Anda di halaman 1dari 43

MSc Energy Dubai Campus

2010 - 2011

School of Engineering and Physical Sciences

Heriot-Watt University is a registered charity in Scotland, SC026900

Dubai Campus MSc Energy Programme Handbook


PAGE NO.
PART A - SCHOOL INFORMATION SUMMARY OF KEY INFORMATION ......................................................................................... 2 1 2 WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION .............................................................................. 3 GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT HERIOT-WATT UNIVERSITY DUBAI CAMPUS AND THE SCHOOL/INSTITUTE ................................................................................. 5 KEY STAFF AND CONTACT DETAILS ...................................................................... 5 PROGRAMME OVERVIEW ......................................................................................... 7 PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND DELIVERY ......................................................... 10

3 4 5

PART B - UNIVERSITY INFORMATION 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ACADEMIC SUPPORT .............................................................................................. 15 ENROLMENT, ATTENDANCE AND PERIODS OF STUDY ...................................... 16 GUIDANCE ON ASSESSMENT................................................................................. 20 EXAMINATION AND RE-ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES ........................................ 21 GRADING, AWARDS AND QUALIFICATIONS ......................................................... 25 GRADUATION ........................................................................................................... 27 CONDUCT, DISCIPLINE AND APPEALS ................................................................. 28 SUSPENSION AND WITHDRAWAL.......................................................................... 30 STUDENT FEES AND CHARGES ............................................................................. 32 STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES ............................................................................. 33 UNIVERSITY POLICY AND GUIDANCE ................................................................... 38

PART A SCHOOL INFORMATION


SUMMARY OF KEY INFORMATION KEY CONTACTS Professor Ammar Kaka Vice-Principal, Dubai Campus, Heriot-Watt University is the Executive Dean and Head of the Heriot-Watt University Dubai Campus (HWUDC). Each Academic course is led by a Course Coordinator, supported by an experienced academic staff team located at the Universitys campus at Dubai International Academic City. The address and contact details are below. In the first instance, students should contact us via our Reception staff who will be pleased to help direct any queries to the appropriate person. Heriot-Watt University Dubai Campus Dubai International Academic City PO Box 294345 UAE Tel: +971 4 3616997 Fax: +971 4 3604800 Web: www.hw.ac.uk/dubai SIGNIFICANT DATES IN ACADEMIC YEAR HWU operates a two twelve-week semester system as shown below, with Taught Masters (MSc) students continuing their studies throughout the summer period. All examinations take place during the assessment blocks, although some postgraduate examinations take place during the break periods. For postgraduate taught programmes resit examinations are at the corresponding examination diet in the following academic year. Full details of examination timetabling are published at the campus and can be found at: www.hw.ac.uk/registry/examinations/timetable.htm

Semester Semester 1 (Postgraduate New and Returning Students) Block 1 Assessment Break 1 Semester 2 Break 2 Block 2 Assessment

Starting Date 12 September 2010 6 December 2010 20 December 2010 9 January 2011 31 March 2011 25 April 2011

Finishing Date 2 December 2010 17 December 2010 7 January 2011 19 May 2011 21 April 2011 20 May 2011

Please see the www.hw.ac.uk and www.hw.ac.uk/dubai websites which contain detailed information about Heriot-Watt University.

LINKS TO FURTHER INFORMATION/SERVICES Please see the www.hw.ac.uk website which contains information about HeriotWatt University. Mechanical Engineering : http://www.eps.hw.ac.uk/departments/mech-eng.htm Institution of Mechanical Engineers: www.imeche.org.uk Energy Institute: www.energyinst.org/home American Association of Mechanical Engineers: www.asme.org

1
1.1

Welcome and Introduction


Welcome from the Principal I am delighted to welcome you as a student of Heriot-Watt University! Heriot-Watt University has a well earned reputation as Scotland's most international and outward-looking University. With three campuses in Scotland (attended by a high percentage of students from across the world), our Campus in Dubai, and Learning Partner institutions across the world, we have a vibrant and diverse learning culture which is unique and unmatched by other universities in the United Kingdom. We are keen to give our students the opportunity to develop an international dimension to their studies which will enhance their opportunities for future growth. Students at our Dubai Campus are an important part of this global community and I very much hope you enjoy your time with us. Professor Steve Chapman Principal and Vice-Chancellor

1.2

Welcome from the Head of Dubai Campus It is with great pleasure that we welcome you to the Universitys Dubai Campus Heriot-Watt University is proud to be here in the UAE, providing a range of high quality courses, relevant to the Middle East region, to the UAE and to the aspirations of its people. Heriot-Watt has a long tradition of providing vocationally relevant academic courses, with strong industry and research links. There are currently over 500 Heriot-Watt Alumni living and working in the UAE and the Gulf States as well as our current students, so you will be joining a successful and vibrant community! We welcome you to your chosen degree programme either as a postgraduate or undergraduate student and look forward to working with you to help you achieve your personal ambitions and goals. Professor Ammar Kaka Vice-Principal, Dubai Campus

1.3

Welcome from the EPS Director of Teaching and Learning Whether you are a new or continuing student, you will, we hope, find it useful to have a one-stop source of information. This handbook is our attempt to provide with such a source. You will find the most immediately useful information in the first few sections, and these have been written by staff in your subject area. The later sections contain essential general University information and Web references where you can find more detail, should you need it. If you have any questions that are not answered, or if anything is at all unclear, do please ask your mentor or any other member of academic or support staff. They will be pleased to help if they can; if they cannot, they will refer you to someone who can! Dr Kevin McCullough Director of Teaching and Learning
4

General Information about Heriot-Watt University and the Dubai Campus


Heriot-Watt University is an international university, based in Edinburgh, the capital of Scotland in the UK, with campuses in the north and south of Scotland and in Dubai. The University also has a worldwide network of Learning Partners. Wherever they are located, Heriot-Watt students have the opportunity to study programmes which will equip them to contribute immediately to the economy and wellbeing of the region in which they choose to work. This ethos of doing things that matter stretches right back to the origins of Heriot-Watt in 1821, when programmes were run to suit the needs of developing industries in Scotland. The Heriot-Watt University Dubai Campus is located in the Dubai International Academic City. The University is the first to operate from this rapidly-developing site, and is offering programmes that meet the demands of the region and beyond. The web address is www.hw.ac.uk/dubai

Key staff and contact details


Point of Contact A Vice-Principal of Heriot-Watt University, Executive Dean and Head of Dubai Campus Operations Manager Student President Reception Recruitment and Admissions Office Student Services Office Finance Office Library IT Office (Help Desk) Transport and Accommodation Office Responsible Staff Name Professor Ammar Kaka Ms Sheelagh Wallace Ms Safiya Salim Mrs Pretty Louis Dr Kishore Sirnani Dr Ashok Srivastava Mr Suresh Kumar Dr Ramakanta Rath Mr Nidhish Cherian Mr Anil Kumar Tel Number +971 4 3616997 +971 4 3616972 +971 4 3616921 +971 4 3616999 +971 4 3641389 +971 4 3616996 +971 4 3616982 +971 4 3616978 +971 4 3616986 +971 4 3616980

Academic School contacts Academic Leader and Operations Manager. School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Postgraduate and Undergraduate courses Co-ordinator Electronic and Electrical Engineering Teaching Fellow (Mechanical Engineering), Research Project Outreach Co-ordinator Teaching Fellow (Mechanical Engineering) Teaching Fellow (Mechanical Engineering) Teaching Fellow (Electrical Engineering) Teaching Fellow (Electrical Engineering) Teaching Fellow (Electrical Engineering)

Dr Sarim Al-Zubaidy

+971 43616366

Dr Nidhal Abdulaziz Dr Ben R Hughes Dr. Sibi Chacko Dr. Fadi Ghaith Dr. Prashanth Soori Dr Senthil Aramugam Dr Mutasim Nour

+971 4 3641386 +971 43616974 +971 4 3616399 +971 4 3616983 +971 4 3612977 +971 4 3616010 +971 4 3616999

Support Staff contacts EPS Lab Engineer Administrative Assistant, SSO School of Engineering and Physical Science Student Services Office Counter Mr. Mohamed Al-Musleh Ms.Easha Anantha +971 4 3616999 +971 4 4332729 +971 4 3616984

Programme Overview
Heriot-Watt University reserves the right to update materials from time to time and will ensure that advance notification concerning changes to materials is provided to students on the relevant section of the University website. It is the responsibility of students to check the website, particularly if they are returning to studies after a period during which their studies have been in abeyance. The MSc Energy programme aims to provide students with insight into energy in terms of technology, environment and business. The course provides a broad insight into the global and national picture of energy production and consumption, fundamental sciences for energy extraction, conversion, and consumption, the impacts of energy-related activities on the environment, our society, and our economic activities. The broad insights are then deepened in a number of optional courses according to each students needs and interests, be they on energy resources, power generation, energy consumption management, energy and the environment, or business. The specialisation is completed with some original research, either in an individual dissertation or a group project. Heriot-Watt University reserves the right to update materials from time to time and will ensure that advance notification concerning changes to materials is provided to students on the relevant section of the University website. It is the responsibility of students to check the website, particularly if they are returning to studies after a period during which their studies have been in abeyance.

