Anda di halaman 1dari 16

News For eMs TeaMs aT saiNT alphoNsus

HEROES SAINTS
ISSuE 1 | JuNE 2012

WELCOME from the Medical Director | STEMI TRANSPORT | Trauma Talk

Saint alphonSuS | emS newSletter

LETTER FROM THE EdITOR

AIMEE STEIN YOU help make the


Emergency & Trauma services relationship Manager & Editor

CritiCal DifferenCe.

reflections from

Welcome to the inaugural edition of the

sIsTEr bETH MuLvANEy


Heroes. saints. They have a lot in common. When the Catholic Church names someone a saint, it is official recognition that during the persons lifetime, he or she was outstanding in the way they responded to Gods love and demonstrated it to others. saints respond to needs. saints overcome all kinds of obstacles to make good things happen. saints often put other peoples hopes ahead of their own. Yes, our present day emergency medical responder Heroes and the saints as described above, have a lot in common.

HEROES ANd SAINTS


Heroes and Saints is a publication designed to promote education, enhance dialogue, stimulate discussion, and celebrate the sacred work you do. We appreciate the stressful and immediate tasks EMS providers face when they get the call to respond to a need for urgent help. Without your 24/7 dedication, training, and commitment there would no doubt be more fatalities and the loss of significant quality of life for many. You dont get to choose where you go, or what youll find when you get there, but you go hoping for the best, and prepared for the worst. Those you serve hope they never have to see you, but are incalculably grateful when you arrive on the scene. Youve experienced horrors most cant imagine, and know that when tomorrow comes, you may not have seen the worst. You are an extraordinary group of people. Like our title suggests, you are Heroes and Saints. When I researched the background of Heroes it seemed clear that in our present day, Heroes and Saints have a lot in common. Its also evident that you need both Heroes and Saints to save a life, offer hope, and speed healing for those in need. Thus, the title of this publication emerged to represent our teamwork and our passion to serve our communities. The Editorial Board for this publication includes our Trauma Surgeons, Medical Directors from Idaho Emergency Physicians, and other physicians, providers and staff who oversee our most critical services. We want this publication to be a dialogue, and a way to provide feedback from our staff to yours. Ive truly enjoyed being out in the field meeting so many of you, and appreciate the feedback and orientation to the various stations in Ada and Canyon County. Next month I plan to head toward Ontario and Baker City to start meeting EMS providers across our region. I hope all of you felt appreciated and honored during National EMS Week May 20 26. Dont miss the photo collage youll see on the pages inside that represent honors bestowed on your EMS brothers and sisters, as well as a few photos I took while visiting various stations. Saint Alphonsus Health System would like to thank all EMS personnel for their commitment to enhance the health and quality of life of those we serve. YOU help make the Critical Difference.

Etymology of Heroes - Coined in English 1387, during the time of King Arthurs round table, the word hero comes from the Ancient Greek. Hero, warrior, literally protector or defender. It is also thought to be a cognate of the Latin verb servo (original meaning: to preserve whole) and of the Avestan verb haurvaiti (to keep vigil over).

Want to share your story? ems@sarmc.org

sarmc.org

HIgHLIgHTS
Canyon County Paramedic

EdITORIAL BOARd
AIMEE STEIN
emergency & trauma Services relationship manager & editor

dR. ERIC ELLIOTT


iep/eagle er medical Director

kRISTEN MICHELETTI
Communications Director & editor

NICHOLE WHITENER
mSn, Cnrn, ne-BC neuro/ Stroke Director

dR. BILLy MORgAN


trauma medical Director

JANE SPENCER
CnS neuro institute

ABOuT THE COvER


John Fogg Sr. opened Ada-Boi Ambulance in 1980 with four Cadillac coach ambulances. Of the four, he kept and refurbished this 1970 Superior Coach to continue the memory. John stated with a chuckle, I wish we still used these rigs. They ride like a Cadillac Limousine where todays rigs ride like dump trucks.

