Coach
Morning brew
QUoTe oF THe DAY
Sports is human life in micro-
cosm.
Howard Cosell
FACT oF THe DAY
When the mens basketball team
hosted Nebraska earlier this
season, Kansas had 25 points in
the frst half. In Lincoln Saturday,
the Jayhawks had 25 in the frst 10
minutes.
www.forbes.com
TriViA oF THe DAY
Q: How many times has Brady
Morningstar led Kansas in scoring
during his career?
A: Saturday was his frst.
www.usefultrivia.com
THiS weeK in
KANSAS ATHLETICS
Mens basketball
vs. Missouri
8 p.m.
TUeSDAY
No events scheduled
weDneSDAY
womens basketball
vs. Iowa State
7:00 p.m.
THUrSDAY
No events scheduled
FriDAY
Softball
vs. North Carolina
8:30 a.m.
vs. Bufalo
10:45 a.m.
at Jacksonville University
Track
ISU Classic
All Day at
Ames, Iowa
SATUrDAY
Mens basketball
vs. Iowa State
3 p.m.
ToDAY
O
n the eve of the biggest game in
KU basketball, I would like to
talk about hockey. While most
people are focused on the game Bill Self and
his players have to win tonight, many people
missed another contest. Last Thursday the
Independence Center was the home of the
Border Showdown On Ice.
My main experience with hockey up to last
week was the movie Miracle and watching
the Florida Panthers with my dad when I
was three. All I remember is that everything
smelled funny and they had really good ice
cream. But last Thursday I made the drive to
Independence, Mo., to check out the KU-MU
hockey game. Why? Because I wanted to see
people hit each other.
I mean, hockey is supposed to be the sport
where tough guys are tough guys. They are
supposed to slam each other into walls and no
player is supposed to have a full set of teeth.
I figured that if the fans at the KU-MU game
got into some knock-out brawls, these hockey
players would be pretty fun to watch.
The Independence Center was a little far
from packed, but quite a few fans did show up
dressed up in their teams colors.
When the teams skated onto the ice KU
fans cheered for the Jayhawks and booed the
players dressed in black and gold, and the MU
fans did the same for their teams. It felt like a
good old-fashioned border war.
And the players noticed it too.
When they step on the ice its a big deal,
coach Tom Pendergast said. When they step
on the ice in front of an arch rival its huge.
The emotions carried the University of
Kansas to a 2-0 lead and Jayhawk fans were
rocking. There were signs and chants. The
players seemed to enjoy their larger audience.
It kind of pumps you up, Freshman Schilar
Kessler said.
At this point I realized that hockey was
kind of elegant. When the players werent
slamming into each other on the ice, with
padded guys carrying around big sticks.I
knew, somewhere in the back of my mind,
that hockey was a little more than an all out
brute fest, but I never really saw it illustrated
in person.
While I was envisioning the hockey players
skating to a beefed up version of Swan Lake,
Missouri scored two goals and it was a tied
game. It was then that hockey turned into
hockey. KU players started to slam MU down
like the Lawrence burning thugs that they
were (or their ancestors were). There were
fights and people getting put in the penalty
box. At the end of the game I wasnt going to
scan the ice for missing teeth.
Unfortunately for KU fans, Missouri beat
Kansas. They scored two more unanswered
goals that gave them the 4-2 win.
When the players walked passed me on
the way to the locker room, with their heads
hung and tired eyes, I realized that this loss,
to them, was like losing to Missouri at home
tonight. This was their big game and they let a
two-point lead slip away from them.
We look forward to this game all year,
both teams do, Senior forward Price Duncan
said.
Unfortunately for the seniors this was their
last opportunity, pending a playoff match to
beat Missouri players to a pulp, but the rest
of the team will only have to wait a year for
their chance.
Edited by Brittany Nelson
Jayhawks, Tigers face of on ice
BY SAMANTHA ANDERSON
sanderson@kansan.com
2B / SPorTS / MoNDAy, FEBrUAry 7, 2011 / THe UniVerSiTY DAiLY KAnSAn / KANSAN.CoM
BY BLAKE SCHUSTER
bschuster@kansan.com
Emotions during the final swim
meet of the year were running
high before the competition even
began. With blown up pictures of
Joy Bunting, Iuliia Kuzhil, Alyssa
Potter, Brittany Potter and Amanda
Maez on the wall behind the start-
ing blocks, Friday night at the
Robinson Center opened up with
the Kansas swimming and diving
team honoring its five departing
seniors. The team then went on to
take a 116-34 lead over the Iowa
State Cyclones to end the first half
of the competition.
The Jayhawks did not lose an
event on the first day of competi-
tion, and sophomore diver Christy
Cash experienced her career
moment when she set a new per-
sonal high score of 261.45 in the
3-meter dive.
With their victory Saturday
against the
Cyclones, the
Jayhawks con-
tinued their
recent streak
of success, giv-
