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The Decomposition of Metal Carbonate by Heating Introduction: Column II carbonates are decomposed by heat into the corresponding oxides

and carbon dioxide. The temperature of decomposition depends upon the activity of the metal; that is to say, the more active the metal, the more stable is the carbonate. Thus, the carbonates of sodium and potassium are stable at the highest temperatures of a Bunsen burner flame:whereas, the carbonates of silver and copper are easily decomposed. In this experiment we shall study the stability of a metal carbonate. Examples of the carbonate decomposition are as follows: Na2CO3(s) + heat -----> Na2O(s) + CO2(g) CoCO3(s) + heat -----> CoO(s) + CO2(g) MgCO3(s) + heat -----> MgO(s) + CO2(g) CuCO3(s) + heat -----> CuO(s) + CO2(g)

Objective: The objective of this lab is to study the action of heat on a metal carbonate, and to identify an unknown through mass relationships & the percent loss of the mass of the solid. Material: Bunsen burners, ring stands, rings, clay triangles, crucibles, balances, solid carbonates in the reactions above Procedure: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Read the instructions and prepare a data table. Clean & dry a crucible, and mass it to the nearest 0.01 g. Dry by heating. Add about 2 grams of calcium carbonate in an crucible , and mass it . Heat the crucible in the hottest flame of a burner for l5 minutes. Let the crucible cool and then remass it. (Record all masses to nearest 0.01 g.) Repeat the experiment a second time to verify your results.

Results: Data: Record all the data in tables you create Calculations: 1. Determine the theoretical masses of the reactants & products for each ot the carbonate decompositions above. 2. Determine the theoretical ratios of all the reactants & products for each ot the carbonate decompositions above. 3. Determine the actual masses of the reactants & products for each ot the carbonate decompositions performed. 4. Determine the actual (experimental) ratios of all the reactants & products for each ot the carbonate decompositions performed. 3. Calculate the percent loss of the mass for each. 4. Calculate the percent yield for each of your experiments.

Conclusion: Write what you have learned, describe possible errors in your work, how these errors affected your lab results, and answer questions you can come up with about the lab. The following are typical examples. 1. 2. How do you account for differences between the actual and theoretical values of the percentage loss of carbon dioxide in the calcium carbonate? How would you modify the experimental procedure in order to decompose calcium carbonate completely?