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redefine teh army by redefining teh s oldier, the mercenary and the corpoaration...

so teh e conomy grew a t a relatively fast pace

the entrepreneur i s teh figure that wuill elad america out of teh d oldrums.. the netrepreneur the heroic figure of capitalism, the atals upon whoce shouldres teh w hole w orld satnds.... seems faintly remarkablein retrospect that lumets teh verdict made mor e money that year than stallones fort bllod, though less than porkys Conan, the entreprenuer....reinntroduce A Barbaric Interlude. Nietzsche. Murray Rothbard quotes him in his letter to Ayn Rand, John Milius quotes him at the start of his adaptation of E Ron Howards Conan The Barbarian. The quote is suitably simplistic, a kind of Hallmark Nietzchianism: That which does not kill us makes us stronger. The movie, Milius pet-project for years, was designed to lift Schwarzenegger out of supporting roles and make him a leading man.The film launches the mini sword and sorcery boom of the 80s, itself a replay of the Sword and Sandals genre of the 50s, the Steve Reeves movies that Frank wants to take in in The Rocky Horror Picture Show, though this is a boom in mosty straight-to-video movies ( it does, however, give ace B-Movie Auter Albert Pyun his only mainstream cinema release with The Sword and The Sorcerer). The Eighties drowns in cheap Fantasy and Sci-Fi thanks to the emergence of the home video market, and mainstream Cinema increasingly begins to shift into a weird zone in which the hyperviolent, spectacularized and cartoonishly simple co-exist. Superheroes are coming back and action movies, featuring real-life martial arts stars, body builders and ex FBI operatives (along witha handful of increasingly steroidal actual actors) are about to become the major box-office successes of the next 30 years. Milius Conan is slightly before this trend, or perhaps Milius is a man between epochs, still touched with some of the moral. aesthetic and philosophical seriousness of the 60s and 70s ( the film draws on images from Kwaidan for example). this results in a slow and portentious, e movie, a film both bloated with its own cumbersome pseudo-intellectualism and at the same time sparse and underpopulated, strangely enervated for an epic. The main selling point for Conan as for many of his early films is Schwarzenegger's muscularity. The film e fefctivlet rehearse teh id e ao f teh s elf made man coming back to destroy the corrupt a nd effeminate hiipy multiracial cult, whic its hard not to erda a s war-loving milius fanatsy of purgin gthe hippies. Significantly it also presasges a couple of tehme s tahtw ill s tart to

dvelop throughout teh eighties, the return of te Superhero, the superman, thewarriro. Superman has returned in more modern form in Donners 1977 Superman,. The distinction between the witless Miliuss plodding meditation of the warrir spirit the kind of geeky boydoldier e ranestness and fascination with detah and its technologies that seesm to be James camerons major theme is in sharp contarst to supermans wit, playfulness and romantic and social angst, Superman isnt kidult in teh s ens e wthat we now understand it, but it is due to s ome gerat a cting and casting by its three cebtral palyers, hackman, kidder and especially Reeve, an affecting film, it carries a realism,that subsequent

