Anda di halaman 1dari 94

a tour of new features

introducing
RTN 910/950
Dimmensioning
1. MW LINK DESIGN

1.1. The Fundamental Elements of Line-
of-Sight Microwave Radio Systems
1.2. MW LINK DESIGN EXAMPLE

2. RTN 910/ 950 DIMMENSIONING


CONTENT
OBJECTIVES
Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

Follow the steps for a Microwave link design

Outline the steps of RTN910950 service
dimensioning

Implement Ethernet service/CES service
/ATM/IMA services dimensioning

Suggested steps for MWL setup
Page5
The process of establishing a reliable microwave system should include the following
steps.

Step 1: A preliminary engineering study for feasibility and budgetary proposal
purposes.

Step 2: A site survey to determine equipment installation requirements.

Step 3: A field path survey to verify station coordinates, path topology, and any
obstructions.

Step 4: Final system engineering, utilizing verified data from the site and path survey,
to address critical path clearances, reflection analysis, link analysis, and determination
of required antenna heights above ground level.

Step 5: Revision of the initial budgetary proposal into a firm, fixed-price quotation for
the turnkey system.
1.1. The Fundamental Elements of Line-of-
Sight Microwave Radio Systems

Frequency

Wavelength

Free-space Loss

Precipitation Loss

Antenna Gain

Antenna Beam-width

Fresnel zones

Phase Relationships

Multi-path Reflections

Atmospheric Refraction

Earth Bulge
This section covers the basic technical elements that provide a foundation
for understanding line of-sight radio frequency systems. The topics include:
Since microwave frequencies have short
wavelengths, they generally require a
line-of-sight (LOS) propagation path.
They also need clearance for what is
referred to as the 1
st
Fresnel zone,
whose boundaries vary with the
frequency and wavelength of the specific
system.
Microwave Frecuency varies in between
300 GHz - 300 MHz
Frecuency
Frequency Band and Radio Channel
Page8
The common frequency bands :
7G/8G/11G/13G/15G/18G/23G/26G/32G/38G (by
ITU-R rec. )
8 5 4 3 2 10 20 1 30 40 50
1.5 2.5GH
z
region
networks
long-distance
backbone network

area and local network,
boundary network

2
8
34
Mbit/
s
2
8
34
140
155
Mbit/
s
3.3 11 GHz
GH
z
34
140
155
Mbit/
s
Frequency Band and Radio Channel
Page9
The central frequency, T/R spacing and channel spacing are defined in
every frequency band.
f
0
(central freq.)
Frequency scope
Channe
l
spacing
f
1

f
2

f
n
f
1

f
2

f
n

Chann
el
spacing
T/R
spacing
T/R spacing
Low frequency band
High frequency
band
Protection
spacing
Adjacent
T/R
spacing
Protection
spacing
Frequency Band and Radio Channel
Page10
f
0
(7575M)
Frequency scope74257725MHz
28M
f
1
=7442 f
5
f
1

=7596 f
2

f
5

T/R spacing:
154M
f
2
=7470
Freq. scope F0 (MHz) T/R spacing (MHz) channel spacing(MHz) High site / low site
7425--7725 7575 154 28 Fn , Fn
7575 161 7
7110--7750 7275 196 28
7597 196 28
7250--7550 7400 161 3.5
.
Modulation modes for Digital MW
Page11
The microwave carrier is digital modulated by
the baseband signal.
Digital base band signal
Intermedia frequency
(IF) signal
Base band
Signal
rate
Channel
bandwidth
modulation
Service
signal
Modulation modes for Digital MW
Page12
The frequency carrier signal can be described
as:




Amplitude Shift Keying (ASK): A is variable, Wc and are constant
Frequency Shift Keying (FSK): Wc is variable, A and are constant Phase Shift
Keying (PSK): is variable, A and Wc are constant
Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM): A and are variable, Wc is
constant

A*COSWc*t+
Amplitude Frequenc
y
Phas
e
PSK and QAM
are commonly
used in digital
MW
Electromagnetic waves propagate at the speed of light (in free-
space or a vacuum), or 300,000,000 meters per second. As a
result, wavelength in meters can be calculated by dividing the
number 300 by the frequency in MHz.
The density of the transmission medium produces changes in radio
wavelengths; similar to the way it affects speed.