ing them seven
wins in their
last eight meets.
However, coach
Clark Campbell
had a more
direct focus when it came to the
meet against Iowa State.
The meet today is all about the
seniors, Campbell said.
Team captain Bunting contrib-
uted four victories to the Jayhawks,
and Kuzhil had three wins, which
helped the Jayhawks beat the
Cyclones 195-99. The Jayhawks
would win all of the events.
Our distance group, they did
a lot better job, but our sprinters
were not here today. Campbell said
after the meet.
Campbell attributed the short-
distance swimmers poor per-
formance to not getting a good
warm-up before the meet.
When the meet finished, it
ended an era of swimming for
the five seniors, all of whom were
saddened that they would never
swim again in Robinson for the
University. When youre with
these girls for four years, its hard
to say goodbye, Bunting said. Its
such an intimate sport.When you
get your butts kicked with each
other every single day, you make a
special bond with each other.
Coach Campbell said he will
also have a hard time saying good-
bye to his senior class.
Ive been coaching for 18 years,
and this is one of the best senior
classes Ive ever had the pleasure of
working with, Campbell said. All
five of them brought something
unique and different to the pro-
gram to make
it a lot better.
Ill miss all of
them in differ-
ent ways, Joy
Bunting for her
leadership, the
Potters are very
hard work-
ers and good
t e a mma t e s ,
Amanda Maez
has improved so much, and Iuliia
is probably arguably one of the top
two or three swimmers that has
ever been at KU.
The Kansas swimming and
diving team has the Big 12
Championships up next, and to
prepare, Campbell is going to
gradually reduce the intensity of
the practices before the February
23 meet in Austin, Texas.
Edited by Amanda Sorell
GEOffREY CALvERT
gcalvert@kansan.com
Sophomore thrower Mason
Finley paced the Kansas track and
field team in the New Balance
Collegiate Invitational at the
Armory Track & Field Center in
New York, N.Y., where his meet
record throw in the shot put
marked one of numerous personal
bests set by Jayhawks in their first
road meet of the season. The mens
team placed 12th out of 41 teams,
and the women finished ninth out
of 42 teams.
Finley won the shot put with a
throw of 66 feet, 11.25 inches, and
was named Male Athlete of the
Meet. Although he was the only
Jayhawk to win an event, 14 of
his teammates set personal bests,
including freshman Diamond
Dixon, who placed fourth in the
womens 400-meter dash cham-
pionship division with a time of
53.93 seconds, which wassecond
best of all time at the University
of Kansas, according to a press
release from the athletic depart-
ment. Dixon joined senior Kendra
Bradley and sophomores Denesha
Morris and Taylor Washington on
the 4x400 meter relay team, which
set a season best time of 3:42.74
and placed ninth.
In the championship division
of the womens 500 meters, junior
Shayla Wilson notched a fifth
place finish with a time of 1:13.63,
missing out on second place by
a little more than half a second.
Washington placed 11th in the
event. Junior Cori Christensen
also had an outstanding race in
the womens college division 800-
meter run, outrunning 71 other
competitors to capture third place
with a season best time of 2:11.97.
In the championship division
of the mile run, junior Rebeka
Stowe placed fourth and set a per-
sonal best with a time of 4:46.62.
Senior Amanda Miller paced four
Jayhawks in the college division
of the 3,000-meter run, placing
second and clocking a personal
best of 9:46.11.
The women pole vaulters and
jumpers had a solid meet, as senior
Jaci Perryman placed fifth in the
championship division of the pole
vault and set a personal best by
clearing 13 feet, 5.5 inches. In
the college division, seniors Abby
Jones and Tara Turnbull cleared
11 feet, 11.75 inches, good for
10th and 11th out of 27 competi-
tors. In the championship divi-
sion of the long jump, sophomore
Francine Simpson claimed fourth
place with a personal best jump
of 20 feet, 5 inches. Sophomore
Rebecca Neville placed sixth out
of 67 competitors in the college
division of the same event, jump-
ing 19 feet, 1.5 inches.And in the
womens triple jump, sophomore
Andrea Geubelle placed fourth
out of 21 competitors, jumping a
season best of 42 feet, 2.25 inches.
On the mens side, senior Keron
Toussaint placed fourth in the
championship division of the
500-meter dash, with freshman
Dominique Manley finishing 10th.
In the college division of the 800-
meter run, freshman Dalen Fink
placed fourth, freshman Brendan
Soucie placed 20th, and freshman
Nick Seckfort placed 21st. They
all set personal bests with times
of 1:54.36, 1:55.45 and 1:55.50,
respectively.
In the college division of the
mens mile, freshman Josh Munsch
set a personal best by running
a 4:12.67, good for eighth place.
Two Jayhawks competed in the
college division of the mens pole