JANA PERRy
rn, mSn trauma / General Surgery Director

NANCy TAyLOR
aprn-np/CnS hospitalist Cardiac Care

RICH TRuMP
pa-C trauma

SISTER BETH MuLvANEy


mission education

ALISHA HAvENS
Saint alphonsus nampa

dR. BEN CORNETT


iep/ada County medical Director

LAuRA HuggINS
Saint alphonsus Baker City

SNOW THANk yOu


Snowboarding with Jeff is the true account of an adventure on Bogus Basin that goes wrong. Go online and watch the video to see how Jeff thanks Saint Alphonsus Eagle Health Plaza Emergency Room for their great work! http://vimeo.com/37383291

LEANNA BENTz
Saint alphonsus Ontario

dR. kARI PETERSON


iep/Canyon County medical Director

TEd RyAN
SarmC emergency Department Director

dR. EdWARd MCEACHERN


iep executive Director/CeO

PAT BERgEy
rn, BSn

uPCOMINg EvENTS
STROkE CASE REvIEW
3rd Wed. of every month 7am-9am Coughlin Conference room 2

2 LETTEr froM THE EDITor 3 HIGHLIGHTs

8 LooKInG AT us 12 nEuro/sTroKE 14 EAGLE Er

TRAuMA ROuNdS
7am-8am Coughlin Conference room 2 June 13 & 27 July 11 & 25 August 8, 22, 29 september 12 & 26

4 MEDICAL DIrECTor GrEETInG 5 CArDIAC CArE 6 TrAuMA TALK

15 AWArDs & rECoGnITIon 16 MAp of LoCATIons

EMS ROOFTOP BBQ


september 27 3pm-7pm

June 2012 3

Saint alphonSuS | emS newSletter

MEdICAL dIRECTOR gREETINg

bILL MORgAN, MD We neeD YOUr


Trauma Medical Director

inpUt anD YOUr SUppOrt....

HELLO ANd WELCOME


to my first installment in the EMs newsletter.
Idaho is beginning to make great stirrings in the area of a Trauma System and its development. As the Southwestern Idaho Trauma Center, Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center is combining forces with Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center in Idaho Falls, the Idaho Medical Association, and the Idaho Hospital Association to explore, in conjunction with the State EMS Director and the Department of Health and Welfare, the options that would best suit the formation of a statewide Trauma System for Idaho. From the EMS standpoint, it is important that each of you be able to voice your opinions on this matter. No system can exist in a vacuum. We need your input and your support to accomplish this for Idaho and its many geographically distanced communities so that each Idaho citizen can receive the same excellent Trauma care. You will be hearing more about this in the future, so for now, this is just an opening statement on this subject. Each of you works incredibly hard and often, we, as the clinicians accepting your patients, fail to remember the environment that you frequently find yourselves working in on a daily basis. I would like to say that I appreciate and value each of you and the daily sacrifices you make, the enormous educational piece that you must accomplish and, the professionalism and dedication you exhibit with each patient encounter. Thank you to each and every one of you.

Meet the regions only Level 2 Trauma Center Team


top: mD trauma and General Surgery: Daele Strawn, mD, Steven Casos, mD, harry Stinger, mD, George munayirji, mD Bottom: rhoda lynch, pa-C, richard trump, pa-C, Jana perry, rn, mSn trauma /General Surgery Director

Want to share your story? ems@sarmc.org

sarmc.org

CARdIAC CARE

uSE OF EMS FOR STEMI TRANSPORT


nAnCY TAyLOR
aprn-np/CnS hospitalist Cardiac Care

the SOOner perfUSiOn tO the mYOCarDiUm iS reStOreD, the Better the patient OUtCOme.