These seemingly small differences can be far more important than they
seem at first, since radio link systems have path lengths that are
measured in miles or kms. Over these distances, the minute
differences in each wavelength become very significant, because of the
vast number of wavelengths required to cover even a single mile
One 2400 MHz wavelength in free-space = 11811/2400 = 4.921 inches
One 2400 MHz wavelength in normal atmosphere = 11811/2400 x .9997 = 4.920 inches
One 2400 MHz wavelength in LMR 400 coax = 11811/2400 x .85 = 4.183 inches

Wavelength
Landform
Page14
The reflection from land affect receiving signal from main direction






4 types of the landform:
A: mountainous region (or the region of dense buildings)
B: foothill (the fluctuation of ground is gently)
C: flatland
D: large acreage of water

Direct
Reflection
Direct
Reflection
Classification of the Fading
Page15

mechanism
Absorption loss
Fading of rain and fog
Scintillation fading
K facter fading
Duct Type fading
Sustained
duration
Received level
Effect
Fast Fading
Slow Fading
Upward Fading
Downward fading
Flat fading
Frequency selective fading
Fading in free space
Fading
Free space attenuation (or loss) increases as frequency goes up,
for a given unit of distance. This occurs because higher
frequencies have shorter wavelengths, and to cover a given
distance; they must complete many more cycles than lower
frequency signals, which have longer wavelength. During each
cycle (wavelength) the signals propagate, some of their energy is
spent.
Where:
FSL= Decibels
F= Frecuency in Mhz
D= Distance betwen end points

32.44 varies depeding on the constant of system losses and
the working units for F and D.
Free-space Loss
Free-space Loss (cont)
Page17
FSL = 92.4 + 20 log d + 20 log f
d = distance in km f = frequency in GHz

Power
Level
PTX = Output power
G = Antenna gain
A = Free space loss
M = Fading Margin
P
TX

distance
GTX GRX

P
RX


A
M
Receiving threshold
G
d
G
f
PRX = Receiving
power
Precipitation Loss
Frequency and wavelength are also affected by precipitation,
which comes in many forms. The detrimental effects of
precipitation vary according to the physical properties of its
form, as well as its wavelength relationship to that of the
particular frequency involved.
Basically, when an objects physical properties
approach wavelength of a particular
frequency, they become highly reflective at
that frequency. Raindrops can easily attain a
dimension of 1/8 inch or more, effectively
becoming multiple reflectors (or more
accurately stated, deflectors) in the path of a
23-GHz signal, while having much less impact
on a 5.8 GHz signal.

However, water droplets of smaller size,
including fog, can become a major
consideration for millimeter wave like over
25Ghz systems.
Precipitation Loss: Rain & Fog
Fading
Page19
Generally, different frequency band has different loss.
less than 10 GHz, its fading caused by rain and fog is
not serious.
over 10 GHz, relay distance is limited by fading caused
by rains.
over 20GHz, the relay distance is only about several
kilometers for the rain & fog fading.

The Fresnel Zones
Creating RF line-of-sight for a microwave path requires more
clearance over path obstructions than is required to establish a
visual line-of-sight. The extra clearance is needed to establish an
unobstructed propagation path boundary for the transmitted
signal, based on its wavelength.
Phase and Its Relationships
Since atmospherically propagated radio signals can take many paths between
one point and another, as in the case of a multi-path reflected signal, it is
possible for them to arrive at the destination in different phase states.

As long as the signals travel a direct path between the antennas, they will arrive
fairly closely in phase with one another, however different paths may end up
with wave cancelling each other.
Atmospheric Refraction
In radio engineering, atmospheric refraction is also referred to as
the K factor, which describes the type and amount of refraction.
For example:

