Anda di halaman 1dari 10
Ottoville to expand by 12 acres, p3 T he D ELPHOS Jefferson girls rout Apaches,

Ottoville to expand by 12 acres, p3

Ottoville to expand by 12 acres, p3 T he D ELPHOS Jefferson girls rout Apaches, p6

The

DELPHOS

Jefferson girls rout Apaches, p6

HERALD

Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869

50¢ daily

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Delphos, Ohio

November 28, 2012 D e l p h o s , O h i o Upfront

Upfront

Herald taking Santa letters

The Delphos Herald has a direct line to Santa and will accept letters from children expressing their wishes for Christmas. They will be printed on Dec. 15 and forwarded to the “Big Guy” himself. Letters are due by 5 p.m. Dec. 12 and can be e-mailed to nspencer@delphosherald. com; mailed to Santa Letters, 405 N. Main St., Delphos OH 45833; or dropped off at the Herald office.

Christmas Worship set

Everyone is invited to the 34th Community Christmas Worship to be held at St.

John the Evangelist Catholic Church on Dec. 10.

A collection will be

taken up for those in need. The service consists of Scripture and music pre- sented by the churches and schools of Delphos.

Retirees to hold Christmas lunch

UAW 962 Retirees will hold a Christmas luncheon at noon on Dec. 10 at the American Legion in Spencerville.

The cost of the meal is $7.

A 50-50 drawing and

$5 optional gift exchange will also be held. RSVP by Friday to Caroline Browning at 419- 647-4564; Judy Richardson at 419-667-3399; or Toma Ladd at 419-692-2406.

Financial aid meeting Monday

Jefferson and St. John’s high school guidance depart- ments will hold a financial aid meeting at 6:30 p.m. Monday in the Jefferson High School cafeteria. The event will feature University of Northwestern Ohio Director of Financial Aid Wendell Schick, who will explain the college financial aid process and how to fill out various forms. The program will be especially helpful for par- ents of seniors who will be attending college next fall.

Sports

THURSDAY Girls Basketball (6 p.m.): Columbus Grove at Elida; Kalida at St. Marys Memorial; Crestview at Tinora. FRIDAY Boys Basketball (6 p.m.): Jefferson at Vanlue; Arlington at Fort Jennings; Ottoville at Cory-Rawson; St. Henry at Spencerville; Lincolnview, Van Wert and Crestview at VWC Hospital Tip-Off Classic, 6/7:30 p.m.; Elida Tip- Off Classic, 6:30/8 p.m.

Forecast

Mostly sunny Thursday morning then becom- ing partly cloudy. Highs in the mid 40s. Lows in the lower 30s. See page 2.

Highs in the mid 40s. Lows in the lower 30s. See page 2. Index Obituaries 2

Index

Obituaries

2

State/Local

3

Politics

4

Community

5

Sports

6-7

Business

7

Classifieds

8

Television

9

World briefs

10

Classifieds 8 Television 9 World briefs 10 Allen County voters cast ballots twice BY STEPHANIE GROVES

Allen County voters cast ballots twice

BY STEPHANIE GROVES sgroves@delphosherald

LIMA — Three cases of possible voter fraud are

under investigation in Allen County. Ken Terry, director of the Allen County Board of Elections, announced the cases were passed on to the prosecutor’s office after three people voted twice in the Nov. 6 election. Allen County Prosecutor Juergen Waldick said he was aware of the cases but the Allen County Sheriff’s Office will

be investigating.

In one case, Terry said

the person voted twice at two separate precincts using provisional ballots. In the other two cases, the people

cast absentee ballots and also voted on election day at their respective precincts—one used a provisional ballot. “Basically, these voters cast two ballots and one of them will not count,” Terry explained. “Since all docu- mentation leading up to the actual digital voting is

paper-based, the electronic check later caught the sec- ond ballot cast.”

A provisional ballot is

used to record a vote when there are questions regard- ing a voter’s eligibility and would be used when the voter refuses to show a photo ID, the voter’s name does not appear on the elec- toral roll for the given pre- cinct, the voter’s registra- tion contains inaccurate or out-dated information such as the wrong address or a misspelled name or the vot- er’s ballot has already been recorded. Voters must present some form of identification, such as a current and valid photo ID, a military ID, a copy of a current utility bill, a bank statement or some sort of paycheck or government check, to vote. According to Ohio law, voters who don’t provide

“Basically, these voters cast two ballots and one of them will not count. Since all documentation leading up to the actual digital voting is paper- based, the elec- tronic check later caught the second ballot cast.”

Ken Terry, director, Allen County Board of Elections

one of those documents will still be able to vote by pro- viding the last four digits of the Social Security number and the ballot is cast as a provisional ballot. If the voter doesn’t have identification and doesn’t know or have a Social Security number, he or she

must sign an affirmation swearing to the voter’s iden- tity under penalty of election falsification charges and that ballot is, again, cast as pro- visional. Whether a provisional ballot is counted is contin- gent upon the verification of that voter’s eligibility. Many voters do not realize that the provisional ballot is not counted until 7–10 days after the election so their vote does not affect the call- ing of the states to different candidates. In addition, Terry reported the board had close to 2,000 provisional ballots, which is up from 1,700 in 2008, and ballots that were cast at the wrong precinct to review. Traditionally, ballots cast at the incorrect precincts would be tossed out.

Students learn ‘Magic is Science’ During the “Magic is Science” assembly, Landeck Elementary student Blaine

Students learn ‘Magic is Science’

During the “Magic is Science” assembly, Landeck Elementary student Blaine Martin interacts with Erika Illig from Fort Amanda Specialties. The trick is pushing a sharp pencil through a storage bag containing water and the water does not leak. The explanation is the plastic polymer conforms around the pencil and does not permit water to leak. Below: Landeck Elementary student Emily Rode assists Illig during the “Magic is Science” assembly. The trick is re-lighting a candle snuffed out by placing a match in the smoke containing wax particles which re-ignites the wick. (Delphos Herald/Stephanie Groves)

out by placing a match in the smoke containing wax particles which re-ignites the wick. (Delphos

Delphos comes through to help those in need

Here is a first-hand account of the delivery by local volunteers of assistance items to New York City for Superstorm Sandy victims.

BY RICK SCHUCK

The Hurricane Sandy Storm Relief project’s goal was to generate needed items to assist people in need in one small area of New York City that was especially hard hit. With the help of a local lady from the area, we were able to determine what was needed and how best to dis- tribute it. The local VFW and American Legion had geared up to offer assistance to those in need displaced by the storm. Our collection drive collected items to meet those needs. Clothes of all sorts, coats, toiletries, cleaning supplies and generators were among the items donated and pur- chased from donated money. Volunteers sorted the clothes and loaded the vehicles and trailers used to transport the supplies to New York. Jay Kundert and Jeff Grothouse donated their time and resources to take the donations to New York. Their cargo van and 6-foot- by-8-foot trailer were as full as could be when they left for New York Friday morn- ing. My truck was full and

the 6-foot-by-12-foot trailer I hauled was over half full. I left for New York with my brother Ray at 9 p.m. on Friday. Literally thousands of pounds of donations left for New York and we arrived at 10 a.m. on Saturday Nov. 17. Once there, we began the task of determining how best to distribute what was brought. We found out that for all the homes flooded, the owners were told to dispose of every- thing touched by the ocean water; this because there was sewage and oil mixed with the water and there was concern of outbreaks of disease, such as cholera, if the items were kept. This meant that those displaced by the flooding lost everything they owned that was on the first floor, with many homes being only one- story buildings. Those homes still standing now also had to be gutted to remove the possibility of mold growing behind the walls. Washers and dryers, cabinets, cloth- ing, beds and bedding and building materials of all sorts could be seen along the route to our destination. Everything removed from the homes by day was being picked up by the sanitation department by night, to clean it up as soon as possible to prevent rats and other vermin from get- ting into everything. Many also lost their vehicles which

ting into everything. Many also lost their vehicles which Jeff Grothouse, right, looks over some of

Jeff Grothouse, right, looks over some of clothing donated to Superstorm Sandy vic- tims as people sort through them to find what they need. (Submitted photos)

found the building had been flooded out but they managed to clean it out well enough to be a collection point for donations so they also could help those in need. They also were offering food to those who needed it. All clean- ing supplies and bath needs not buried by the boxes and bags of clothes we took were dropped off here, along with a generator, which they still needed as their power was

out due to damaged wiring in the building. One lady at this point thanked us so much for the laundry detergent we brought as she needed it desperately. Next we were off to a VFW post further out on Long Island that was flooded out and needed everything. When we got there, we were only able to leave some

were still parked along the roadways. The American Legion post was set up as a relief site for workers as well as a soup kitchen for people to come and get food and whatever supplies were available. Their greatest need was cleaning supplies. We dropped off what donations were need- ed at the American Legion after which we went to the VFW a few blocks away. We

See SANDY, page 10

2 – The Herald

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

www.delphosherald.com

Herald Wednesday, November 28, 2012 www.delphosherald.com For The Record P OLICE R EPORT O BITUARIES Police

For The Record

POLICE REPORT

OBITUARIES

Police tase erratic driver three times

At 11:25 p.m. on Nov. 20, Delphos Police observed a vehicle being operated errati- cally in the 1700 block of East Fifth Street. The vehicle was being operated in the wrong (oncoming) lane of travel and “drifting” across all lanes. Officers stopped the vehicle and identified the driver as 55-year-old Delphos resident Randall L. Murray. Murray showed signs of intoxication and was extreme- ly uncooperative with offi- cers. He refused to comply with officers commands and became aggressive towards officers. This resulted in a Taser being utilized in an attempt to subdue Murray. Murray was momentarily subdued but then resumed his aggressive actions towards officers. This resulted in the Taser being utilized again. At this point, Murray became compliant and was arrest- ed for operating his vehicle while under the influence of alcohol. Officers impounded Murray’s vehicle and trans-

ported him to the Delphos Police Department for a breathalyzer test and pro- cessing of paperwork. Murray was initially coop- erative but again became

aggressive towards officers when he realized his court date

would

conflict

with a

hunt-

ing trip

he had

planned.

This

resulted

in a

physical

con-

fronta-

tion. To end this con- frontation, officers were forced to utilize the Taser again. This caused Murray to cease his aggressive actions towards officers. Murray was then trans- ported to the Allen County Jail and booked in for oper- ating a vehicle while intox- icated, resisting arrest and obstructing official business.

icated, resisting arrest and obstructing official business. Murray Vehicle towed from scene of crash Delphos Police

Murray

Vehicle towed from scene of crash

Delphos Police investigat- ed a two-vehicle crash at 4:29 p.m. Tuesday at 1104 Elida Avenue. According to reports, Philip Coil, 32, of Delphos was traveling westbound in Elida Avenue and Mary Ann Wilson, 54, of Delphos was traveling eastbound. Wilson attempted to turn north into a

business and caused the colli- sion with the Coil vehicle. Wilson was cited for fail- ure to yield the right of way when turning left. No one was injured. Wilson’s vehicle sustained severe damage and was towed from the scene. The Coil vehicle sustained disabling damage.

Driver strikes street light

A Beaverton, Mich., man was cited for a marked lane usage violation after a single- vehicle accident reported at 1:11 p.m. Monday. Harrison Bugbee, 60 of Beaverton was traveling

southbound on North Main Street and attempting to turn west onto First Street but cut the corner too close causing his vehicle to strike a street light. No one was injured.

Expand

Your

Shopping

Network

You’ll love shopping the Classifieds!

Expand Your Shopping Network You’ll love shopping the Classifieds! The Delphos Herald 419-695-0015 www.delphosherald.com

The Delphos Herald

419-695-0015

www.delphosherald.com

Van Wert Bedrooms SALE EXTENDED! The “HOLIDAY KICK OFF” Sale - Black Friday Savings insert
Van Wert
Bedrooms
SALE EXTENDED!
The “HOLIDAY KICK OFF” Sale -
Black Friday Savings insert in today’s
newspaper sale date is extended
until Saturday, December 1st!
706 W. Ervin Road
Van Wert, Ohio 45891
419-238-3399
Toll Free 1-866-Bedroom
www.vanwertbedrooms.co m

Lincoln Ridge

Free 1-866-Bedroom www.vanwertbedrooms.co m Lincoln Ridge “Christmas in the Country” Open Thurs, Fri, Sat 10-5:30

“Christmas in the Country”

Open Thurs, Fri, Sat 10-5:30

Sun 1-5

Visit our New Christmas Shoppe

Handcrafted Gourd Snowmen Æ Ornaments Decor Æ Natural Reindeer Æ Wreaths Grapevine Trees and more!

Lincoln Candle

“your hometown candle company” Our Shoppe is filled with our best fragrances for your home and gift giving! Handmade Potpourri • Oils • Accessories • Pillars

Jar Candles - 25% off this week - Stock Up!

New! My Sisters Snowmen

Handcrafted, awesome, great gift for the collector!

We’ll light the fire, put on the Christmas music, serve hot spiced cider and welcome you to enjoy Christmas at our farm!

7 mi west of Van Wert just off Lincoln Hwy.

at our farm! 7 mi west of Van Wert just off Lincoln Hwy. www.lincolncandleco.com 419-749-4224 Special

www.lincolncandleco.com

419-749-4224

Special This Week!

Twig Wall Basket

only $12.95

filled w/fresh greens and winterberry

Pinecone dipping for the kids!

Shoplifter arrested in store

on

Wednesday, Delphos offi- cers were dispatched to Chief Supermarket regard-

ing a shoplifter complaint. Upon arriving at this location, officers made contact with 35-year-old Delphos resident Terry J. Dray.

Dray

admit-

ted to

stealing

certain

items

from the

store.

Those

items

were returned to the store and a charge of theft will be filed against Dray into Lima Municipal Court. Dray was released from the scene and not jailed.

At

1:16

a.m.

was released from the scene and not jailed. At 1:16 a.m. Dray B IRTHS ST. RITA’S

Dray

BIRTHS

ST. RITA’S

A girl was born Nov. 20

to Erin and Bryan Recker of Kalida.

A girl was born Nov. 21 to

Alyssa Pollock and Chase Fry of Delphos.

A boy was born Nov. 22

to Kimbra and James Moore of Elida.

A boy was born Nov. 23 to

Christina Auer and Sherman Jones of Delphos.

A boy was born Nov. 24 to

Courtney and Aaron Klausing of Spencerville.

A boy was born Nov. 25 to

Shanelle and Michael Sellers of Venedocia.

A boy was born Nov. 25

to Chelsee Schnipke and Juan Delgado of Delphos.

A boy was born Nov. 27 to

Beth and Dean Trombley of Fort Jennings.