the question is, why do seventies films even soemthing like Superman so musch more a dult than their eiighties equivalents. The sgift to realism, the new wave of directors in te e raly s eventies still partly informs the earlyw ave of seventies blockbusters, Clos e enCounters , jaws even starwars. teher is a certain amount o really inetrpersonal social difficulty here. when Leih confesses taht she love s Han solo, or luke Discovers Vader si his father, there si a degre e of existetial shock that later movie s just dont or cant carry. why this is, whi films of the eightie s an d nineties are incabale of incorporating som of te structure s of realism form teh seventies. Conan is unconcerened with a ny s ense of emotional or social c onnection betwen its central c haracters, ther si a kind of autism to teh Republican mindset, incapable of garsping t he nuanced inetrority or inetraction and Shwazennegers inability as an a ctor is relevant here he is there @urely f or his bulk, his look, Image is a ll. just a s teh iange of teh unites states abroad is w hat matters. if teh post w ar soldiers are represented alternately in Hal asbys coming home as cripples or psychos milius w ants to erdiscover teh noble warriror. we can take that teh nietzhe quote is designe d to deal w ith Vietnam, teh Americans need to get their act back t ogether. teher is a nother tarnsitional figure in Rambo i First Bllod which is still in hock t o soem of teh concerns and sensibilitie s of teh Seventies, wintry, concerned in some w ays with social issues, poratraying Rambo asa man with weaknesses and feas in te infamously garbled final monologue, in c ontarst w ith raaaambo 2 and 3 whick leave all pretence at realism behind in order to onflate acomic book hyper masculainitya nd hyper militarism. The hyper eral is a neoliberal of body-building,the need for every workout to be pressages by motivational quotes, from Lao tse or Nietzhe, the body builder is a warrior, the businessmen is a warrior, a hero, arisk-taker, the Superman, witness the ridiculous mach hijinks of CEO od Enron Jeff Skilling, quad biking etc.. nice guys finisg last, number one is everythingan d number two is nothing, just as the businessman becomes more like a soldier, so the army itself begins to resemble a business....

he point is not that Milius finally finds a star for his project in Schwarzenegger but that Schwarzenegger fulfills mIlius fantasy and a film must be created for him. In otherwords Arnold msut becomem te great box office star of teh Eighties, this is teh urgent need. In this s ens e all of shwazzenegers films in te eighties are remakes of pumping iron, celebrations of Shwazennegers body, his body is teh s tar, the locus of attarction, the

films purpose. he stes an unbeatable precedent, other stars have to c ompete, Stallone (later prosecuted fro taking sterois in New Zealand) Noticablt pumps up and a whole hsot of musclebound new warriors flood into hollywood from all corners of teh globe. and homegrown action heroes move into the mainstram chuck norris, steven segal. the superhero and the martial arts star, both of which have been significant if singular concerns in the seventies, The re-make of Superman, Bruce Lee) also boom in poularity of martial arts.

The film is inetersting in a number of respects, though a lmost non of them are directy connected t what goe s on on screen. Milius is a cigar-chomping would be hard ass who inexplicably directed teh gerat Dillinger with warren oates. this is pretty much teh single highpoint in a CV which otherwise includes dismal clunkers like teh Wind and The lion and the ... Big wednesay. nostagia for youth...combination of nostakgia for teh fifties a nd a fasciantion w ith innocent boyhood, and a paradise lost motif,combined with a matrial and militarized adulthood, in Star wars, young luke Sywalker must learn to become a Jedi warrior the clunky motivational wisdoms of bodybuilding a nd business managment gurus designed to augmnet self belief and creta eteh killer instinct the landscape of Conan, a kind of deolate is the seventies a n empty world sunk in decadence snake cult...conan the destroyer campy peformatively neters the 80s. its only through the purging of the (of coirs ethe masochistic element of the eighties action hero is prefigured in, action heroes begin to take on teh trappings of rebel culture, as do enterpreneurs, long hair leather jackets, blue jeans. because teh bodtbuilder ah s teh warriotr philosophy, th eye of te tiger, the cobination of masochism and popposity intertwined into

An aside on a term: Premediation.

into Terminator idea in the future need to be soldiers,

this is the pretentious nietzhean chracter

still cant prevent america having ists ars e kisked bya group of giys on a bolw of ric e a day with some bamboo guns, or as now, a bunc america wants to refight the w ar wants to re imagine istelf as a wrrior

militarism a nd celebration of soldier/warrior. in cameron two

this s i ebcause the e ighties can7t handle teh truth and anything which bedfons ot approacj teh real complexity of a lifeworld, taht is touched by incomprehension, falure, joy or the xocial must be magiced a wa... the social and interdeprnedent complexity can be replaced witha kind of glossy lifestlyiem.. the complex inetreprsonal needs a nd idntifictaions, teh social with all its trials can be magiced away via teh mediation of goods and the pursuit of self ineterst. part of the ideology of the markets and the the problems of teh seventie s ar e glossed over by an elaboration of te spectacle an d flood of booms, credits, cheap commodities and techo utupionism... a list of te problems o that bedevilled teh s eventie s no one wills uggest that thes e ideas w ere alrgely forgotten for thirty eyars because neliberalim s olved them, teh taruma of the golden thirtie s running to a clos e is in fact plastered over with an illusory boom