4.1

Educational Aims of the Course The subject-specific aims of the course are to provide a practical and theoretical grounding in technologies and wider knowledge and skills relevant to the Energy sector, for the practicing Engineer as well as Decision-making managers and Policy makers. The course aims to equip students with a broad, yet detailed overview over Energy resources, conversion, and use, as well as the socio-economic and environmental impacts of energy-related activities. To do this, the course provides a broad introduction to current energy issues and specialist knowledge and skills to analyse, appraise, or design energy systems or equipment. In addition to the subject-specific specialist knowledge and skills, the course aims to provide a broad range of transferable skills The students are expected to apply a mature approach to learning, tackling personal projects and organizing their study. They will learn communication skills both written and oral (they are requested to do presentations as part of their coursework and defend their MSc thesis). The mode of assessment of the masters is a mixture of continuous assessment and examination.

4.2

Learning Outcomes The learning outcomes for the course are as follows: Understanding Critical understanding of the principal theories, concepts and tools underpinning Energy technologies and their impact. Extensive, detailed and critical understanding of at least one specialist area within this domain. Understand and use of a significant range of the principal skills, techniques and practices required to design or assess components or systems, or to develop new opportunities. Knowledge A broad knowledge of the main areas of Energy Engineering Sciences and practices. Detailed and critical knowledge of at least one area of specialisation, incorporating awareness of current issues and research. Application-based knowledge and skills relating to a range of activities. Cognitive skills Develop and apply skills in critical analysis, evaluation and synthesis in consideration of the range of theories, concepts and techniques, and in the design of projects and experimental models. Abilities to critically understand and apply relevant theories and technologies to developing analytical and design skills Develop and utilise advanced problem-solving skills and techniques in the development of original and creative solutions to general and specialist issues. Scholarship, Enquiry and Research Build an overview over techniques and current debates on the basis of independent, research-informed learning. Develop advanced skills by transferring and applying knowledge acquired through research-informed learning. Autonomy, Accountability and Working with Others Work autonomously and within teams, as appropriate, demonstrating a capability for both taking and critically reflecting on roles and responsibilities Industrial, Commercial and Professional Practice Demonstrate critical awareness of the current issues within the discipline, and make informed judgements on the basis of available information and subject knowledge.

Specialist and critical knowledge, understanding and skills in a number of mainstream and specialist areas within Energy technologies. Communication, Numeracy and ICT Develop and demonstrate skills and techniques in oral and written communication with peers and academic/industrial staff, using a range of appropriate methods to suit different levels of knowledge and expertise within the audience. Develop and demonstrate critical knowledge and skills in the planning and usage of industry standard tools, programming languages and numerical techniques An ability to identify, formulate and resolve problems.

5
5.1

Programme Structure and Delivery


Programme Courses and Options The programme delivered at the Dubai campus follows a blended delivery format drawing on local support and support from course leaders at the Edinburgh campus. The programme structure contains six mandatory courses and two optional courses. The taught courses follow the semesters given below, with support available from Edinburgh campus course leaders during the semester in which the course is taught. Semester 1 courses are examined in December and Semester 2 courses examined in April/May. The first course taken is Foundations of Energy and the Technology Futures and Business Strategy is the final taught course. The taught courses are followed by the project part of the programme. Postgraduate Diploma and MSc candidates take the Critical Analysis and Research Preparation course with the MSc candidates following onto the Energy Dissertation.

Semester 1 Mandatory B51EV1 B51GO1 B51GP1 B51GQ1 D11VD1 Foundations of Energy Heat Transfer and Heat Exchangers Process Intensification Renewable Energy Technologies Ventilation & Air Conditioning

Optional (choose two)

Semester 2 Mandatory B51GM2 B51EX2 B51GL2 B51GN2 D11BS2 Technology Future and Business Strategy Critical Analysis and Research Preparation Environmental Impact Assessment Demand Management & Energy Storage Building Energy Management

Optional (choose two)

Summer Session Mandatory B51MD Masters Dissertation (Masters students only)

10

5.2

Programme Assessment Guidelines


All courses within the programme have a balance of summative and formative assessment, where the major component of the summative assessment will usually be an end-of-course examination for the taught courses and an extensive written report such as the dissertation resulting from the research phase of the programme. The formative assessment of the programme draws from a range of methods, including specified exercises, the compilation of a portfolio, a research-informed report, or an oral presentation. All examination papers will be internally checked by an independent member of staff before being submitted to the external examiner for approval. As far as possible, coursework, exam scripts, and course report forms will be made available to the external examiner prior to an Exam Board. In common with the other postgraduate taught programmes in the School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, the programme consists of two phases: A taught phase, consisting of a set of 8 taught courses, some mandatory and some optional, defined in the programme structure, which the students will normally complete over two semesters. 1. Assessment of the taught phase is through a variety of methods including coursework and/or examination. 2. Students are normally required to submit all elements of assessment before being permitted to progress to the next stage. 3. The examinations are usually at the end of the semester during which the course is taught. 4. In exceptional personal or medical circumstances students may be granted leave by the examiners to resit part or all of the assessment on one occasion only and at a date decided by the examiners, as stated in university regulations 4 and 5. This provision is in addition to the provision that students may retake assessment for courses in which they have achieved a grade D or less. Consistent with PGCAPS, students will be able to retake the assessment of up to a maximum of 3 taught courses at the next opportunity, subject to payment of the appropriate fees to the University, and may be required to do so to obtain the necessary credits for completion of their programme or for progression. Students may only resit courses for which their examination grade is D, E or F, and the best grade achievable in a reassessment is normally grade C. The method of reassessment for each course is specified in the appropriate course descriptor. Students will normally complete the taught phase and the first stage of the dissertation phase, at which point progression to the last two stages of the dissertation phase is dependent on assessed performance. To progress students must meet the criteria stipulated in the Programme Notes (Form 18). Students meeting the required standards for Masters in the taught phase will be permitted to progress to the second stage of the dissertation phase. Students meeting the required standards for Postgraduate Diploma and Postgraduate Certificate (set out in Form 18) in the taught phase, but not meeting the Masters standard, will not be permitted to progress to the second
11

stage of the dissertation phase. Subject to performance in the first stage of the dissertation phase, students may be recommended to graduate with a Postgraduate Diploma or a Postgraduate Certificate at this point. Students failing to meet the required standards for Postgraduate Diploma and Postgraduate Certificate (set out in Form 18) in the taught phase will not be permitted to progress to the second stage of the dissertation phase, nor will they be eligible for any award. A dissertation phase, consisting of two stages: 1. A preliminary project course, Critical Analysis and Research Preparation, formally part of the taught phase of the programme during semester 2, during which the student identifies the project, carries out a literature review, and plans the research. The assessment of this work is in the form of a portfolio submission, which will be graded separately from the dissertation itself . 2. The second stage consists of an appropriate technical research project, during the Summer Semester where the student carries out the bulk of the research, leading to the preparation of a substantial project dissertation report, and an oral presentation towards the end of the programme. 3. Dissertations must be submitted on or before the publicised submission date; dissertations submitted after that date and without the prior consent of the Programme Director may be assessed at a penalty. 4. Dissertations will be marked by the supervisor and at least one independent internal marker as described in detail in the Programme Notes. All dissertations and marking sheets will be made available to the external examiner prior to the Exam Board. Assessment policies affecting Award decisions 1. The specific Award requirements are detailed in the Programme Notes (Form 18) 2. In exceptional circumstances the Exam Board has the discretion to permit student progress or award, irrespective of student performance against required standards and policies, subject to appropriate justification provided by the Board. 3. Allowance for poor performance in or non-submission of a component on medical grounds is normally made only where supported by written testimony from a professional health practitioner. Such testimony must be lodged with the Course Director prior to the Examination Board meeting.