A K factor of 1 describes a condition where there is no refraction
of the signal, and it propagates in a straight line.
A K factor of less than 1 describes a condition where the
refracted signal path deviates from a straight line, and it arcs in
the direction opposite the earth curvature.
A K factor greater than 1 describes a condition where the
refracted signal path deviates from a straight line, and it arcs in
the same direction as the earth curvature.
Atmospheric Refraction: K Factor
Fading
Page23
A equivalent radius: Re=KR (R is the real radius
of earth).
the value of K is depend on the local
meteorological phenomena
R
e
R
Atmospheric Refraction
Page24
Atmosphere absorption mainly affect the microwave
whose frequency is over 12 GHz.
Refraction, reflection, dispersion in the troposphere.
Scattering and absorption loss caused by rain, fog and
snow. It mainly affect the microwave whose
frequency is over 10 GHz.
Multi-Path Propagation and
Fading
Page25
The receiving paths includes direct path and other reflection
paths.
Multi-path fading is caused by the signals interference from
different propagation paths
Ground
Flat Fading
Page26

1 h
Receive
level in
free space
Threshold
(-30dB )
Signal
interruption
Upward
fading
Fast
fading Slow
fading
Frequency Selective Fading
Page27
Frequency selective fading will cause the in-
band distortion and decrease system original
fading margin.
Freq. (MHz)
R
e
c
e
i
v
i
n
g

p
o
w
e
r

(
d
B
m
)

Normal
Flat
Selective fading
Physical Earth Bulge
Line-of-sight radio system engineering must deal with the effects of
earth curvature, or Earth Bulge as it is sometimes called.

Physical Earth Bulge reflects earth curvature only and does not take
into account the effects of atmospheric refraction. For purposes of
line-of-sight radio link design, we must always combine Physical Earth
Bulge with the effects of atmospheric refraction, or K. When these two
parameters are combined, a modified earth bulge profile results, which
is known as Effective Earth Bulge.
Antifading Technologies
Page29
Types Improving effects
Antifading
technologies
related with
device

Adaptive Equalization Wave shape distortion
Cross Polarization Interference
Counteract
Wave shape distortion

Automatic Transmit Power
Control
Power reduction
Forward Error Correct Power reduction
Antifading
technologies
related with
system
Diversity receive technologies
Wave shape distortion
and Power reduction
Automatic Transmit Power
Control
Page30
ATPC is used to reduce interference to adjacent system, upward-fading, DC
power consumption and refine characteristic of residual error rate.
modulator
transmitter
receiver
demodulator
ATPC
receiver
ATPC
transmitter
modulator
demodulator
XPIC
Page31
XPIC is cross-polarization interference
counteracter.
Direction of
electric
field
Horizontal
polarization
Vertical
polarization
Frequency configuration in U6GHz bandITU-R F.384-5

30MH
z
80MHz
60MHz
340 MHz
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

680MH
z

V (H)
H (V)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

30MH
z

80MHz
60MHz
340MH
z
680 MHz
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
V (H)
H (V)
1X 2X 3X 4X 5X 6X 7X 8X
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1X 2X 3X' 4X 5X 6X 7X 8X
Diversity Reception
Page32
Diversity reception is used to minimize the effects of fading. It
includes:
Space diversity (SD)
Frequency diversity (FD)
Polarization diversity
Angle diversity
Antifading Methods:Diversity
Used to avoid Reflection, Refraction and other affecting
features.
f1
f1
f2
Other Antifading Methods
Antenna
Page35
The antenna propagates the electric wave from transmitter
into one direction, and receive the electric wave. Paraboloid antenna and
Kasai Green antenna are usually used.
The common diameter of antenna are: 0.3, 0.6, 1.2, 1.8, 2.4, and 3.0m, etc.
Paraboloid antenna Kasai Green antenna
Antenna (cont.)
Page36
Several channels in one frequency band can share one
antenna.
Tx
Rx
Tx
Rx
Channel Channel
1
1
n
n
1
1
n
n
Antenna Aligning
Page37

Side view
Side
lobe
Rear lobe
Top view
Rear lobe
Side
lobe
Main lobe
Main lobe
Antenna Beam-width
Since antenna gain results from redirecting available radiated
energy in a given direction, the higher the antenna gain of an
antenna in its forward direction, the lower its gain in other
directions. Thats why larger antennas with higher gain are
more directional. Consequently, they are often used to solve
interference problems when the interference source may be
located off-azimuth from the affected system path.
Half power angle
Half power angle (3 dB beam width)
From the main lobe deviates to both sides,
the points where the power decrease half
are half power point. The angle between
the two half power points is half power
angle.

