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Shakespeare's Herbal Code Shakespeare's words in MacBeth are dotted with herbal lore.

Here are some of the 'translations' of what the 'Witches' might have put in their cauldron: *Eye of Newt - any of the 'eye' flowers such as daisy, horehound, bachelor's buttons, etc. *Toe of Frog - buttercup *Wool of Bat - holly leaves *Tongue of Dog - houndstongue *Lizard's Leg - a creeping plant such as ivy *Scale of Dragon - leaf of dragonwort, tarragon *Tooth of Wolf - leaf of wolfsbane *Gall of Goat - honeysuckle or st. John's wort *Nose of Turtle - turtle's cap *Adder's Fork - bistort *Tiger's Chaundron - lady's mantle from The Magickal Almanac by Scott Cunningham

Preserving Your Pumpkins Want your carved work of art pumpkin to last longer than a day? Read on. If October temperatures in your area hover in the 70s and 80s, your carved jack-'o-lantern's life span may last between a day and two weeks. Try these tricks to make your works of art last longer. Your goal is to slow down the dehydration process, and deter the onset of mold. If your pumpkin dries out too much, (a shriveled jack-'o-lantern is spooky but not too attractive), restore him back to his original condition by soaking him in water overnight the night before Halloween or your Halloween party. You can also use the petroleum jelly technique: coat all cut surfaces of the pumpkin with petroleum jelly immediately after carving. Use a paper towel to apply a light coating to the entire inside of the pumpkin. Because temperature, particularly heat, will shorten the life of your pumpkins, move the pumpkins

to a dry, shaded area during the day. If you happen to have a spare refrigerator, store pumpkins in it to slow down decomposition. You can use a pumpkin dip available at most grocery stores or fruit stands during the Halloween season. Just mix the pumpkin dip with water in a large container and submerge your pumpkins in it, overnight if you wish. One caveat: This technique is a bit messy and you have to do it every night after they've been carved. You can purchase a spray-on preserver called -- ta-da! -- Pumpkin Preserver. This low cost ($4 includes s/h) spray is environmentally friendly and deters mold, rot, and bugs. Made of all natural ingredients, Pumpkin Preserver (see link below) comes in a convenient spray bottle for easy application -- simply spray the inside and cut parts of your pumpkins, allow them to drain, and drip dry. www.pumpkin-carving.com/preserver/index.html

Plants to Use in Creams and Lotions Aloe Vera The sap from the leaves is soothing and healing. Avocado An excellent skin food with high vitamin E and A content. Borage Good for dry, sensitive skins. Calendula A healing herb for rough or problem skin. Chamomile A gentle, soothing herb that also softens and whitens skin. Comfrey A healing and soothing herb that contains allantoin, a protein which speeds up cell renewal. Good for rough and damaged skin. Cucmber A cleansing agent and toner. Soothing and healing. Dandelion Contains a rich emollient useful in cleansing lotions for dry, sallow skin. Elderflower A good tonic for all skins. Reputed to soften skin and smooth wrinkles, fade freckles and soothe sunburn. Essential oils These are excellent additions to creams and lotions. Fennel Cleansing and soothing. Add crushed seeds to face packs. Purifies oily skin. Hens and Chicks

A healing and soothing herb especially good for dry, sensitive skin. Ivy Relieves sunburn; helps to disperse trapped fluids and toxins in the fight against cellulite. Lady's Mantle A healing herb for soothing dry, sensitive skin; a good astringent for large pores. Lavender A gentle cleanser and tonic for all skin types. Lemon An astringent that restores the skin's natural acid balance. Linden tree blossom Softens the skin. Deep cleansing. Lupin seed A cleanser and pore refiner for oily skin. Marsh mallow A healing softener for dry skin, chapped hands and sunburn. Nettle A deep cleanser; very good for oily skin. Orange flower An excellent skin tonic, said to help restore the skin's acid barrier. Also treats dry skin and broken capillaries and stimultes cell replacement. Parsley A conditioner for dry, sensitive and troubled skin. Peppermint An astringent which clears the complexion. Rose A soothing and gentle cleanser which has a softening effect on the skin. Rosemary An invigorating antiseptic which boosts circulation and deep cleansing. Sage A cleansing, stimulating astringent which tightens pores. Thyme A stimulating but gentle antisptic cleanser. Violet A gentle astringent. Watercress Expressed juice can help to clear blemishes. Witch hazel Soothing and astringent.

Yarrow A healing and cleansing astringent. Good for oily skin.

-MAGICKAL HERBS ~ LOOKING GOOD Here are two homemade masks for two different problems that can be used once or twice a week to keep your skin "Looking Good." For Oily Skin ~ Mix 10 drops of lemon juice with an egg white. Mix well and apply it to your face, (keep it away from the eye area). Leave it on 20 minutes and rinse off with cool to warm water, (not hot). For Dry Skin ~ Boil a cup of milk in a saucepan. Let cool so that a "skin" of milk forms in the pan. Mix that "skin" with an egg yolk and apply it to the face, (again, avoid the eye area). Leave on 20 minutes and rinse with cool to warm water,(not hot). If you like a little dazzle, but hate looking "made-up", this tip is for you. Mix a bronzing powder with a clear or light beige lip gloss. Apply it to your eyelids to open the eyes up and give them a slight shine. You can also use this at the browbone instead of a highlighter.