12

5.3

Award Criteria
No. of Course Overall Passes Mark/Grade Master (Distinction): 9 >= 70 Basis of Overall Mark/Grade Average mark of taught courses >= 70% Mark of dissertation applicable) >= 70% Master: 9 >= 50 (where

Average mark of taught courses >= 50% Mark of dissertation applicable) >= 50% (where

Diploma (Distinction): Diploma:

>= 70

Average mark of taught courses >= 70% Average mark of taught courses >= 40% Average mark of 4 taught courses >= 40%

>= 40

Certificate:

>= 40

The Award Board may usually award one Discretionary Credit for a taught course. Normally the Award Board will base its recommendation for an award on the overall average mark obtained by a candidate. The award board, however, has the discretion to base its decision on the relative average marks for the dissertation and the taught component and on the overall grade profile of a candidate 5.4 Progression Requirements For full-time PG Certificate and PG Diploma, there are no progression stages. For part-time students, the progression to the next stage of studies is on the basis of successful completion of courses completed at the time of the Progression Board. The key progression point for MSc courses is the progression from the taught component of the course to the dissertation stage. The standard progression requirement is a successful completion of all taught courses such that the overall performance is at grade C or better. The Award and Progression board has the discretion to allow a student not satisfying the normal progression requirement to progress to the dissertation if the board feels that the student is in a strong position to succeed in the dissertation and the next resit opportunity. 5.5 Re-assessment Opportunities Following PG CAPS, students have normally one re-sit opportunity in up to three courses, where their performance has been at D, E, or F grade. The re13

assessment opportunity is usually at the next standard diet for that course in the following academic year. The grade for re-assessment is normally capped at grade C. Given sufficient justification, such as medical evidence, the Progression Board may decide to offer the student another assessment opportunity which shall be counted as their first opportunity and is therefore not capped.

14

PART B UNIVERSITY INFORMATION


The Academic Registry is responsible for producing Part B of the handbook to provide information and assistance on University policies and support services. Kathy Patterson is the Academic Registrar and Deputy Secretary. Students should contact the appropriate School/Institute in the first instance for any academic query or assistance. However, any queries relating to Part B should be directed to Miss Jenny Tough, Administrative Officer, Academic Registry, and this will be directed to the relevant staff. Email: J.Tough@hw.ac.uk Tel: + 44 (0)131 451 3292 Please note that any references to the Campus or School Office contained within Part B apply to the Dubai Campus.

1
1.1

Academic Support
Mentoring Each student studying on a Heriot-Watt University course at the Campus will be assigned to a member of staff who will act as their mentor. Mentors can be consulted on all aspects of work, study and other areas of student life. Mentoring is a significant way for Heriot-Watt University to ensure that students studying at the Campus receive the support and guidance that they need. The development of a good working relationship between mentor and mentee (the student) is essential for this to be achieved and all students are encouraged to engage with their mentors through regular meetings scheduled in advance. It is important that both student and mentor ensure that they are available for scheduled appointments. Mentors can provide constructive feedback on academic performance from the outset of study and authoritative guidance on academic progression. Examples of the support that mentors will typically provide to students might include: acting as first point of contact where students require advice on academic and non-academic issues directing students to further sources of information and advice within the Campus and the University monitoring students academic progress helping students to build a holistic view of how their University career is developing. At all times students should keep their mentors informed of any changes in circumstances which may affect their academic progress. Where mentors are unable to resolve problems directly with a student, referrals to staff within the Universitys Student Support Services may be recommended, a list of which appears within this handbook. For further information, please refer to:
15

http://www.hw.ac.uk/careers/mentor.php http://www.hw.ac.uk/registry/enrolment.htm http://www.hw.ac.uk/quality/studentsupport.htm 1.2 Professional Development Planning Professional Development Planning (PDP) is a structured process to help students to reflect upon their own learning, performance and achievements. It has been designed to support the planning of a students personal, educational and career development. At Heriot-Watt University, (with the assistance of the Careers Advisory Service at the Edinburgh Campus) PDP is gradually being introduced to all study programmes and this will include those delivered at the Campus. PDP involves a process of thinking about what stage of development a student is currently at, where their interests lie, what their strengths are and what improvements they would like to achieve in order to get to where they want to be using the learning opportunities available to them. The ability to reflect on their achievements in areas of personal, academic and career development is an important precursor to planning the next step ahead. For further information, please refer to: http://www.hw.ac.uk/careers/pdp/index.php 1.3 Student Feedback There are a range of options open to students to communicate their views on programmes and courses to members of academic staff. Questionnaires are regularly issued for students to complete at the end of each programme, allowing students to give feedback on the quality of the programme and teaching. Students will also receive regular opportunities to speak with staff informally about any concerns or issues that they are facing and staff will always endeavour to resolve issues directly or will provide further guidance and suggestions for students to follow themselves. A system of student class representatives has been organised for the Campus. For further information, please refer to: http://www.hw.ac.uk/quality/studentfeedback.htm

2
2.1

Enrolment, Attendance and Periods of Study


Enrolment Each student studying on a Heriot-Watt University programme or course is required to enrol with the University at the start of their programme and at the start of each subsequent Academic Year. Students will be advised of enrolment arrangements prior to the start of each Academic Year. Students who fail to enrol with the University, at each stage of their programme, will be compulsorily withdrawn from the University.
16

Please refer to the Dubai Enrolment and Finance Information Handbook for further details. 2.2 Student Identity Cards Following enrolment, students will be issued with a Student Identity Card for the duration of their study it is essential that this card is kept in a safe place. All students are advised that they are required to show their Student Identity Card to an authorised person on the following occasions: - at an examination - on request by any officer of the University - for use of library and computing services - on any other occasion for good cause. 2.3 Amendment to Registration If a new undergraduate or postgraduate student wishes to amend their: - attendance level (full-time, part-time, etc.) - study method (on-campus, distance learning, etc.) Providing the student has not enrolled, he/she should contact Recruitment and Admissions, contact details are provided below. If enrolment has taken place, or if the student is a returning student, an application should be made and an Amendment to Registration form completed and submitted to the appropriate School/Institute Course Director. The form should be directed to the Dubai Student Services Office, where it will then be forwarded to the appropriate School for consideration in the first instance. Please refer to the following to download the Form: www.hw.ac.uk/registry/studentrecords.htm The Amendment to Enrolment form can also be used in the following circumstances: - to apply for an extension to period of study (not exceeding one additional year from date of first enrolment). - to apply for Suspension of Studies (for further information, please refer to Section 8 for further details. 2.4 Attendance Students are required to attend all lectures, tutorials and laboratory sessions. Class work must be completed satisfactorily and examinations taken as prescribed for the programme of study. A student who does not meet the requirements for attendance or performance, or both, for a particular course may not be permitted to sit the examination for that course and may also be required to withdraw from the University if problems persist. The University has introduced a new policy on Student Attendance which also contains guidance on Compulsory Withdrawal in cases where a students attendance falls below
17

acceptable standards. Students are encouraged to review the Policy on Student Attendance and the accompanying Withdrawal Procedures, which may be accessed at the following web link: www.hw.ac.uk/registry/resources/studentattendancepolicy.pdf Where a student is unable to attend classes or perform work for four working days or less because of illness or accident, a self-certification form should be submitted. These are available from the Campus Office. For a period of illness of five or more working days the student must provide the Campus Office with a medical certificate signed by an authorised medical practitioner(medical doctor). Medical certificates should be provided to the appropriate member of staff within the Campus Office who will ensure that the relevant course co-ordinators are informed. A medical certificate is also required if the performance of a student has been affected by illness or if a student is prevented from sitting an examination through illness or accident, irrespective of the total length of the absence. Students who experience any difficulties with their studies due to illness or for any other reason are encouraged to talk to a member of staff about their situation, preferably their mentor, their programme director or any member of staff whom the student feels is best able to support them. Members of staff will do their best to help students who are having problems but can only do so if they are aware of the situation. For further information, please refer to: Regulation 1 General Regulation, paragraph 6 Regulation 4 Postgraduate Diplomas and Graduate Diplomas, paragraph 12, Regulation 18 Postgraduate Certificates and Graduate Certificates, paragraph 12 Regulation 48 Higher Degrees of Master (Taught), paragraph 12 http://www.hw.ac.uk/ordinances/regulations.pdf 2.5 Student Personal Information In accordance with the Data Protection Act 1998, Heriot-Watt University is registered as the Data Controller for personal data that is held about students. The University will process student personal data in accordance with the University Data Protection Policy, the UK Data Protection Act 1998 and other applicable laws. For further information, please refer to the Student Data Collection Notice and the Student Personal Data Statement at: www.hw.ac.uk/students/data_protection_policy.pdf 2.6 Change of Address Students will be able to update their address, during the online enrolment process or through our new student self-service system.