Approximate calculation formula is:

D

u ) 70 ~ 65 (
0 0
5 . 0
=
Antenna Specifications (cont.)
Page39
Cross polarization discrimination (XPD)
The suppressive intensity of power received from expected polarization (Po) to
the other polarization (Px). It should more than 30db. Formula is:
XdB10lgPo/Px
Antenna protection ratio
It is the ratio of the receiving attenuation in antenna other lobes to the
receiving attenuation in antenna main lobe. The 180 degree antenna
protection ratio also be called as the front / rear protection ratio.
Antenna Gain
The input power ratio of isotropic antenna (Pio) to surface antenna (Pi)
when getting the same electric field intensity at the same point.
It can be calculated by formula( unit: dB) :


q

t
-
|
.
|

\
|
= =
2
D
P
P
G
i
io
An antenna with a large aperture has more gain than a smaller one; just as it captures
more energy from a passing radio wave, it also radiates more energy in that direction.
Side view
Side
lobe
Rear lobe
Top view
Rear lobe
Side
lobe
Main lobe
Main lobe
n: antenna efficiency
D :antenna Diameter
Antenna Gain


Gain antenna in terms of frequency
G= 17.8 + 20 log (f * D)

Where

f = Frequency in GHz
D= Diameter of MW antenna in meters.

Outdoor Unit
Page42
The main specifications of transmitter
Working frequency band:
One ODU can cover one frequency band or some part of a frequency
band.
Output power:
The power at the output port of transmitter.
The typical range of power is from 15 to 30 dBm.
Outdoor Unit (cont.)
Page43
The main specifications of transmitter (cont.)
Frequency stability
The oscillation frequency stability of microwave device is from 3 to 10
ppm.
Transmitting frequency spectrum frame
A restricted frequency scope is frequency spectrum frame.
Outdoor Unit (cont.)
Page44
The main specifications of receiver
Work frequency band:
The receiving frequency of local station is the same with the remote
station.
Frequency stability
The requirement is from 3 to 10ppm.
Noise Figure
The noise figure of digital microwave receiver is from 2.5 to 5dB.
Receive Signal Level (RSL)
RSL: Receive signal level (dBm)
Po = output power of the transmitter (dBm)
Lctx, Lcrx = Loss (cable,connectors, branching unit) between
transmitter/receiver and antenna(dB)
Gatx, Garx = gain of transmitter/receiver antenna (dBi)
FSL = free space loss (dB)

Link feasibility
Receiver sensitivity threshold is the signal
level at which the radio runs continuous
errors at a specified bit rate
Path Profile

A Path profile is a graphic representation of the path traveled by the radio waves
between the to ends of a link. The Path Profile determines the location and height
of the antenna at each end of the link. All of the previously mentionated concepts
are meant so you can decicie a working frecuency or set of frecuency, Antifading
methods to be applied and the required equipment to be used.
Basic
Recommendations
Use higher frequency bands for shorter hops and
lower frequency bands for longer hops
Avoid lower frequency bands in urban areas
Use star and hub configurations for smaller
networks and ring configuration for larger
networks
In areas with heavy precipitation , if possible, use
frequency bands below 10 GHz.
Use protected systems (1+1) for all important
and/or high-capacity links
Leave enough spare capacity for future expansion
of the system

MW LINK design example
Considerations
Frequencies GHz
1 18
2 23
3 32
Consideration Considered Value
Antena Height 5 mts
Antena 0, 6 meters
RSL THRESHOLD -80 dB
1.Site Location
Page50
You have the following situation.
We are required to design a microwave link for the
new traffic between this two existing Radio Stations
19 13' 9.744"N
99 15' 0.367"W
19 16' 10.613"N
99 2' 52.386"W
2.Make a path profile
Page51
The Survey team has develop the following Path
Profile for a default antenna height of 5m
Distance(Km)
3.Calculate D (Km)
Page52

2
+
2
=
2

Dx : distancia entre el sitio A y el sitio B
Dy: altura antena sitio B + altura terreno B- altura terreno A
4.Following Calculations
Calculate FSL