LOCAL PRICES

Corn

$7.73

Wheat

$8.48

Soybeans

$14.42

Corn $7.73 Wheat $8.48 Soybeans $14.42 John Henry ‘Jack’ Walter Jan. 7, 1942 Nov. 27, 2012

John Henry ‘Jack’ Walter

$8.48 Soybeans $14.42 John Henry ‘Jack’ Walter Jan. 7, 1942 Nov. 27, 2012 John Henry “Jack”

Jan. 7, 1942 Nov. 27, 2012

John Henry “Jack” Walter,

70, of Delphos and formerly

of Wapakoneta, died at 8:07

a.m. Tuesday at Vancrest

Healthcare Center in Delphos, where he had been a resident for 7 years. He was born Jan. 7, 1942,

in Wapakoneta to William and

Florence (Hemmert) Walter, who preceded him in death. On May 19, 1990, he mar- ried Clara Balster Brown,

who survives in Delphos. Also surviving is a daugh-

ter, Connie Dear of St. Marys;

a son, James Walter of Lima;

a son-in-law, Alvie Herzog

of St. Marys; grandchildren, Justin Lee and Shannon and Corey Herzog of St. Marys; stepchildren, Linda (David)

Seffernick of Wapakoneta and Scott (Pamela) Brown and Kevin Brown of Spencerville;

stepgrandchildren, John and Steve Brown, Michael and Kaitlin Seffernick and Joe

Anderson and Jordan Brown;

a brother, Paul Walter of

Wapakoneta; a sister, Janet (Norm) Klein of Cleveland;

a brother-in-law, Jerry (Joan)

John H. Wrocklage Jr.

John H. Wrocklage Jr., 64, of Spencerville died at 3:25 p.m. Tuesday at Mary Ann Brown Care Center in Lima. Funeral services will begin at 10 a.m. Saturday with visitation from 3-7 p.m. Friday at Thomas E. Bayliff Funeral Home in Spencerville, where further arrangements are incomplete.

Pandora woman stable after vehicle-tractor crash

Information submitted

OTTAWA — The Ohio State Highway Patrol is cur-

rently investigating a serious injury crash that occurred 6:11 p.m. Monday.

A 2002 Ford Focus driven

by Nancy J. Kline, 57, of Pandora was westbound on US 224. A 1965 John Deere tractor driven by Mark A. Hempfling, 50, of Ottawa was westbound on US 224 at a slow speed. Kline struck the tractor and caused severe

damage to the 2002 Ford

vehicle, she sustained serious injuries and was transported

to St. Rita’s emergency where

she is in stable condition. Ottawa EMS and Heavy Rescue assisted on scene as

well as deputies from the Putnam County Sheriff’s Department. Kline was cited for failing

to maintain and assured clear

distance. Hempfling was cited

for an equipment violation. The crash remains under investigation at this time.

HOLISTIC • SELF-HELP • COGNITIVE • INDIGENOUS • FAITH BASED Losing a Loved One to
HOLISTIC • SELF-HELP • COGNITIVE • INDIGENOUS • FAITH BASED
Losing a Loved One to
Drugs or Alcohol?
Call for a free
confidential assessment
• Customized
• One Year Aftercare
Treatment Plans
• Multi-Approach
Result Based
Programs
• Job Referral
Training
Insurance accepted - Financing available
Save a Life today, Call: 1 (866) 226-2856
www.bestdrugrehabilitation.com

Sturwold of Parish, Fla.; sisters-in-law, Ruth Walter of Piqua, Ina Walter of Wapakoneta and Alice Balster and Esther (James) Moeller of Springfield and Mary (Conrad) Philipot of Russia; brothers-in-law, Walter (Marilyn) Balster of Dayton and Larry (Pat) Balster of St. Henry; and several nieces and nephews. He was also preceded in death by a daughter, Mary Herzog; a son-in-law, Bill Dear; brothers, Richard and William Walter; sisters, Rita Sturwold, Marilyn (Jake) Staats and infant Florence Walter; and brother-in-law, Richard Balster. Mr. Walter attended St. Joseph School in Wapakoneta and served in the U.S. Army from 1960-62. He spent his life as a truck driver. He enjoyed dancing, playing cards and bingo and fishing and hunt- ing trips. He was a lifemem- ber of the Bowersock Bros. VFW Post 6772 and a mem-

ber of the Harry J. Reynolds American Legion Post 191, both in Spencerville. At the VFW, he served as a Junior Vice and on the Color Guard. He was a devoted husband and grandfather and “Special” to his stepchildren and grand-

children. He was a member

of St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church. Mass of Christian Burial will begin at 10:30 a.m. Friday at St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church, the Rev. Chris Bohnsack offi- ciating. Burial will follow in Spencerville Cemetery, with military rites by the Spencerville Veterans. Friends may call from 3-5

p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Thursday at Thomas E. Bayliff Funeral Home, where a parish wake

will begin at 7:30 p.m.

Ohio man gets jail for mocking disabled girl

CANTON (AP) — A northeast Ohio man caught on video apparently making fun

of a young girl with cerebral palsy has been sentenced to a month in jail. Canton Municipal Judge

JohnA.Poulosorderedthemax-

imum sentence for 43-year-old William Bailey, who pleaded no contest Tuesday to reduced misdemeanor charges of disor- derly conduct and aggravated menacing.

The (Canton) Repository reports that Bailey was caught on cellphone video at a school bus stop making fun of how the 10-year-old disabled girl walks. The video was then widely disseminated on the Internet and local TV news.

Bailey denied he was mocking the girl, saying he was react- ing to name-calling directed at his 9-year-old son. Bailey apologized to the girl and her family in a state- ment Tuesday.

CLUB WINNERS

Delphos Fire Assoc. 300 Club

Nov. 21 - Grace Morris

Nov. 28 - Jack and Jane

Westrich Jefferson Athletic Boosters 300 Club

Jim

— Sharon Feathers - No. 266.

November

and

300 Club Jim — Sharon Feathers - No. 266. November and The Delphos Herald Vol. 143

The Delphos Herald

Vol. 143 No. 119

Nancy Spencer, editor Ray Geary, general manager Delphos Herald Inc. Don Hemple, advertising manager Tiffany Brantley, circulation manager

The Delphos Herald (USPS 1525 8000) is published daily except Sundays, Tuesdays and Holidays. By carrier in Delphos and area towns, or by rural motor route where available $1.48 per week. By mail in Allen, Van Wert, or Putnam County, $97 per year. Outside these counties $110 per year. Entered in the post office in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as Periodicals, postage paid at Delphos, Ohio. No mail subscriptions will be accepted in towns or villag- es where The Delphos Herald paper carriers or motor routes provide daily home delivery for $1.48 per week. 405 North Main St. TELEPHONE 695-0015 Office Hours 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. POSTMASTER:

Send address changes to THE DAILY HERALD, 405 N. Main St. Delphos, Ohio 45833

WEATHER

Delphos weather

High temperature Tuesday in Delphos was 35 degrees, low was 27. High a year ago today was 42, low was 36. Record high for today is 69, set in 2005. Record low is 1, set in 1930.

WEATHER FORECAST Tri-county The Associated Press

TONIGHT: Partly cloudy. Lows in the mid 20s. Southwest winds around 5 mph. THURSDAY: Mostly sunny in the morning then becoming partly cloudy. Highs in the mid 40s. Southwest winds 5 to 15 mph. THURSDAY NIGHT:

Partly cloudy. Lows in the lower 30s. South winds 5 to 10 mph.

EXTENDED FORECAST FRIDAY: Partly cloudy. Highs in the upper 40s. South winds 5 to 10 mph. FRIDAY NIGHT AND SATURDAY: Partly cloudy. Lows in the upper 30s. Highs in the lower 50s. SATURDAY NIGHT:

Mostly cloudy with a 40 per- cent chance of showers. Lows in the upper 40s.

Highway patrol:

3 killed in north- west Ohio crash

TIFFIN (AP) — Authorities say three people have been killed and at least two others injured in a car crash in north- west Ohio. The Ohio State Highway Patrol says two vehicles were involved in the crash Tuesday night in Hopewell Township, Seneca County, about 50 miles southeast of Toledo. Three people were pro- nounced dead at the scene and two others were flown to Mercy St. Vincent Medical Center in Toledo. The names of the victims were not immediately avail- able. The Toledo Blade reports it’s unclear what caused the crash. Troopers continue to investigate.

LOTTERY

CLEVELAND

(AP)

These

Ohio

lotteries

were

drawn Tuesday:

 

Mega Millions

 

05-12-26-42-49,

Mega

Ball: 24

Estimated jackpot: $49 M Megaplier

4

Pick 3 Evening

6-5-2

Pick 3 Midday

5-0-1

Pick 4 Evening

3-0-3-9

Pick 4 Midday

5-5-4-6

Pick 5 Evening

3-6-2-5-7

Pick 5 Midday

1-6-6-0-0

Powerball Estimated jackpot: $425 M Rolling Cash 5

01-11-18-25-33

Estimated

jackpot:

$100,000

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

The Herald –3

www.delphosherald.com Wednesday, November 28, 2012 The Herald –3

STATE/LOCAL

B RIEFS

Report shows disparity in Ohio graduation rates

COLUMBUS (AP) — New statistics show that Ohio has one of the lowest high-school graduation rates for black stu- dents, but one of the better rates for white students. The U.S. Department of Education comparable state-by- state graduation numbers show only three states have a wider disparity between graduation rates for blacks and whites. Ohio’s graduation rate for all students was 80 percent for the 2010-11 school year, the first year in which a common calcu- lation was used in most states. For black students, the rate was 59 percent. For white stu- dents, it was 85 percent. For students who come from poor families, it was 65 percent. Iowa had the top overall graduation rate, while Nevada had the lowest. The numbers were reported by The Columbus Dispatch today.

Ohio Senate nixes divisive family planning bill

COLUMBUS (AP) — The Ohio Senate’s leader says his chamber won’t act this ses- sion on a bill that would boot Planned Parenthood to the back of the line for public family-planning money. Republican Senate President Tom Niehaus told reporters Tuesday that the Senate wouldn’t have ade- quate time to weigh the sig- nificant policy issues at stake. He said he let House Speaker William Batchelder, a fellow Republican, know his plans. The full House has not voted on the measure, and it’s unclear whether the GOP- controlled chamber will act. Niehaus said he didn’t con- sult his caucus about the deci- sion because there was “noth- ing to discuss at this point.” He said he took into account the “entirety of the work” of Planned Parenthood, which he believes includes needed ser- vices that aren’t available at other places.

Ohio drilling opponents won’t get public hearing

ATHENS (AP) — The state is holding an open- house style forum instead of the formal public hearing that southeastern Ohio gas-drilling opponents had wanted. The Columbus Dispatch reports that opponents of a proposed hydraulic-fracturing waste disposal well in Athens County are rankled the state isn’t holding a public hearing. Instead, they’ll get a public forum tonight that isn’t open to people carrying signs, ban- ners or video cameras. Heather Cantino, a mem- ber of the Athens County Fracking Action Network, said the open house doesn’t give residents an opportunity to have their comments placed on the record before the state grants a disposal-well permit. But a state spokeswoman said the venue will provide people with greater access to officials.

SAFY, Shear Brilliance reach goal for Rapunzel Project SAFY (Specialized Alternatives for Families and Youth)

SAFY, Shear Brilliance reach goal for Rapunzel Project

SAFY (Specialized Alternatives for Families and Youth) recently teamed up with Shear Brilliance Salon to raise money for The Rapunzel Project. For every $5 dona- tion, staff had a chance to win cancer awareness prizes such as jewelry, tote bags, blankets, scarves and more. The Rapunzel Project is dedicated to helping cancer patients keep their hair during chemotherapy via cold cap approach. The caps help preserve hair during treatments by cooling the hair follicles which helps prevent the toxins from reaching them, thus preserving the patient’s hair. It was a great week and it was rewarding to make contributions that could help to “Make a Beautiful Difference” in the lives of cancer patients. Participating in the donations are, from left, Kathy Reinsel, Jane Breggeman, Kelly Hackworth, Peggy Grothause, Sherry Bockey and Jenni Verhoff.

Hunters harvest more than 1,300 turkeys during Ohio’s fall season

Information submitted

COLUMBUS — Hunters harvested 1,338 wild turkeys

well as Adams and Richland (37 each). Ashtabula was also the top county in 2011, with 67 wild turkeys.

shows the harvest numbers for 2012, and the 2011 numbers are in parentheses. Adams: 37 (35); Ashland:

during Ohio’s 2012 fall wild

Prior to the start of this

22

(17); Ashtabula: 61 (67);

turkey season, according

fall’s hunting season, Ohio’s

Athens: 32 (27); Belmont:

to the Ohio Department of

wild turkey population was

27

(32); Brown: 21 (26);

Natural Resources’ (ODNR)

approximately 180,000. More

Carroll: 29 (39); Clermont:

Division of Wildlife. Ohio’s

than 17,000 hunters, not

42

(32); Columbiana: 29

2012 fall wild turkey hunt-

including private landowners

(37); Coshocton: 56 (44);

ing season was open Oct.

hunting on their own prop-

Cuyahoga: 2 (0); Defiance:

13-Nov. 25.

erty, enjoyed Ohio’s fall wild

20

(13); Gallia: 25 (36);

This year’s total is a 2.5

turkey season. Hunters could

Geauga: 53 (31); Guernsey:

percent decline from 2011,

pursue a wild turkey of either

39

(53); Harrison: 34 (38);

when hunters bagged 1,372

sex in 48 counties using a

Highland: 32 (37); Hocking:

wild turkeys. The 2010 har-

shotgun, muzzleloading shot-

28

(20); Holmes: 38 (42);

vest total was 1,425.

gun, bow or crossbow.

Jackson: 21 (17); Jefferson:

“Wild turkey hunting is

More information about

23

(20); Knox: 46 (55); Lake:

a challenging activity that

Ohio wild turkey hunting can

9

(7); Lawrence: 14 (21);

thousands of hunters enjoy year after year with family and friends,” said ODNR

be found at wildohio.com. Hunters can share photos by clicking on the Photo Gallery

Licking: 41 (40); Lorain: 9 (29); Mahoning: 22 (24); Medina: 11 (17); Meigs:

Director James Zehringer.

tab online.

30

(15); Monroe: 34 (45);

“Ohio’s wild turkey popula-

ODNR ensures a balance

Morgan: 17 (23); Morrow:

tion remains strong, and we

between wise use and protec-

16

(11); Muskingum: 35 (36);

appreciate those hunters who participated in the fall wild

tion of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the

Noble: 31 (50); Perry: 29 (26); Pike: 21 (21); Portage:

turkey season this year.”

ODNR website at ohiodnr.

19

(18); Richland: 37 (39);

The top 11 counties for

com.

Ross: 20 (19); Scioto: 24

fall turkey harvest were:

(22); Stark: 17 (23); Summit:

Ashtabula (61), Coshocton (56), Geauga and Tuscarawas (53 each), Knox (46), Clermont (42), Licking (41), Guernsey (39), Holmes (38) as

Editor’s Note: A list of wild turkeys checked by hunters during the 2012 fall season is shown below. The first number following the county’s name

9 (3); Trumbull: 36 (31);

Tuscarawas: 53 (53); Vinton:

34 (21); Washington: 24 (24);

Wayne: 7 (9); Williams: 22 (27). Total: 1,338 (1,372).

Yield is up on first day of Ohio deer-gun season

COLUMBUS (AP) — Ohio hunters killed 24 per- cent more deer on the first day of gun season this year compared to last year. The Columbus Dispatch reports that hunters took 29,297 white-tailed deer on Monday, the first day of the week-long gun season. That

was a significant increase over the number killed dur- ing a soaking rain on the first day in 2011. The Ohio Department of Natural Resources’ Division of Wildlife says an estimat- ed 420,000 hunters will take the fields this year. The gun season continues through

Sunday, with an additional weekend hunt Dec. 15 and

16.