18

It is very important that students update addresses as soon as possible. Failure to do so may lead to important information being misdirected, such as assessment results. The change of address form is available at: http://www.hw.ac.uk/registry/resources/ChangeofAddress.pdf 2.7 Periods of Study Students are normally expected to follow the recommended periods of study as described within the Universitys Regulations. Students may extend this period of study up to a maximum period, again as described in the Universitys Regulations. These time periods are as follows: Type of Award being studied Recommended period UNDERGRADUATE AWARDS Graduate Certificate (f/t) 6 months Graduate Certificate (p/t) Graduate Diploma (f/t) Graduate Diploma (p/t) Undergraduate Degree (Ord.) (f/t) Undergraduate Degree (Ord.) (p/t) Undergraduate Degree (Hons.) (f/t) Undergraduate Degree (Hons.) (p/t) Undergraduate Masters Degree (f/t) Undergraduate Masters Degree (p/t) 12 months 9 months 15 months 3 years 4 years Maximum Period* 2 years 4 years 2 years 4 years 4 years Up to 10 years 5 years Up to 10 years 6 years Up to 10 years

5 years

Type of Award being studied

Recommended period

Maximum Period* 2 years 4 years 2 years 4 years 2 years 7 years

POSTGRADUATE AWARDS Postgraduate Certificate (f/t) 6 months Postgraduate Certificate (p/t) 12 months Postgraduate Diploma (f/t) Postgraduate Diploma (p/t) Postgraduate Masters Degree (f/t) Postgraduate Masters Degree (p/t) 9 months 15 months 1 year 2 years

*Undergraduate and Postgraduate Studies Committees, acting on behalf of Senate, can extend these periods in extraordinary circumstances. For further information, please refer to: Regulation 3 (new) Modular First Degrees, paragraph 6 Regulation 4 Postgraduate Diplomas and Graduate Diplomas, paragraph 10

19

Regulation 18 Postgraduate Certificates and Graduate Certificates, paragraph 10 Regulation 48 Higher Degrees of Master (Taught), paragraph 10 http://www.hw.ac.uk/ordinances/regulations.pdf 2.8 Accreditation of Prior Learning Students may be able to obtain accreditation of prior learning for undergraduate and taught postgraduate programmes of study through submission of acceptable evidence. The criteria for admission and exemption based on accreditation of prior learning shall be as specified in the programme structure for each programme of study. For further information, please refer to: Regulation 46 Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL): http://www.hw.ac.uk/ordinances/regulations.pdf

3
3.1

Guidance on Assessment
Common Assessment and Progression System (CAPS) The University operates an integrated Common Assessment and Progression System (CAPS) for all students. The main features of this system include a common allocation of course results in the form of grades and clear assessment, re-assessment and progression guidelines. The web link below refers to separate information for undergraduate and postgraduate students. For further information, please refer to: http://www.hw.ac.uk/registry/policies.htm

3.2

Submission of Assessment Assessed coursework for all degree programmes must be submitted by the stated deadline. Students will be informed of this by a member of the Campus Office staff. Work submitted by students will be recorded and logged by the Campus Office. Students are strongly advised to retain a copy of their submitted work as well as any other documentation. Extension to Assessment Deadlines Assessed work submitted after the due date may be subject to a penalty (reduction in marks) being applied. The work should be submitted to the Campus Office together with any medical certificates or supporting documentation outlining the reasons for the late submission. Students are strongly advised to retain a copy of their assessed work and all supporting documentation. All late submissions will be reviewed by the relevant Assessment Board, along with any supporting documentation. The Board will have the option to adjust the mark and to reduce the penalty in the light of the circumstances. The Board has

3.3

20

absolute discretion in this matter and the outcome will be notified to students only after the meeting of the Board. 3.4 Non-Submission of Assessments Students should inform the Campus Office if they are unable to submit assessed work for any reason. The student will be asked to supply any medical certificates or supporting documentation relating to the non-submission where relevant.

4
4.1

Examination and Re-assessment Procedures


Examinations Full-time students in attendance at the University are entered automatically, without fee, for the first opportunity of examination of courses for which they are enrolled. It is important that students ensure that they have notified any change in course to the Campus Office no later than the end of Week 3 of the relevant semester. Failure to notify the Campus Office of a change in course may lead to a fine being imposed and a delay in notification of examination results. Please note that the University may prevent a student taking an assessment if University fees and/or charges are outstanding. Please refer to the Policy on Student Fees and Charges and Ordinance 2 Fees, Charges, Fines and Debts. For further information, please refer to: http://www.hw.ac.uk/policy/student_fees.pdf http://www.hw.ac.uk/ordinances/ordinances.pdf

4.2

Re-assessment Students will be formally notified of any re-sit requirements and opportunities when their progression decision and final grades are made available at the end of the Academic Year. The Academic Registry will mail a Re-assessment Application Form to those students who have not gained the minimum grade requirements for progression. It is therefore important that students maintain up to date contact details (including address) with the Campus Office who will liaise with the Edinburgh Campus to ensure that the student record is updated. A fee must be paid for each reassessment. Students must register and pay the appropriate fee to Academic Registry. This includes re-sit examinations, resubmission of assessed work or project work and any remedial work. Students should check what form the re-assessment takes and note the relevant examination diet. Students should refer to the Re-assessment Application Form for the relevant fee and deadline date for application. See also section on Student Fees and Charges below for details. Normally re-sit examinations must be taken as arranged in the location of the campus at which the student studies. However, in exceptional circumstances, the University may consider applications from students to re-sit examinations at alternative locations. It should be noted that ALL expenses incurred by the University in arranging this are required to be met by the student, which may be extensive in some cases. If a student has been involved in a disciplinary matter

21

relating to examinations or assessments, they may only undertake reassessment at their campus location. For further information and Re-assessment Application Forms, please refer to: http://www.hw.ac.uk/registry/examinations/reassessmentprocedures.htm 4.3 Examination Diets The normal schedule for undergraduate examination diets is as follows: Semester 1 December Diet Semester 2 Spring Diet 6-17 December 2010 25 April-20 May 2011

The dates for postgraduate examination diets are determined by the School and students should contact a member of staff in the School at the Campus for details of their examination diets. Whilst the University makes every effort to accommodate practice in countries across the world, there may be occasions when this is not possible. Please note that postgraduate examinations may be scheduled on Fridays at the Dubai Campus. In exceptional cases, some undergraduate examinations may also be scheduled on Fridays. Examinations can be scheduled up to, and include, the last day of each assessment period. In some cases, postgraduate examinations are scheduled during vacations. Therefore, students are strongly advised to take note of examination dates in assessment and re-assessment blocks before making any travel arrangements which take them away from the Campus in order to avoid any unnecessary problems. 4.4 Examination Timetables Examination timetables are prepared by the Academic Registry and will be made available on the Academic Registry website by the following dates: December diet Spring diet (final year students) Spring diet (continuing students) Re-sit diet 31 October 28 February 12 March 24 July

The examination timetables are published on the Student Notice Boards at the Campus according to the above timescales and students must check these timetables carefully as it is their responsibility to ensure that they have the correct time and location for any examinations that they are sitting. Draft timetables are posted a week prior to these dates (or two weeks prior to the Spring diet timetables). All timetables are published subject to necessary alteration. For further information, please refer to: http://www.hw.ac.uk/registry/examinations/timetable.htm 4.5 Assessment Results Provisional results are not normally made available after the examination diet as they are subject to ratification. However, students may receive feedback on their
22

performance via their mentor or course leader. Examination results will normally be posted on an appropriate noticeboard within the Campus. Where results are displayed on Campus Office noticeboards they will be presented in order of student number only. A letter confirming results and decisions on students performance in each course by grade, and giving a progression decision (for example, Re-assessment, PassProceed, etc.) are sent out by the Academic Registry at the end of the academic year and following re-sits where these are required. Any direct communication of examination results will be done face-to-face with staff and students only. 4.6 Discretionary Credits - Undergraduate In cases where an undergraduate student has satisfied the overall requirements for the programme or for progression to the next stage of the programme, but does not have the required number of credit points, the Progression Board may award 'discretionary credits', granted in a maximum of two courses or 30 credits, so that the student is eligible to receive the final award or to progress to the next stage. Discretionary credits are not given automatically to students who do not have sufficient credit points, but are applied only after consideration by the Progression Board. For further information on this issue please refer to: Regulation 3 Modular First Degrees, paragraph 23 available at http://www.hw.ac.uk/ordinances/regulations.pdf 4.7 Discretionary Credits - Postgraduate Postgraduate students who have satisfied the overall requirements for their programme, but do not have sufficient credit points with respect to the final award may be awarded 'discretionary credits' in a maximum of one taught course in order to be eligible for award. 'Discretionary credits' are not given automatically to students who do not have sufficient credit points for the award, but are applied only after consideration by the examiners. For further information on this issue please refer to: Regulation 4 Postgraduate Diplomas and Graduate Diplomas, paragraph 20 Regulation 18 Postgraduate Certificates and Graduate Certificates, paragraph 20 Regulation 48 Higher Degree of Master (Taught), paragraph 21 available at http://www.hw.ac.uk/ordinances/regulations.pdf 4.8 Use of Calculators and Dictionaries in Examinations Calculators