Lavender, History & Magic -----------------Lavender has been around for several thousand years, dating back at least to the times of the ancient Greeks. It is perhaps a surprise to some that Lavender is an herb closely related to Rosemary, Sages, Thyme's and others. The history of lavender is long and vast. It's sweet fragrance and lasting aroma was a favorite of the Victorian area. With such uses as perfume, bathing, insect repellant & cooking. It is one of my favorite herbs & oils. Use Lavender for magical love spells & sachets, clothing rubbed with it will attract love to you. Scent your paper with Lavender oil for love notes. The flowers are also burned or smoldered to induce sleep and scattered about the home to maintain peacefulness. If you put Lavender under your pillow while thinking of your wish and in the morning if you have dreamt

anything relating to your wish it will come true. Author Unknown

Valerian Valeriana officinalis Valerian is one of the best-known herbs for promoting a good night's sleep and easing nervous tension. Its sedative effects were first recognized in the seventeenth century, and since then it has enjoyed a long history of safe and effective use. Its Latin name, Valeriana, means "wellbeing." In popular lore, it is known as cat's weed or moonroot. Plant facts: Valerian belongs to the umbelliferous family of plants. Growing up to 5 feet tall, this graceful perennial emits a spicy aroma and tastes slightly bitter. Remedies are often made from its cylindrical rootstocks, which spread via underground runners. Origin: Valerian is native to Europe and the parts of Asia that have a moderate climate. It prefers moist soil-swampy meadows in particular-but it also grows on the plains and in the mountains, even at altitudes above 6,000 feet. Parts used: The rootstock (rhizome) of the healing plant is used in natural medicine, it is used fresh or dried, which is done at temperatures above 104 degrees F. Components: The root of the valerian plant contains various active medicinal agents: approximately 5% valepotriate (the calming substance), 1.5% essential oil from Borneo camphor, formic and acetic acids, mucilage and tannins. Indications: A popular natural tranquilizer, valerian is an excellent remedy for all forms of nervousness. It helps to alleviate anxiety; it promotes sound sleep; and its calming effects benefit those suffering from exhaustion or mental burnout as well. The herb also appears to have anti-convulsive properties. However, some people cannot digest valerian properly and may get headaches or feel nervous when using it. In these instances, another herb should be used. Extra tip: To use valerian in a medicinal preparation, first crush the dried root in a mortar; it will have an unpleasant smell. A scant teaspoon of the powder is sufficient to make a cup of tea. Methods of Administration: -Valerian teaPour 1 cup of boiling water over 1 tsp. of dried valerian. Allow to steep for 5 min. Add linden leaves or hops to enhance the calming effect. -TabletsValerian comes in tablets and capsules. Take 1 or 2 capsules or tablets (200 mg. each) up to 3 times daily. -Valerian bath sachetsPlace 3 1/2 oz. of dried valerian root pieces in a small cotton bag. Let the bag soak in the tub. This herb is idea for calming nervous or agitated children. -Valerian soakSoak 3 /2 oz. of dried valerian root pieces in 1 qt. of water for 10-12 hours. Decant the liquid and use it in your bath. For an even quicker solution, try one of the ready made bath products that contain valerian and other herbs. -From "The Complete Guide to Natural Healing

How to Bring and Grow Herbs Indoors For gardeners who like to cook, there's nothing like fresh herbs. When the growing season ends though, does it mean you have to resort to grocery store herbs? No sirree! By bringing a few herbs indoors, you can continue to enjoy a year-round, flavorful bounty. Here's how to do it: The best time to pot up most herbs is before the first frost. Start by selecting the healthiest looking plants to bring indoors. Then dig them up--gently now--causing as little root damage as possible. Divide the plants if necessary. Some perennial herbs that make the transition to indoor conditions fairly easily include chives, garlic chives, thyme, mint, winter savory, and lavender. Chives adapt well to indoor living conditions Pot the herbs up in fresh, commercial potting soil and water them well. Don't skimp on soil quality. Herbs in pots need a reasonably rich soil mix with good drainage. Here's an all-purpose soil recipe for herbs: One part potting soil, one part sand, and one part peat moss Before bringing plants indoors, double and triple-check each plant for pests by inspecting the stems and leaves. Pests can be sneaky so check under the leaves as well. Surviving the great indoors The indoor environment can be quite a shock to plants that are accustomed to cool nights, breezes, rain, and direct sunlight. To help with the transition, you need to reverse the "hardening off" process. Begin by setting the plants out of direct sun for about a week. This gets them used to the lower light conditions indoors. After a few days, bring the plants inside for a few hours, then return them outside. Repeat this "in and out" routine for 5 to 7 days, then bring them indoors for good. Believe me, this will make a big difference in how well the survive the great indoors. Once inside, isolate your herbs (and that means quarantined!) for a couple of weeks before introducing them to the rest of your houseplants. There's nothing worse than causing an infestation caused by overlooking a bug or two. Tired of bugs buzzing around? Yellow sticky traps provide a safe method for trapping aphids, thrips, fungus gnats, whiteflies and more. They are Ideal for indoor and outdoor plants and are one of my must-have garden solutions. (Fortunately, bugs go for them, too.) You can buy them through my online catalog. A set includes nine, 3x5-inch sticky traps, 3 wire holders and complete instructions. $7.00 per set. To see how effective they are, check out this photo. (WARNING: Not for the squeamish!) They are worth every dime, believe me! When it comes to light, herbs need at least 6 hours of direct sunlight each day. (Exceptions are parsley, rosemary, thyme, and mint, which can tolerate partial shade). Supplement with flourescent lighting if necessary. A simple, inexpensive shop-light arrangement works just fine. Hang the lights about 6 inches above the plants and give them 14 to 16 hours of light each day. Turn the plants, especially if they're on the windowsill, so they enjoy even lighting conditions. Herbs need 14 to 16 hours of light per day A few more tips: Mist plants occasionally, provide good air circulation,