Part 2. Arnold In Wonderland. secon half of Arnolds carree starting with terminator/break out movie..deal with conan the barabarian at end of part two. also the ide a that machine s will bring a boutteh a pocalpyse is literalised in t2 as a kin of battle but w e are alreday teher in s oem extent with microsecond tadaes a n d machine s talking to e ach other... This can lead on into observations about teh car asa kind of supplement to tehtechnology stuff here. Three Times At the start of James Camerons 1982 Terminator, Schwarzenegger's real breakout role, the human hero and his cyborg nemesis are beamed back from the future to modern day L.A.

The same sequence is repeated in thre movies trope is repeated in all three movies, though s ignificantly by terminator three, rise of teh amcgines teh urban deadzone of teh first two movie has modulated singnificant;y. while the terminators of the first two movies are sent abck into rubbisg strewn parking lots or car parks and and confroted by teh social detritus of teh eighties running w ild in\ amongst teh urban d ecay Kristina Lokkens female terminator is beamed abcjk intoa boutique and immediately steals a highe nd motor, she may be a female desctructborg f rom teh future but as a women she still essentiallya consumer. you could tarce three visions of teh city through teh three Terminator movies and through teh thre e roes teh terminators adopt, first ly tehers shwazennegers Punkish terminator ina lawless city, teh first thing he encounters a re punks, in the s econd robert patricks cop and teh third teh empowered black w omen in teh boutique. a acros s teh thre e flms and teh best aprt of adecade teh representation of teh urban and teh s uburban s hifts considerably, in both one and two teh s uburbs a re teh s@ace of light rationality an safety and teh urban core anre dangersous and nighlistic benighted zones. Terminator three shows a fully neoliberalized city, a city of clean s treets and boutiques and in oredre for Shwazenneger to find his scustomary outfit this time the film locate s him out in the country una camp hen night. Three Terminators equally in terminator thre teh s uburb is less importnat, the stark d ivision between suburban and urban has been blurred, as ahs the idea of teh city a s location od teh industry., teher are two considerations her, teh city as teh center of ahi\opeful industruialism a saving industrialism and the citys development a fundamentally c ommercial space Three Cities From blue Collar to Robocop Rcp reconfigures distopia as aplayground teh paradigmatic cities pf teh 70s and eighties are probably Detroit, new york Manhatten and the warriors

Three Times At the start of James Camerons 1982 Terminator, Schwarzenegger's real breakout role, the hero John and his cyborg nemesis are beamed back from the future to modern day L.A.