vault, and both found success.
Freshman Alex Bishop placed sec-
ond, and senior Cooper Merrill
placed sixth.
The mens 4x400 meter relay and
distance medley relay team both
set a season best, with the 4x400
team of sophomore Kyle Clemons,
freshman Dominique Manley,
Pieter Marx and Toussaint plac-
ing sixth with a time of 3:12.39.
The distance medley relay team
of Fink, Marx, Munsch and junior
Donny Wasinger ran a 10:06.57,
good for ninth place.
Along with Finley breaking
the meets shot put record, junior
thrower Joel Krause set a personal
best with a throw of 52 feet, 5
inches, good for 16th place. Senior
Brian Bishop was close behind
him in 18th place.
Edited by Amanda Sorell
Swimmers, divers continue winning streak
Jayhawks achieve personal records at Invitational
SwiMMing & DiVing
Chris Bronson/KANSAN
Junior swimmer
Stephanie Payne
surges through the
water in the womens
300-yard IMsaturday
morning at the Rob-
inson Center where
the Jayhawks took on
Iowa State. Payne did
not place in the event
with a time of 3:16:27.
The Jayhawks won the
meet 195-99.
Chris Bronson/KANSAN
Senior swimmer Joy Bunting surges through the water and adds to her teams lead in the womens 200-yard medley relay Friday evening at the Robinson Center where the Jayhawks competed
against Iowa State. Buntings teamfnished in frst place with a time of 1:44:55. Competition will continue tomorrowmorning.
This is one of the best
senior classes Ive ever
had the pleasure of work-
ing with.
CLArK CAMpBELL
Coach
TrACK & FieLD
KANSAN.COM / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / MONDAY, FebruArY 7, 2011 / SPORTS / 3b
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ARLINGTON, Texas Forget
Lombardi on Broadway. Green Bay
has the newest Super Bowl hit:
Aaron Rodgers.
Capping one of the greatest
postseasons for any quarterback,
Rodgers led the Packers to their
first NFL championship in 14 years
Sunday, 31-25 over the Pittsburgh
Steelers. The Packers reclaimed the
Vince Lombardi Trophy, named for
their legendary coach who won
the first two Super Bowls and is
making his own star turn in New
York these days in the play named
after him.
Rodgers, the games MVP,
thrilled his legion of Cheesehead
fans with a spectacular six-game
string that should finally erase the
bitterness of the Brett Favre separa-
tion in Green Bay. Hes now equal
with Favre in Super Bowl wins, and
he extended the Packers record of
NFL titles to 13, nine before the
Super Bowl era.
Its what I dreamt about as a
little kid watching Joe Montana and
Steve Young, Rodgers said, and
we just won the Super Bowl.
The Packers QB threw for three
touchdowns, two to Greg Jennings,
and the Packers (14-6) overcame
even more injuries, building a 21-3
lead, then hanging on to become
the second No. 6 seed to win the
championship. Coincidentally, the
2005 Steelers were the other.
Rodgers threw for 304 yards,
including a 29-yard touchdown
to Jordy Nelson, who had nine
catches for 140 yards to make up
for three big drops. Rodgers found
Jennings, normally his favorite
target, for 21- and 8-yard scores.
Then the favored Packers held
on as Pittsburgh (14-5) stormed
back.
Weve been a team thats over-
come adversity all year, Jennings
said, who noted injuries to Charles
Woodson and Donald Driver.
Few teams have been as
resourceful as these Packers, who
couldnt wait to touch the trophy
honoring their greatest coach
and their title. Several of them
kissed it as Cowboys great Roger
Staubach walked through a line of
green and gold.
Vince Lombardi is coming back
to Green Bay, NFL Commissioner
Roger Goodell said.
6b / SPORTS / Monday, February 7, 2011 / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / kansan.coM
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KANSAN.COM / THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN / MONDAY, februArY 7, 2011 / SPORTS / 7b
MENS BASKETBALL REWIND
Prime Plays
Kansas 42 | 44 86
34 | 32 66 Nebraska
Jayhawk Stat Leaders
Points Rebounds Assists
Marcus Morris
7
Nebraska
Kansas
Player FG-FGA 3FG-3FGA Rebs A Pts
Marcus Morris 5-7 1-3 7 1 16
Markief Morris 6-6 3-3 1 0 17
Tyshawn Taylor 2-8 0-1 3 5 6
brady Morningstar 5-7 5-7 2 6 19
Tyrel reed 4-8 3-6 3 0 14
Thomas robinson 1-2 0-0 6 1 8
elijah Johnson 1-4 0-2 3 1 2
Mario Little 1-2 1-1 1 2 4
Travis releford 0-1 0-1 1 0 2
Totals 25-45 13-24 33 16 86
Player FG-FGA 3FG-3FGA Rebs A Pts
brandon ubel 2-4 1-2 5 0 7
Andre Almeida 0-4 0-0 4 0 0
brandon richardson5-9 2-4 3 0 16
Caleb Walker 3-7 1-3 5 0 10
Lance Jeter 3-8 0-1 0 10 10
Toney McCray 4-11 3-7 3 1 11
Cristopher Niemman0-1 0-1 0 0 0
ray Gallegos 2-5 0-2 2 0 4
Jorge brian Diaz 4-7 0-0 4 1 8
Totals 23-56 7-20 30 13 66
Game to Remember Game to Forget
Self
Johnson Morningstar
Quote of the Game
First Half
12:52: Markief Morris hits two three-pointers at the top of the arc.
The second one forces Nebraska coach Doc Sadler to take a timeout.
(20-10)