Calculate Presipitation Loss

Other Interference conditions like Refraction, Reflection
and if Necesary Earth Bugel
4.Calulating FSL
Page54
5.Calulating Fresnel zone
FSL AND FRESNEL ZONE
FSL per frequency:
f1::144,4039037
f2::146,5330103
f3::149,4014532

Fresnel1 per frequency:
F1:: 9,5706736
F2:: 8,46671303
F3:: 7,1780052
6. Calculate Link Budget
Once you define the enviromental conditions onf the microwave link, you
can define the features of your microwave link in terms of Power,
frecuency, Antenna Gain, Fading Cancellation Techniques, Receiver
sensitivity thresholdand , system gain so on.

System gain depends on the modulation used
(2PSK, 4PSK, 8PSK, 16QAM, 32QAM,
64QAM,128QAM,256QAM) and on the design
of the radio

6.Link Budget
Imagine you have only one sized of antenas of 0.6m
and the threshold for the Receivers Level is -80dB

Calculate the require Po for the minimum Feasible
Link if there is no Considerable Cable Lost in any of
the Radio Stations.

f = Frequency in GHz
D= Diameter of MW antenna in meters.

7. Results
Frecuency FSL Fresnel Zone1
Antenna
Gain Po Feasible
18Ghz 144,40dB 9,570m 38,46dBi -12.54 dBm
23Ghz 146,53dB 8,46m 40,59dBi -16,80 dBm
32Ghz 149,40dB 7,17m 43,46dBi -22.53 dBm
RTN910/950 DIMMENSIONING
Page61
Contents
1. Service Types of RTN910950
2. Dimmensioning NE
3. Dimmensioning the Ethernet Service
4. Dimmensioning the CES Service
5. Dimmensioning the ATM/IMA Service
Page62
Service Types of RTN910950
Ethernet service
E-Line service
UNI-UNI E-Line service
UNI-NNI E-Line service carried by port
UNI-NNI E-Line service carried by PW
UNI-NNI E-Line service carried by QinQ link
E-Aggr service
UNI-UNI E-Aggr service
UNI-NNI E-Aggr service carried by port
UNI-NNI E-Aggr service carried by PW on the network side
Page63
Service Types of RTN910950 (Cont.)
CES TDM service
UNI-UNI CES service
UNI-NNI CES service
ATM/IMA service
UNI-UNI ATM/IMA service
UNI-NNI ATM/IMA service

Page64
Contents
1. Service Types of RTN910950
2. Dimensioning NE
3. Dimensioning the Ethernet Service
4. Dimensioning the CES Service
5. Dimensioning the ATM/IMA Service
Page65
Dimensioning IDU 910
Item Performance
Chassis height 1U
Pluggable Supported
Number of microwave directions is 01-02
RF configuration mode 1+0 non-protection configuration
2+0 non-protection configuration
1+1 protection configuration
XPIC configuration
Table 1 RF configuration modes
Configuration Mode Maximum Number of
Configurations
1+0 non-protection configuration 2
1+1 protection configuration (1+1
HSB/FD/SD)
1
2+0 non-protection configuration 1
XPIC configuration 1
Page66

Dimensioning IDU 910

Page67
Dimensioning IDU 910

Page68
Dimensioning IDU 910
Page69
Dimensioning IDU 950
Table 1 Introduction of the IDU 950
Item Performance
Chassis height 2U
Pluggable Supported
Number of microwave directions is 01-06
RF configuration mode 1+0 non-protection configuration
N+0 non-protection configuration (N 5)
1+1 protection configuration
XPIC configuration
Table 1 RF configuration modes
Configuration Mode Maximum Number of
Configurations
1+0 non-protection
configuration
6
1+1 protection configuration
(1+1 HSB/FD/SD)
3
N+0 non-protection
configuration (N 5)
3 (N = 2)
2 (N = 3)
1 (N 4)
XPIC configuration 3