Hunters brought down 90,282 deer in the weeklong gun season last year — a drop of about 15,000 from 2010. No hunting accidents have been reported so far this year.

No hunting accidents have been reported so far this year. Ottoville Council approves purchase of nearly

Ottoville Council approves purchase of nearly 12 acres

BY STEPHANIE GROVES sgroves@delphosherald.com

OTTOVILLE — The Village Council approved the purchase of 11.757 acres of Niedecken prop- erty in the Industrial Park and will utilize the property for commer- cial development. The land costs $7,000 per acre, bringing the total purchase price close to $82,300. Council also approved audit- ing the Village’s Personnel Policy and Procedure Manual, Section 6.07, regarding the use of per- sonal employee information. Village council members passed the annual agreement with Monterey Township Trustees for the use of the public library, housed at 349 Wayne St., and the reim- bursement of a portion of the yearly electric bill at $1,400 per year. Council member Tony Langhals addressed the absence of the flashing stop light and the danger at the 3-way intersection where route’s 66 and 224 meet. Since the storm in June, which took down the flashing light, management of the traffic at the intersection has become perilous. The installation of a new flash- ing light or any other caution-

ary mechanisms depends upon approval from the state. Guest Sam Bonifas spoke with council asking for permis- sion to utilize a portion — 500 feet — of the old canal bank for a section of The Buckeye Trail. The trail, which is designed to link the four corners of Ohio, is a continuous looping hiking trail of 1,444 miles encircling the state. Vertical blue markings painted on trees and utility poles every few hundred feet, delineate the trail. The Board of Public Affairs reported the installation of the por- table lift station on Route 66 will be completed this coming week. Also addressed was the contract- ing of sludge cake removal from the wastewater facility. Quazar Energy Group gave a $4.59 per gallon or $200 per load to treat and remove the waste, which can be used as fertilizer. The Fire Department’s sta- tion is in need of renovations and includes interior painting of the floor and walls and replacement of existing metal walls. The total anticipated cost for the work is $25,000 to $26,000. The next council meeting will be held at 6 p.m. on Dec. 19.

The next council meeting will be held at 6 p.m. on Dec. 19. ✓ Steel ✓
The next council meeting will be held at 6 p.m. on Dec. 19. ✓ Steel ✓
✓ Steel ✓ Iron ✓ Copper ✓ Brass ✓ Aluminum ✓ Stainless ✓ Lead ✓
✓ Steel
✓ Iron
✓ Copper
✓ Brass
✓ Aluminum
✓ Stainless
✓ Lead
✓ Zinc
Buying all grades of ferrous
and non-ferrous metals
over 80 years!
Also offering container service for metals and trash (roll-off
boxes, van, dump & low-boy trailers). Kohart Recycling is
your full service scrap recycling facility.
Kohart Recycling has 3 convenient locations to serve you!
State Route 613 E.
Paulding, OH 45879
634 Spruce St.
Fostoria, OH 44830
905 S. Main St.
Delphos, OH 45833
419-399-4144
419-435-7792
419-692-4792

4 — The Herald

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

www.delphosherald.com

4 — The Herald Wednesday, November 28, 2012 www.delphosherald.com

POLITICS

“We are not all born at once, but by bits. The body first, and the spirit later.”

— Mary Hunter Austin, American novelist and playwright (1868-1934)

Hunter Austin, American novelist and playwright (1868-1934) L ETTER TO THE EDITOR DEAR EDITOR: Dear community,

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

DEAR EDITOR:

Dear community, Have you toured these two treasures in our community, the Delphos Museum of Postal History and the Delphos Canal Commission Museum. If you have an opportunity when Gary Levitt is giving a tour at the postal museum, please attend. He has so much informa- tion that his tours are interesting even to a person like me who is not a stamp collector. If you are a stamp collector, plan on spending hours at this museum. The second treasure is the Delphos Canal Commission Museum. From now to Christmas, there are many decorated trees at the Christmas Tree Festival. The themes vary from tree to tree. Some trees are decorated by community groups while others are decorated by volunteers at the museum. Several trees are decorated with items which will be given to local charities. A group or a family may wish to do this next year. However if the trees do not interest you, the displays in the museum are wonderful. If you look carefully, you will notice you are touring a parlor, dining room, bed room, and a kitchen. Upstairs there is an old store, a school room, a log cabin, a military display with a barbwire tree, toys from the past, and a medical display. There is also the torture machine, an old fash- ioned machine used for hair permanents. More than one older lady could tell about their scalp burns. The basement has farm items, items from roads and items manufactured in Delphos. There are other displays, too. The price is family friendly because both are free but a donation is always welcome. Thanks to all who volunteer their time to build and maintain these two Delphos treasures. Catherine Heitz

Delphos

IT WAS NEWS THEN

One Year Ago

• Teens Against Substance Abuse (TASA) students got in

the Christmas spirit with their “Rockin Around a Drug-Free Tree” for this year’s Canal Commission Christmas Tree event. TASA members Anna Mueller, Ethan Benavidez, Syndey Fischbach and Ashlyn Troyer worked on the tree.

25 Years Ago — 1987

• The 1936 graduating class of the former Gomer High

School held its annual Thanksgiving dinner at Maria’s Restaurant at Elida. Those present were Mr. and Mrs. Daniel

Huffer of Fort Wayne, Mr. and Mrs. Norman Diller of Elida, Mr. and Mrs. Jay Evans, Edith Glancy and Mr. and Mrs. John

E. Morris of rural Gomer and Mr. and Mrs. George Jones of

Gomer, Mr. and Mrs. Owen Micha and Mr. and Mrs. David

T. Humphreys of Lima.

• Edna Jane Nolte received 27 girls into the ranks of Court Delphos 707, Junior Catholic Daughters of the Americas

(JCDA). Nolte is national first regent of the Catholic Daughters of he Americas, the social-service organization that sponsors JCDA for girls grades two through 12.

• Three members of St. John’s Blue Jay volleyball team were voted honorable mention honors by the Midwest

Athletic Conference for the 1987 season. They were senior Laura Shaw, setter; senior Elaine Wrasman, hitter and junior, Anne Hohman, hitter. Shaw is the daughter of Ray and Kathleen Shaw, Wrasman is the daughter of Melvin and Ruth Wrasman, and Hohman is the daughter of Louis and Carol

Hohman.

50 Years Ago — 1962

• Dorothy Miller was elected president of the Mary Martha

Bible Class of the Christian Union Church during a meeting of the class held Tuesday night in the home of Martha Meeker,

North Main Street. Other officers chosen to serve during the year 1963 are: Theola Wilcox, vice president; Elizabeth Wiley, secretary; Pauline Martin, assistant secretary; and Beulah Jacobs, treasurer.

• Mrs. A. J. Meyer and Mrs. Robert Liggett served as

co-hostesses for the ladies day luncheon party held Tuesday afternoon at the Delphos Country Club. A delightful buf-

fet luncheon was followed by cards. Prizes were awarded to Mrs. Cletus Myers, Eleanore Minzing and Mrs. Kenneth

Parkinson.

• Mrs. Herman Lehmkuhle was hostess to the members

of the Gaytimers Club Monday evening in her home on Bank Street. In card games played, first prize went to Mrs. Richard Shirack, second and traveling prizes were awarded

to Mrs. Elvin Patton and Mrs. Waldo Baker received the third

prize.

75 Years Ago — 1937

• Norbert and Carl Gerdemann, of west of Delphos, have

entered livestock in the annual Cleveland Livestock Show which will be held Nov. 29-30 at the Equestrium. Arnold Gerdemann, also of near Delphos, has entered livestock in the

feeders’ show. The Gerdemanns have been entering livestock

in the Cleveland show for many years and have received some fine awards.

• A group of local residents were in Napoleon Friday eve-

ning to attend a union rally. Present were the following from Delphos: Rev. and Mrs. C. A. Ford and sons, Dallas, Glen

and Robert, Mrs. Bert Miller, Rosabel Miller, Nick Gengler, Hariette and Florence Baer, Clarence Butler, Juanita DeLong, Irvin Fair and Lloyd Peters.

• Various important business matters including nomination

of officers will come before the Pythian Sisters at a regular meeting scheduled for Tuesday evening in Castle Hall. At the close of the meeting a potluck luncheon will be served. The committee is composed of Mrs. C. Fredrick Faye, chairman; Leona Griffith, Mrs. Van Clawson, Mrs. Homer Nihiser and Pearl Leininger.

US economy gets lift from consumers, businesses

WASHINGTON (AP) — American consumers are growing more confident about

the job market, companies are

ordering more equipment and home prices are rising in most major cities. The latest batch of govern-

ment data suggests that the economy is improving just as the holiday shopping season begins. The only threat is a package of huge spending cuts

and tax increases that will kick

in unless Congress strikes a

budget deal by year’s end.

Rising home values, more hiring and lower gas prices pushed consumer confidence

in November to the highest

level in nearly five years. And

steady consumer spending appears to have encouraged businesses to invest more in October after pulling back over the summer. Those trends could boost

economic growth slightly in the final three months of the year. But the real payoff could come early next year — if the automatic tax increases and spending cuts known as the “fiscal cliff” can be averted. Businesses that have post- poned expansion plans could move forward with projects, leading to more hiring. Reports Tuesday showed:

— The Conference Board’s

consumer confidence index rose to 73.7 in November from 73.1 in October. Both are the

best readings since February

2008. The index is still below

90, the level that is consistent with a healthy economy. It last reached that point in December

2007, the first month of the

Great Recession. But the index has increased from the all- time low of 25.3 touched in February 2009.

— The Standard & Poor’s/

Case-Shiller 20-city index of home prices rose 3 percent in September compared with the same month last year. Prices

also gained 3.6 percent in the July-September quarter com- pared with the same quarter in

2011. Prices increased in 18

of 20 cities over the 12-month period.

WASHINGTON — As events unfolded in what shall

ever be known as “The Petraeus Affair,” one cannot escape noticing that the women in this sordid saga have been handed

the short end of the shtick, as

though the men are mere vic- tims of ambitious, hormonally driven vixens. There’s the so-called “socialite” in Tampa, Jill Kelley, who courted generals and exchanged at least hun- dreds of emails with our lead commander in Afghanistan, John Allen. And there’s the biographer with toned arms, Paula Broadwell, who wore tight jeans and allegedly seduced America’s most dar- ling general, David Petraeus. The double standard we apply to men and women in these very human dramas is nothing new, but also nothing

short of appalling. Even as we urge women to behave in every way as men, even pushed to arms on the battlefront, the Madonna-whore dichotomy is alive and writhing. The two men are golden,

we are inclined to infer. The women, well, what is one to think? Tarnished and brand- ed, discarded as chattel hav-

ing each served her purpose. Here’s an alternative

narrative. Let’s assume for

a moment that everyone

involved in this spectacle is actually a good and decent, if

Senate Dems divided over cuts to benefit programs

By STEPHEN OHLEMACHER The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Deep divisions among Senate Democrats over whether cuts to popular benefit programs

like Medicare and Medicaid should be part of a plan to slow the government’s mushroom- ing debt pose a big obstacle to a deal for avoiding a poten- tially economy-crushing “fis- cal cliff,” even if Republicans agree to raise taxes. Much of the focus during negotiations seeking an alter- native to $671 billion in auto- matic tax increases and spend- ing cuts beginning in January has centered on whether Republicans would agree to raising taxes on the wealthy. President Barack Obama has insisted repeatedly that tax increases on the wealthy must be part of any deal, even as White House officials concede that government benefit pro- grams will have to be in the package too. “It is the president’s position that when we’re talking about

a broad, balanced approach to

dealing with our fiscal chal-

lenges, that that includes deal- ing with entitlements,” White House press secretary Jay

Carney said Tuesday. But even if GOP lawmak- ers agree to raise taxes, there

is no guarantee Democrats can

come up with enough votes in the Senate to cut benefit pro- grams — as Republicans are demanding. “I hope not if it means Social Security or Medicare benefit cuts,” said Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I. There’s a growing consen- sus among Senate Democrats and the White House that Social Security should be exempt from any deficit-reduc- tion package. But some cen- trist Democrats in the Senate argue that fellow Democrats must be willing to consider cuts to Medicare and Medicaid in order to get concessions from Republicans on taxes. “It has to be both — a sig- nificant revenue increase as well as spending cuts,” said Sen. Max Baucus, D-Mont., chairman of the Senate Finance Committee. Sen. Kent Conrad, D-N.D., who is retiring as chairman of the Senate Budget Committee, said rising health care costs in Medicare and Medicaid are helping to drive future spend- ing, making them an essential part of a long-term deficit-

reduction package. “I’ve been part of every bipartisan group here. We’ve always put everything on the table,” Conrad said. “If you’re going to solve this problem, you’re going to have to deal with where the spending is and

the revenue can be raised.”

But senators like Baucus and Conrad increasingly are being drowned out by other Democrats emboldened by the recent election results to fight against benefit cuts. Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, said he is willing to find sav- ings in Medicare and Medicaid by making them more effi- cient. But, he said, he won’t support benefit cuts. “I think the election spoke

very strongly about the fact that the vast majority of American people don’t want to cut these programs,” Harkin said. Congress and the White House are devoting the next three weeks to finding at least

a bridge over the fiscal cliff

by reducing the sudden jolt of higher taxes and spending cuts in January while laying a framework for addressing the nation’s long-term financial problems next year. Obama wants to let tax rates rise for wealthy fami- lies while sparing middle- and low-income taxpayers. Some Republican leaders, including House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, have said they were willing to consider making the wealthy pay more by reduc- ing their tax breaks. But most Republicans in Congress ada- mantly oppose raising any- one’s tax rates. Negotiations are going slowly as each side waits for the other to make concessions.

Senate Dems rally for Rice against GOP opposition

By DONNA CASSATA The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Senate Democrats rallied to U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice’s defense as Republicans said they were even more troubled by her account of the deadly attack on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, and sig-

naled they would try to scuttle her nomination if President Barack Obama tapped her as the next secretary of state. “The personal attacks against Ambassador Rice by certain Republican sena-

tors have been outrageous

and utterly unmoored from facts and reality,” said Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., who called the criti- cism unfathomable in light of disclosures from the intelli- gence community. As congressional Democrats and the Obama administration delivered a full-throated defense of the possible diplomatic nominee, Rice was meeting Wednesday

with Republican Sens. Susan Collins of Maine and Bob Corker of Tennessee. Corker

is next in line for the top GOP

spot on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. “We’ll see and we’re going to sit down and talk to her,” Corker told The Associated Press. “She always delivers the party line, the company line,

whatever the talking points are.