Activation of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) in the care of patients experiencing an ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is critical to early identification of this condition, as well as effective treatment. In an article published in Circulation in 2011, Mathews et al. reported on an observational study of greater than 37,000 patients suffering from a STEMI using the National Cardiovascular Registry data between January 2007 and 2009 where they looked at patient factors related to EMS transport versus self-transport. They found that EMS transport was used only 60% of the time. Our data shows that we have been closer to 70% in the past 6 months. Calling EMS has been shown to decrease time to treatment and reduces ischemic time. The long used phrase of time is muscle really is true. The sooner perfusion to the myocardium is restored, the better the patient outcome. So who are the patients that call

EMS? Those characteristics identified by the review of patients in this article revealed those patients who were older were more likely to call EMS. In addition, those people living farther from the hospital were more likely to call. The last group that seemed more likely to call were those who were more unstable with greater hemodynamic compromise. What didnt appear to be related to likelihood to call were race, income, or education level. How do we get more than 60% of people to call EMS when they are having symptoms of a heart attack? The most effective way to get anyone to change a behavior is by education. Community programs that teach the importance of early heart attack care are essential to changing this statistic. Working together, we can get the word out and help the community understand fully the benefits they reap when they activate EMS.

June 2012 5

Canyon County Paramedics | Brush C. & Jesse C.

Saint alphonSuS | emS newSletter

TRAuMA TALk
Life Flight Network

Boise Fire Station #5

rICHArD TRuMP
pa-C trauma

standardizing Trauma Triage

SAINT ALS THREE LEvELS OF TRIAgE


Level 2
+ GCs 9 to 13 + Chest tube in place + pelvic fracture (suspected) + Two obvious long bone fractures

Level 3
+ Death of same car occupant + Extrication time >20 minutes + fall 2X patients height + Auto vs. bike or Auto vs. pedestrian + Motorcycle/ATV/snowmobile/

Level 1
+ bp < 90mmHg, or respiratory rate

>24, Tachycardia >120 at any time in adult trauma patients


+ Age specific hypotension or

(femur/humerus)
+ flail Chest + near drowning + Cervical fracture + Ejection from an enclosed vehicle + burns >20% or involving face, airway,

tachycardia in children <70 mmHg + 2 X age Hr >200 or < 60


+ respiratory compromise/obstruction + Intubation + patients receiving blood to maintain

jet ski crashes


+ Horse ejection or rollover + >12 intrusion into occupant

space or vehicle
+ star any window shield + rollover + broken/bent steering wheel + Assault with change in level

hands, feet, or genitalia

vital signs
+ GCs <8 with mechanism attributed

to trauma
+ Major limb amputation + Trauma arrest + pregnancy >20 weeks gestation with

of consciousness
+ Amputation of one or more digits + second or third degree burns <10-20%

vaginal discharge or bleeding or abdominal pain that also meet a mechanism attributed to trauma.
+ Hanging with loss of consciousness

Change from a level 3 to a Level 2


+ Transfer from another facility + Extremes of cold or heat with + Co-morbidities (Anti-coagulant use,

or any neurological deficits


+ penetrating injury to abdomen, head,

CopD, diabetes, CHf, etc.)


+ presence of intoxicants or illicit drugs

neck, chest or proximal limbs including knee and elbow.


+ spinal cord injury with neurologic

prolonged exposure
+ Extremes of age <12 or >65

abnormality

We encourage the EMS agencies locally and throughout the region to utilize this trauma triage criteria when transporting a patient to our facility. This mobilizes all the appropriate resources for an injured patient to the ER. The Trauma Service suggests presenting the 6
Want to share your story? ems@sarmc.org

criteria to your supervising physicians for consideration to add to your local protocols and when you call in you can give a level assignment with your patient history and our access center mobilizes the in house resources. It would be appropriate to give

strong consideration to air lifting patients from remote areas from the Trauma Center if they meet a level 2 criteria or greater. Please never hesitate to contact the Trauma Center for any questions or concerns at 367-3674.