The present they are beamed into is a contemporary urban area . This trope is repeated in all three movies and acts almost a sa model f they shifting nature of the City and the suburb over fifteen years or so of American life. In the first in the series the terminator is sent back to a blasted and crumbling , rubbish strewn dystopia overrun with by punks and junkies from whom he steals his outfit. Here there is a clear urban/suburban spilt. Sarah Conner lives out in the bright, suburbs, an area of sunlight, lawns, bustling communities and service jobs (Sarah works as a waitress), the City is a kind or perpetual night, a dark and atavistic realm of Industry and excitement. Much the same kind of division, though more muted is at Play in T2, though here the city is the home both of the older forms of industry that will again destroy the new terminator with a dependable American old tech and the newly emergent post industrial offices of Cyberdine, the suburbs also carry a stronger sense of malaise than is hinted at in the first film. The distinction between the two is more blurred between the two, (indeed it might be argued that T1 represents a kind of fantasy projections of a bored/frustrated suburban women of just what the dyonision, dirty and death-filled delights the City holds Significantly by TerminatorThree, Rise of the Machines the urban dead-zone of the first movie has been thoroughly transformed. Kristina Lokkens female terminator is beamed back into a fashionable boutique, gets herself kitted out in an expensive leather catsuit and immediately steals a high end motor. She may be a female destructborg from the future intent on bringing forth the Apocolypse, but as a women she still essentially a consumer. Terminator Threes city is one of expensive shops and professional black women driving expensive cars,in order f or the T200 to don his requisite leather jacket and trousers he now ahs to rustle them up from a campy women-only strip show on the Citys periphery, there are no urban punks running wild anymore, and the Eighties expression of a martial hypermasculinity has been domesticated through first, its taking on of the role of father, then the role of .. utopias of the seventies clean hippyish zen-fascist... the inaginaton of neoliberalism is immediately distopian The Terminator movies span then what might be termed the Urban Renaissance or the Neo Liberalization of the city and the paradigmatic city here is New York, which well turn to later. If in Terminator one and two the city is still home to industry, and the link between American vitality and dynamism and the industry of the past as its still visible counterpart is stressed. Industry is, a real, heavy, primitive and rust flecked but still the expression of and the force through which spirit can be used to c rush the threat of superior technologie s invading and overwhelming it from without, including in Judgement Day, the more amorphous and supple informational T2. Her one f orm of technology threatens a nother, the f ilms are filled with a nxieties about technological obsolonce an dteh accelerating apce of change, inth e first film Sarah Conner and are the humans who must defeat the advanced technology and do so through a

combination of spirit and the already e xisting technology. In T2 the previously threatening etchnology ha s already been domesticated in two s enses, both made to act as a father/husband figure and take on some human and American values, and is itself now subject toa threta from outside, from more sophisticated shifts in technology thatthretaen to render it obsolescent, again, in conjunction with two now dated forms of technology, one of which has taken on trappings of the spirit the post industrial liquid crystal hydra of the t300 is slain. The problem for T3 of course is that it doesnt have an equivalent shift and domestication of the previously alien the T3 is a kin of hybrid of the t1 and 2, or a t2 with a few extra gimmicks,. Here the series runs out of eas an is forced to play fundamentally with cultural tropes sonvce the T@ represents the horizon of imaginative representations of te fear of te waeightless economy. Ideally in T3 Robert Patrick w ould have returned as the new defender/custodian of te American spirit fightingagainst an e ntirely new from of Cyborg, but s inc e this is impossible to imagine (and it would also mean losoingte franchises star, Shwazenneger) the f ilm instead flatlines. The anxieties of the seventies and eighties, te rapid shifts in technology, reduced to campy self-referential fun.
Three Times At the start of James Camerons 1982 Terminator, Schwarzenegger's real breakout role, the hero John and his cyborg nemesis are beamed back from the future to modern day L.A. The present theya re beamed into is a contemporay urban city. This trope is repeated in all three movies, though s ignificantly by terminator three, rise of teh amcgines teh urban deadzone of teh first two movie has modulated singnificant;y. while the terminators of the first two movies are sent abck into rubbisg strewn parking lots or car parks and and confroted by teh social detritus of teh eighties running w ild in\ amongst teh urban d ecay Kristina Lokkens female terminator is beamed abcjk intoa boutique and immediately steals a highe nd motor, she may be a female desctructborg f rom teh future but as a women she still essentiallya consumer. you could tarce three visions of teh city through teh three Terminator movies and through teh thre e roes teh terminators adopt, first ly tehers shwazennegers Punkish terminator ina lawless city, teh first thing he encounters a re punks, in the s econd robert patricks cop and teh third teh empowered black w omen in teh boutique. a acros s teh thre e flms and teh best aprt of adecade teh representation of teh urban and teh s uburban s hifts considerably, in both one and two teh s uburbs a re teh s@ace of light rationality an safety and teh urban core anre dangersous and nighlistic benighted zones. Terminator three shows a fully neoliberalized city, a city of clean s treets and boutiques and in oredre for Shwazenneger to find his scustomary outfit this time the film locate s him out in the country una camp hen night. Three Terminators

equally in terminator thre teh s uburb is less importnat, the stark d ivision between suburban and urban has been blurred, as ahs the idea of teh city a s location od teh industry., teher are two considerations her, teh city as teh center of ahi\opeful industruialism a saving industrialism and the citys development a fundamentally c ommercial space Three Cities From blue Collar to Robocop Rcp reconfigures distopia as aplayground teh paradigmatic cities pf teh 70s and eighties are probably Detroit, new york Manhatten and the warriors