I think most of us hold the

secretary of state and secretary

of treasury to a whole different

level. We understand they’re going to support the administra- tion, but we want to know they are independent enough, when administration is off-base, that they are putting pressure. I think that’s what worries me most about Rice.” Rice answered questions Tuesday from Sens. John McCain, Lindsey Graham and Kelly Ayotte about her much- maligned explanations about the cause of the September attack in Libya that killed Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans. At the hour-plus, closed-door session, Rice conceded that her initial account — that a spon- taneous demonstration over an anti-Muslim video triggered the attack — was wrong, but she

insisted she had not been trying

to mislead the American people

when she made her comments five days later. “The talking points provid- ed by the intelligence commu- nity, and the initial assessment upon which they were based,

were incorrect in a key respect:

There was no protest or dem- onstration in Benghazi,” Rice said in a statement after the meeting. “While we certainly wish that we had had perfect information just days after the terrorist attack, as is often the

American complex

KATHLEEN PARKER

Point of View
Point
of View

flawed, person, variations of the definitions notwithstand- ing. Yes, Kelley and her hus- band have financial difficul-

ties, but who doesn’t these days? Isn’t it also possible that Kelley, in addition to enjoy- ing the company of generals, wanted to do something nice for her country by providing

a social outlet for military

personnel in the area? As for her email exchanges with Allen, the only relevant concern seems to be the gen- eral apparently has more time on his hands than a general should. Otherwise, commu- nicating via social media and email is merely our modern campfire. We are social ani- mals, and lonely people will find each other through the smoke. Do we really care who and how people choose to fill the void in their lives? More complicated is the relationship between Petraeus

and Broadwell, if only because

of an investigation into ques-

tionable emails she sent to Kelley, whom she apparently

considered a rival. Broadwell is being investigated for “cyberstalking” and also in

regard to classified documents found on her computer. These investigations are ongoing and, as yet, have con- firmed no personal or profes- sional breach. Still, Broadwell has been essentially indicted in the public mind. Her secu- rity clearance, which ulti- mately might justify her pos- session of the documents in question, has been suspended, which is probably appropri- ate under the circumstances, though hardly conclusive. Nevertheless, Broadwell’s reputation has been tarnished well beyond the sin for which

she has expressed sincere remorse. The married mother of two has been characterized by an increasingly tabloid press as the scarlet woman, the “mistress,” an outdated word that indicts a woman but rarely the man, smirkingly suggestive of “kept-ness.” Broadwell has even been crit- icized for showing too much arm on TV. Such observa- tions seem odd in a sleeveless era launched by the first lady, whose enviable guns are leg- endary and often on display. As much as we sympathize with the painful upheaval suf- fered by the families involved, let’s pause a moment for Broadwell and recall that she was an Army officer, a West Point graduate, an accom- plished, yes, ambitious, elite member of the military who,

case the intelligence assess-

ment has evolved.” She was joined in the meet- ing by Acting CIA Director Michael Morell. Rice requested the meeting with the three senators — her

most outspoken critics — but she failed to mollify them and they indicated they would try

to block her nomination.

“We are significantly trou- bled by many of the answers that we got and some that

we didn’t get concerning evi- dence that was leading up to the attack on the consulate,” McCain told reporters after

a session with Rice that he

described as candid. Said Graham, “Bottom line, I’m more disturbed now than

before that 16 Sept. explana- tion.” He said in a later inter- view that Rice went “far beyond the flawed talking points” and should be held accountable. “I’m more troubled today,”

said Ayotte, who argued that

it was clear in the days after

the attack that it was terrorism and not a spontaneous demon- stration. Rice’s unusual visit to Capitol Hill — typically only nominees meet privately with lawmakers — reflects the Obama administration’s cam- paign for the current front- runner to replace Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton against some strenuous GOP opposition.

as it turns out, happens to have had a relationship with a man for whom she apparently had strong feelings. Did she cause others pain? Of course, and for this she is suffering by all accounts. Does she deserve to be pilloried in the public square? Or does she deserve the same second chance any similarly accomplished man would be accorded? One does not need to approve of the behavior to grant compassion and sus- pend judgment, at least until we know whether there is any reason for public interest beyond the prurient. In the meantime, our urgency to apply different standards to women than to men deserves scrutiny. For women, there’s no margin for error in public life, yet men walk away virtually unscathed — re-elected to office, rehired by Wall Street, re-assigned to a new parish, rehabilitated by the mere act of entering “rehab.” Puhleez. Broadwell is one of America’s success stories, if you buy the woman-warrior myth. Her only flaw seems to have been falling for another man and, in the way some men do, showing off biceps toned by hundreds of hours of hard work. To the pyre, to the pyre.

Kathleen Parker’s email address is kathleenparker@washpost.com.

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

The Herald – 5

www.delphosherald.com Wednesday, November 28, 2012 The Herald – 5

COMMUNITY

LANDMARK

November 28, 2012 The Herald – 5 C OMMUNITY L ANDMARK Franklin Elementary School C ALENDAR

Franklin Elementary School

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

TODAY

6 p.m. — Shepherds of

Christ Associates meet in the

St. John’s Chapel.

7 p.m. — Bingo at St.

John’s Little Theatre.

THURSDAY

Holiday recipe special

BY LOVINA EICHER

I

hope

everyone

had

a

sugar. Add eggs and beat well. Mix in cream, soda,

salt, extract and flour. Roll very thin, almost

paper thin. Cut out with cookie cutters of your own pref- erence. Bake for 5 minutes or until the edges are golden, the cookie dough is very thin so they do not need to bake long. Cool and dec- orate with candies or frosting.

happy, healthy,

and blessed

T h a n k s g i v i n g

holiday. Hard to

believe there’s only

a month left before

2012 is history. I thought I’d share a few favorite recipes from our family that

you might enjoy during the upcom- ing Christmas sea-

son. Try these three!

during the upcom- ing Christmas sea- son. Try these three! WHITE CHRISTMAS CUT-OUT COOKIES HOMEMADE HOLIDAY

WHITE CHRISTMAS CUT-OUT COOKIES

HOMEMADE HOLIDAY PEANUT BUTTER FUDGE

4 cups granulated sugar

1/4 cup light corn syrup

1/2 teaspoon salt 3/4 cup evaporated milk

Grogg wins coloring contest Franklin Elementary School kindergartner Zada Grogg won a coloring contest during

Grogg wins coloring contest

Franklin Elementary School kindergartner Zada Grogg won a coloring contest during National School Bus Safety Week. Ohio State Highway Patrol Bus Safety Instructor Tina Eley congratulates her. (Photo submit- ted)

Living in the Now, Preparing for the Future For many of us, our goals in
Living in the Now,
Preparing for the Future
For many of us, our goals in life remain constant: financial indepen-
dence and providing for family. Striking a balance between saving
for goals, such as education and retirement, and allocating
money for daily expenses can be challenging. But you can do it.
Learn how you can redefine your savings approach
toward education and retirement. Call or visit today.
Andy North
Andy North
Financial Advisor
Financial Advisor
.
.
1122 Elida Avenue
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
419-695-0660
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

without stirring until a lit- tle of the mixture dropped in cold water forms a soft ball (232 degrees on a candy thermometer). Remove from heat. Cool to lukewarm (110 degrees). Add peanut butter and the vanilla. Beat until mixture thickens and loses its gloss. Pour into a buttered 8x8x2- inch pan. Cool.

CHOCOLATE CHIP CHEESE BALL 1-8 ounce package of cream cheese 1 /2 cup oleo, softened 3/4 cup powdered sugar 2 tablespoons brown sugar

1/4 teaspoon vanilla 3/4 cup mini-chocolate chips Graham crackers or choc- olate graham crackers Beattogethercreamcheese and oleo until smooth. Mix

in powdered sugar, vanil- la, and brown sugar. Stir in chocolate chips. Cover and chill for 2 hours. Shape into a ball and serve with graham crackers.

2 hours. Shape into a ball and serve with graham crackers. Happy Birthday NOV. 29 Karl

Happy Birthday

NOV. 29 Karl Boecker Ken Grothous Deann K. Heiing Noah Eggleston Deborah Meister Glen Lause Andrea Geise Justyn Hasenkamp Stephen Seffernick

The Delphos Herald

Your No. 1 source for local news

9-11 a.m. — The Delphos

1

cup shortening

Canal Commission Museum,

2

cups white sugar

241

N. Main St., is open.

2

eggs

11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center, 301 Suthoff Street. 5-7 p.m. — The Interfaith Thrift Shop is open for shop- ping.

FRIDAY 7:30 a.m. — Delphos Optimist Club, A&W Drive- In, 924 E. Fifth St. 11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center, 301 Suthoff Street. 1-4 p.m. — Interfaith Thrift Store is open for shopping.

SATURDAY

9 a.m.-noon — Interfaith

Thrift Store is open for shop-

ping. St. Vincent DePaul Society,

located at the east edge of the St. John’s High School park- ing lot, is open.

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. — Delphos

Postal Museum is open. 12:15 p.m. — Testing of

warning sirens by Delphos Fire and Rescue 1-3 p.m. — Delphos Canal Commission Museum, 241 N. Main St., is open.

7 p.m. — Bingo at St.

John’s Little Theatre.

SUNDAY

1-3 p.m. — The Delphos Canal Commission Museum,

241 N. Main St., is open.

MONDAY 11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen

Center, 301 Suthoff Street.

7 p.m. — Delphos City

Council meets at the Delphos Municipal Building, 608 N. Canal St. Delphos Parks and Recreation board meets at the recreation building at Stadium

Park.

1/2 cup cream or milk

1

teaspoon soda

3/4 cup water

1

teaspoon salt

1/3 cup chunk-style pea-

1

tablespoon

lemon

nut butter

extract

 

1 teaspoon vanilla

1

tablespoon vanilla

 

In a saucepan, combine

5

cups flour

the sugar, syrup, salt, milk,

Preheat

oven

to

350

and water. Bring mixture to

degrees. In a large mixing bowl, cream shortening and

a boil, cover, and cook 2 minutes. Uncover and cook

IN THE SERVICE

Knueve promoted

to technical sergeant

Daniel R. Knueve Jr. has been promoted to the rank of technical sergeant in the U.S. Air Force. Knueve is a quality assur- ance inspector assigned to the 437th Airlift Wing at Joint Base Charleston, S.C. He has served in the military for 10 years. He is the son of Dan and Deb Knueve of Kalida and graduated in 1996 from

Kalida High School.

of Kalida and graduated in 1996 from Kalida High School. K n u e v e

Knueve Jr.

LSO offers Bells, Brass and Bows

Join the Lima Symphony Orchestra at 7:30 p.m. Dec. 8 for Bells, Brass and Bows in the Crouse Performance Hall, Veterans Memorial Civic and Convention Center. The Lima Symphony

Chorus will join the orches- tra for carols, timeless clas- sics and sentimental holiday favorites, including a special reading of the Night Before Christmas. For the first time in several seasons, vocal soloist Kirsten

Osbun-Manley and the cho- rus will lend their voices to exalted selections from Handel’s glorious Messiah, concluding with the much- loved Hallelujah. Osbun-Manley is resident artist in music, lecturer in music and co-director of the musical theatre program at Ohio Northern University, where she teaches voice and diction for singers and directs the Opera Workshop pro- gram.

DELPHOS EMS Warm Soup HAM AND BEAN SUPPER WITH CORNBREAD. Cooked over an open fire.
DELPHOS EMS
Warm Soup
HAM
AND
BEAN SUPPER
WITH CORNBREAD.
Cooked over
an open fire.
ONLY $3.50
16 oz.
bowl
Refreshments available
FRIDAY, NOV. 30
Serving starts at 5pm til SOLD OUT
at Delphos EMS Building
125 E. Second St.
Dine in or Carry out.
Stop in and enjoy our delicious
Ham & Bean Soup while downtown
enjoying Hometown Christmas!
This message published as a public service by these civic minded firms.
AUTO DEALERS
FURNITURE
•Delpha
Chev/Buick Co.
•Lehmann’s Furniture
•Westrich Home
Furnishings
GARAGE
AUTO PARTS
•Omer’s Alignment Shop
•Pitsenbarger Auto
FINANCIAL
HARDWARE
INSTITUTIONS
•First Federal Bank
•Delphos Ace Hardware
& Rental
Make everyday Christmas with a gift subscription! Plus $3 off your next renewal with gift
Make everyday Christmas
with
a gift subscription!
Plus
$3 off your next
renewal with
gift
purchase!
Your gift subscription will
deliver knowledge, entertainment,
plus the latest in local news and sports!
BY CARRIER
BY MAIL
in Allen, Putnam
& Van Wert Counties
BY MAIL
Outside
These Counties
o
$23 - 3 months
o $28 - 3 months
o $35 - 3 months
A perfect gift
o
$41 - 6 months
o $52 - 6 months
o $59 - 6 months
o
$77 - 1 year
o $97 - 1 year
o $110 - 1 year
for the hard
o
$75 - 1 year with
to buy for
Golden Buckeye discount
person on
Name
your list!
Address
Call us today
City
Zip
419-695-0015
Send payment to: The Delphos Herald
405 N. Main St., Delphos, OH 45833
THE
DELPHOS
HERALD
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869

6 – The Herald

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

www.delphosherald.com

6 – The Herald Wednesday, November 28, 2012 www.delphosherald.com

SPORTS

Withering press propels Lady Wildcats past Apaches

By JIM METCALFE

jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com

DELPHOS — The Jefferson girls basketball team has thrived over the decades under 30-plus-year mentor Dave Hoffman on forcing turnovers that lead to fast-break points. The formula worked well once more Tuesday night as the Lady Wildcats crushed invading Fairview 57-20 in non-league action at Jefferson High School. The stats don’t lie: the Wildcats (2-1) forced 31 mis- cues (11 of their own) — even throwing in a 46-38 winning of the backboards (22-16 offensive) — that accounted for a 64-44 disparity in field- goal attempts. The Red and White fin- ished making 22 shots (includ- ing 4-of-5 3-balls) for 34.3 percent to the Lady Apaches seven (1-of-3 triples) for 15.9 percent. “We are in a much better flow offensively when the ball is moving up and down the court. That is our game and we’re at our best in that style,” Hoffman said. “We moved the ball better as the game wore on, using the skip pass and so forth. We are getting more aggressive tak- ing the ball to the basket as well.” The turnovers started from the word go as the hosts forced eight in the first peri- od as the visitors struggled to handle the full- and half- court pressure defense of the hosts. Still, Delphos didn’t necessarily take advantage as they canned only 4-of-18 shots. A desperation 23-foot 3-ball by Fairview’s Ali Hug at the horn got the Apaches within 9-7. Whereas the Apaches only seemed to get worse from then on — the seven points in the first was their best output of the night — the Red and White were just getting start- ed. The Wildcats kept up their pressure “D” and forced eight more errors by the visitors, plus they maintained their excellent offensive rebound- ing, getting second and even third attempts on their treks downcourt. Five different

even third attempts on their treks downcourt. Five different Rileigh Stockwell battles Fairview’s Bradi Hill and

Rileigh Stockwell battles Fairview’s Bradi Hill and Ali Hug for an offensive rebound Tuesday night at Jefferson High School. The Jefferson junior led the hosts with 14 markers in a 37-point rout of the Lady Apaches. (Tom Morris/Delphos Herald)

Wildcats scored at least a basket and they combined for 6-of-19 from the field and they held the Apaches score- less for the first 6:48 of the canto. A putback by junior Rileigh Stockwell (game- high 14 markers, 9 boards, 4 thefts) with 53 ticks left put the hosts up 23-9 but a base- line jumper from Fairview’s Emilee Carder (8 points) with 40 ticks left accounted for a 23-11 halftime spread. The Wildcats really revved up the attack in the third period, led — of course — by full-court trapping pressure. They forced another 12 turn- overs that led to a number of layups at the other end. Stockwell caught fire with

eight markers in the period and classmate Katie Goergens (12 counters, 3 steals) and sophomore Brooke Culp (8 boards, 7 counters) added five each. When Goergens swished a triple from the left side with 17 ticks on the clock, their lead had mush- roomed to 45-16. The Apaches didn’t have quite as many turnovers in the fourth — three — as Hoffman called off the dogs. They just couldn’t shoot straight — 1-of-18. Jefferson emptied its bench as well as it could (only 9 dressed), as did the visitors as the largest lead was the final margin on a basket by sophomore Heather Pohlman. “I was most pleased with

our defensive improvement from our opener Friday. We got burned off the dribble quite a bit and we’ve been

addressing that in practice,” Hoffman added. “We were much better keeping things

in front of us and that leads

to steals. We got into some foul trouble the first half but we got contributions off the bench. As a starter, Rileigh really had a good game.” Fairview was 5-of-6 from the line (83.3%) and received five points, 15 boards and four blocks from senior Brittany Conkey, one of only two for the Lady Apaches. They added 15 fouls. The seniorless Wildcats knocked down 10-of-18 free- bies (55.6%). Junior Gabby Pimpas had a team-high seven steals, classmate Brooke Hesseling four dimes and 6-1 sophomore Shelby Koenig four blocks. They totaled 11 fouls and will visit Columbus Grove to commence NWC play Dec. 6. In junior varsity action, the Wildcats also went to 2-1 with a 38-18 whipping. Freshman Taylor Stroh led the hosts with eight, while Kayla Bauer countered with eight for the visitors.