sarmc.org

TRAuMA TALk

EDWArD MCEACHERN, MD
iep executive Director/CeO

Brian Boesiger, MD

Accidental Deaths Among u.s. Children

THE gOOd NEWS ANd BAd NEWS


A new report on accidental deaths among US children received extensive coverage, mostly from online sources. Most sources portrayed the findings as a step in the right direction, but also emphasized the fact that deaths among this population due to some factors, like prescription drug abuse, are on the rise. USA Today (4/17, Hellmich) reports, The number of children and teens who die from any kind of accidents has dropped nearly 30% from 2000 to 2009, mostly because of a decline in traffic deaths, says a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. However, the gains are offset by the sobering news that more than 9,000 young people still die annually from motor-vehicle accidents, fires, poisoning, drowning, falls and other unintentional injuries. Road traffic fatalities account for more than 41% of all deaths, most of those are with the child as occupant, followed by a vehicle strike of a child as a pedestrian. Falls, burns, and drowning were the next most common causes of pediatric death. The Los Angeles Times (4/17, Maugh) Booster Shots blog reports that agency officials fear it may be difficult to lower the rate further, however, because of sharp increases in two areas: a 91% increase in poisoning deaths among teenagers during the period primarily from prescription drug abuse and a 54% increase in suffocation deaths among infants. The report indicated that for every accidental death, there were 25 hospitalizations and 925 visits to the emergency department (ED). Every 4 seconds, a child is treated for injury in an ED. The AP (4/17, Stobbe) reports, The report also looked at trends in individual states. The researchers saw declines in almost every state, with the biggest drops in Delaware, Iowa, Oregon and Virginia. The Boston Globe (4/17, Kotz) Daily Dose pointed out that Massachusetts had the lowest rate in the nation for pediatric injury deaths in 2009: 4 deaths per 100,000 children up to age 19. This compares with a national average of 11 deaths per 100,000, with the worst state, Mississippi, having a death rate of 25 per 100,000 -- more than six times the rate of Massachusetts. The findings were published in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Continued on page 10

StateS With the lOWeSt Death rateS tenDeD tO have mOre laWS On the BOOkS aDDreSSinG ChilD SafetY anD mOre prOGramS aimeD at keepinG ChilDren anD teenS Safe.

June 2012 7

Saint alphonSuS | emS newSletter

LOOkINg AT uS

Ada County Paramedics

Want to share your story? ems@sarmc.org

Meridian Fire Dept.

Boise Fire Station #5

Nampa Fire Dept

Nampa Police Dept Nampa EMS

Canyon County Paramedics

sarmc.org

LOOkINg AT uS

June 2012 9

Baker City EMS

Boise Fire Station #5

Saint alphonSuS | emS newSletter

TRAuMA TALk
Continued from page 7 CQ (4/17, Reichard, Subscription Publication) reports that in a news release, CDC Director Thomas Frieden said, Kids are safer from injuries today than ever before. The Hill (4/17, Pecquet) Healthwatch blog reports, In conjunction with the reports release, the CDC and more than 60 partner organizations released a National Action Plan to raise awareness about childhood injury risks, highlight prevention solutions and mobilize action in a national, coordinated effort. MedPage Today (4/17, Petrochko) reports that unintentional injury still accounted for 37% of all deaths in the 19-and-under age group in 2009 and was the fifth leading killer of patients younger than 1, the report said. WebMD (4/17, Boyles) reports, States with the lowest death rates tended to have more laws on the books addressing child safety and more programs aimed at keeping children and teens safe. Also covering the story are the Minneapolis Star Tribune (4/17, Stoxen) Health Check blog, the Wall Street Journal (4/17, Martin) Health Blog, the CNN (4/17) The Chart blog, the Huffington Post (4/17, Young), Reuters (4/17), HealthDay (4/17, Gardner), and the CBS News (4/17) HealthPop blog.
Multiple sources cited; from ACEP and other wires