23

Where a calculator is required for the completion of the examination, a candidate shall use either a standard calculator as prescribed by the University or a nonstandard calculator as approved by the Head of Dubai Campus, in liaison with the relevant School at the Edinburgh campus. Where calculators are permitted and the Head of School decides that there should be a restriction on the model of calculator which may be used in an examination set by that School, then students are only allowed to use one of the following approved models: Casio fx-83ES Casio fx-83MS Casio fx-85WA Casio fx-85MS Casio fx-85ES In specific cases, the Head of Dubai Campus, in liaison with the School at the Edinburgh campus, may recommend to the Academic Registry that other models of calculator be permissible for use if essential for the completion of the examination. However, in this case, and in the case where the Head of School has agreed that there should be no restriction on the model of calculators used, any restrictions on text storage and retrieval facilities must be imposed by the Head of School setting the examination. The Head of School shall notify the Examinations Officer of any non-standard calculator which has been approved. In all cases, calculators must be provided by the student. Dictionaries A candidate shall not be permitted to introduce printed or other material such as dictionaries including electronic dictionaries into the examination room except such as may be authorised by the Head of Dubai Campus, following guidance from the School at the main campus in Edinburgh. Mobile telephones and other electronic equipment shall be switched off and shall be deposited with other personal items in an area designated by an invigilator. For further information, please refer to: Regulation 9 Assessments and Examinations, paragraph 8 http://www.hw.ac.uk/ordinances/regulations.pdf Students should refer to Part A of this handbook for programme specific information on calculators and dictionaries. 4.9 Ill Health and Extenuating Circumstances Assessment and Examinations A student who is prevented from sitting an assessment/examination through illness or other extenuating circumstances, or who believes that their performance has been affected by these circumstances, should notify a member of staff as soon as possible. In addition, students must also submit a medical certificate signed by an authorised medical practitioner (medical doctor) (or other documentary evidence,

24

as appropriate) to the Campus Board/Examination Board meets.

Office

before

the

relevant

Course

For further information regarding Assessment, please refer to: Regulation 1 General Regulation, paragraph 6 Regulation 4 Postgraduate Diplomas and Graduate Diplomas, paragraphs 12, 17 and 21 Regulation 18 Postgraduate Certificates and Graduate Certificates, paragraphs 12, 17 and 21 Regulation 48 Higher Degrees of Master (Taught), paragraphs 12, 17 and 22 Regulation 51 Degree Entry Programme (Dubai), paragraph 19 and 20

http://www.hw.ac.uk/ordinances/regulations.pdf For further information regarding Examinations, please refer to: Regulation 9 Assessments and Examinations, paragraphs 9 and 12 http://www.hw.ac.uk/ordinances/regulations.pdf

5
5.1

Awards, Grading and Qualifications


Intermediate Awards Intermediate Awards are University awards which may be conferred on any eligible student wishing to apply for a certificate as they progress through each stage of their programme and gain credits towards their degree, on the condition that they have obtained sufficient passes in their assessment. For example, an undergraduate student may be eligible to apply for a Certificate of Higher Education once they have achieved 120 credits. Applications for Intermediate Awards are made to the Academic Registry along with a payment of the appropriate fee, which can be confirmed by staff in the Campus Office. For further information for undergraduate students, please refer to: http://www.hw.ac.uk/registry/awards/intermediateawards.htm For further information for postgraduate students, please refer to: http://www.hw.ac.uk/registry/awards/intermediateawards.htm

5.2

Requirements for Awards Information on the level of performance required for award and the number of necessary credits are specified in the University regulations. For further information, please refer to: Regulation 4 Postgraduate Diplomas and Graduate Diplomas, paragraphs 15, 19 and 21

25

Regulation 18 Postgraduate Certificates and Graduate Certificates, paragraphs 15, 19 and 21 Regulation 44 Mixed-Mode Study - Modular First Degrees (for undergraduates only) Regulation 48 Higher Degrees of Master (Taught), paragraphs 15 and 20 http://www.hw.ac.uk/ordinances/regulations.pdf Students should refer to the programme-specific information in Part A of this handbook on award criteria. 5.3 Undergraduate Honours Classification and Awards Grading Honours year is currently unavailable at the Campus, but it may be possible for students to transfer to Edinburgh to do the final Honours year. Please contact your Discipline director for further information in the first instance. Honours classification is determined by the following criteria: Award First Class Honours Grade Grade A Minimum Criteria Either overall performance in qualifying courses at Grade A, or equivalent average percentage mark, or the majority of passes in qualifying courses at Grade A and none less than Grade D Either overall performance in qualifying courses at Grade B, or equivalent average percentage mark, or the majority of passes in qualifying courses at Grade B and none less than Grade D Either overall performance in qualifying courses at Grade C, or equivalent average percentage mark, or the majority of passes in qualifying courses at Grade C and none less than Grade D Either overall performance in qualifying courses at Grade D, or equivalent average percentage mark, or the majority of passes in qualifying courses at Grade D normally a minimum of Grade D in prerequisites and in courses designated as requiring a Grade D minimum

Second Class Honours (Upper)

Grade B

Second Class Honours (Lower)

Grade C

Third Class Honours

Grade D

Ordinary

Grade E

Where the weighted average indicates a borderline case (i.e. D/E, C/D or B/C), the Progression Board may give further consideration on a case by case basis. For further information regarding the qualifying courses used to determine honours classifications, please refer to: Regulation 3 (new) First Degrees, paragraph 15 For further information on credit levels relating to degree awards, please refer to:

26

Regulation 3 (new) First Degrees, paragraph 21 http://www.hw.ac.uk/ordinances/regulations.pdf 5.4 Postgraduate Awards Postgraduate awards are determined by the following criteria:

Award Masters with Distinction

Masters

Postgraduate Diploma or Graduate Diploma with Distinction Postgraduate Diploma or Graduate Diploma

Postgraduate Certificate or Graduate Certificate

Either overall performance in qualifying courses at Grade A, or equivalent average percentage mark, or the majority of qualifying courses at Grade A and no course pass at less than Grade C Either overall performance in qualifying courses at Grade C, or equivalent average percentage mark, or the majority of qualifying courses at Grade C and no course pass at less than Grade D1 Either overall performance in qualifying courses at Grade A, or equivalent average percentage mark, or the majority of qualifying courses at Grade A and no course pass at less than Grade C Either overall performance in qualifying courses at Grade D, or equivalent average percentage mark, or the majority of qualifying courses at Grade D and no course pass at less than Grade E Either overall performance in qualifying courses at Grade D, or equivalent average percentage mark, or the majority of qualifying courses at Grade D and no course pass at less than Grade E

The Progression Board may, in exceptional circumstances, recommend an award in the case of a student who has achieved a Grade E or Grade F in a qualifying course (ie performance in a course which contributes toward the final award). Justification for the award decision should be recorded in the minutes or formal record of the meeting.

Graduation
The Academic Registry is responsible for organising Graduation ceremonies which take place each year in June and November in Edinburgh. There is also a Graduation ceremony held in Dubai in November/December of each year. Students have the option to delay their graduation until the June of the following year should they wish to graduate in Edinburgh. This is an important day in the University diary where students, parents, other guests and staff celebrate the graduates achievements. Graduation ceremonies in other locations are organised from time to time in accordance with University policy. For further information, please refer to: http://www.hw.ac.uk/registry/graduation.htm

27

Conduct, Discipline and Appeals


The University has Guidelines for Students and Staff on Student Discipline Procedures, a copy of which may be accessed at the following web link: http://www.hw.ac.uk/registry/resources/discguidelines.pdf

7.1

Use of Mobile Telephones Mobile telephones should be used around the University with consideration for others. During lectures, tutorials and examinations, mobile telephones should be switched off. Failure to follow these requirements may result in disciplinary action being taken by the University. For information on all areas of Academic Conduct (including copying, plagiarism and collusion) within the following section, please refer to: Regulation 9 Assessment and Examinations, paragraph 8 Regulation 50 Student Discipline http://www.hw.ac.uk/ordinances/regulations.pdf http://www.hw.ac.uk/registry/discipline.htm

7.2

Academic Misconduct The University takes plagiarism and examination misconduct extremely seriously and investigates all alleged cases of misconduct. Any student suspected of misconduct will be dealt with accordingly through the Universitys Student Discipline Procedures. Academic misconduct during examinations includes: the act of bringing unauthorised material (written, printed or in any other format) into the examination room communicating with, receiving assistance from, copying from or providing assistance to another candidate during an examination removing examination books or worksheets from the examination room. If the University finds a student to be in breach of discipline by having cheated in assessed work and/or in examinations, the University has the discretion to apply a variety of measures, ranging from nullification of course results to suspension or even expulsion from the University. A standard penalty would be to make null and void all assessments undertaken during the relevant diet. The University understands that students may not be fully aware of the issues surrounding academic misconduct and they may also find that guidance provided at Heriot-Watt differs from advice previously given, perhaps compared to that given within their home country or through other experiences. It is therefore important that students inform themselves of these issues by referring to the Universitys guidance on misconduct and plagiarism. If in doubt, students should seek the advice of staff within the Campus Office who will liaise with one (or more) of the range of University support services referred to in this Handbook.