VARSITY FAIRVIEW (20) Cathleen Woenker 0-0-0, Christina

Gebers 0-0-0, Bradi Hill 0-0-0, Brittany Conkey 0-5-5, Ali Hug 1-0-3, Emilee Carder 4-0-8, Sara Carder 1-0-2, Kayla Bauer 0-0-0, Olivia Garrigus 1-0-2. Totals 6-1-5/6-20. JEFFERSON (57) Heather Pohlman 2-1-6, Brooke Culp 2-3-7, Katie Goergens 5-0-12, Rileigh Stockwell 6-2-14, Hannah Sensibaugh 1-3-5, Gabby Pimpas 3-1-7, Shelby Koenig 1-0-2, Brooke Hesseling 1-0-2, Jasmine McDougall 1-0-2. Totals 19-3-10/18-57. Score By Quarters:

Fairview

Jefferson 9 14 22 12 – 57

Three-point goals: Fairview, Hug; Jefferson, Goergens 2, Pohlman.

7

4

5

4 – 20

------

JUNIOR VARSITY FAIRVIEW (18) Cathleen Woenker 1-0-2, Olivia Kime 0-0-0, Christina Gebers 0-0-0, Allie Thompson 0-0-0, Amelia Ankney

1-0-3, Kayla Bauer 4-0-8, Chasity Kittle 0-1-1, Blakelyn Sheets 2-0-4. Totals

7-1-1/4-18.

JEFFERSON (38) Taylor Stroh 3-2-8, Heather Pohlman 0-4-4, Lindsay Deuel 3-0-6, Brooke Gallmeier 0-1-1, Shelby Koenig 1-0-2, Tori Black 1-4-6, Jessica Pimpas 1-0-2, Bailey Gorman 2-0-4, Brooke Hesseling 0-0-0, Jasmine McDougall 2-1-5. Totals 13-0-12/18-38. Score by Quarters:

Fairview

Jefferson 10 12 6 10 - 38 Three-point goals: Fairview, Ankney; Jefferson, none.

5

7

2

6 - 18

LOCAL ROUNDUP

Musketeers sneak by Lady T-Birds LIMA — Fort Jennings

trailed by six entering the fourth period of its girls bas- ketball contest Tuesday night

at Lima Central Catholic’s

Msgr. E.C. Herr Gymnasium. They out- scored the Lady Thunderbirds

20-11 to seize

a 42-39 non-

league triumph. Senior Macy S c h r o e d e r led all scorers with 19 for the Lady Musketeers (3-0), adding five steals and three assists. Cassie Lindeman added 10 for the Orange and Black, who canned 17-of-59 from the floor (3-of-17 down- town) for 28.8 percent; 5-of-7 singles (71.4%); and 12 turn- overs. They visit Bluffton 1 p.m. Saturday. The Lady Thunderbirds (1-1) received 10 markers from Sydney Santaguida, who added three thefts. Sydney Mohler added eight boards. They connected on 17-of-49 shots (34.7%), including 0-of-12 long range, and also 5-of-7 from the line (71.4%). They had 21 boards but 17 turnovers.

FORT JENNINGS (42) Macy Schroeder 4-3-2-19, Ashley Gable 1-0-0-2, Cassie Lindeman 5-0- 0-12, Gabbi German 2-0-1-5, Emily Kehres 1-0-2-4, Gina Stechschulte 1-0-0-2. Totals 14-3-5/7-62. LIMA CENTRAL CATHOLIC (39) Sydney Santaguida 5-0-0-10, Meredith Shepherd 4-0-0-8, Elizabeth Kidd 1-0-1-3, Sydney Mohler 3-0-0-6, Shelby Warner 2-0-1-5, Kayla Verhoff

1-0-3-5, Shanna Farler 1-0-0-2. Totals

Kayla Verhoff 1-0-3-5, Shanna Farler 1-0-0-2. Totals 17-0-5/7-39. Score by Quarters: Fort Jennings 4 4

17-0-5/7-39.

Score by Quarters:

Fort Jennings 4

4

14

20 - 42

Lima Cent. Cath. 6

9

13

11 - 39

JV score: Fort Jennings won.

----

Lady Lancers ride third-quarter blitz over Hicksville 58-43 By JIM COX DHI Correspondent sports@timesbulletin.com HICKSVILLE - After an ugly first half by both teams, Lincolnview played a beauty of a third quarter and took a 58-43 win over Hicksville in girls basketball action Tuesday night.

The Lady Lancers are now 2-0, the Lady Aces 0-3. After the third quarter started with a Hicksville free throw to put the home team on top 19-17, the visitors went

on a 22-4 blitz — triggered by the Lancer defense (12 Ace turnovers in the period) — to turn the game around at 39-23 with 2:02 on the clock: a Katie Dye free throw, 17-foot corner

swisher by Claire Dye, Kaylee Thatcher freebie, slicing layup by Katie Dye, Thatcher layup (assist Katie Dye), nothing- but-net trey from the right wing by Julia Thatcher, Kaylee Thatcher layup (assist by Hannah McCleery), Katie Dye layup, Kaylee

T h a t c h e r

layup, another wing three by Julia Thatcher and two Julia Thatcher free throws. It wasn’t over, however. The Aces’ sharp-shooting sophomore, Rachel Schroeder

(16 second-half points), came alive to lead a run that closed the gap to 43-36 with 4:51 remaining in the game. At that point, though, Lincolnview took control for the final time, getting an elbow bas- ket by Kaylee Thatcher, steal and layup by McCleery, two Claire Dye free throws, an old-style 3-point play from Katie Dye and a Kaitlyn Brant layup (assist Julia Thatcher). With the score 54-40 and only 1:56 remaining, there was no longer any doubt. The first half (18-17, Hicksville) should probably best be forgotten but the stats were noteworthy for their ugliness. In the first 16 min- utes, the Lancers shot 6-for-29 (21%) from the field and com- mitted 16 turnovers. The only good stat for the visitors was

a 21-12 edge on the boards.

Hicksville was 7-of-21 (33%) from the field with 14 turn- overs. The Aces’ 5-10 swing player, McKenzie Gonwick, the only senior on Hicksville’s

player, McKenzie Gonwick, the only senior on Hicksville’s roster, had nine points by then. However, she

roster, had nine points by then. However, she would not be a factor in the second half. “We were being a little too unselfish, making too many passes,” said Lancer coach Dan Williamson. “The girls had shots in the paint, or they had driving lanes, and they wouldn’t take it. Obviously, our passing was not very good but they (the Aces) did a nice job of controlling the tempo. They wanted to slow it down and it was really effective in the first half.” In contrast to the first half, Williamson had to love the third quarter numbers for his team - 8-for-15 field goal shooting and only four turn-

overs, while the defense was wreaking havoc on the Aces’ backcourt. “In the third quarter, their press was huge for us,” explained Williamson. “I think we’ll do well when teams try to press us. We have the guards who can handle that and can make the right deci- sion. We got some layups and that gave us some confidence. Until then, we weren’t making any shots.” Despite the brick-shooting contest in the first half, both teams came up with some decent numbers. Hicksville ended at 40 percent (16-of- 40) from the field, while Lincolnview shot at a 34 percent (20-of-58) clip. The Lancers were hot from the stripe - 75 percent (15-of-20); the Aces were not - 53 percent (10-of-19). Hicksville boarded better in the second 16 min- utes, ending up with only a 27-29 rebounding deficit, but the Aces committed 32 mis- cues to the Lancers’ 22. Lincolnview got balanced scoring from four starters - Julia Thatcher (14), Katie Dye (14), Kaylee Thatcher (13)

and Claire Dye (11). There was little balance for Hicksville, with Schroeder and Gonwick hitting for 19 and 14. Lincolnview visits Ottoville

1 p.m. Saturday (JV tip).

Lincolnview (58) Kaylee Thatcher 5 3-6 13, Claire Dye 3 4-4 11, Katie Dye 5 4-5 14, Kaitlyn Brant 2 0-0 4, Julia Thatcher 4 4-5 14, McCleery 1 0-0 2, Stemen 0 0-0 0, Springer 0 0-0 0, Teman 0 0-0 0. Totals 20 15-20 58. Hicksville (43) Monroe 1 0-0 2, Hablawetz 1 1-2 3, Sell 0 0-0 0, Gonwick 6 2-8 14, Schroeder 6 6-7 19, Burris 1 0-0 2, Shock 0 0-0 0, Demland 0 0-0 0. Totals 16 10-19 43. Score by quarters:

Lincolnview 9 8 22 19 - 58 Hicksville 10 8 9 16 - 43 Three-point field goals:

Lincolnview 3 (Julia Thatcher 2, Claire Dye), Hicksville 1 (Schroeder).

-----

Second quarter

lifts Lady Bulldogs COLUMBUS GROVE –

C o l u m b u s

Grove used

a strong sec-

ond quarter

T u e s d a y

night to

e Hardin Northern 60-23 in a non-league girls contest. The Bulldogs had a 14-8 lead after the opening quar-

ter before breaking the game open with a 24-3 scoring run

in the second quarter. Hardin

Northern (0-1) was never able to recover after the second quarter. Rachel Schumacher led the Bulldogs with 13 points and eight rebounds and Sammi Stechschulte had 10 points and nine rebounds. Sydney McCluer had nine points and three assists. Columbus Grove owned the boards in this game, out- rebounding the Polar Bears

45-13.

d

a

t

in this game, out- rebounding the Polar Bears 45-13. d a t e f Kylee Hooker

e

f

Kylee Hooker and Chelsey Delong both had eight points for the Polar Bears. Brooklyn Watts pulled down four rebounds. Columbus Grove made it

a clean sweep Tuesday night, winning the junior varsity contest 47-4. Kyra Yinger had 11 points for the junior Bulldogs and Watts had three points for Hardin Northern. Grove visits Elida 6 p.m.

See ROUNDUP, page 7

ALL-OHIO DIVISION III/IV

The Associated Press COLUMBUS — The 2012 Associated Press Division III and IV All-Ohio high school football teams based on the recommendations of a state media panel:

DIVISION III First Team

OFFENSE: Ends—Jordan Lauf, Napoleon, 6-5, 191, sr.; Matt Iammarino, Chagrin Falls, 5-7, 145, jr.; Nelson Perry, Peninsula Woodridge, 5-11, 155, sr.; Skylar Schwarzel, The Plains Athens, 5-10, 155, sr. Linemen—Stephen Ericksen, Carrollton, 6-4, 275, sr.; Lucas Kolbe, Napoleon, 6-3, 235, sr.; Geno Zappa, Sandusky Perkins, 6-5, 275, sr.; Evan Grosel, Mentor Lake Cath., 6-4, 300, sr. Quarterbacks—Malik Zaire, Kettering Alter, 6-2, 190, sr.; Tommy Iammarino, Chagrin Falls, 6-0, 208, sr.; Mason Mamarella, Dover, 5-11, 165, sr.; Jalen Santoro, Bellevue, 6-0, 155, sr. Backs—Dymonte Thomas, Alliance Marlington, 6-1, 190, sr.; Layne Perone, Millersburg W. Holmes, 6-0, 205, jr.; Denzel Norvell, Dayton Thurgood Marshall, 5-9, 170, sr.; Jack Campbell, Chagrin Falls, 5-10, 210, jr. Kicker—Hunter Niswander, Peninsula Woodridge, 6-4, 218, sr. DEFENSE: Linemen—John Stepec, Mentor Lake Cath., 6-3, 230, sr.; Brandon Flucas, Dayton Thurgood Marshall, 6-2, 230, sr.; Demetrius Farmer, Dover, 6-2, 265, sr.; Andrew Lorenz, Cols. Watterson, 6-3, 280, sr.; Gabe Snyder, Millersburg W. Holmes, 6-5, 210, sr.; Aaron Adkins, Akron SVSM, 6-0, 215, jr.; Bryant Schlade, Napoleon, 6-0, 191, jr.; Richard Johnson, Cleve. John Hay, 6-2, 240, sr. Linebackers—Ty Warnimont, Gallipolis Gallia Acad., 5-9, 170, jr.; Dante Booker, Akron SVSM, 6-4, 215, jr.; Quentin Poling, Elida, 6-1, 210, sr.; Courtney Love, Youngs. Mooney, 6-1, 230, sr.; Dan Kuenzig, Chagrin Falls, 6-0, 220, sr. Backs—Marcus McWilson, Youngs. Mooney, 6-0, 200, sr.; Fransohn Bickley, Akron SVSM, 5-6, 145, sr.; Brandon Poncsak, Bryan, 6-2, 163, jr.; Nick Raifsnider, Bellevue, 5-10, 155, sr. Punter—Jake Morgan, Sheffield Brookside, 5-9, 158, jr. Offensive players of the year:

Tommy Iammarino, Chagrin Falls; Mason Mamarella, Dover; Jalen Santoro, Bellevue. Defensive players of the year:

Brandon Flucas, Dayton Thurgood Marshall; Dante Booker, Akron SVSM. Coaches of the year: Tory Strock, Napoleon; Craig Clarke, Zanesville Maysville. Second Team OFFENSE: Ends—Tyler Peterson, Uhrichsville Claymont, 5-11, 195, sr.; Noah Mallen, Canton South, 6-2, 180, sr.; Brandon Stinson, Elida, 6-3, 180, sr.; Trey Guilliam, Defiance, 5-9, 170, jr.; Tim Helton, Chardon Notre Dame- Cathedral Latin, 6-2, 190, sr. Linemen—Jay Grote, Delaware Buckeye Valley, 6-0, 195, sr.; Connor Sharp, Beloit W. Branch, 6-4, 301, sr.; Johnny Glas, Norton, 6-1, 230, jr. Quarterbacks—David Fraley, Granville, 6-0, 185, sr.; Joe Burrow, The Plains Athens, 6-3, 170, soph. Backs—Brenden Wells, Beloit W. Branch, 5-10, 194, sr.; Vincent Rambo, Cols. Independence, 5-10, 165, sr.; Drew McArtor, Newark Licking Valley, 6-2, 180, sr.; Trae Williams, The Plains Athens, 5-10, 180, soph.; Brad Smith, Clyde, 5-8, 185, sr. Kicker—Ed Shelley, Chagrin Falls, 6-0, 182, jr. DEFENSE:Linemen—Chance Weitz, Elida, 5-10, 165, jr.; Matt Markley, Chagrin Falls, 6-5, 235, jr.; Cole Clark, Circleville Logan Elm, 6-3, 229, sr. Linebackers— Zack Hofecker, Oberlin Firelands, 6-0, 220, sr.; Thomas Glick, Clyde, 6-1, 225, sr.; Aaron Mawhirter, Sandusky Perkins, 6-3, 220, sr.; Max Westhoven, Napoleon, 5-11, 189, sr.; Antonio Garnett, Cin. Taft, 5-10, 190, sr. Backs— Semaj Steele, Cin. Taft, 5-9, 165, sr; Chad Sonkin, Pepper Pike

Orange, 5-8, 165, sr.; Shawn Kirk, Alliance Marlington, 5-11, 185,

jr.; Mark Malone, Chardon Notre Dame-Cathedral Latin, 5-8, 150, sr.; Andy Barbaur, Bay Village

Bay, 5-9, 180, sr. Punter—Nathan Delozier, Philo, 5-9, 145, jr.