and don't crowd the pots together. Herbs are extremely sensitive to dry, stagnant air. Stale air sets up the perfect conditions for pests and fungal diseases. Try to keep your herbs happy with fresh air by cracking a window, setting up a small fan, or by opening doors for good ventilation. If your herb plants become dusty or dirty, you might find my house plant cleaning tips helpful. Growing herbs indoors also presents a wonderful opportunity to start new plants from cuttings. They make great gifts, plus you'll have a crop of seedlings ready to transplant in the spring. (To start your own herb plants from seed, visit my seed starting tips). Fertilizing indoor herbs is a little bit of a balancing act. On one hand you want your herbs to be healthy and productive, but not so leggy that they lose their flavor and scent. Feed them monthly with an organic plant food such as PlanTea. When it comes to watering, herbs can be a little finicky. As a general rule, water most herbs thoroughly when the soil surface starts drying out. Here are some other helpful guidelines: + Use room temperature -- not shocking cold -- water. + Let marjoram, oregano, sage, bay, and thyme dry out between waterings. + Don't let rosemary completely dry out. + Lemon balm, mint, and scented geraniums enjoy moister conditions. For a wonderful selection of scented geranium plants and hundreds of other plants and great garden items, visit No Thyme Productions. Herbs work hard as houseplants. They add a certain charm to the indoor environment, giving you flavor, fragrance, and sometimes flowers. With a little extra space, you'll never have to be without fresh herbs again.

Herbs and Roots and their Usages Acacia flowers- Burn for power & blessings Adam & Eve Root- Powerful for love & happiness. The man carries the Eve root, the woman, the Adam root Adders Tongue-Use to stop gossip or slander African Bird Pepper- Throw in someone's yard to cause problems African Ginger- Stops hexes & curses, cures mouth sores Agar Agar- mix with Fast Luck powder to bring luck in bingo, rub on hands before you play Agrimony- Burn to reverse & turn back spells Ague Weed- Burn to stop hexes & crossings from getting to you Ajenjible- wash a person's clothes in this tea added to wash water to make someone move out of your house Alfalfa- Keep in the home to keep poverty away & help you prosper

All Heal- Make into a tea & sprinkle in the room of the sick to cure illness Allspice- mix with Gloria incense & burn everyday for money, attracts success & prosperity Aloes- Burn on the night of the full moon to have a new lover by the new moon Althea(Marshmallow)- keep a jar on altar or burn on candles to pull the good spirits to you Angelica Root- As a tea, sprinkle in corners & entryway to purify & stop evil Anise- Burn to increase your clairvoyant abilities Anise Estella (Star Anise)- brew into tea and sip or bathe in it to bring back your lover, burn as incense Archangel- Burn to bring a lost love back to you Altamisa- This makes a very good love & attraction bath Arrow Root- Mix with gambling powder to increase luck Asafoetida- Burn to hex & increase black magick power, throw in a person's yard to cause misery Ash Leaves- Burn to prevent hexes & witchcraft from harming you Balm- Put on wine or food to make a love potion Balm of Gilead buds- Carry for protection against evil & to solve love problems Balmony- wrap a persons name in a bundle of Balmony & it will cause them to get sick Basil- A very good herb to bathe in to remove jinx & to change your luck Bay Leaves- Keep in home or on person to protect against any type of evil, best protection Bayberry Bark- Attracts good fortune & money, Burn a white candle sprinkled with the bark Berry of The Fish- Sprinkle in enemy's yard to make them move away or keep away from you Beth Root- Attract a mate by secretly mixing this into food or drink Benzoin- Burn with incense & oils for peace of mind & to defeat witchcraft, It is said that no demon can stand this scent Bergamot- Considered very powerful for success, it can be burned at any

ritual for more power Betony Wood- Burn with uncrossing incense to defeat any form of witchcraft Bistort- Carry in a yellow flannel bag to attract wealth & good fortune Bittersweet- Toss into an enemy's path or yard to make them leave town & never look back Black Candle Tobacco- Mix with salt & burn with a black candle, said to win most court cases Black Cohosh- Make into a tea & add to bath water, it is said to ensure a long & happy life Black Mustard Seed- Causes problems & disturbances when sprinkled in an enemy's yard Black Snake Root- Bath in tea to uncross your nature, also may be burned as a love incense Bladderwrack- Carry while traveling for protection, said to cause a UTI if placed by stall of enemies Blood root- A favorite voodoo root used for defeating hexes & spells aimed to harm you Blue Flag- Mix with money drawing incense for financial gain Blueberry- Said to cause confusion & strife when tossed in a doorway or path of enemy Boldo Leaves- Sprinkle around the house to ward off evil, must be renewed once a month Boneset- To curse an enemy, burn as incense along with a black candle inscribed with their name Broom Tops- Make into a tea & sprinkle around the home to clear away all evil Buchu Leaves- Bathe in these to be able to foretell the future Buckthorn Bark- Grants a wish if made into a tea & sprinkled in a circle at the full moon Camphor- Burn with Rama Dream incense before retiring for prophetic dreams Caraway seed- Carry these for protection Cardamom- Add this, powdered, to the drink of the one you want to love you Cascara Sagrada- sprinkle tea made from this around the courtroom before court to win case Chamomile- Wash your hands with a tea made of this before going to gamble