28

The consequences of misconduct in examinations and all other forms of assessment are severe and may result in all assessments undertaken at the relevant diet being made null and void. 7.3 Copying Copying the work of others, including that of other students in the class or group, is an indication of unfair advantage whereby one person gains credit for the work undertaken by another. Where an element of copying is a desirable element of an assessment, as might be the case in a group project or presentation, the instructions for the assessed work will specify the extent to which such copying is permissible. Any authorised or legitimate copying of the work of others that is included within students work must be clearly acknowledged by the student. In any work submitted, students must make clear any permitted copying which has been carried out. Students are advised to check the rest of their work to ensure that it is their own. Working with other students in informal study groups is a desirable part of the academic experience but students must ensure that the work they finally submit is theirs and not that of anyone else. Students should keep copies of material such as working notes, or sketches of diagrams or drafts of essays that show that the work and its source has been acknowledged and identified. 7.4 Plagiarism

As the consequences of misconduct in examinations and all other forms of assessment are severe, the Student Guide to Plagiarism (link below) is embedded into this handbook, please refer to the Appendix.
http://www.hw.ac.uk/registry/resources/plagiarismguide.pdf For the Chinese language version, please refer to: http://www.hw.ac.uk/registry/resources/plagiarismguidechinese.pdf For the Arabic language version, please refer to: http://www.hw.ac.uk/registry/resources/plagiarismguidearabic.pdf Note on Detection of Plagiarism Heriot Watt University may require student work to be submitted for checking using plagiarism detection software. This is intended to assist students in identifying possible plagiarism in coursework being submitted for assessment which could otherwise result in disciplinary action being taken against students by the University in accordance with Ordinance 9 (Student Discipline). For further information, please refer to: http://www.hw.ac.uk/registry/discipline.htm http://www.hw.ac.uk/registry/resources/plagiarismjiscnote.pdf

29

7.5

Collusion Collusion involves an agreement to deceive. This means that more than one person is involved in the deception. An accusation of collusion may be added to an accusation of copying if there is clear evidence of the involvement of two parties. Students should be extremely careful about lending their completed work to other persons. Students may think that they are helping others to meet a deadline in lending their work for copying to others but this may result in problems. What starts out as a supportive action may carry the risk of an accusation of collusion and a case taken to a disciplinary hearing.

7.6

Appeals Students who are dissatisfied with decisions on academic progress or classification of degree being awarded, have the right to appeal where there are extenuating circumstances or procedures which are felt to be unfair. In each case, there are clear and established procedures which students can follow which are outlined in Regulation 36 - Student Appeals. Please note relevant point in Regulation 36 that medical and other matters which could have been brought to the attention of the Examiners or the Board of Examiners prior to the disputed decision being taken shall not normally be considered at this stage. Please note relevant point in Regulation 36 that a student who receives an award at a congregation or in absentia may not subsequently appeal against the award. For further information, please refer to: Regulation 36 Student Appeals available at http://www.hw.ac.uk/ordinances/regulations.pdf

Deferred Progression, Suspension and Withdrawal


Students may wish to suspend or withdraw from their studies for many reasons. Such reasons should be discussed with a students mentor or another member of academic staff as soon as possible. These discussions can help students to consider all available options and perhaps identify a way in which the student can continue with their studies at a more suitable pace or stage. Should the student decide to withdraw permanently from their studies, further advice can be given to ensure that this transition is completed efficiently and reducing any stress.

8.1

Deferred Progression An undergraduate student who has satisfied the requirements for progress and who wishes to suspend studies prior to continued enrolment may be permitted by the Head of School to defer proceedings for one academic year in the first instance. In this case students should complete the 'Amendment to Registration Form (Approval by School) which is available at: www.hw.ac.uk/registry/studentrecords.htm

30

8.2

Suspension In exceptional circumstances, during the programme of the academic year, where applicable, a candidate for an undergraduate award may be permitted to suspend studies temporarily for a specified period of time. In this case students should complete the 'Student Appeal Form (Approval by Undergraduate Studies Committee) which is available at: www.hw.ac.uk/registry/studentrecords.htm Postgraduate students who wish to suspend studies should complete the Amendment to Registration Form (Approval by Postgraduate Studies Committee) which can be found at: www.hw.ac.uk/registry/studentrecords.htm Students are advised to consult with their Mentor and/or their Year Co-ordinator/Director of Studies in the first instance. In addition, any relevant medical certificates or other supporting documentation must also be submitted before the relevant Examination Board meets. For further information on Suspension please refer to: Regulation 3 (new) First Degrees, paragraph 19 Regulation 4 Postgraduate Diplomas and Graduate Diplomas, paragraph 10 Regulation 18 Postgraduate Certificates and Graduate Certificates, paragraph 10 Regulation 48 Higher Degrees of Master (Taught), paragraph 10 available at http://www.hw.ac.uk/ordinances/regulations.pdf

8.3

Withdrawal Any student wishing to withdraw from the University should inform the Campus Office in writing of the date of their proposed withdrawal and the reasons for withdrawing, using the appropriate Withdrawal from the University pro forma which is available at: www.hw.ac.uk/registry/studentrecords.htm Before making any decision to withdraw, students are strongly advised to speak to their mentor or other trusted member of staff to discuss the situation fully.

8.4

Exit Awards Students who choose to leave the University part way through their programme may have acquired enough credits to be eligible for an Exit Award. Students will be informed by the Academic Registry if they are eligible for an Exit Award and will receive an Exit Award Application Form. Students must apply and pay the Award Fee by the prescribed deadline date, details of which are contained on the Application Form.

31

9
9.1

Student Fees and Charges


Student Fees and Charges Policy All students are advised to refer to the Policy on Student Fees and Charges which is available at: http://www.hw.ac.uk/policy/student_fees.pdf The Dubai campus fees and charges are available at: http://www.hw.ac.uk/dubai/financial-information/tuition-fees.htm

9.2

Additional Charges The following items will attract a charge as follows: Re-assessment Students applying to re-sit courses and examinations must pay a set fee for each re-assessed course or examination, using a prescribed form available from the Academic Registry. For further information, please refer to: http://www.hw.ac.uk/registry/examinations/reassessmentprocedures.htm Repeat and Additional Courses Should a student not satisfy the minimum progression criteria for a particular course and be permitted to repeat a course, the student should pay the standard course fee in advance of commencing the repeated course (where applicable). It may also be relevant to charge the appropriate course fee for any additional courses taken by a student. For further information on current course fees, please refer to: http://www.hw.ac.uk/student-life/scholarships-fees.htm Academic Transcript Should a student require a transcript for any reason, a charge will be levied by the relevant School Office. Certification For further details on School/Institute Office.

the

Certification

process,

contact the

relevant

Late Enrolment Students who have not enrolled with the University by the appropriate date will be charged a late enrolment fee of 200 AED to cover administration costs. Exemption from the fee may only considered in certain cases. However, this will not apply to students at the Campus during their first year. Late Course Enrolment Where a student wishes to change enrolment for optional or elective courses, there is a small late course enrolment fee which is applied by the Academic

32

Registry to students who enrol on a course after the end of week 3 of the semester in which the course is taught. However, this will not apply to students at the Campus during their first year. Replacement Student Identity Card A fee is charged by the Academic Registry to replace a students Identity Card unless there is evidence of good reason, outwith the students control, for loss of the previous identity card. For further information on charges highlighted in this section and all others, please refer to the Enrolment Pack section, and choose the appropriate pack that relates to your specific status, and refer to the Additional Notes on Fees link at: http://www.hw.ac.uk/registry/tuition-fees.htm Students can also refer to the following University Ordinance for more information: Ordinance 2 Fees, Charges, Fines and Debts http://www.hw.ac.uk/ordinances/ordinances.pdf