Page70
Dimensioning IDU 950
Page71
IF Board -- Board Installation
IDU 910
IDU 950
Slot5
PIU
Slot3 IFE2
SLOT 1 and SLOT 2
Slot4 IFE2
Slot6
FAN
Slot 6 IFE2
Slot 8
Slot 2 IFE2
Slot 4 IFE2
Slot 5 IFE2
Slot 7
Slot 1 IFE2
Slot 3 IFE2
Slot
11
FAN
Slot
10
PIU
Slot
9
PIU
Page72
IF Board -- IF Performance (Cont.)
Channel
Spacing (MHz)
Modulation
Scheme
Ethernet throughput (Mbit/s)
7 QPSK 9 to 11
7 16QAM 19 to 23
7 32QAM 24 to 29
7 64QAM 31 to 37
7 128QAM 37 to 44
7 256QAM 43 to 51
The modulation mode and capacity supported by IFE2
Page73
IF Board -- IF Performance (Cont.)
Channel
Spacing (MHz)
Modulation
Scheme
Ethernet throughput (Mbit/s)
14 (13.75) QPSK 20 to 23
14 (13.75) 16QAM 41 to 48
14 (13.75) 32QAM 50 to 59
14 (13.75) 64QAM 65 to 76
14 (13.75) 128QAM 77 to 90
14 (13.75) 256QAM 90 to 104
The modulation mode and capacity supported by IFE2
Page74
IF Board -- IF Performance (Cont.)
Channel
Spacing (MHz)
Modulation
Scheme
Ethernet throughput (Mbit/s)
28 (27.5) QPSK 41 to 48
28 (27.5) 16QAM 84 to 97
28 (27.5) 32QAM 108 to 125
28 (27.5) 64QAM 130 to 150
28 (27.5) 128QAM 160 to 180
28 (27.5) 256QAM 180 to 210
The modulation mode and capacity supported by IFE2
Page75
IF Board -- IF Performance (Cont.)
Channel
Spacing (MHz)
Modulation
Scheme
Ethernet throughput (Mbit/s)
56 QPSK
84 to 97
56 16QAM
170 to 190
56 32QAM
210 to 240
56 64QAM
260 to 310
56 128QAM
310 to 360
56 256QAM
360 to 420
The modulation mode and capacity supported by IFE2
Page76
E1 Board -- Board Installation
IDU 910
IDU 950
Slot5
PIU
Slot3 ML1(A)
SLOT 1 and SLOT 2
Slot4 ML1(A)
Slot6
FAN
Slot 6 ML1(A)
Slot 8
Slot 2 ML1(A)
Slot 4 ML1(A)
Slot 5 ML1(A)
Slot 7
Slot 1 ML1(A)
Slot 3 ML1(A)
Slot
11
FAN
Slot
10
PIU
Slot
9
PIU
Page77
FE Board -- Board Installation
IDU 910
IDU 950
Slot5
PIU
Slot3 EF8T(F)
SLOT 1 and SLOT 2
Slot4 EF8T(F)
Slot6
FAN
Slot 6 EF8T(F) /AUXQ
Slot 8
Slot 2 EF8T(F) /AUXQ
Slot 4 EF8T(F) /AUXQ
Slot 5 EF8T(F) /AUXQ
Slot 7
Slot 1 EF8T(F) /AUXQ
Slot 3 EF8T(F) /AUXQ
Slot
11
FAN
Slot
10
PIU
Slot
9
PIU
Page78
GE Board -- Board Installation
IDU 910
IDU 950
Slot5
PIU
Slot3 EG2
SLOT 1 and SLOT 2
Slot4 EG2
Slot6
FAN
Slot 6 EG2
Slot 8
Slot 2 EG2
Slot 4 EG2
Slot 5 EG2
Slot 7
Slot 1 EG2
Slot 3 EG2
Slot
11
FAN
Slot
10
PIU
Slot
9
PIU
Page79
IF Board -- IF Signal Parameters
Item Performance
IF signal
Transmitting frequency (MHz) 350
Receiving frequency (MHz) 140
Resistance (ohm) 50
ODU
management
signal
Modulation mode ASK
Transmitting frequency (MHz) 5.5
Receiving frequency (MHz) 10
Dimensioning ODU
Table 2 RTN 600 ODUs supported by the OptiX RTN 910
Item Description
Standard Power ODU High Power ODU
ODU type SP and SPA HP
Frequency band 7/8/11/13/15/18/23/26/38
GHz (SP ODU)
7/8/11/13/15/18/23/26/28/
32/38 GHz
6/7/8/11/13/15/18/23 GHz
(SPA ODU)
Microwave modulation
mode
QPSK/16QAM/32QAM/64
QAM/128QAM/256QAM
(SP ODU)
QPSK/16QAM/32QAM/64
QAM/128QAM/256QAM
QPSK/16QAM/32QAM/64
QAM/128QAM (SPA
ODU)
Channel spacing 7/14/28 MHz 7/14/28/56 MHz
Page80
Page81
Split-mount MW Equipment -
Installation
Antenna
(ODU)
IF cable