8:03: Marcus Morris misses everything on a three, but Thomas rob-
inson is right there for the rebound and a two-handed slam. (27-21)

1:00: Tyrel reed gives Kansas another 10-point lead with a three-
pointer from the corner. (42-32)

Second Half
16:21: Morningstar connects on another three. He is 4-5 from down-
town with 14 points. (50-41)

7:07: Tyshawn Taylor feeds Marcus Morris for the dunk. Kansas hits
70 points, which means Kansas has a good chance of winning. When
Nebraska opponents score 70 points, it is 0-2 on the year. (70-56)
Brady Morningstar
19
Brady Morningstar
6
Ofensively, thats as good as we can execute.
Bill Self
Brady Morningstar
In two of the last three games, a Jayhawk has had the
best performance of his career and made this part
of my job really easy. Thomas robinsons 19-point,
seven-rebound efort against Kansas State, with
everything going on in his personal life, was the frst
one. Morningstars 19-point, six-assist, zero-turnover
performance Saturday was the second. Morningstar
has scored more one other time in his career, but that
was against Coppin State, who doesnt defend quite like Nebraska.
Elijah Johnson
With Josh Selby out of the lineup, Johnson got a
chance to fght his way back into the rotation as a
one-game fll-in. Johnson went 1-for-4 from the feld
for two points and an assist to go along with three
boards in 14 minutes. It looks like hell have one
more opportunity to fnd a rhythm against Missouri
Monday, but if he doesnt produce, hell be reduced
to a spot minutes role.
BY MIKE LAVIERI
mlavieri@kansan.com