Three Times At the start of James Camerons 1982 Terminator, Schwarzenegger's real breakout role, the hero John and his cyborg nemesis are beamed back from the future to modern day L.A. The present they are beamed into is a contemporary urban area . This trope is repeated in all three movies and acts almost a sa model f they shifting nature of the City and the suburb over fifteen years or so of American life. In the first in the series the terminator is sent back to a blasted and crumbling , rubbish strewn dystopia overrun with by punks and junkies from whom he steals his outfit. Here there is a clear urban/suburban spilt. Sarah Conner lives out in the bright, suburbs, an area of sunlight, lawns, bustling communities and service jobs (Sarah works as a waitress), the City is a kind or perpetual night, a dark and atavistic realm of Industry and excitement. Much the same kind of division, though more muted is at Play in T2, though here the city is the home both of the older forms of industry that will again destroy the new terminator with a dependable American old tech and the newly emergent post industrial offices of Cyberdine, the suburbs also carry a stronger sense of malaise than is hinted at in the first film. The distinction between the two is more blurred between the two, (indeed it might be argued that T1 represents a kind of fantasy projections of a bored/frustrated suburban women of just what the dyonision, dirty and death-filled delights the City holds Significantly by TerminatorThree, Rise of the Machines the urban dead-zone of the first movie has been thoroughly transformed. Kristina Lokkens female terminator is beamed back into a fashionable boutique, gets herself kitted out in an expensive leather catsuit and immediately steals a high end motor. She may be a female destructborg from the future intent on bringing forth the Apocolypse, but as a women she still essentially a consumer. Terminator Threes city is one of expensive shops and professional black

women driving expensive cars,in order f or the T200 to don his requisite leather jacket and trousers he now ahs to rustle them up from a campy women-only strip show on the Citys periphery, there are no urban punks running wild anymore, and the Eighties expression of a martial hypermasculinity has been domesticated through first, its taking on of the role of father, then the role of ..

The Terminator movies span then what might be termed the Urban Renaissance or the Neo Liberalization of the city and the paradigmatic city here is New York, which well turn to later. If in Terminator one and two the city is still home to industry, and the link between American vitality and dynamism and the industry of the past as its still visible counterpart is stressed. Industry is, a real, heavy, primitive and rust flecked but still the expression of and the force through which spirit can be used to c rush the threat of superior technologie s invading and overwhelming it from without, including in Judgement Day, the more amorphous and supple informational T2. Her one f orm of technology threatens a nother, the f ilms are filled with a nxieties about technological obsolonce an dteh accelerating apce of change, inth e first film Sarah Conner and are the humans who must defeat the advanced technology and do so through a combination of spirit and the already e xisting technology. In T2 the previously threatening etchnology ha s already been domesticated in two s enses, both made to act as a father/husband figure and take on some human and American values, and is itself now subject toa threta from outside, from more sophisticated shifts in technology thatthretaen to render it obsolescent, again, in conjunction with two now dated forms of technology, one of which has taken on trappings of the spirit the post industrial liquid crystal hydra of the t300 is slain. The problem for T3 of course is that it doesnt have an equivalent shift and domestication of the previously alien the T3 is a kin of hybrid of the t1 and 2, or a t2 with a few extra gimmicks,. Here the series runs out of eas an is forced to play fundamentally with cultural tropes sonvce the T@ represents the horizon of imaginative representations of te fear of te waeightless economy. Ideally in T3 Robert Patrick w ould have returned as the new defender/custodian of te American spirit fightingagainst an e ntirely new from of Cyborg, but s inc e this is impossible to imagine (and it would also mean losoingte franchises star, Shwazenneger) the f ilm instead flatlines. The anxieties of the seventies and eighties, te rapid shifts in technology, reduced to campy self-referential fun.