for good luck Chewing John Root- Chewing the root & throwing it away sends back a curse, use for court cases Chicory- Burn with a black skull candle to cause a sure hex on an enemy Cinnamon- Add to wine or food as a love potion, use for good luck in money matters Cinquefoil -To curse someone, rub on an image candle along with Dume oil at the full moon. Protection against all things from a man's hand. Brings the five virtues to your life Cloves- Mix with Camphor & burn before using a ouija board for better luck/results with it Coriander- Powder & mix with food or drink for a strong love potion Cumin- Mix with food to keep lover faithful even over long period of separation Curry Powder- Burned to keep evil forces away Damiana- Said to be an aphrodisiac & to draw love to those who drink it as tea Dandelion- Carry to make wishes come true, said to induce clairvoyant ability Devil Bone Root- Cut into small pieces & carry in a red flannel bag to ward off arthritis Devil Shoestring- Carry in a red flannel bag for protection or in pocket for drawing gambling luck Dill Seed- Steep in hot wine for love potion or keep in home to repel witchcraft Dittany of Crete- Bathe in this before a date for success & attraction with the person Dog Grass- Sprinkle in an enemy's yard to ruin their yard & make it look ugly Earth Smoke- To attract quick financial gain, make into tea & sprinkle about & rub on shoe bottoms Eucalyptus- Sew into a pillow to ward off nightmares & for peaceful sleep Elecampane- grind together with vervain & mistletoe to make a powerful love powder Elder Berries- Grind & place in corners & doorway for protection & to eliminate trouble Fennel Seeds- Carry to prevent witchcraft and also used in love potions

Five Finger Grass- Wrap in red cloth and hang over the bed to ward off dark spirits of the night Flax Seed- For more accurate readings into someone's future, sprinkle a tea made of this in the area Frankincense- one of the strongest resins for mystical purposes. Burn prior to any ritual for success Galangal- Burn nightly for 14 days before a court case. Save the ashes in a green flannel bag & take to court. Garlic- Kept on hand protecting from witchcraft & envious people Gentian- add tea to bath for much power & strength Grains of Paradise- to ensure success & protection Gravel Root-Helps get a job, carry in green flannel bag and anoint with Job oil Guinea Pepper- Cast upon doorsteps to break up homes, used to cause death by enchantment :-( Holy Thistle- Brew into a tea and sprinkle around the house to get rid of a jinx thrown on you Hawthorne- Add to scrub water to purify your home, & to remove negative vibrations Holy Ghost Root- prolongs life and protects against evil spirits & witchcraft Hyssop- bathe in to keep away evil eye and ward of jinx & to purify Horehound- keep near doorways to keep trouble away Irish Moss- make into tea & sprinkle around business to bring in customers Iron Weed- Carry in purple flannel bag for control over others, controls boss & co-workers Jamaican Ginger- carry for gambling luck, bathe in this before going to Vegas Etc... Jasmine- very good as a love & attraction bath, sewn into lover's pillow so they will only want you Jezebel Root- to cause one harm, put root in jar with Jezebel oil & Destierro powder, bury in their yard Job Tears- Carry 7 for luck and having one wish come true Joe Pie- Carry in blue flannel bag to gain popularity & friendship, anoint with pure Orris oil Juniper Berries- steep in wine for increased vitality

Kava Kava Root- carry in red flannel bag for success & job promotions, protects from harm Khus Khus (Vetivert) - to change your luck, bathe in this tea for 9 days King of the Woods-A man carries for this control over his woman Knot weed- Used to get rid of an enemy Ladies Thumb- draws love to you Lucky Hand Root- carried in red flannel bag with good luck charms while gambling for best of luck Life Everlasting- It is believed that this tea will prolong life Lovage Root- bathe in this prior to court for victory Laurel- Give to the bride for a long & happy marriage Lavender- Burn with incense to bring peace, love & money to the home Linseed- Burn to attain divinatory powers Lemon Verbena- Used for a peaceful home, to help a marriage going sour or to break one up Licorice- Sprinkle on the footprints of lovers to keep them faithful Linden- Keeps a lover faithful, dab a small amount on your forehead before retiring Mace-In earlier times this was thought a very powerful love herb. Still used in some reuniting rituals Maiden Hair Fern- Brings beauty & love into your life (represents Venus, the goddess of Love) Mandrake- Carry in a red flannel bag to draw love from the opposite sex. Burn as incense in black magick spells Manzanilla- Used as a hand wash for good luck in bingo & lotto, keep tickets with a packet of the herb Marjoram- Prized as a charm against witchcraft, place in each room of dwelling & renew monthly Magnolia- Sew into a mate's pillow to ensure faithfulness Marigold- Used with love sachets to attract, bathe in tea for 5 days to find 'Mr. Right" Marjoram- for a person, who is sad or grieving, bathe them in this for 7 days