LINCOLN, Neb. Kansas
and Nebraska played at Bob
Devany Sports Center for
the last time as members
of the Big 12 Conference.
Kansas defeated Nebraska
86-66, but were not led by
the Morris twins.
The two combined for
33 points on 11-13 shoot-
ing. Both misses were three-
pointers by junior forward
Marcus Morris. The Morris
success came in large part from
the shooting and passing of senior
guard Brady Morningstar, who
had his best statistical game of the
season.
Hes shooting with a lot of
confidence, Marcus said.
Confidence is the reason Marcus
and Markieff have been successful
this season. The two are averag-
ing 16.7 points per game and 60.1
percent from the field, and 13.1
points per game and 58.7 percent
from the field, respectively.
The biggest downfall for the
two is their free-throw numbers.
The two are a combined 66.5
percent from the line. Success in
the postseason could be make
or break depending on the free-
throw shooting, especially from
these two because of how many
touches they have down low.
I got to get back to work shoot-
ing on my free-throws, Marcus
said.
He attributed the missed free-
throws to the ball. He said the
Adidas ball is smaller and hard-
er to grip than the Wilson ball
Kansas uses. He said it was harder
to put the ball in the basket even
though he went 5-7, Markieff went
6-6 and Morningstar went 5-7.
Marcus agreed with coach Bill
Self, who said this was some of the
best offensive play from the team.
Morris said the team could do
better offensively with freshman
guard Josh Selby, who sat with a
stress reaction in his right foot.
Self said sitting Selby was due to
precautionary reasons. He said he
thought Morningstar did a good
job of stepping up in the starting
roll.
I really dont expect much of a
drop off even though I know our
best players have to play, Self said.
I think we have a bunch of best
players.
Self said it would be difficult to
lose Marcus and Markieff.
Self said the two are the best
passers and that when they pass
well, the rest of the team does as
well.
I think they demand a lot of
attention, which opens up things
for everybody else, junior guard
Tyshawn Taylor said.
Edited by Samantha Collins
Howard Ting/KANSAN
Junior forward Markief Morris puts up a basket against the Huskers on Saturday afternoon in Bob Devaney Sports Center at Lincoln, Neb. Morris shot a perfect 6-6 and 3-3 fromthe arch scoring a total
of 17 points against the Huskers.
Game
Mon., Feb. 9 Time (CT)
Texas A&M at Colorado 7:00 p.m.
Texas A&M at Nebraska 1:00 p.m.
Nebraska at Baylor 7:00 p.m.
Texas at Oklahoma 8:00 p.m.


To say Kansas shot the ball
well against Nebraska Saturday is
an understatement. The Jay-
hawks had an efective feld goal
percentage of 70 percent, easily
their best of the season. Efective
feld goal percentage counts three
pointers made as 150 percent as
valuable as a two-point feld goal,
because three pointers are, of
course, worth half-again as many
points. By the more common mea-
sures, Kansas was no less impres-
sive. The Jayhawks hit 55.6 percent
of their shots and a season-high
13 threes on 54.2 percent shoot-
ing from outside. If the Jayhawks
can average the same points per
possession (1.25, eighth best on
the season), and adjust to Mis-
souris much quicker pace, theyd
score 93 points Monday night.
senior
gaurd,
Brady Morn-
ingstar
Where did
this come
from? Morn-
ingstar actually
had an ofen-
sive rating double that of Marcus
Morris Saturday, and Morris was
no slouch. Morningstar played a
season-high 37 minutes and could
barely miss, hitting 5-of-7 seven
shots, all of them from behind the
arc. He was efective from the free
throw line as well, hitting 4-of-5
from there. Tack on his six assists
and zero turnovers, and Morning-
star played a near-perfect game
on the ofensive side of the ball.
Even if Selby is available to play,
Morningstar may get the nod over
him if he is not at 100 percent.
Theres no doubt Morningstar has
earned more minutes with his re-
cent play the question is whose
minutes he has earned.
How will Kansas handle Mis-
souris balance?
That question needs some ex-
plaining. After all, Bill Self has said
several times that hes got seven
or eight guys that play at the level
of starters. But Kansas is like most
teams in that there are a handful
of players who can be reason-
ably expected to take the shot at
the end of each possession. On
Kansas, its the three posts the
twins and Thomas Robinson
and Josh Selby who use the most
possessions. They all use at least
24 percent of the possessions
that they are a part of. Missouri is
much more balanced in that they
have zero players using 24 percent
of their possessions, but eight
players using anywhere from 19 to
24 percent. What that boils down
to is that Kansas cannot aford to
key on one player, because there
are seven more waiting to fll their
shoes.
Theyre like little gnats that
wont leave the kitchen when you
leave the dishes in there.
Marcus Morris on Missouri

missouri
18-5, (4-4)
starters
Matt Pressey, 6-foot-2 junior guard
Tairu is averaging nine points a game. He is
shooting 33.3 percent from behind the arc. He
is one of two starters that has a positive assist/
turnover ratio. He is averaging one assist per
game and 0.68 turnovers per game. He has 55
rebounds on the season, 19 of them coming
on the ofensive end.