in te s ens e that america is no longer in c harge of the technology


oit could eb tempting to assume tah the thrat of the alien terminators represents American a nxiety about being technologically outpaced by competitors especially Japan (and certainly there is plenty of

American paranoia about Japan up to Rising s Sun in te early nineties, by which point Japan-wise, its already all over) when an e qually compelling view might be that Terminators represent anxieties inherent to capitalism themselves, a kind of Shumpeterian nightmare in which the characters are caught up in cycles of creative destruction tah they manage to hold at bay or domesticate, incorporate into te enduring frame of American society and realtions, tah these a re less invaders from the Outside than soemthing immanent to American life, the nightmare products of progress and success. Follow in along line of movies about seemingly benign technologies going rogue, terminator extends on westworld and futreworld the terminator in this sens e is nt much of a shift on form the remorseless robot cowboy of westworld. from demons eed distopias of the seventies are clean distotpias. only in te eightie sthat they suddenly get ugly

and Miami. scarface one declines and is reborn, teh other neters viscious d ownaward spiral while the third booms on drug boom, althre e become visions of hell can shake of f teh knowedge of teh corporatism taht is to invade everyday life, ina snes ethen Rothbardian anarcho c apitalist w ill still clam that teh country ist really neo liberal or free market s o it may make sens e to talk about actually e xisting neo liberalism. if communism in practic e is unatainable due to teh power collecting in goc vernemmet then free market liberalism is perhaps jsuta s utopian, hence corporatism teh real of american neoliberalism constantly haunts th e films f teh e ightie s whicha re kind of hyper eral, ultra violemt reterads of teh capra Movie s of te fifties if La id both teh wasteland of te terminator and and its paradaisal suburbs, the open vistas of teh ebach new wyork is also the only really fucked city here is detroit. domesticating technology, technology increasingly coming from oitside or from the nemy within can be doemsticated, shaped to fit prevailing norms of american life, if in teh first movie the fantasy is of the terminator still being detsroyed by old tech then in two the terminator has been gi\umanised, thee imperriled character in terminator switches from the woman to the child to the man, if the terminator and robocop try to create a new masculinity, a masculinity that is not just rebel cool but actively closed off... in a sesne the organic city becoems as bland and hogenized as teh suburbs a kind of simulacrum takes its place, with everything that the city would spontaneously offer designed v back into the gentrified arra we might even imagine that lokken is sent back to exactly the same spot

escape from new york robocop blade runnera nd terminators la, scarfaces miaimi chinatown of course te projected future fro new york an d the of course next carpeneter ahs to turn to la about to experience enron sponsored rolling black outs and little latera termendous housing crash etc the distopian 1997 new york is repalced by a la where is michaelm amnns theif set?

shift f rom teh vision of a middle class ennervated existence running up against teh ral of violence part of te sepcatcle goes wrong....

poetic realism like french tradition doomed heroes, friedking, shrader and amnn all hang on toa a european tardition friedking films teh birthday party in e ngland for e xample, remaled Cluzots wages of fear a nd interviews fritz lang (aswella s making teh e xorcist and french connection) what eightie s cinema abjure s is realism, the return to teh s eventies the sens e of soem congruence between lived experience and what happens on te screen., teh s nes ethat experience s of power and institutions from teh Nation through to teh familya re being examined is abjured in teh eightie s in favour of the hyper real, and a raft of exting ne w theories are drafted in to bolster this turn Japan at this point become s the locus of futurologicala nd techno- desire apr e xcellence, a locus of both desire a n d fear given what is percieved as japans industrial d ominence, tne thre e films which best capture this example of Japan a s object of wonder and fear and the japanese as both inhuman a nd post human are Gung Ho, (domestication) Blade Runner 8immersion) and black rainn domestication is a powerful metahor withinn the eightie s agoony of integrating new waves of asians a nd latinos and tehr is e of teh tiger economies, the fightback is mostly simbolic an d indedd it might be argue s taht effectivley the Americans borrow money from teh Asian in order to fund fanatsie s of wealth and still being number one , theers also a powerful d raw toward Japanes cinema, e specially e arly Japanese cinema, (schrader wrote a book on Japan and also co w rote the thriller teh Yakusza) the amnic energy and colour of eightie s cinema (which aprtially s obers with indy inthe 90s., from the frantic fantasy of the boom t through the fantasy wisdom of the great moderation, representatins of japan die off after the incongruously late Rising Sun, largely because of Japans colossol financial crisis of the late nineties (and arguements as to whetjer thiswas @reasaged by the plaza accord an attempt to get the value ofthe yen down is still rumbling on)