Accidental Death Among Children

IdAHO SLIgHTLy HIgHER THAN NATIONAL AvERAgE


NuMBER OF uNINTENTIONAL INJuRy dEATHS By CAuSE, 2000-2005
Transportation related suffocation poisoning fires/burns falls Drowning 34 14 9 13 39 330

+ The number of unintentional injury

deaths for the period 2000 2005 was 486; that is an average of 81 deaths per year.
+ The unintentional injury death rate

was 19.3 per 100,000 population; this was higher than the national rate of 15.0 per 100,000 population.
+ Most injury deaths (65%) occurred

among males 0 to 19 years of age.


+ Children 15 to 19 years of age and
100 150 200 250 300 350

number of Deaths

50

those less than 1 year of age had the highest death rates of all age groups (39.6 and 28.9 per 100,000 population, respectively).
+ Transportation-related injuries had the

uNINTENTIONAL INJuRy dEATH RATES By AgE gROuP, 2000-2005


15-19 39.6

highest death rate among children 0 to 19 years of age in the state of Idaho (13.1 per 100,000 population).
+ The death rate for drowning was

10 to 14

10.8

5 to 9

8.6

1.6 per 100,000 population, and for suffocation was 1.4.


+ rates based on fewer than 20 deaths

1 to 4

14.3

may be unreliable. numbers of deaths are presented.


28.9

Less than 1

Death rate per 100,000 population

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

Other unintentional injuries (for example: deaths from machinery or firearm) are not included in this figure therefore total number of injury deaths on the figure does not match the total number of injury deaths. Find further information on these data, including methods, in the CDC Childhood Injury Report: Patterns of Unintentional Injuries among 0-19 Year olds in the United States, 2000 2006.

Data Source, CDC/NCHS, National Vital Statistics System

10

Want to share your story? ems@sarmc.org

sarmc.org

TRAuMA TALk

Things that you can do to prevent childhood deaths and injuries:


+ Teach your children to use a seat belt and never + Teach your children to swim, and respect water

drive with out the proper child restraints in a car.


+ Teach your children common sense around cars

at a young age.
+ Lower the temperature of your water heater at home

and traffic.
+ never leave your child unattended at a pool

so that the hot tap water is unlikely to burn a child.


+ Lock all medicines away from areas where children

or around water.
+ be aware of fall risks in your home.

might come in contact with them.

June 2012 11

Life Flight Network

Saint alphonSuS | emS newSletter

NEuRO/STROkE

Life Flight Network

nICHoLE WHITENER
mSn, Cnrn, ne-BC neuro/Stroke Director

CERTIFIEd STROkE CENTER uPdATE


May was Stroke Awareness month. As we strive to educate our community about stroke risk factors, signs and symptoms of stroke, and the importance of calling 911 if stroke is suspected, we recognize the vital role that our First Responders play in the outcome of those who experience a stroke. Our continued partnership allows us to provide the highest quality care and reduce the impact that stroke has on Southwest Idaho. Research has proven that treating ischemic strokes with IV t-PA reduces death and disability from stroke. Across the country, the average treatment rate is between 2-3%. At Saint Alphonsus, our IV t-PA treatment rate has risen from 8.33% in 2008 to 17.24% in 2011! We would like this rate to be even higher so that more patients can benefit from this life-saving treatment. First responders can have a tremendous effect on the treatment received by stroke patients. The American Stroke Association has published recommendations for First Responders who provide stroke care:
+ Patients should be transported to the + Pre-notify Saint Alphonsus Medical Access

Center with a brain attack. This designates an acute stroke and allows our stroke response team to prepare to receive the patient and act quickly.
+ Cincinnati Stroke Scale is a highly reliable

at Saint alphOnSUS, OUr iv t-pa treatment rate haS riSen frOm 8.33% in 2008 tO 17.24% in 2011

tool for identifying a stroke patient. It is also a great communication tool for the ED hand-off.
+ Determine by asking the patient or the

witness what time the patient was last known to be normal. This time starts the treatment clock-remember that IV t-PA must be given in 3 hours (4.5 hours for certain patients) and clot extraction must happen within 8 hours.
+ Ask the patient or witnesses if

the

patient takes warfarin or other anticoagulant medications.