Separate installation
Soft
waveguide
IDU
IF interface
Antenna
ODU
IDU
Direct installation
IF cable
IF interface
Page82
Radio Link


1+1 protection
Field Value Description
Protection Group ID 1, 2, 3 Sets the protection group ID.
Working Mode HSB, SD, FD Selects the working mode for the IF 1+1 protection
group.
Revertive Mode Revertive, Non-
Revertive
Specifies whether to switch back to the original working
service after removing the fault. Select Revertive to
switch back to the working service, or select Non-
Revertive not to switch back to the working service any
longer.
Default: Revertive
WTR Time(s) 300 to 720 Specifies the wait-to-restore time. Refer to the period of
time starting when it is detected the working board
returns to normal and ending when the working board is
switched back after the protection switching.
Default: 600
Enable Reverse Switching Enabled, Disabled Specifies whether to enable reverse switching.
Default of HSB/SD:
Enabled
In the case of the 1+1 FD, Enable Reverse Switching
is not supported and thus the default value is
Disabled. In addition, the value cannot be changed.
Default of FD: Disabled In the case of 1+1 HSB, it is recommended that you
disable reverse switching to avoid incorrect switching
actions.
Page83
Radio Link (Cont.)
IF General Attributes: 802.1Q and QinQ
QinQ is the VLAN (IEEE 802.1Q) stacking technology
DA SA TPID (8100) VLAN Ethernet Data
6 6 2 2 N
DA SA TPID (8100) S-VLAN TPID (8100) C-VLAN Ethernet data
6 6 2 2 2 2 N
VLAN Frame
QinQ Frame
Page84
Radio Link (Cont.)
IF General Attributes: 802.1Q and QinQ
Page85
Radio Link (Cont.)
Configuring IF Attributes: ATPC, channel
space
Page86
Contents
1. Service Types of RTN910950
2. Dimensioning NE
3. Dimensioning the Ethernet Service
4. Dimensioning the CES Service
5. Dimensioning the ATM/IMA Service
Dimensioning the Ethernet Service

The different attributes of Ethernet interface
correspond to different scenarios

Page87
Application Scenario Required Interface Attribute
Accessing the Ethernet service General attributes and Layer 2
attributes
Carrying the QinQ link General attributes and Layer 2
attributes
Carrying the tunnel General attributes and Layer 3
attributes
Page88
Configuring Ethernet Interface (Cont.)
Configuring General Attributes
Page89
Contents
1. Service Types of RTN910950
2. Dimensioning NE
3. Dimensioning the Ethernet Service
4. Dimensioning the CES Service
5. Dimensioning the ATM/IMA Service
Dimensioning the CES Service

Page90
Start
Create network
Configure interface
Configure the UNI-UNI CES service
Configure tunnel
Configure the UNI-NNI
CES service
End
UNI-UNI CES service
UNI-NNI CES service
Page91
Contents
1. Service Types of RTN910950
2. Dimensioning NE
3. Dimensioning the Ethernet Service
4. Dimensioning the CES Service
5. Dimensioning the ATM/IMA Service
Dimensioning the ATM/IMA Service

Page92
Start
Create network
Configure the UNI-UNI ATM
service
Configure tunnel
Configure the UNI-NNI ATM
service
End
UNI-UNI ATM
service
UNI-NNI ATM service
Configure the ATM policy
Configure ATM interface
Configure NNI
Configure the ATM policy
Configure ATM interface
Page93
Configuring the ATM Service (Cont.)
Configuring the UNI-NNI ATM Service