Kim English, 6-foot-6 junior guard


Roberson is the main ball handler for the
Red Raiders. He leads the team with 82 assists,
4.1 per game. He is second with 12.9 points
per game. His average of 1.4 steals per game
leads the team, although Brad Reese has more
total steals. Roberson is the player Texas Tech
wants at the line if the game is close at the
end. He is shooting 79 percent, a team best
for players with 25 attempts.

Marcus Denmon, 6-foot-3 junior guard


Lewandowski is fourth on the team with 9.3
points per game. His 5.1 rebounds per game
put him as second on the team behind Sin-
gletary. He is also second on the team with 19
blocks. Lewandowski is averaging one assist
per game. Lewandowski has not attempted
a three pointer this season, and it is highly
unlikely that he will attempt one tonight. The
Red Raiders cant aford to lose Lewandowski
because of foul trouble. He has fouled out
three times this season; tonight might be
four if the Morris twins and Robinson take it
to him.

Ricardo Ratlife, 6-foot-8 junior forward


Ratlife has been a monster on the glass
for the Tigers. He leads the team with 6.8
rebounds per game. He is huge on the defe-
nisive end, blocking 35 shots on the season.
He, however, has fouled out three times this
season. He will need to be careful guard-
ing the Morris twins and Thomas Robinson
who are bigger and more athletic. If he isnt
careful he will become best friends with the
bench. He is second on the team scoring 11.7
points per game.

Laurence Bowers, 6-foot-8 junior for-


ward
Bowers is one of fve players averaging
double digits per game. He is fourth with
10.7 points per game. He is second in re-
bounding and leads the team with 49 blocks.
Like Ratlife, Bowers commits a lot of fouls. He
has 67 on the season with two foul outs. If he
isnt careful, he may be joining Ratlife. The
Tigers may have to call on junior center
Steve Moore who has 21 blocks, but is
only averaging 11.9 minutes per game.
Bowers and Ratlife each average more
than 24 minutes.
KaNsas
22-1, (7-1)
starters
Tyshawn Taylor, guard
Taylor isnt scoring like he used to lately
in his last two, hes averaging just three
points per game but hes still one of the
best assist men in the conference. Even
though his numbers have dipped a little
bit, its been in conjunction with better play
from the guards around him and smarter
play on his part. Hes turned the ball over
just six times in the last fve games while
amassing 20 assists.

Tyrel Reed, guard


It appears that Reed found his stroke
against Nebraska, hitting 50 percent of his
threes en route to 14 points. Reeds also a
solid rebounder, especially considering that
he is undersized for his position. Of Kansas
six guards (including Travis Releford) Reed
is by far the best rebounder, with 70 on the
season compared to second-place Tyshawn
Taylors 44. Josh Selby is averaging a similar
clip, but missed the frst nine games.

Josh Selby, guard


Selby is ofcially doubtfull, but as often as
hes been described as a tough kid, its hard
to believe hed miss his frst shot at Missouri
and guard Kim English, who he called a big
brother to him. But as anyone with a big
brother knows, theres nothing sweeter than
taking him down. Selby said he and English
havent talked about the game: And Im not
sure we will.

Marcus Morris, forward


Morris, true to his season-long form,
didnt need a lot of shots to be efective
against the Cornhuskers on Saturday. In
conference play, hes taken 10 or more shots
in only half the games, but hes still scored
in double fgures in all eight. Saturday he
was 5-of-7 from the feld with both misses
coming from outside the three-point line.
He fnished with 16 points, in part because
he got to the free throw line more times
than in any game since the conference
opener.