Master of the Woods- A man carries this to have control over his woman Mesquite-burn as an incense to cleanse your tools or voodoo room, us in purification baths Mistletoe- Made into a tea & bathed in it for love drawing Motherwort- keep some in a jar by the family pictures to keep them safe Mugwort- Burn as an incense while crystal gazing to increase psychic visions & ability Mullein- Used as incense in black magick to dume (doom) an enemy Mustard Seed (Red) - Sprinkle in & around the home to ward off burglars Mustard Seed (Yellow) - A symbol of faith followed by success, one of the oldest good luck amulets Myrrh- Burn on the altar before performing any ritual, for success, a good incense to clear your home Myrtle- Inhaling the warm vapors of a myrtle infusion is said to clear head pains caused by severe colds, also used as a love herb Nettles- For removing curses & hexes, mix with Jinx removing powder & sprinkle in each room & doorway Nutmeg- Make a hole in the nutmeg, fill with quicksilver, seal hole with wax, carry in red flannel bag for best gambling luck - The most royal of all trees, burn with mistletoe to remove spirits from businesses Orange- Use the leaves or flowers for love rituals, very good to bring on a proposal Oregon Grape Root- Carry in green flannel bag with money drawing powder for money & popularity Oregano-mix with Stay Away powder to repel in-laws, with Law Stay Away to repel law Orris Root- Cast a love spell by dusting it on the clothes of the opposite sex & wear for attraction Palo Azul- Very powerful, make into a tea and use to remove any jinx or hex Palo Santo-Used when you feel you have been cursed Rub this herb on your body then bathe Papaya leaves- mix with Mandrake root and burn or bathe for spell reversal or jinx Parsley- mix with jasmine & carry in your shoe to make you more attractive to opposite sex Passion Flower- Brew into a tea & bathe in for 5 days to attract opposite

sex Patchouli- Used in money & love rituals, incites lust, use in any ritual where graveyard dirt is required Peach Tree-mix the leaves with Concentration & Success oil to help pass tests Pennyroyal- Carry while traveling by water & never know the pangs of sea sickness Peony- For protection against any evil or to cure lunacy, and for good luck. Peppercorns Black- Can be used to cast evil to someone or to get rid of evil Pepper Tree (Pirul) - Used for limpias and cleansing, mix with ruda ad bathe in for 10 days to remove evil Peppermint- To increase chance of prophetic dreams, add to Rama dream incense Periwinkle- A love herb, Burn with love incense before having sex Pine- burn as an incense to cleanse house, also used to remove negativity & attract money Plantain- hang in car to protect from evil or jealous people Poke Root- Breaks hexes by brewing it into a teas & adding it to bath water Poppy Seeds- Sleep on a pillow stuffed with poppy seeds if you suffer from insomnia Primrose- Put in children's pillows to gain control over them, also put some in bath water to make them mind Quassia Chips- Mix with some hair of your beloved, burn & keep ashes in small bottle to preserve the love Queen of the Meadow- for good luck, make into a tea Queens Delight Root- Legends say that drinking a tea made from this root will help a woman conceive Queens Root- Take a bath in this when you wish to get married Quina Rojo- Use only when sex is desired & with extreme caution Quince Seed- Used in spells pertaining to protection, love & happiness Raspberry- Bathe in this herb daily and your man will not want to wander Rattle Snake Root- Put in a purple flannel bad for protection from sudden death & accident, keeps others from doing you wrong Rosemary- Kept near the bed to ensure faithfulness, good for cleansing &

protection as well Rose Petals- Known as the love herb, Keep your lovers picture in a bowl of rose petals Rue (Ruda)- Make into a tea & bathe in it for 7 days to attract love from the opposite sex Sacred Bark-Keep in a bowl on your alter or reading table to help you concentrate Safflower- Mix with any jinx incense to cause destruction to an enemy, also used by gay men to bring on exciting sexual encounters by rubbing it on the inside of their knees Sage- Wards off misfortune, used in reversing spells, also used for protection Sampson's Snake Root- Used to regain male vigor (lost manhood) Sandalwood- One of the 3 holy incenses, used for love, health & fortune, to grant wishes Sarsaparilla- alleged to prolong life, hinder premature aging, excite passions, improving virility Sassafras- Should be carried in your purse or wallet near your money, makes it go farther Saw Palmetto- use in a strong tea made of Damiana, Sarsaparilla, and muira puama to help men get erections; supposedly, this is what the ancient gods use to have sexual encounters Scullcap- To keep mate faithful, women should sew into his pillow some scullcap and 2 white lodestones in white flannel Sea Wrack- add to black magick & hex rituals Senna- secretly have mate bathe in a tea made of this to ensure faithfulness, to get one to notice you Slippery Elm- Excellent in poultices for skin ailments keeps others from gossiping about you Smartweed- attracts money & clears the mind Snake root- carried as a charm to strengthen ones vitality, also good for court cases Solomon's seal root- carry for protection & success, place on altar to ensure success with all rituals Southern John the Conqueror- carry as a charm to bring luck in love & money matters Southernwood- kept in the home as a love charm, burned to protect one from

trouble Spearmint- used for cleansing Spikenard- to keep a lover faithful, to secure a relationship bury it in the ground and renew monthly Squaw Vine- Bathed in by pregnant women once a week to keep jealousy away from unborn child Squill Root- to draw money, place in container, add one dime, quarter & dollar, say money prayer Star anise- to increase power, place on altar, carried for luck, burn to increase psychic ability St. Johns Wort- protects against all forms of black witchcraft, hang above all windows in home Sulfur- although not an herb, it is mixed with many herbs to bring harm upon an enemy Sumbul Root- A favorite love root, said to attract the opposite sex very quickly, carry on you or burn Tansy- a bit placed on shoes is said to keep the law away, can also be bathed in for same purpose Tarragon- To cause a person to have a toothache, sprinkle on mouth of figure candle & burn at midnight Thyme- bathe in to ensure money at all times, add to jar & keep in home for good luck, use to cleanse magick areas and place in pillows to stop nightmares Tonka Beans- a favorite hoodoo good luck charm, to make wishes come true.. Tormentil- as a tea, drunk to keep or remove witchcraft that has been given in food or drink Trefoil- mix with vervain, dill & St. Johnswort for most effective defense against evil doing Trumpet Weed- used to make a man more potent, rubbed on member as a tea while hard Twitch Grass- reverses hexes, causes trouble for enemies if thrown on their doorstep Unicorn Root-Carried for protection, used as a love charm, hide in loves belongings for love or hide two tied together to keep them faithful Uva Ursi- carry to increase your power, burn with psychic incense when meditating Valerian- drink to soothe nerves, sprinkle about to bring peace and end