+ First Responders and hospitals

photo above: listed left to right top: vic Garabedian mD, lisa nelson mD, Will farley, adrean Casper, nichole Whitener middle: ted ryan, Jane Spencer, terry newsome Bottom: patty huffman, mary river mD, tita petersen, Jackie Whitesell mD

should collaborate in EMS training. To that end, we would like to provide you with some stroke education that offers free CE credits! EMS4Stroke.com to learn more about this great opportunity. Thank you for all the stellar care that you give to our patients!

highest level of care or the nearest Certified Stroke Center.

12

Want to share your story? ems@sarmc.org

sarmc.org

NEuRO/STROkE

ITS gOLd AgAIN FOR SAINT ALPHONSuS


Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center has received the American Heart Association/ American Stroke Associations Get With The Guidelines-Stroke Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award for the second year in a row. The award recognizes Saint Alphonsus commitment and success in implementing excellent care for stroke patients, according to evidence-based guidelines. Saint Alphonsus is the only hospital in the region to be named. To receive the award, Saint Alphonsus achieved an 85 percent or higher adherence to all Get With The Guidelines-Stroke Quality Achievement indicators for two or more consecutive 12-month intervals and achieved 75 percent or higher compliance with six of 10 Get With The Guidelines-Stroke Quality Measures, which are reporting initiatives to measure quality of care. These measures include aggressive use of medications, such as tPA, antithrombotics, anticoagulation therapy, DVT prophylaxis, cholesterol reducing drugs and smoking cessation, all aimed at reducing death and disability and improving the lives of stroke patients. The time is right, now more than ever, for Saint Alphonsus to be focused on improving the quality of stroke care by implementing Get With The Guidelines Stroke. The number of acute ischemic stroke patients eligible for treatment is expected to grow over the next decade due to increasing stroke incidence and a large aging population. As the areas only Joint Commission Certified Primary Stroke Center, Saint Alphonsus is committed to providing the most effective stroke treatment available, said Nichole Whitener, RN, MSN, Director, Saint Alphonsus Stroke Program.

BREAkTHROugH STROkE dEvICE MAkES dEBuT AT SAINT ALPHONSuS


Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center is proud to be the only hospital in the Treasure Valley to have used the Solitaire FR for the treatment of acute stroke. In clinical trial, Solitaire FR showed a 1.7 times improvement in neurological function and a 55 percent reduction in mortality at 90 days when compared to other devices. This state-of-the-art device works by expanding into a clot that is blocking a vessel in the brain and snaring it, then removing the clot. Compared to other devices, the Solitaire FR restored 2.5 times as much blood flow to the brain, which is crucial in the successful treatment of stroke. Saint Alphonsus radiology staff is fully trained to use this device to treat acute stroke. Physicians have received specialized training and experience that is unique to the Treasure Valley. This new advancement is another addition to Saint Alphonsus award-winning, certified, proven system of care to treat complex stroke patients.