Third Team OFFENSE: Ends—Jerald Spohn, New Lexington, 6-1, 175, sr.; Luke Vadas, Hunting Val. Univ. School, 6-1, 180, sr.; Will Carter, Pepper Pike Orange, 6-1, 170, sr.; A.J. Branisel, Chardon Notre Dame-Cathedral Latin, 6-4, 225, sr. Linemen—Austin Perry,

Bellevue, 6-3, 280, sr.; Alex Daoust, Bryan, 6-0, 213, sr.; Grant Lingafelter, Chagrin Falls, 6-5, 270, sr.; Frank Estep, Vermilion, 6-3, 310, sr. Quarterbacks— Alex Young, Wintersville Indian Creek, 6-4, 210, sr.; Wade Jarrell, Gallipolis Gallia Acad., 6-0, 160, jr.; Austin Schimmoeller, Bryan, 6-2, 175, jr. Backs—Dashon Redman, Steubenville, 5-11, 215, sr.; Tanner Lawrence, Urbana, 5-11, 175, sr.; David Stewart, Struthers, 6-0, 210, sr.; Nick Evans, Chardon Notre Dame- Cathedral Latin, 5-9, 170, sr.; Scott Davidson, Jefferson Area, 5-8, 175, sr. Kicker—Pat DiSalvio, Cin. McNicholas, 5-11, 180, sr. DEFENSE: Linemen—Shane Evan, Poland Seminary, 6-0, 260, sr.; Bennett Brown, Clyde, 5-10, 250, sr.; Tashaun Chavis, Pepper Pike Orange, 6-0, 230, sr. Linebackers—Trevor Hardesty, Cambridge, 5-11, 200, jr.; Josh

Kenny, Canton South, 6-1, 225, sr.; Jake Jones, Bryan, 6-0, 200, jr.; Steve Burns, Bay Village Bay, 5-10, 185, sr.; Michael Dickey, Rocky River, 6-0, 190, sr. Backs—Jalen Fox, Cin. Wyoming, 5-11, 180, jr.; JD Demkowicz, Cambridge, 5-9, 155, sr.; Daivon Barrow, Cols. Eastmoor Acad., 6-0, 205, sr.; Sayyid Kanu, Cols. DeSales, 5-10, 175, jr. Punter—

Quincy Colvin, Cols. Eastmoor Acad., 5-10, 208, fresh. Special Mention (Local) Clark Etzler, Elida. DIVISION IV First Team OFFENSE: Ends—Frank Catrine, Middletown Fenwick, 6-0, 185, jr.; Dan Monteroso, St. Clairsville, 6-3, 180, sr.; Brady Berger, Creston Norwayne, 6-2, 195, sr.; Jacob Matuska, Cols. Hartley, 6-4, 240, sr. Linemen— Caleb Barb, Creston Norwayne, 5-11, 180, sr.; Brady Taylor, Cols. Ready, 6-5, 255, sr.; Jared McCray, Minford, 6-6, 310, jr.; Nick Keller, Genoa, 6-0, 235, sr.; Matt Samuelson, Ottawa-Glandorf, 6-3, 225, sr.; Quentin Horton, Lorain Clearview, 6-0, 220, sr. Quarterbacks—Trent Williamson, Williamsport Westfall, 5-10, 205, sr.; Matt Kinnick, St. Clairsville, 6-1, 180, sr.; Joe Dreher, Creston Norwayne, 6-2, 165, jr. Backs— Ja’Wuan Woodley, Cols. Hartley, 5-10, 220, sr.; Jon Zimmerly, Creston Norwayne, 5-10, 195, sr.; Tristan Parker, Ottawa-Glandorf, 6-2, 200, sr.; Kyle Nutter, Genoa, 5-11, 214, sr.; Chad Anderson, Lorain Clearview, 5-11, 190, sr. Kicker—Cody Pickard, Genoa, 5-8, 146, soph. DEFENSE: Linemen—Trent Smart, Clarksville Clinton-Massie, 6-4, 235, sr.; Isaiah Blevins, Richwood N. Union, 6-4, 265, sr.; Aaron Stephens, Ironton, 6-3, 210, sr.; Wyatt Karhoff, Ottawa-Glandorf, 6-5, 250, sr.; Kalil Morris, Cols. Hartley, 6-3, 225, jr. Linebackers—Evan Nichols, Perry, 6-1, 205, sr.; Nick Pelegreen, Cadiz Harrison Central, 6-4, 210, sr.; Michael Ferns, St. Clairsville, 6-3, 220, sr.; Corbin Grassman, Johnstown-Monroe, 6-2, 205, sr.; Darrien Howard, Dayton Chaminade-Julienne, 6-2, 250, sr. Backs—Dorian Williams, Streetsboro, 5-11, 190, sr.; Caleb Siefker, Ottawa-Glandorf, 6-3, 190, sr.; Justin Taylor, Elyria Cath., 5-10, 165, soph.; Cody Schau, Martins Ferry, 6-3, 170, sr. Punter—Nick Peyakov, Akron Manchester, 6-3, 215, sr. Offensive player of the year:

Ja’Wuan Woodley, Cols. Hartley. Defensive players of the year:

Trent Smart, Clarksville Clinton- Massie. Coaches of the year: Cliff Walton, Gates Mills Hawken; Brett McLean, St. Clairsville; Joe Harbour, Creston Norwayne. Second Team OFFENSE: Ends—Ty Black, Waynesville, 6-1, 175, sr.; Justin Sawmiller, Kenton, 6-1, 175, jr.; Gerell Williams, Lorain Clearview, 6-4, 170, jr.; Kyle Kearney, Wooster Triway, 6-5, 195, sr. Linemen—Jake Hanzel, Akron Manchester, 6-2, 235, jr.; Derek Reiman, Ottawa-Glandorf, 6-5, 290, sr.; Joe Mirabito, Gates Mills Hawken, 6-0, 200, sr.; Dakota Tallman, Elyria Cath., 6-4, 285, jr. Quarterbacks—Isaac Brabson, Piketon, 6-1, 180, sr.; Ryan Smoyer, Tontogany Otsego, 6-4, 195, sr.; Jeremy Holley, Elyria Cath., 6-5, 205, jr. Backs—Patrick Lewis, Ironton, 5-10, 175, sr.; Jaylon Brown, St. Clairsville, 5-8, 155, jr.; Bayle Wolf, Clarksville Clinton-Massie, 6-1, 200, jr.; Ryan Mosora, Brookfield, 5-11, 185, sr.; Donyelle Simpson, Heath, 5-11, 175, sr.; David Nay, Galion, 6-0, 205, sr.; Kicker—Callum Jones, Clarksville Clinton-Massie, 5-10, 145, soph. DEFENSE: Linemen—Matt Fitchet, Ashtabula Edgewood, 6-5, 230, jr.; Michael Dieter, Genoa, 6-4, 278, jr.; Brad Topp, Carlisle, 6-2, 205, sr.; Troy Blair, Byesville Meadowbrook, 6-1, 250, sr. Linebackers—Sam Groff, Magnolia Sandy Valley, 6-1, 195, sr.; Chad Reed, Creston Norwayne, 5-9, 185, sr.; Tyler Smith, W. Salem Northwestern, 5-8, 180, jr.; Nate Cass, Galion, 5-11, 185, sr. Backs—Mitch Knieriem, Creston Norwayne, 5-9, 160, sr.; Luke Cline, Williamsport Westfall, 6-0, 152, sr.; Conner Riddell, Elyria Cath., 6-0, 145, jr. Punter—Cody Brewer, Massillon Tuslaw, 6-3, 195, sr. Third Team OFFENSE: Ends—Jamar Dukes, Akron Manchester, 6-4, 190, sr.; Dareian Watkins, Galion, 6-2, 195, jr.; C.J. Conrad, LaGrange Keystone, 6-4, 210, soph.; Alex Sommers, Brooklyn, 6-2, 170, sr. Linemen—Dylan Richards, Ontario, 6-2, 260, sr.; Dakota Crawford, Johnstown- Monroe, 6-3, 315, sr.; Tyler Schaffer, Cols. Hartley, 6-0, 225, sr.; Jake Weaver, Clarksville Clinton-Massie, 6-4, 225, sr.; Wesley Martin, West Milton Milton- Union, 6-3, 295, jr.; Aaron Honious, Brookville, 6-1, 250, sr.; Will Steur, Cin. Madeira, 6-5, 300, sr. Quarterbacks—Grant Sherman, Kenton, 6-4, 200, jr.; Jason Kish, Fairview Park Fairview, 5-11, 148, jr. Backs—Marcellus Calhoun, Cols. Hartley, 5-11, 175, sr.; Dylan McCaleb, Ashtabula Edgewood, 5-10, 190, sr.; Maurtice Hython, Cadiz Harrison Cent., 5-8, 205, sr.; Jake Davis, Gnadenhutten Indian Valley, 5-9, 209, soph. Kicker—Grant Brown, Amanda- Clearcreek, 5-10, 150, sr. DEFENSE: Linemen—Ian Baker, Upper Sandusky, 6-2, 235, sr.; David Smith, Elyria Cath., 6-4, 275, sr.; Billy Miller, Perry, 6-1, 245, sr.; Andrew McDulin, Cin. Madeira, 6-2, 215, sr.; Jesse Simpson, West Milton Milton- Union, 6-2, 220, sr. Linebackers— Jimmy Quinlan, Brookfield, 6-2, 185, sr.; Tylor Pritchard, Upper Sandusky, 6-3, 200, jr.; Matt Bahr, Kenton, 6-1, 205, jr.; Anthonie Magda, Ashtabula Edgewood, 5-9, 180, jr.; Ramir Hollis, Cin. North College Hill, 6-2, 187, sr. Backs—Kelly Culbertson, Cols. Ready, 5-9, 165, jr.; Nick Sadinsky, Johnstown-Monroe, 6-0, 190, sr.; Robert Boston, Norwood, 6-1, 175, sr.; Ja’mel Sanders, Dayton Chaminade-Julienne, 6-1, 200, sr.; Nick Browning, Hamilton Badin, 5-9, 170, sr. Punter—Ian Kovacs, Elyria Cath., 6-1, 200, sr. Special Mention (Local). Andrew Garland, Lima Bath; Caleb Halsey, Kenton.

l

l

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

The Herald — 7

Wednesday, November 28, 2012 The Herald — 7 T OP 25 CAPSULES The Associated Press Men’s

TOP 25 CAPSULES

The Associated Press Men’s BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Cody Zeller scored 20 points, grabbed eight rebounds, was 8-of-13 from the field and dominated the middle, leading No. 1 Indiana to its most impressive vic- tory this season — a stunning 83-59 rout over No. 14 North Carolina on Tuesday night. It was a game that pitted two of the nation’s most storied college programs — they have combined for 10 national titles and 3,767 all-time wins. Dexter Strickland had 14 points, Marcus Paige had 11 and James Michael McAdoo finished with 10 for North Carolina (5-2). Victor Oladipo and Will Sheehey both added 19 points and Jordan Hulls had 13 for Indiana (7-0), which has won 34 consecutive home games in November, dating to a 2005 loss to Duke in the same tournament. No. 3 Michigan 79, No. 18 North Carolina St. 72 ANN ARBOR, Mich. — Trey Burke had 18 points and a career-high 11 assists without a turnover to lead Michigan.

Roundup

Freshman Nik Stauskas led the Wolverines (6-0) with 20 points and Tim Hardaway Jr. added 16. T.J. Warren had 18 points N.C. State (4-2), which trailed 73-58 before going on a 10-0 run. Michigan committed only six turn- overs — four in the first half. N.C. State shot 57 percent from the field but lost its fifth straight game in the ACC-Big Ten challenge. Michigan has committed 10 or fewer turnovers in five of its six games this season. No. 21 MINNESOTA 77, FLORIDA ST. 68 TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Joe Coleman scored 16 points and Rodney Williams added 14 for Minnesota which beat defending Atlantic Coast Conference champion Florida State in the ACC-Big Ten Challenge. Coleman made 8-of-13 field goals and had 12 points in the second half while helping the Gophers build a 58-37 lead. Austin Hollins added 13 points and Andre Hollins had 12 for the Gophers, who never trailed. Elliott Eliason had 10 rebounds.

Minnesota (7-1) led 38-25 at half- time and by as many as 21 points in the second half. The Gophers’ lone loss was to No. 2 Duke in the Battle 4 Atlantis. Reserve Terrance Shannon led

Florida State (4-2) with 14 points and

11 rebounds. Michael Snaer finished

with 12 points and Terry Whisnant and Okaro White both had 10 for the Seminoles. No. 19 COLORADO 85, TEXAS SOUTHERN 80 BOULDER, Colo. — Josh Scott scored the first two baskets of the second overtime for Colorado, which fought back from an early 15-point deficit. The Buffaloes (6-0) withstood a 39-point performance by Omar Strong, who made nine 3-pointers, including three in the extra sessions. Spencer Dinwidde had 24 points

to lead Colorado, which is off to its best start since opening 6-0 in 1989- 90. Scott finished with 18 points and

12 rebounds, Askia Booker added 15

points and Andre Roberson had 11.

Fred Sturdivant had 12 points and

11 rebounds for Texas Southern (1-6).