strife Vanillin-powder can be burned with love incense to ensure that mate will always think of you Verbena- Bathe your children in this to help them learn faster, Burn with sandalwood for jinx removing Vervain- considered a holy herb; bathe in for 7 days to bring money, used for love drawing & jinx removing Vetivert (Khus Khus) - placed in cash registers for increased business, burnt to overcome evil spells Violet- used with other attraction herbs like lavender to bath in, helps those ill to heal faster Virginia Snake Root-Said to be best good luck charm but very expensive & hard to get Wahoo Bark- Also very hard to get, used to remove hexes Willow Bark- Burn when you want the aid of Satan Wintergreen- bathe your children in this to grant them good fortune & luck throughout their lives Witch Grass- bathe in to attract a new lover, wear special witch perfume as well Woodruff- good for victory, place in your left shoe before a game so your team will be victorious Wormwood- sprinkle on enemy's path to cause strife & misfortune to them Yarrow- Used to overcome fears, place in yellow flannel bag with a piece of parchment paper on which you have written your fears, carry with you Yerba Mate- Said to keep a lover from wandering, put 2 Tablespoons into their food once a day Yerba Santa- Used to attain beauty from within, to make ones body more desirable Yucca- For jinx removing, Use a new slice of yucca root daily for 7 days and rub all over your body.

-Herbs and Old Wives Tales Bluebells have both a good and bad magical reputation. Long associated as harbingers of death, it is said that if you hear bluebells ringing someone close to you will die. Nevertheless,

bluebells are commonly thought to be lucky. Carrying bluebells compels you to tell the truth. Cedar branches hung around your house protects it against lightning strikes. Cedar, in your wallet, attracts money. This spell really works. For years, I've had cedar in my wallet. No matter what the situation or circumstance, somehow or other, money comes my way. If you've been cursed, scatter chili pepper {or seeds} around your house to break the spell. This also is a great spell for kids who are afraid of the boogey man. Put the chili peppers in a child's room, tell the child about the spell, and watch the nightmares and "afraid ness" start to disappear. Growing elder trees near your house will bring you prosperity in addition to delightful elder flower champagne, elderberry jam, and a plethora of hungry birds. Elder branches and twigs make perfect wands. Garlic is nature's antibiotic and an excellent pest control in the garden. It's also a protection against shipwrecks for sailors, against foul weather and monsters for mountaineers, and against assaults by bullies. Garlic rubbed into your pots and pans gets rid of negative vibrations that might ruin your food, and if you eat garlic, you'll become lusty. If you're a witch, plant geraniums around your house to foretell coming visitors. Grapes have long been considered symbols of fertility and money. Wine, which is made from grapes, was often treated as sacred in ancient cultures. In Tarot, the Ace of Cups can mean possible wealth - both money-wise and for new friends. Gather holly leaves on a Friday night - but beware, make absolutely no sound when you pick the holly leaves or this spell will not work. Wrap the leaves in a white cloth, knot the cloth nine times, and place it under your pillow. Your dreams will come true! Honesty or money plants {and chili peppers} when scattered about your house will repel all monsters. Finding the first white lily of the season will give you strength. Wearing a fresh lily will break any love spells cast against you, particularly when the love is unwanted. Marigold and/or orange flowers added to your bath will make you respected, admired, and attractive. Hang marigolds on your doorpost to stop evil from entering your house (and stop those evil pests from entering your garden)! Mint is not just any ordinary garden herb used for mint juleps in summer and relaxing teas in winter. Mint kept in the house protects you and your loved ones. Putting a few leaves of mint in your wallet will attract money. And mint leaves rubbed against your temples will relieve headaches {same as smelling peppermint essential oil}.

If you catch a falling oak leaf, you won't have a cold in the winter. Onions protect against venomous beasts and grown in your garden protects your plants (against those venomous pests!). Quarter an onion and place the quarters in the four corners of your house, you'll get rid of any disease. Replace the onion quarters when they turn black. Pick pansies or Johnny-jump-ups, when the dew is still on them and it will soon rain. Eating parsley makes you lusty but wearing parsley on your head stops you from getting drunk. Roses and myrtle stand for love. Red roses mean passion, pink roses friendship, and white roses - pure love. Rowan planted on a grave stops Hauntings and planted around your house protects you and planted in stone circle makes the protection stronger. (Too, rowanberries make wicked jam and wine.) {Ditto for flint {a crystal} - both rowan and flint were used in ancient rituals.} Rue grows best when stolen and then makes your garden grow better. Toads don't like rue. Romans used to drink rue juice to guard against werewolves. Thyme placed beneath a pillow ensures a pleasant night's sleep. Thyme worn in a woman's hair will make her irresistible, and if you both carry and smell thyme, you'll gain courage, but if you wear thyme, then you'll see faeries. On New Year's Eve, cast one of the shoes you're wearing up into a willow tree {you have 9 tries}. If your shoe stays up in the tree, then you'll be married within the year. To complete the spell, you need to climb up into the willow tree and retrieve your shoe. That horrid witch grass of garden wrecking fame, scattered under your bed, attracts new lovers. An infusion of witch grass sprinkled around your house repels depression (probably because you'll have lots of new lovers!). Washing your head with a yarrow infusion will prevent baldness, and carrying it, will attract love and friendship. Yew (poison) will help you raise the dead.

