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Summary of Obesity, Nutrition and Physical Activity Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Grant Communities Putting

Prevention to Work
March 19, 2010 Public Health - Seattle & King County (Public Health) applied for $20 million in funds to implement interventions to improve obesity, physical inactivity and poor nutrition through policy, systems and environment changes. We are pleased to announce that our application was selected and the funds awarded total $15.5 million. Public Health will award about $10 million in Communities Putting Prevention to Work (CPPW) funds to partners in media, local government, schools, community organizations, worksites and economic development. Community partner funding will occur through competitive requests for proposals (RFPs) which will be released in mid-April 2010. Public Health will use the following strategies and interventions to support healthy eating: 1. Media: Promote healthy food/drink choices and counter-advertise against less healthy items though mass media campaigns, social media focused on communities affected by health inequities, and school-based counter advertising. 2. Access: Increase healthy food/drink availability and limit unhealthy food/drink availability by promoting nutrition standards in schools, childrens programs and worksites; working to modify zoning policies to increase access to stores selling healthy food and decrease the density of fast food outlets in underserved neighborhoods, supporting vending machine nutrition guidelines, increasing number of small food retailers that sell healthy food through WIC and SNAP; helping immigrant and lowincome people grow food in their communities and sell it to local food retailers; and supporting farms-to-school efforts, increasing availability of healthy foods at worksites. 3. Product placement and attractiveness: Support marketing of healthy items at corner stores, and at schools and worksites. 4. Price: Changing relative prices of healthy vs. unhealthy items by exploring the feasibility of enacting city privilege tax or fee on sugar sweetened beverages, working with interested partners to lower the cost of healthy items relative to less healthy items in cafeterias and vending machines at schools and worksites, and organizing purchase coops at schools, child care and public housing. Active Living Strategies: Public Health proposes to increase active living through strategies that address: 1. Access: Increasing access to safe, attractive, accessible places for activity through joint use agreements for schools and parks; supporting standards for minimum play space, equipment, and duration of play in childrens programs; modifying park and recreation policies to increase low-income and racial/ethnicity access; incorporating healthy community elements in interested cities comprehensive plans; adopting complete street

Public Health-Seattle & King County Obesity Prevention Application summary, 3/19/10

legislation in suburban cities and supporting school siting guidelines so children can walk and bicycle to school. 2. Access: Increase opportunities for physical activity in schools by promoting daily quality physical education, high-quality physical education (PE) standards, curricula, training, certification of PE teachers, and regular recess in grades K-8. 3. Social Support: Increase the number of schools participating in Safe Routes to Schools. Leadership Team and Coalitions: We are delighted with the commitment among high-level King County policy makers to serve on the Leadership Team for Communities Putting Prevention to Work. This Leadership Team will provide guidance on both the obesity and tobacco prevention policy and system changes. Local and state government leaders: Dow Constantine, King County Executive; Mike McGinn, Mayor-Elect, City of Seattle; Suzette Cooke, Mayor, City of Kent; State Senator Karen Keiser (Chair, Committee on Health and Long-term Care); Julia Patterson, King County Council and Chair, Board of Health. Content expert: Brian Saelens, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Washington. Public HealthSeattle & King County Staff; David Fleming, MD, Director, PHSKC; Jim Krieger, MD, MPH, Chief, Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention, PHSKC; Erin MacDougall, PhD, Project Manager, PHSKC. School sector leaders: Maria Goodloe-Johnson, PhD, Superintendent, Seattle Public Schools; one additional Superintendent from a focus community School District. Community leaders: Tom Hansen, MD, President & CEO, Seattle Childrens Hospital and Regional Medical Center; Carol Lewis, Executive Director, Philanthropy Northwest. King County currently has many active coalitions that work to promote healthy eating and active living (HEAL). They include Steps to Health King County (STEPS), Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH), King County Food and Fitness Initiative (KCFFI), King County Physical Activity Coalition, Healthy and Active Rainier Valley Coalition, Community Kitchen Coalition, Great City Coalition, Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities, and City Fruit Coalition. They will bring their extensive network of relationships, community mobilization skills, and knowledge of local needs and opportunities for change.

Funding Mechanisms CPPW provides the opportunity to break through to the next level by paying for a change our goal is to provide our partners with funds to pay the one-time costs for ready-to-go policy, systems and environment changes to improve community health. The financing strategies vary by sector and are as follows: 1. Media. A comprehensive communications strategy will increase public awareness and support for nutrition and physical activity interventions. The media strategy will include mass media (paid/earned) and campaigns to increase awareness of priority interventions.

Public Health-Seattle & King County Obesity Prevention Application summary, 3/19/10

CPPW also will support social media campaigns in focus communities and among ethnic groups and youth. 2. Schools, Community Organizations, and Local Government. Competitive request for proposals (RFPs) will provide funding to partners for priority interventions. Eligible applicants will select from a menu of policy and environment changes for their sector. Half of the RFP funds will go to focus communities. The RFPs will be released in April 2010; with proposals due about four weeks later and awards announced in late June 2010. More information will be at www.kingcounty/health/cppw. 3. Worksites. We will contract with a local expert in worksite wellness to provide technical assistance to businesses to launch worksite health promotion. 4. Economic Development Support. Support for healthy food retail (such as healthy corner stores) will be delivered through a business incentive program managed by the City of Seattle Office of Economic Development (OED). OED will leverage additional funds to support credit enhancement incentive funds (including grants, interest buy-downs, partial equity, and rebates). Together, these interventions and funding mechanisms hold the potential to improve the food environment and physical activity opportunities to communities throughout King County.

Public Health-Seattle & King County Obesity Prevention Application summary, 3/19/10