(Continued from Page 6) Thursday.

Hardin Northern 9-33 2-8 23:

Brianna Campbell 0-1-1; Michaela

Curtis 0-0-0; Shelby Schlatter 2-0-4; Brooklyn Watts 1-0-2; Chelsey Delong 3-1-8; Morgan Madison 0-0-0; Alanna Roth 0-0-0; Rhiannon Ferkins 0-0- 0; Kearston Schlatter 0-0-0; Kylee Hooker 3-0-8. Columbus Grove 19-59 13-16 60: Breanne Halker 3-0-7; Sydney McCluer 4-1-9; Kyrah Yinger 2-0-5; Megan Verhoff 2-0-4; Melissa Amstutz 1-2-4; Annie Schramm 0-0-0; Hope Schroeder 1-0-2; Sammi Stechschulte 3-4-10; Rachel Schumacher 5-2-13; Renee Karhoff 1-4-6; Aubrey Fruchey 0-0-0; Danielle Schramm 0-0-0. Score by Quarters:

Hardin Northern

8

3

7

5 - 23

Columbus Grove 14 24 11 11 - 60 Three-point goals: Hardin Northern 3-11 (Hooker 2, Delong

1); Columbus Grove 3-18 (Halker 1, Schumacher 1, Yinger 1). Rebounds: Columbus Grove 45 (Stechschulte 9, Schumacher 8); Hardin Northern 13 (Watts 4). Turnovers: Hardin Northern 20, Columbus Grove 12. Junior Varsity: Columbus Grove

47-4.

------

Beavers stay perfect at 4-0 with 74-53 win at Oberlin College

OBERLIN — The Bluffton University women’s basketball team used a dominating perfor- mance from junior post Lauren Hutton (New Reigel) to spank Oberlin College 74-53 Tuesday at Philips Gymnasium in the Beavers’ first game away from the Sommer Center. The beat rolled on for Bluffton as the visitors moved to 4-0 for the first time since the 1991-92 cam-

paign. Oberlin lost for just the second time in six games. The home team scored first a minute into the contest and led 6-3 before Bluffton ran off nine straight points and never trailed again. Hutton, who blistered the nets with 9-of-10 shooting from the field, keyed the run with a triple that put the Beavers up 8-6 at the 16:40 mark. She got to the rack for consecutive buckets midway through the first period, making the score 18-13. With starting point guard Taylor Knight (Perrysburg) stuck on the sideline thanks to a pair of early fouls, fellow fresh- man Carolin Baker (Bethel-Tate) did not miss a beat as her layin at the 6:24 mark made the score 22-15. The Yeowomen were still within four (27-23) late in the first stanza before three straight Bluffton hoops in the paint gave the Beavers a comfortable 33-23 advantage at the break. Sophomore Mikayla Coburn (McGuffey/Upper Scioto Valley) and Brooke Ruffer (Stryker) con- verted early in period two, while Hutton dropped in six quick counters as Bluffton opened a 45-30 lead with 14:51 to play. Oberlin trimmed the deficit to just five points (54-49) at the 7:04 mark but triples by Knight and freshman Taylor Whitaker (Mansfield/Lexington) and con- secutive chip shots from Hutton helped Bluffton quash any thoughts of a Yeowomen win.

Whitaker capped the 18-2 jag with a free throw as Bluffton opened a 72-51 lead with a little over a minute to play. A pair of Knight makes at the stripe made the final score 74-53. Hutton missed just one of her 10 shots from the field and she added two freebies for 21 total points. She also ripped down a game-high seven boards. Ruffer came up big, going 6-for-9 from the field for 16 points with five rebounds. Also in double figures was Knight who tallied 11 mark- ers, including a pair of threes. Whitaker had a solid all-around performance with eight points, four rebounds, four assists and a steal. Rachel DeBord (Lebanon) handed out a career-high six dimes in the victory. Bluffton controlled the paint with a 30-18 advantage from in close and the Beavers also showed their depth as the Bluffton bench outscored Oberlin 24-8. The visitors hit 29-of-54 (53.7 percent) from the field, com- pared to 18-of-48 (37.5 percent) for the Yeowomen. The Beavers won the war on the glass (34-23) and they handed out six more assists (17-11) in the victory. The Beavers will look to con- tinue their torrid start when they travel to Franklin College for the Heartland Conference opener on Saturday. The contest is the first of a women’s and men’s double- header in the Spurlock Center. Tipoff is slated for 2 p.m.

NBA GLANCE

The Associated Press EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Brooklyn

9

4

.692

New York

9

4

.692

Philadelphia

9

6

.600

1

Boston

8

6

.571

1 1/2

Toronto

3

12

.200

7

Southeast Division

 
 

W

L

Pct

GB

Miami

10

3

.769

Atlanta

8

4

.667

1 1/2

Charlotte

7

6

.538

3

Orlando

5

8

.385

5

Washington

0

12

.000

9 1/2

Central Division

 
 

W

L

Pct

GB

Milwaukee

7

5

.583

Indiana

7

8

.467

1 1/2

Chicago

6

7

.462

1 1/2

Detroit

4

11

.267

4 1/2

Cleveland

3

12

.200

5 1/2

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Memphis

10

2

.833

1/2

San Antonio

12

3

.800

Houston

7

7

.500

4 1/2

Dallas

7

8

.467

5

New Orleans

4

9

.308

7

Northwest Division

 
 

W

L

Pct

GB

Oklahoma City 11

4

.733

Denver

8

7

.533

3

Utah

8

7

.533

3

Minnesota

6

7

.462

4

Portland

6

8

.429

4 1/2

Pacific Division

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Golden State

8

6

.571

L.A. Clippers

8

6

.571

L.A. Lakers

7

8

.467

1 1/2

Phoenix

7

8

.467

1 1/2

Sacramento

4

10

.286

4

——— Monday’s Results San Antonio 118, Washington 92

Brooklyn 96, New York 89, OT Detroit 108, Portland 101 Milwaukee 93, Chicago 92 Memphis 84, Cleveland 78 Oklahoma City 114, Charlotte 69 Utah 105, Denver 103 New Orleans 105, L.A. Clippers 98

Tuesday’s Results Phoenix 91, Cleveland 78 Philadelphia 100, Dallas 98 Houston 117, Toronto 101 Minnesota 97, Sacramento 89 Indiana 79, L.A. Lakers 77 Today’s Games San Antonio at Orlando, 7 p.m.

Portland at Washington, 7 p.m. Brooklyn at Boston, 7:30 p.m. Charlotte at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. Phoenix at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Dallas at Chicago, 8 p.m. Toronto at Memphis, 8 p.m. Utah at New Orleans, 8 p.m.

Houston at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. New York at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. Minnesota at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Thursday’s Games San Antonio at Miami, 8 p.m. Denver at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.

NBA INDIVIDUAL LEADERS

The Associated Press THROUGH NOV. 27 Scoring

 

G

FG

FT

PTS AVG

Bryant, LAL

15

138

108

416

27.7

Anthony, NYK

13

121

71

342

26.3

Durant, OKC

15

125

115

389

25.9

James, MIA

13

129

51

327

25.2

Harden, HOU

14

107

109

351

25.1

Westbrook, OKC 15

114

68

317

21.1

Mayo, DAL

15

107

55

312

20.8

Aldridge, POR

13

107

54

268

20.6

Bosh, MIA

13

94

73

263

20.2

Pierce, BOS

14

89

75

281

20.1

FG Percentage

 

FG

FGA PCT

 

Chandler, NYK

57

81

.704

Landry, GOL

75

126

.595

Howard, LAL

97

163

.595

Jordan, LAC

61

103

.592

Ibaka, OKC

89

155

.574

Faried, DEN

84

148

.568

Bosh, MIA

94

168

.560

Kaman, DAL

78

143

.545

Horford, ATL

79

145

.545

McGee, DEN

69

127

.543

Rebounds

 

G

OFF DEF TOT AVG

Varejao, CLE

14

81

128

209

14.9

Randolph, MEM 12

60

98

158

13.2

Asik, HOU

14

55

118

173

12.4

Faried, DEN

15

75

95

170

11.3

Jefferson, UTA

15

39

124

163

10.9

Lee, GOL

14

37

115

152

10.9

Hickson, POR

13

54

83

137

10.5

Howard, LAL

15

48

109

157

10.5

Duncan, SAN

15

27

125

152

10.1

Assists

 

G

AST AVG

 

Rondo, BOS

13

178

13.7

Paul, LAC

14

133

9.5

Holiday, PHL

15

136

9.1

Williams, Bro

13

116

8.9

Vasquez, NOR

13

115

8.8

Westbrook, OKC

15

129

8.6

Calderon, TOR

15

117

7.8

Lawson, DEN

15

112

7.5

Teague, ATL

12

87

7.3

Jennings, MIL

12

86

7.2

In 1992, Los Angeles Lakers broadcaster Chick Hearn called his 2,500th consecutive game. He hadn’t missed a broadcast since November 1965.

BOWLING

Tuesday Merchant Nov. 20, 2012

Topp Chalet

28-12

R

C Connections

28-12

Adams Automotive 24-16

Unverferth Mfg.

22-18

Ace Hardware

20-20

Kerns Ford

20-20

Lear’s Martial Arts

18-22

Caballero’s Tavern 16-24 Delphos Sporting Goods 14-26 Men over 200 Denny Dyke 226, Larry Etzkorn 255, Shane Lear 215-201, Bruce VanMetre 235-225, Bruce Haggard 220-212, Mark Biedenharn 215-209, Dan Wilhelm 236-257, Jason Mahlie 233-236-206, Dan Stemen 245-224, Dave Stemen 224-212, David Newman 225-234, John Jones 214, John Allen 202, Jason Wagoner 235-224, Joe Geise 215, Zach Sargent 223-235-238, Russ Wilhelm 202- 211, Shawn Allemeier 245, Kyle Early 300-211, Josh DeVelvis 237-267-236, Jerry Mericle 235, Brock Parsons 232, Jeff Lawrence 212, Pat Mathis 233, Jason Teman 202, Mark Drerup 207-220, Shane Schimmoller 213, Todd Merricle 229-222, Scott Scalf 206-201-234. Men over 550 John Adams 555, Larry Etzkorn 594, Shane Lear 612, Bruce VanMetre 658, Bruce Haggard 569, Mark Biedenharn 605, Dan Wilhelm 688, Jason Mahlie 675, Dan Stemen 657, Dave Stemen 563, David Newman 651, John Jones 554, John Allen 553, Carter Prine 554, Jason Wagoner 624, Joe Geise 588, Zach Sargent 696, Russ Wilhelm 596, Shawn Allemeier 609, Kyle Early 667, Josh DeVelvis 740, Jerry Mericle 584, Brock Parsons 620, Jeff Lawrence 571, Pat Mathis 568, Mark Drerup 610, Todd Merricle 632, Matt Metcalfe 558, Scott Scalf 641.

Wednesday Industrial Nov. 21, 2012

K

& M Tire

30-10

Strayer’s

30-10

Rustic Cafe

22-18

Moeís Dougout

20-20

Topp Chalet

18-22

D

& D Grain

18-22

John Deere

18-22

DRC 13th Frame Lounge

18-22

Delphos Restaurant Supply

14-26

Cabo’s

12-28

Men over 200 Tony Hire 277-216-223, Shawn Stabler 218-218-255, Jeff Kreischer 234-225-233, Butch Prine Jr. 226-224, Clint Harting 227- 224, Mike Rice 206, Bruce Moorman 211, Dan Kleman 203-218, Jeff Rode 213, Dave Knepper 208-246, Bob White 202-233, Charlie Beckner 208, Frank Miller 236-244, Joe Geise 227-236, Charlie Lozano 225, John Allen 228- 203, John Jones 213-235, Coda Henze 251, Terry Trentman 203, Dave Jessee 224-223- 211, Kyle Profit 235-223, Ben Jones 258-222, Lee Schimmoller 225-203, Don Rice 214-206, Shawn Allemeier 247-246-237, Bruce VanMetre

205-261-256.

Men over 550 Tony Hire 716, Shawn Stabler 691, Jeff

Kreischer 692, Butch Prine Jr. 612, Clint Harting 625, Dan Kleman 596, Dave Knepper 640, Bob White 617, Frank Miller 674, Joe Geise 640, Charlie Lozano 553, John Allen 610, John Jones 641, Coda Henze 618, Phil Fetzer 554,

Jr Valvano 555, Dave Jessee 658, Kyle Profit

625, Ben Jones 652, Lee Schimmoller 628, Don Rice 584, Shawn Allemeier 730, Bruce VanMetre 722.

Thursday National Nov. 22, 2012

Westrich

28-4

C

B 97

23-9

K-M Tire

20-12

V

F W

18-14

Erin’s Dream Team

18-14

Wannemachers

17-15

Bowersock Hauling

14-18

First Federal

12-20

D

R C Big Dogs

8-24

Men over 200 Sean Hulihan 224, Rob Ruda 205-207- 227, Kevin Decker 222, Fred Wagner 212-226, Derek Gaskill 243, Dave Moenter 233-216, Randy Fischbach 212, Jason Mahlie 219, Frank Miller 235-211, Tim Koester 279, Carl Beck 244, Brad Thornburgh 212-202, Doug Milligan Sr. 265-216-207, Pat Mathis 278, Dave Knepper 224, Dave Miller 211, Brian Schaadt 203-205, Bruce VanMetre 299, Tom Pratter 233, Mike Herr 225, Dick Mowery 215, Mike Rice 222, Jeff Lawrence 201, John Jones 259, Jerry Mericle 201, Rob Shaeffer 207-214, Jason Wagoner 236-226, Doug Milligan Jr. 203, Ray Geary 205, Rick Schuck 208. Men over 550 Travis Hubert 565, Sean Hulihan 574, Rob

Ruda 639, Kevin Decker 594, Fred Wagner 631, Derek Gaskill 596, Dave Moenter 642, Randy Fischbach 579, Jason Mahlie 567, Frank Miller 630, Tim Koester 654, Carl Beck 584, Brad Thornburgh 566, Doug Milligan Sr. 688, Pat Mathis 584, Dave Knepper 594, Brian Schaadt 604, Bruce VanMetre 688, Tom Pratter 572, Mike Herr 580, Dick Mowery 566, Mike Rice 588, John Jones 648, Jerry Mericle 566,

Rob Shaeffer 610, Jason Wagner 657, Doug Milligan Jr. 559.