Apartment Gardening

Let's face it, herbs are weeds. They grow even where you don't want them! So it's really not that difficult to have a wonderful herb garden even if your planting space is confined to the coffee table. Here are some things to consider when planning your indoor or balcony garden. Light: Most herbs do tend to be sun-loving creatures, preferring 8 - 10 hours of sunlight a day. South facing windows are fantastic, as they get the brightest light for the longest time (if you live in the Northern Hemisphere, that is; if you live in the Southern Hemisphere a northfacing window would be best.) Can you still grow herbs if you live in a north-facing basement apartment with window wells? Of course! Artificial light can be a wonderful thing. Fluorescent lights are available in a wide variety of sizes and prices to fit any table top or budget. There are small, compact units designed to fit on your kitchen counter, or there are huge, 4 or 5 shelf units that take up the space of a bookcase. You can buy everyday, office-type fluorescents, or you can invest in a set of broad-spectrum GroLites, which are minimally more expensive. When placing your lights remember to keep them as close above the plants as possible. Plants tend to stretch toward the light, and leggy, spindly plants are unhealthy plants. Keep the lights so they are just brushing the tops of the plants. Rotate them or move the light if you have to so that all parts of the plant get adequate light. Water: Container plants do dry out faster than plants in the ground, especially those on sunny balconies. Keep a careful eye on your pots, and water if they are dry to the touch, or of course if the plant starts to look wilted. It's better to water deeply every few days rather than a little bit every day; soaking the plant encourages deep, healthy root growth. I like to put my portable plants in the kitchen sink and really soak them; then I let them sit for a few hours till I know they won't drip on the rug. If you tend to be absent minded, there are all sorts of lovely gadgets available to help you keep your plants watered; from mats the plants sit on to taps you can push into the soil from above. Keep in mind that some plants do like to be dry, though; rosemary, for example, will get root rot if you water it too much. Feeding: Be prepared to feed your indoor plants regularly, as it is difficult to replenish the soil with rotting kitchen scraps when the pot is sitting on your dining table! There are many different types of plant food available, from potting soil with the fertilizer built right in to tablets you bury in the pot to liquids you add to the water. I've had good luck with a kelp solution from "The Cook's Garden;" it's nice and high in nitrogen, which is what leafy plants like. Also be sure they are getting enough phosphorus, which will help keep their roots healthy. Plan to repot your plants about every year or so; move them into a bigger pot with fresh soil, or divide them into several smaller plants and give some away to your friends. Size: You definitely want to take size into account when planning your indoor garden. Clary sage is a wonderful herb, but it is not a particularly good companion when you are living in a studio apartment! Most herbs are available in smaller or "dwarf" varieties; check the label for size and habitat before purchasing seeds or seedlings. "Bushy" or "compact" and comfortable sizes, but I would stay away from "ground-cover" or "invasive" as they tend to take over the window sill. You can use ground-covers in hanging baskets though, just take care to trim them regularly. Pests: Herbs tend not to be bothered too much by pests; those same essential oils that make them attractive to us render them undelicious snacks for most bugs. You may occasionally find a few pests like white fly or mealy worm; rinse the occasional one off with a stream of water and treat more serious infestations with pyrethrin spray or a mixture of crushed garlic and Tabasco, strained into a spray bottle. (Pyrethrin is a natural extract of chrysanthemum; however it is still toxic, so take care around children and pets!) Usually, however, herbs tend to repel pests from your other house plants. Harvesting: One of the main reasons I like to grow herbs indoors is to have a year-round supply

of fresh herbs. Keep the flowers picked off so the plant doesn't go to seed, and simply snip the leaves off as you need them. Source: Written by Cyndy

Herbs 'N Spices -- Chamomile Chamomile is a wonderful and soothing herb. I haven't had room to grow it very often, but have found it's easy to buy in bulk and use for tea blends that I make myself. The first recipe is for the very basic chamomile tea. It makes one cup of tea. In the recipes you can use this with the dried chamomile or substitute a chamomile tea bag. Either way is fine, depending on what you have on hand. Basic Chamomile Tea Ingredients: 1 cup of water 1 tsp. of dried chamomile flowers Bring the water to the boil in a saucepan. Sprinkle the dried flowers into the water and continue to boil for about 30 seconds with the lid on. Remove the pan from the heat and allow it to stand for another 1-4 minutes. Use in recipes or sweeten with honey and serve. Chamomile Cooler Ingredients: 3 chamomile tea bags, or an equal amount of dried chamomile leaves 2 sprigs lemon balm 2 cups boiling water 1/2 cup orange juice 1 cup pineapple juice 1/4 cup lime juice 1 cup white grape juice 2-1/2 cups cold unflavored sparkling water In a bowl, pour boiling water over the herbs. Cover and steep for at least 10 minutes. Strain the liquid into a glass pitcher. Stir in the orange, pineapple, lime, and grape juices. Chill til time to serve. Fill iced tea glasses 2/3 full of the juice/tea mixture. Add ice and fill the glasses with sparkling water. Makes about 6 servings. Chamomile Cranberry Tea Ingredients: 4 chamomile teabags or 4 tsp.. dried chamomile 4 cups boiling water 1 cup cranberry juice cocktail Sugar or honey to taste Steep the teabags or chamomile in the boiling water for 8-10 minutes. Strain and add the cranberry juice. Stir and serve. Add sugar and honey to taste. Makes 4 servings. Chamomile Spice Tea Ingredients: 2 cups dried lemon balm or other lemon herb 1 cup dried chamomile