June 2012 13

Saint alphonSuS | emS newSletter

EAgLE ER

ErIC ELLIOTT, MD
iep/eagle er medical Director

EAgLE ER kEEPINg PATIENTS CLOSE TO HOME


The Emergency Department at the Saint Alphonsus Eagle Health Plaza was the first of its kind in Idaho, and has proven to be a valuable resource for the Eagle community. We provide care close to home for patients of all ages, with a range of diagnoses, from urgent to emergent. As an EMS provider, you are probably familiar with the facility, but its important to understand the nuances of the free-standing ER. The Eagle ER is a full-service facility with the capability to handle a broad range of emergent conditions. Staffed 24/7 with a board-certified emergency medicine physician and certified emergency medicine nurses, we are always ready to receive EMS arrivals. The facility is equipped to care for patients with high-risk problems such as chest pain, abdominal pain, headaches, COPD exacerbations, asthma attacks, fever, anaphylaxis, closed fractures, and Level 3 traumatic injury. Many patients with these problems are treated and discharged from the ER, so it makes sense to keep them close to home. And if a patient needs admitted from the Eagle ER, transport by ambulance is provided free of charge to any local hospital of the patients choice. There are a few patients who should not be transported to the Eagle ER, but rather go directly to the nearest hospital capable of definitive treatment for their condition. As a general rule, these are patients with emergent conditions that need immediate treatment by a specialist in a hospital setting. These would include patients with STEMI, acute stroke, pre-hospital intubation, and Level 1 or Level 2 traumatic injury. Also, patients with open fracture, unstable active GI bleeding, and contractions or labor during pregnancy. The Eagle ER is always ready to assist with resuscitation. If you have a patient who is receiving CPR or needs emergent intubation, do not hesitate to come directly to the Eagle ER for assistance with initial management and stabilization. Thank you for all you do. We look forward to partnering with you in providing care for our community, keeping patients close to home.

eaGleS OnlY er iS a fUll ServiCe faCilitY. patientS WhO reqUire aDmiSSiOn Or COnSUltatiOn Will Be tranSferreD expeDitiOUSlY tO Saint alphOnSUS reGiOnal meDiCal Center at nO aDDitiOnal COSt tO the patient.

14

Want to share your story? ems@sarmc.org

Saint Alphonsus Eagle ER

sarmc.org

AWARdS & RECOgNITION

2012 ACP EMS AWARdS

CLInTon WOLF

reServe Of the Year

AMon RAE

phYSiCian Of the Year

ExCELLENT JOB kuNA EMS!


We value your work and appreciate you keeping our community safe.
pat Bergey, rn, BSn

MArK HENzLER,MD

parameDiC Of the Year

MArK BABSON

emt Of the Year

GEorGE WINg
BUSineSS OffiCe emplOYee Of the Year

The Trauma Service Team would like to express thanks to Kuna Fire for a job well done. Kuna ambulance transported two patients to Saint Alphonsus in the early morning hours of February 14. Both patients, a 41 and 42 year-old male were involved in a high-speed rollover collision in the desert by Swan Falls. The less injured patient extricated himself from the vehicle, and pulled a sleeping bag out to cover the other more seriously injured patient who was ejected from the vehicle. The Kuna ambulance service did an outstanding job. The patients received excellent care, and were packaged appropriately for transport. The crew called in the appropriate information, which allowed the Access Center to activate the trauma team members necessary for the level of care. Good job Kuna, great teamwork! If you would like to have further follow up on your patients hospital course, please have a representative of your agency contact me by phone or email, and I will be happy to provide a more complete report. Contact: 208.367.6435 or patrberg@sarmc.org

KArEn MARTIN

gREAT JOB TO THE AdA COuNTy PARAMEdICS


for their Trauma Leveling skills!
Through the efforts of the Ada County Paramedics, the Saint Alphonsus Access Center, and the Saint Alphonsus Emergency Department, trauma under triage level has been 3% or less over the past 8 months! Thank you!

aDminiStrative Of the Year

AMY FuLLER

June 2012 15

Joe Link, Paul Schepper, Jon Tillman TJ Lawrence, Sean Stear

SUperviSOr Of the Year

Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center 1055 N Curtis Road Boise, ID 83706

EMERgENCy dEPTS. BOISE


1055 n. Curtis rd. 208.367.2121

EAgLE
323 E. riverside Dr. 208.367.5300

NAMPA
1512 12th Ave. rd. 208.463.5000

ONTARIO
351 sW 9th st. 541.881.7000

BAkER CITy
N E S W

3325 pocahontas rd. 541.523.6461