10

Student Support Services


The following information describes a range of services aimed at helping students to get the most out of their time on Heriot-Watt University courses and to assist with, and remedy any problems experienced along the way. Students study for Heriot-Watt awards from all over the world and the University is therefore committed to providing a range of online support services which will be available to any student who requires it. In doing so, the University will attempt to ensure that all students receive high quality and relevant services that support their studies. The main student support services are summarised below. For further information on each of the services, please refer to the online Freshers Guide: http://www.hw.ac.uk/registry/enrolment.htm

10.1

Student Support and Accommodation Student Support and Accommodation, combined with the Careers Advisory Service and the Academic Registry, form the wider Office of Student Services, under the directorship of the Academic Registrar and Deputy Secretary. The primary function of Student Support and Accommodation is to provide all students with an open and supportive service capable of providing advice and guidance to students who are experiencing all types of personal and academic difficulties. The main areas of support provided can be grouped as follows: Funding Advice - including Hardship Funds
33

Counselling and Support Disability Assessment, Advice and Support Accommodation on and off campus For further information, please refer to the Freshers Guide and the Student Support and Accommodation website: http://www.hw.ac.uk/registry/enrolment.htm www.hw.ac.uk/welfareWWW Disability Adviser Heriot-Watt University is committed to equal opportunities for all. Lorraine Vallance is the University's Disability Adviser within the Student Support and Accommodation section. Any student with a disability, medical condition or specific learning disability (such as dyslexia) can contact Loraine for advice or assistance (L.Vallance@hw.ac.uk). Based on medical or other evidence provided, Lorraine will liaise with the student, relevant staff and other professionals if necessary and make support recommendations. Support offered can include special exam arrangements, assistive software and equipment etc. In all cases the university will ensure that any reasonable adjustments are made in accordance with UK legislation. For further information please refer to: http://www.hw.ac.uk/welfare/disability-service.htm 10.2 Religious Services There is a prayer room for students within the Dubai Campus. In addition to the multi-denominational Chaplaincy, a Muslim Prayer Room is provided for students at the main University campus in Edinburgh. Academic Registry The Academic Registry is responsible for a range of academic administrative services in relation to undergraduate and postgraduate students, staff and programmes at all campuses of the University and for those studying in approved learning partners and independently. The Academic Registry is responsible for the administrative aspects of: Accreditation of Prior Learning Enrolment/Matriculation International Student Advice Examinations and Assessments Results Letters, Transcripts and Certifications Intermediate Awards/ Exit Awards Graduation Prizes and Medals Quality Assurance and Enhancement Ordinances and Regulations
34

10.3

Common Assessment & Progression System (CAPS) Accreditation of Prior Learning Student Complaints, Discipline and Appeals to Senate Student related statistical returns Academic Committee Secretariat. Academic Registry Feedback Form Feedback is welcomed from students on the service provided by Academic Registry and it would be appreciated if students could find the time to complete the questionnaire at the following web address and return it to the Academic Registry http://www.hw.ac.uk/registry/resources/studentfeedback.doc For further information, please refer to: http://www.hw.ac.uk/registry 10.4 Careers Advisory Service The University Careers Advisory Service is part of the Office of Student Services and offers a range of core services aimed at helping students to develop the skills required to make and implement their career choice, including the ability to market themselves successfully in the graduate selection process. The following online services are available to students who are studying at the Campus: Employer, employment and occupational and job-hunting information Careers education, advice and support Online careers education, advice, guidance and support Professional Development Planning For further information, please refer to: www.hw.ac.uk/careers 10.5 Academic Counselling and Skills Coaching As part of the Careers Advisory Service, the Academic Counselling and Skills Coaching service is aimed at helping students to develop skills and become effective learners, to improve the way they study, to achieve greater academic success at university and to acquire transferable skills which are highly valued by employers. The following online services are available to students studying on the Campus: Guidance on Planning, Organisation and Motivation Skills Guidance on Academic Study Skills Where specific advice is required, contact should initially be made through the student mentor or programme tutor. For further information, please refer to the Freshers Guide:
35

http://www.hw.ac.uk/registry/enrolment.htm www.hw.ac.uk/sbc/library/academic_skills/index.htm 10.6 The Students Association The Students Association provides a range of services that aim to enrich student life and help students overcome any difficulties that might affect their time at University. The Association has an Advice and Support Centre based at the Edinburgh Campus. Staff at the Advice and Support Centre may be able to help regarding issues to do with the various University procedures such as academic appeals, disciplinary procedures and complaints about University Services and academic matters. To access such support, contact should initially be made through the student mentor/ programme tutor/student representative or the Head of the Dubai Campus. Alternatively, you can contact Miss Jenny Tough, Administrative Officer, Academic Registry. J.Tough@hw.ac.uk 10.7 Library Students studying at the Campus have access to a wide range of library services: Access to books and printed magazines to support coursework Study facilities open for long hours Access to over 4000 electronic journals and specialist databases Access to general advice and assistance from professional library staff in the campus library Remote access to specialist Subject Librarian support from the University Library Access to internet PCs Advice on Internet resources Obtaining materials not in the Library For further information, please refer to: http://www.hw.ac.uk/library/dubai/ 10.8 Computing Services The University provides comprehensive computing services for all students studying for Heriot-Watt University awards. All students at the Campus have access to PC equipment with a range of common software and to a Help Desk that provides technical advice. All users of these services are required to comply with Heriot-Watt University Regulation 29 Use of Computing Facilities and should read the following document: http://www.hw.ac.uk/IT/Documents/conditions.html

36

Help Desk Service The Campus Computing Officer is the first point of contact and will be able to assist with any enquiries. The Help sections on the Heriot-Watt University web site also provide information on the use of computing facilities: www.hw.ac.uk/it PC Service The service is available on PCs connected to the Universitys network across the campus, to provide a common core of software packages through a standard interface. Access is by username and password. New students will be provided with assistance on how to register to use the computing facilities. For further information, please refer to the Freshers Guide. www.hw.ac.uk/IT 10.9 Information Security Keep your information secure by taking the following steps: Protect your own personal information its valuable. Keep your passport and other important personal documents safely locked away. If you have to make an electronic copy of a document that could be used for identity theft always ensure it is securely protected e.g. in encrypted format. Dont keep your only copy of your work on a memory stick. Always back up your work to your University account Protect confidential electronic documents with strong passwords combining letters and numbers Lock your computer screen or log out when you are leaving your desk Protect your passwords and dont share them with others. When handling someone elses personal information, consider: if this was your personal data, would you be happy for everyone else to see it? Take control of your communications: If you use web 2.0/social networking technologies, activate the privacy settings before you or other users share personal and confidential data. Check that you dont surrender IPR to the service provider. Keep back up copies of your work as external services can and do disappear without notice. If you have to send confidential information by email, encrypt or password protect the data. Dont respond to email requests for your password or bank details Be cautious about opening email attachments if in doubt scan for viruses.

37

To find out more about what the University does with your personal data please contact the FOI and Data Protection Office:
Email: foi@hw.ac.uk Tel: +44 (0)131 3219/3274 10.10 Development and Alumni Office Heriot-Watt University is the home of The Watt Club, the UKs oldest Graduate Association, founded in 1854. This association provides a number of services to more than 75,000 graduates around the world. With a network of local branches and Ambassadors around the world, The Watt Club provides a great opportunity to meet fellow graduates and re-connect with friends. Students who graduate with a Heriot-Watt degree will automatically join this exclusive society of alumni members and enjoy the following benefits: Bi-annual copies of the HWU magazine Tri-annual e-newsletter Watt Club Online (www.hw.ac.uk/wattclub) Invitations to Watt Club events in their region Support for any alumnus wishing to establish or support worldwide local branch activities Direct contact with staff at The Development and Alumni Office in Edinburgh For further information, please refer to the Freshers Guide. To learn more about our alumni, The Watt Club and to keep in touch after you graduate please visit: www.hw.ac.uk/wattclub

11

University Policy and Guidance


The University publishes many policies and reference information on its website that may be of use and of interest to students through the course of their studies at Heriot-Watt University. Wherever practicable, University policy is designed to include all members of the Universitys community, both within and outwith the main campus environments. The University respects religious and cultural diversity and aims to support individuals in their religious and cultural observance, where academic aspects and business priorities permit. The University statement can be found at: http://www.hw.ac.uk/policy/students/religious-and-cultural-observance.pdf Students can refer to policies of specific interest and relevance: www.hw.ac.uk/registy For further information, please refer to: http://www.hw.ac.uk/registry/enrolment.htm.
38

Appendix

STUDENT GUIDE TO PLAGIARISM 1 Introduction


1.1. This guide is intended to provide students at Heriot-Watt University with a clear definition of plagiarism and examples of how to avoid it. The guide may also be of use to members of staff who seek to advise students on the various issues outlined below.

1.2.