Rob Shaeffer 610, Jason Wagner 657, Doug Milligan Jr. 559. B USINESS St. Rita’s Home Medical

BUSINESS

St. Rita’s Home Medical Equipment named HomeCare Elite Top Agency

Information submitted

LIMA — St. Rita’s Home Medical Equipment has announced it has been named a Top Agency of the 2012 HomeCare Elite™, a compi- lation of the top-performing home health agencies in the United States. Now in its sev- enth year, the HomeCare Elite identifies the top 25 percent of Medicare-certified agen- cies and further highlights the top 100 and top 500 agencies overall. Winners are ranked by an analysis of publicly available performance mea- sures in quality outcomes, process measure implemen- tation, patient experience (Home Health CAHPS), qual- ity improvement and financial performance. “The 2012 HomeCare Elite winners demonstrate a commitment to provid- ing patient-centered care and serving as lead- ers in the home health community. Their success offers data-driven proof of being well-managed and high-quality care provid- ers to hospitals, managed care organizations, ACOs and other potential referral partners across the health- care continuum,” said Susan L. Henricks, president and COO of National Research Corporation, the parent com- pany of OCS HomeCare. “Again this year, we updated our methodology to reflect

the rapidly-evolving quality- focused healthcare landscape and national value-based pur- chasing trends.” “HomeCare Elite recogni- tion continues to gain impor- tance given the increased regulatory mandates and the threat of shrinking reim- bursement revenue. Home health agencies that have earned recognition among the HomeCare Elite demonstrated that they not only can adapt to an evolving marketplace but continue to excel in clinical, patient experience, quality improvement, and financial outcomes,” said Marci Heydt, product manager for the post- acute care business group of DecisionHealth. The HomeCare Elite is the only performance recognition of its kind in the profession. The 2012 HomeCare Elite is co-sponsored by National Research Corporation (also known as OCS HomeCare), the leading provider of cross-continuum healthcare metrics and analytics, and DecisionHealth, the publisher of the industry’s most respect- ed independent newsletter Home Health Line. The data used for this analysis were compiled from publicly avail- able information. The entire list of 2012 HomeCare Elite agencies can be download- ed by visiting the National Research Corporation web- site at www.nationalresearch. com.

FREE

basic computer training for adults

Feel comfortable using a computer and the Internet, Be eligible for special Internet and computer offers

Be eligible for special Internet and computer offers Classes are FREE and forming NOW at community

Classes are FREE and forming NOW at community organizations in your area.

and forming NOW at community organizations in your area. Call 855-NOW-I-CAN (669-4226) for local class information

Call 855-NOW-I-CAN (669-4226)

for local class information

Call 855-NOW-I-CAN (669-4226) for local class information Kids Go FREE! COLUMBUS ZOO WILDLIGHTS GETAWAY Packages start

Kids Go FREE!

COLUMBUS ZOO WILDLIGHTS GETAWAY

Packages start at just $99 and include:

FREE kids tickets to Wildlights at the Columbus Zoo

FREE kids meals at Dublin area restaurants

Discounted rates at 6 Dublin Hotels

Book online NOW at www.IrishisanAttitude.com

800/245-8387

Book online NOW at www.IrishisanAttitude.com 800/245-8387 Hurry! Offer expires 12.31.12 Man suing Facebook wants
Hurry! Offer expires 12.31.12
Hurry!
Offer expires
12.31.12

Man suing Facebook wants lawyer to stay

BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — A New York man claiming part ownership of Facebook indicated Tuesday that his lawyer wants off the case because he’s received threats, but he opposed the law- yer’s motion to withdraw. “I appreciate the fear for his own safety that he has and the threats that have been made against him,” Paul Ceglia of Wellsville said during a tele- phone conference to consider Ohio attorney Dean Boland’s request to leave the case. But Ceglia said it would be hard to find another attorney for his 2-year-old lawsuit, especially since his arrest last month on criminal charges accusing him of doctoring and destroying evi- dence to support his Facebook claim. He’s pleaded not guilty. Boland filed the request to withdraw last month, after Ceglia’s arrest on federal charg- es. He detailed his reasons in two private letters to the judge. On Tuesday, Facebook attorney Orin Snyder asked that Boland’s reasons be made pub- lic to determine whether “they might be overblown, exagger- ated or worse.” The judge gave Boland until

Dec. 4 to respond and said he’d rule on the request after that. At least a half dozen lawyers or law firms have withdrawn as Ceglia’s attorney before Boland. Ceglia’s original attorney, Paul Argentieri of Hornell, has stayed on the case in a second- ary role. But he said Tuesday that his own future is uncertain because he’d recently received a subpoena to testify about Ceglia before a grand jury. Snyder, from New York City firm Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, dismissed Ceglia’s suggestion that he’d influenced federal prosecu- tors downstate to bring the crimi- nal charges to better Facebook’s chances in the civil case. In his 2010 lawsuit, Ceglia claims he and Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg signed a soft- ware development contract in 2003 that included a provision entitling Ceglia to half-owner- ship of Facebook in exchange for $1,000 in startup money for Zuckerberg’s then-fledgling idea. Zuckerberg counters the doc- ument he signed had only to do with a street-mapping data- base called Streetfax that Ceglia had hired Zuckerberg, then a Harvard University student, to

help develop. Earlier this year, attorneys for Menlo Park, Calif.-based

Facebook and Zuckerberg filed

a motion to have Ceglia’s law-

suit dismissed, asserting that Ceglia had forged documents, fabricated emails and destroyed

evidence. They also said he had waited too long — six years —

to bring his claim and the statute

of limitations had expired.

TROUBLE BATHING?

TROUBLE BATHING? NEW WALK-IN TUB OR SHOWER LOCAL COMPANY ONE DAY INSTALL ON SALE NOW! CALL

NEW WALK-IN

TUB OR SHOWER

LOCAL COMPANY ONE DAY INSTALL ON SALE NOW! CALL FOR PRICES

EASYBATHINC.COM Toll Free 1-866-425-5591

You Lost a Chunk of Change Last

Year

Billions

in Fact

You Lost a Chunk of Change Last Year Billions in Fact Report Medicare/Medicaid Fraud in Ohio.

Report Medicare/Medicaid Fraud in Ohio. Call: 1-800-488-6070

You can stop Medicare fraud.

It’s as easy as 1

2

3

* PROTECT your Medicare Number

* DETECT Read your Medicare Summary Notice

* REPORT Your Concerns to 1-800-488-6070

1-800-488-6070

Notice * REPORT Your Concerns to 1-800-488-6070 1-800-488-6070 www.proseniors.org ProSeniors.Org No-Cost Legal Hotline

www.proseniors.org

ProSeniors.Org

No-Cost Legal Hotline

WEBB

INSURANCE AGENCY, INC.

HOME • AUTO • BUSINESS • LIFE • HEALTH

AGENCY, INC. HOME • AUTO • BUSINESS • LIFE • HEALTH 1-800-727-1113 212 W. High -

1-800-727-1113

212 W. High - Lima, 419-228-3211 138 N. Main - Bluffton, 419-358-4015

Being HARASSED by DEBT COLLECTOR CALLS?

Under Federal Law, You Can STOP THE CALLS and Make Them PAY YOU and It Won't Cost You a Penny!

AND YOU DO NOT HAVE TO FILE BANKRUPTCY

Listen to Free Recorded Message 24 Hrs/Day

Call: 1-888-484-2104

(TOLL FREE)

Kahn & Associates, LLC – 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste 215, Cleveland, Ohio 44131 Craig A. Kahn (OH Lic. #63988)

STOCKS

Quotes of local interest supplied by EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS Close of business November 27, 2012

Description

Last Price

Change

DJINDUAVERAGE

12,878.13

-89.24

NAS/NMS COMPSITE

2,967.79

-8.99

S&P 500 INDEX

1,398.94

-7.35

AUTOZONE INC.

382.38

-0.55

BUNGE LTD

72.43

-0.76

EATON CORP.

51.05

-0.12

BP PLC ADR

41.35

-0.25

DOMINION RES INC

50.54

-0.11

AMERICAN ELEC. PWR INC

41.45

-0.03

CVS CAREMARK CRP

45.25

-0.05

CITIGROUP INC

35.04

-0.53

FIRST DEFIANCE

16.97

-0.08

FST FIN BNCP

14.72

-0.29

FORD MOTOR CO

11.10

-0.00

GENERAL DYNAMICS

64.96

-0.10

GENERAL MOTORS

25.01

-0.22

GOODYEAR TIRE

11.67

-0.16

HEALTHCARE REIT

59.29

-0.64

HOME DEPOT INC.

64.16

-0.22

HONDA MOTOR CO

32.89

-0.63

HUNTGTN BKSHR

6.17

-0.14

JOHNSON&JOHNSON

68.81

-0.28

JPMORGAN CHASE

40.75

-0.13

KOHLS CORP.

51.16

-0.75

LOWES COMPANIES

35.34

-0.00

MCDONALDS CORP.

85.92

-0.32

MICROSOFT CP

27.08

-0.31

PEPSICO INC.

70.11

+0.11

PROCTER & GAMBLE

68.99

-0.49

RITE AID CORP.

1.00

-0.01

SPRINT NEXTEL

5.63

+0.01

TIME WARNER INC.

46.60

+0.08

US BANCORP

32.10

-0.28

UTD BANKSHARES

10.25

+0.82

VERIZON COMMS

42.98

-0.32

WAL-MART STORES

69.50

-0.41

8 – The Herald

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

www.delphosherald.com

Herald Wednesday, November 28, 2012 www.delphosherald.com Today’s Crossword Puzzle ACROSS 1 Refrain syllables 4

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

ACROSS 1 Refrain syllables 4 Cleopatra’s wooer 8 Flu-ridden 11 Ego ending 12 Mead’s island
ACROSS
1
Refrain syllables
4
Cleopatra’s wooer
8
Flu-ridden
11
Ego ending
12
Mead’s island
13
-- Paulo
14
16
Silence, in a way (2 wds.)
Pt. of GPA
17
Rah-rah speech (2 wds.)
18
Emphatic refusal (2 wds.)
20
Creeping vine
21
Pro vote
22
Chili server
25
Boom
29
Toward shelter
30
Good times
31
-- Tzu
32
Funny Charlotte --
33
Switch positions
34
“I -- -- man with seven
wives”
35
Vacillates
38
Bricklayer
39
Fine (hyph.)
40
Carbondale sch.
41
Column type
44
Alfalfa and clover
48
Part of TNT
49
First appearance
51
Moose kin
52
“48 Hrs.” lead
53
Vocalist -- Sumac
10
Sluggish
37
Time
of
the
mam-
54
Deli bread
12
Barrel part
mals
55
Grabs a bite
15
Serviceable
38
Gnat
56
Showery mo.
19
Boat rower
40
Varieties
21
Itches
41
Livy’s route
DOWN
22
Pie crust ingredient
42
Monsieur’s airport
1
Speech problem
23
Jai --
43
Reebok rival
2
Late tennis great
24
Bug repellent
44
Hat material
3
Traffic sign
25
Grayish horses
45
Gaelic pop star
4
Like crazy
26
Dots in “la mer”
46
Sgt. Preston’s group
5
On a rampage
27
Noted Roman censor
47
Dry up
6
Noisy dispute
28
Zen riddle
50
Extinct bird
7
Kitchen hisser
30
Branch off
8
“-- -- Her Standing There”
34
Bea Arthur sitcom
9
Volcanic emission
36
“Bali --”

Classifieds

Classifieds
Classifieds

www.delphosherald.com

001 Card Of Thanks

Thank you to all the Delphos residents who helped look for our dog, Bailey. Thanks especially to Kevin Osting and the Vonderwell girls for their help.

The Martz Family

010 Announcements

ADVERTISERS: YOU can place a 25 word classified ad in more than 100 news- papers with over one and

a half million total circula- tion across Ohio for $295.

place one

order and pay with one check through Ohio Scan-Ohio Statewide Classified Advertising Net- work. The Delphos Herald advertising dept. can set this up for you. No other classified ad buy is sim-

It's easy

you

pler or more cost effective. Call 419-695-0015, ext

138.

040 Services

LAMP REPAIR Table or floor. Come to our store. Hohenbrink TV.

419-695-1229

080 Help Wanted

CDL Drivers

Regional Positions, 2500-3000 miles per week. Palletized Truck load Van. 2yrs Exp. Req.

CLASS-A

www.risingsunexpress.com

800-288-6168

080 Help Wanted

AND

Restoration

looking for experienced carpenters with tools. Competitive wages. Call

567-712-7384

Company

DEVELOPMENT

HIRING DRIVERS with 5+ years OTR experi- ence! Our drivers average 42cents per mile & higher! Home every weekend! $55,000-$60,000 annually. Benefits available. 99% no touch freight! We will treat you with respect! PLEASE CALL 419-222-1630

OTR SEMI DRIVER NEEDED Benefits: Vacation, Holiday pay, 401k. Home weekends & most nights. Call Ulm!s Inc.

419-692-3951

120 Financial

IS IT A SCAM? The Del-

phos Herald urges our

readers to contact The Better Business Bureau,

or

1-800-462-0468, before entering into any agree- ment involving financing, business opportunities, or work at home opportuni- ties. The BBB will assist in the investigation of these businesses. (This notice provided as a cus- tomer service by The Del- phos Herald.)

(419)

223-7010

Place Your

Ad Today

419 695-0015

Herald.) (419) 223-7010 Place Your Ad Today 419 695-0015 INTERESTED IN SPORTS? WOULD YOU LIKE TO
Herald.) (419) 223-7010 Place Your Ad Today 419 695-0015 INTERESTED IN SPORTS? WOULD YOU LIKE TO
Herald.) (419) 223-7010 Place Your Ad Today 419 695-0015 INTERESTED IN SPORTS? WOULD YOU LIKE TO
Herald.) (419) 223-7010 Place Your Ad Today 419 695-0015 INTERESTED IN SPORTS? WOULD YOU LIKE TO

INTERESTED IN SPORTS?

WOULD YOU LIKE TO EARN SOME EXTRA CASH?

The Delphos Herald is looking for interested applicants who enjoy attending local sporting events and would like to cover them for the Delphos Herald.

We welcome all applicants. We can work with your schedule!

Contact: Jim Metcalfe

419-695-0015,

Extension 133

or by email at

jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com

Extension 133 or by email at jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com 2 9 0 Wanted to Buy Raines Jewelry Cash
Extension 133 or by email at jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com 2 9 0 Wanted to Buy Raines Jewelry Cash
Extension 133 or by email at jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com 2 9 0 Wanted to Buy Raines Jewelry Cash

290 Wanted to Buy

Raines

Jewelry

Cash for Gold

Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry, Silver coins, Silverware, Pocket Watches, Diamonds.

2330 Shawnee Rd. Lima (419) 229-2899

300 Household Goods

FIREPLACE SURROUND Just add insert. Medium oak finish. H50xW56xD23 Very good condition. $90. Call 419-286-2412

SEALY POSTUREPEDIC, Queen adjustable air mat- tress and box springs. New in 2009, pristine con- dition. $600 OBO. Call 419-236-8228 after 4pm.

340 Garage Sales

HUGE VINTAGE JEWELRY SALE. 2 days only! Well over 20,000 pieces. Great jewelry for gift buy- ing at $2 each. Saturday Dec. 1, 10am-8pm, Sun- day Dec. 2, 9am-3pm. St. Augustine’s Church, 210 E. Clinton St., Napoleon, OH. Don’t miss this sale!

590 House For Rent

SMALL 2 Bedroom House for Rent. Washer/Dryer, stove, refrigerator. No Pets and No Smoking.

419-695-6841

600 Apts. for Rent

1 BEDROOM upstairs apartment. Stove and re- frigerator. $300/mo. Call

419-996-9870

810

Auto Repairs/

Parts/Acc.

Midwest Ohio

Auto Parts

Specialist

Windshields Installed, New Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors, Hoods, Radiators 4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima

1-800-589-6830

840