Markief Morris, forward


Morris, true to his season-long form,
didnt need a lot of shots to be efective
against the Cornhuskers on Saturday. In
conference play, hes taken 10 or more
shots in only half the games, but hes still
scored in double fgures in all eight. Satur-
day he was 5-of-7 from the feld with both
misses coming from outside the three-
point line. He fnished with 16 points, in
part because he got to the free throw line
more times than in any game since the
conference opener.

mu
tipoff
At A GlAnce
KaNsas VS. missouri
8 p.m., Allen fieldhouse, Lawrence
Ku
tipoff
COUNTDOWN TO TiPoff
date opponent TV Channel Time
Feb. 12 Iowa State Big 12 Network 3 p.m.
Feb. 14 Kansas State ESPN 8 p.m.
Feb. 19 Colorado ESPN 1 p.m.
At A GlAnce
PlAyer to wAtch
question mArk
heAr ye, heAr ye
Taylor
Reed
Selby
Morris
Morris
Pressey
English
Denmon
BiG 12 sChedule sChedule
Missouri avenged its 89-76 loss
to Colorado in Boulder earlier this
season, by defeating the Bufaloes
on Saturday 89-73 in Columbia. The
Tigers are currently tied for fourth
place in the Big 12 with Texas A&M
and Oklahoma with a 4-4 record.
Missouri is winning their games
at home, which it should, but it is
winless on the road. Missouri likes
to play a fast, up-tempo game that
fts well into what Kansas likes to
do. Coach Mike Andersons style
of defense is to pressure its oppo-
nents and try to force turnovers.
Kansas has had success against
Missouri, especially at Allen Field-
house, when Missouri tries the full-
court press.
Senior forward Justin Saford
A season ago Saford was start-
ing for the Ti-
gers. He is one
of two seniors
on the team,
but is the only
one that sees
playing time.
This season, he
has only started
in 11 of the 23 games for Mis-
souri. He is averaging 6.8 points
per game on 40.7 percent shoot-
ing. He is averaging 4.4 rebounds
per game. Saford only played six
minutes against Colorado and
was inefective. Missouri may call
upon Saford for senior leadership,
because this will be his fnal time
playing at Allen Fieldhouse. Last
season in Missouris matchup with
Kansas in Lawrence, Saford led
the Tigers in scoring with 19 points
in 32 minutes.
Can Missouri get it done on
the road?
Missouri has one quality win on
the road: at Oregon; that game was
also the only true road test for the
Tigers before conference play. Mis-
souri lost to Georgetown at the
Sprint Center in overtime 111-102
and defeated then ranked No. 22 Il-
linois at the Scottrade Center in St.
Louis 75-64. Missouri is 0-4 on the
road in conference play with losses
in Boulder, Colo., College Station,
Texas, Austin, Texas, and Stillwater,
Oklahoma. The loss to Texas A&M
in College Station was a 91-89 loss
in overtime. The Aggies are 1-2 in
their last three games at home. The
Longhorns are perfect in Austin
during conference play and Colora-
do is 3-1 at home, with its only loss
being to Kansas. Missouri might be
a better team, but Bill Self calls Al-
len Fieldhouse a legitimate sixth
man. Missouri falls to 0-5 on the
road and 4-5 in conference, giving
them a steep uphill climb to the Big
12 title, with a lot of things needing
to go wrong at the top of the con-
ference.
Unfortunately, English said.
We can do it, we just have to do
it consistently.
Junior guard KimEnglish on Missouri
playing away fromColumbia after its 89-
73 victory against Colorado.
PlAyer to wAtch
question mArk
heAr ye, heAr ye
Bowers
Ratlife
Morningstar
BORDER SHOWDOWN
A match made in rival heaven
TimDwyer
Mike Lavieri
Saford
ALLEN FiELDHOuSE WiLL ROCK iF
Missouri steps on the court. There is, of course, no love lost between
the Jayhawks and Tigers, and the environment is always one of the
best of the season at Allen. For it to stay rocking, though, the Morrii
and Thomas Robinson will need to continue to play at a high level.
Missouri has one of the most athletic frontcourts in the country.
THE TiGERS WiLL ROAR iF
Marcus Denmon gets in a groove. Denmon is the most efcient player
in the Big 12 that uses at least 20 percent of his possessions, just in
front of Marcus Morris. Hes also got enough balance around him (see
the Question Mark section to the left) that if he goes of, there will be
enough role scoring to pose the Jayhawks a serious threat.
Prediction:
Kansas 84, Missouri 66
Tyshawn Taylor
Photo by HowardTing/KANSAN

8B / GAMEDAY / MONDAy, FEBRUARy 7, 2011 / THE uNiVERSiTY DAiLY KANSAN / KANSAN.COM