Definition
1.3. Plagiarism involves the act of taking the ideas, writings or inventions of another person and using these as if they were ones own, whether intentionally or not. Plagiarism occurs where there is no acknowledgement that the writings or ideas belong to or have come from another source. Most academic writing involves building on the work of others and this is acceptable as long as their contribution is identified and fully acknowledged. It is not wrong in itself to use the ideas, writings or inventions of others, provided that whoever does so is honest about acknowledging the source of that information. Many aspects of plagiarism can be simply avoided through proper referencing. However, plagiarism extends beyond minor errors in referencing the work of others and also includes the reproduction of an entire paper or passage of work or of the ideas and views contained in such pieces of work.

1.4.

Good Practice
1.5. Academic work is almost always drawn from other published information supplemented by the writers own ideas, results or findings. Thus drawing from other work is entirely acceptable, but it is unacceptable not to acknowledge such work. Conventions or methods for making acknowledgements can vary slightly from subject to subject, and students should seek the advice of staff in their own School/Institute about ways of doing this. Generally, referencing systems fall into the Harvard (where the text citation is by author and date) and numeric (where the text citation is by using a number). Both systems refer readers to a list at the end of the piece of work where sufficient information is provided to enable the reader to locate the source for themselves. When a student undertakes a piece of work that involves drawing on the writings or ideas of others, they must ensure that they acknowledge each contribution in the following manner: Citations: when a direct quotation, a figure, a general idea or other piece of information is taken from another source, the work and its source must be acknowledged and identified where it occurs in the text; Quotations: inverted commas must always be used to identify direct quotations, and the source of the quotation must be cited; References: the full details of all references and other sources must be listed in a section at the end of any piece of work, such as an essay, together with the full publication details. This is normally referred to as a List of References and it must include details of any and all sources of information that the student has referred to in producing their work. (This is slightly different to a Bibliography, which may also contain references and sources which, although not directly referred to in your work, you consulted in producing your work). 1.7. Students may wish to refer to the following examples which illustrate the basic principles of plagiarism and how students might avoid it in their work by using some very simple techniques:

1.6.

The author acknowledges the following sources of information used in preparing this guide to Plagiarism: Plagiarism A Good Practice Guide, Carroll, J and Appleton, J (2001) and various extracts from Student/Course Handbooks 2004/2005, Schools and Institutes at Heriot-Watt University

39

1.7.1.

Example 1: A Clear Case of Plagiarism Examine the following example in which a student has simply inserted a passage of text (in italics) into their work directly from a book they have read: University and college managers should consider implementing strategic frameworks if they wish to embrace good management standards. One of the key problems in setting a strategic framework for a college or university is that the individual institution has both positive and negative constraints placed upon its freedom of action. Managers are employed to resolve these issues effectively. This is an example of bad practice as the student makes no attempt to distinguish the passage they have inserted from their own work. Thus, this constitutes a clear case of plagiarism. Simply changing a few key words in such a passage of text (e.g. replace problems with difficulties) does not make it the students work and it is still considered to be an act of plagiarism.

1.7.2.

Common Mistakes Students may also find the following examples of common plagiarism mistakes made by other students useful when reflecting on their own work: I thought it would be okay as long as I included the source in my bibliography [without indicating a quotation had been used in the text] I made lots of notes for my essay and couldn't remember where I found the information I thought it would be okay to use material that I had purchased online I thought it would be okay to copy the text if I changed some of the words into my own I thought that plagiarism only applied to essays, I didn't know that it also applies to oral presentations/group projects etc I thought it would be okay just to use my tutor's notes I didn't think that you needed to reference material found on the web I left it too late and just didn't have time to reference my sources
2

None of the above are acceptable reasons for failing to acknowledge the use of others work and thereby constitute plagiarism. 1.8. What follows are examples of the measures that students should employ in order to correctly cite the words, thought or ideas of others that have influenced their work: 1.8.1. Example 2: Quoting the work of others If a student wishes to cite a passage of text in order to support their own work, the correct way of doing so is to use quotation marks (e.g. ) to show that the passage is someone elses work, as follows: One of the key problems in setting a strategic framework for a college or university is that the individual institution has both positive and negative constraints placed upon its freedom of action. 1.8.2. Example 3: Referencing the work of others In addition to using quotation marks as above, students must also use a text citation. If the work being cited is a book, page numbers would also normally be required. Thus, using the Harvard system for a book: One of the key problems in setting a strategic framework for a college or university is that the individual institution has both positive and negative constraints placed upon its freedom of action (Jones, 2001, p121).
2 Extract from Plagiarism at the University of Essex advice copyrighted and published by the Learning, Teaching and Quality Unit at the University of Essex (http://www.essex.ac.uk/plagiarism/common_excuses.htm), reproduced with kind permission.

40

The same reference could also be made to a book using the numeric system: One of the key problems in setting a strategic framework for a college or university is that the individual institution has both positive and negative constraints placed upon its freedom of action (Ref.1, p121). More often, a piece of work will have multiple references and this serves to show an examiner that the student is drawing from a number of sources. For example, articles by Brown and by Smith may be cited as follows in the Harvard system It has been asserted that Higher Education in the United Kingdom continued to be poorly funded during the 1980s [Brown, 1991], whereas more modern writers [Smith, 2002] argue that the HE sector actually received, in real terms, more funding during this period than the thirty year period immediately preceding it. or as follows using the numeric system: It has been asserted that Higher Education in the United Kingdom continued to be poorly funded during the 1980s [Ref 1], whereas more modern writers [Ref 2] argue that the HE sector actually received, in real terms, more funding during this period than the thirty year period immediately preceding it.

1.8.3.

Example 4: Use of reference lists Whichever system is used, a list must be included at the end, which allows the reader to locate the works cited for themselves. The Internet is also an increasingly popular source of information for students and details must again be provided. You should adhere to the following guidelines in all cases where you reference the work of others: If the source is a book, the required information is as follows: Authors name(s) Year of Publication Title of Book Place of Publication Publishers Name All Page Numbers cited rd Edition (if more than one, e.g. 3 edition, 2001)

If the source is an article in a journal or periodical, the required information is as follows: Authors name(s) Year of Publication Title of Journal Volume and part number Page numbers for the article

If the source is from the Internet, the required information is as follows: Authors or Institutions name (Anon, if not known) Title of Document Date last accessed by student Full URL (e.g. http://www.lib.utk.edu /instruction/plagiarism/) Affiliation of author, if given (e.g. University of Tennessee)

The way in which the information is organised can vary, and there are some types of work (for example edited volumes and conference proceedings) where the required information is slightly different. Essentially, though, it is your responsibility to make it clear where you are citing references within your work and what the source is within your reference list. Failure to do so is an act of plagiarism. 1.9. Students are encouraged to use a style of acknowledgement that is appropriate to their own academic discipline and should seek advice from their mentor, course leader or other appropriate member of academic staff. There are also many reference sources available in the University Library which will provide useful guidance on referencing styles.

41

Managing Plagiarism
1.10. Students, supervisors and institutions have a joint role in ensuring that plagiarism is avoided in all areas of academic activity. Each role is outlined below as follows: How you can ensure that you avoid plagiarism in your work: Take responsibility for applying the above principles of best practice and integrity within all of your work Be aware that your written work will be checked for plagiarism and that all incidents of plagiarism, if found, are likely to result in severe disciplinary action by the University. The standard penalty is to annul all assessments taken in the same diet of examinations (for details please refer to Regulation 50 at http://www.hw.ac.uk/ordinances/regulations.pdf and to the Guidelines for Staff and Students on Discipline at http://www.hw.ac.uk/registry/discipline.htm). How your School/Institute will help you to avoid plagiarism: Highlight written guidance on how you can avoid plagiarism and provide you with supplementary, verbal guidance wherever appropriate Regularly check student work to ensure that plagiarism has not taken place. This may involve both manual and electronic methods of checking. A number of plagiarism detection packages are in use at Heriot-Watt University, one example being the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) TurnitIn plagiarism detection software. See https://submit.ac.uk/static_jisc/ac_uk_index.html for more information on how this software package works. Alert you to the procedures that will apply should you be found to have committed or be suspected of having committed an act of plagiarism and explain how further action will be taken in accordance with University policy and procedures. How the University will endeavour to reduce student plagiarism: Provide clear written guidance on what constitutes plagiarism and how to avoid it directly to your School/Institute and to you Alert you and staff in your School/Institute to the penalties employed when dealing with plagiarism cases Take steps to ensure that a consistent approach is applied when dealing with cases of suspected plagiarism across the institution Take the issue of academic dishonesty very seriously and routinely investigate cases where students have plagiarised and apply appropriate penalties in all proven cases.

42