whats certainn is that the finacial crisis (again, property speculation is the key) also wipes out much of the japanese film industry... in some ways the shift to the htper real is an attempt to mirror the neon wodnderland of tokyo ...its shortly after that the j government indulges in a massive construction project which will concrete over everything and , Japan is no longer the future and into teh ninetie s america takes on a kind of serenity, a self-satisfied celebration of its own invention and nous but that too, only alsts so long. japanese movie Hausu Gung Ho OIL SHOCK! CARQUAKE! one of the biggest stars of the Eighties want aperdon at all. itw as Bigfoot. The car holds a central and ambiguous place in 70s Cinema, icon of American Freedom predicated on c heap oil a s w as globalization.... trucks also move from cb and subversion and truckers as cowboys/heros to dangerous monster truck effectively truck on steroids... also car crash movies. cars crossed with sperherors/wrestling and superheroes interface way bach when white line fever battling against corription cb radio the cowboy... shifts from trucker to truck, documentray says kids osessed with moster truck ut as a sub culture based around narcissism and discipline it offers both new vistas for Bridges business ventures.

Foreman says those jobs are going boys/and they aint coming back. Bruce Springsteen My hometown Those jobs arent coming back.

Steve Jobs to Obama.

The cars the star.

If the cars of the Seventies are all too human the Eighties introduces a larger-than-life substitute, a muscle car, a car on steroids, cartoonishly outsize and a huge hit with the kids, spawner of a new set of marketing fads and products, Monster Trucks. The truck in question being Bigfoot. From supporting roles in a host of B-Movies Bigfoot eventually becomes a star in his own right (rather like Arnold himself), the main attraction at a series of monster truck spectaculars, the centrepiece of which is invariably Bigfoot bouncing destructively over a set of normal cars relics of the Fordist past. This destruction is different from the egalitarian pile ups and carquakes of the Seventies, or even from the menacing vision of Speilbergs Duel, here technology is again domesticated rendered not as severe or sublime but anthropomorphized as a character, Bigfoot, a mythological or fantastic creature, again we have both domestication and disneyfication, The grand pre-mediating potlach of the 70s destructo-thons gives way to the celebration of power and giganticism in the revitalized, supersize Eighties. If the Seventies is a time without ideas, an era of drift and destruction from which no form of rebirth seems to be promised Bigfoot helps to symbolize that missing future, the loss of Americas supremacy as a a car manufacturer the intimate link between the health of teh car-economy an d the country itself whats good for General Motors is good for America is repositioned as pure spectacle. Bigfoot has no practical value as a product (though arguably it paves the way for more consumeroriented giganticism and heft later with SUVs etc). The audience inside the stadium roars in delight as Bigfoot crushes dilapidated Fords and Chryslers. This is a perverse power, a power that can not create, an empty symbol whose only appeal is its power to destroy. In Bigfoot something of the militarization of the US economy, or at least the unabashed militarization to come, after the humiliation of Vietnam and the quiescent Seventies, in which America cant even get its act together to rescue the hostages in Iran. The Japanese, the Germans may have a hugely productive, modern and scientificlaly managed car industries that have driven ours into the ground, but see Bigfoot! A truck with supermassive wheels! A post Industrial Behemoth, putting on shows of strength and turning tricks in the family-friendly stadium of your dreams!

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