flowers 1 cup dried mint 1 cup dried orange peel 3 tbsp. whole cloves, crushed 6 inch cinnamon stick, crushed Blend all ingredients together and store in a covered tin. To make tea, use 1 tsp. of blend for each cup of water. Add to a teapot, and add boiling water. Steep the tea for 5-10 minutes and serve with honey. Soothing Winter Tea Ingredients: 1/4 inch piece fresh ginger root, peeled and chopped 1/4 cup dried chamomile flowers 1/2 cup fresh mint leaves 1 teaspoon fennel seed lemon juice, honey (optional) red cayenne pepper or other hot pepper In a glass or ceramic pan add all the ingredients. Cover with 2 quarts water. Bring to a boil and simmer covered for 30 minutes. Strain a cup at a time throughout the day. Add a little lemon and honey to the cup and drink slowly. If it's too strong for your taste, add more boiling water. You can drink 2-3 cups a day, or smaller 1/2 cups as needed. This is great when you have a fever, the flu or a cold. Relaxing Tea Blend Ingredients: 1/4 cup dried mint 1/4 cup dried lemon grass or lemon verbena 1 cup dried lemon balm 1/2 cup dried catnip 3/4 cup dried chamomile flowers Blend all herbs thoroughly and store in an airtight container. To make the tea, use 2 teaspoons of blend for each cup of boiling water. Brew for 5 minutes or so, then strain. Sweeten with honey if desired. More Chamomile Tips and Recipes: Growing tips and more recipes for using chamomile: http://www.oldfashionedliving.com/chamomile.html All material copyright Brenda Hyde 2001-2004 http://www.oldfashionedliving.com

> > How To Plan Your Herb Garden > > An herb garden can bring a person a lot of pleasure because there's > so many things that can be done with herbs such as herbal crafts, > herbal teas and herbal seasonings. On top of this, you get to care > and tend for the plants which, if this is all you do, is enough > reason to grow an herb garden. Seeing how the herbs mingle together > and enjoying their fragrance are other benefits. > > By planning your herb garden, you will eliminate any frustration > that may arise from planting an herb in the wrong area. For example, > if you plant Basil in a very shady area, it will not grow as well as

> if it were planted in a warm, sunny area. Also, your herb garden > will bring you more satisfaction If you plan which herbs you will > use. > > The first thing to think about when planning your herb garden is > location. Full sun is the best for herbs, but it has been my > experience that most herbs will grow in partial shade. If your herbs > are planted in partial shade, they may not grow as fast as when > planted in full sun, but they will do just fine. The place to avoid > is full shade, herbs simply will not do well in full shade. > > When you have decided on a location for your herb garden, it's time > to figure out which herbs you'd like to grow. To figure this out, > ask yourself why you want to grow herbs. Is it for cooking, teas, > potpourri, fragrance, or a combination of all these? Whatever reason > you decide you're growing herbs for will help you decide which herbs > to grow. If it's for cooking, which herbs do you currently use? You > could grow these, plus others that have caught your interest in the > past. If it's for any of the other reasons, do some research first > to find out what herbs are good for that interest. Visit the library > and choose books on that subject, or search the Internet for > information. Ask your herb growing friends. > > You will also need to find out if the herbs you have chosen will > grow in your zone and soil type. Again, the library and Internet > will be good sources of information. > > Now that you have chosen the herbs you want to grow, it's time to > put them into a plan. First, make a list of the herbs you will be > using, leaving a space for its' description of height, foliage > and/or flower color, and spacing requirements. To find these > requirements, look these plants up in a gardening reference book. > Decide what shape of bed you'd like and what size. Keep in mind that > to be easily accessed, an island bed (a bed that can be accessed > from all sides) should be no wider than 5 feet, and a border bed (a > bed that can only be accessed from the front) should be no wider > than 2 1/2 feet. > > Now take a piece of paper and a pencil and sketch in the shape of > the bed. Look at your list of herbs and place your herbs according > to height, and which plants would compliment each other. You can do > this by sketching or writing in the names of the plant. If you > change your mind about something, simply erase and change. As you > are placing your plants, make notes of how far apart the plants > should be spaced. You may even want to go as far as using colored > pencils to do some color coding or to color in the color of the > plants. This sketch is your rough draft. You can use this as your > planting guide. > > The planning process can be just as enjoyable as planting and caring > for the herbs. It also enables you to get to know your plants before > they are even planted. Finally, as mentioned above, it will save you > a great deal of frustration, so take the time to plan your herb > garden. >

False Unicorn Root Botanical: Chamaelirium luteum (A. GRAY) Family: N.O. Liliaceae ---Synonyms---Starwort. Helonias. Helonias dioica (Pursh.). Helonias lutea (Ker-Gawl). Chamaelirium Carolinianum (Willd.). Veratrum luteum (Linn.). ---Part Used---Root. ---Description---A herbaceous perennial found in low moist ground east of the Mississipi and flowering in May and June. Stem 1 to 3 feet high, simple, smooth, angular; leaves alternate, spatulate below, lanceolate above, radical leaves, 8 inches long, 1/2 inch wide, narrow at base and formed into a whorl; flowers numerous, small, greenish white, bractless, dioecious, in a dense, terminal raceme, nodding like a plume, 6 inches long, petals of such flowers narrow, stamens longer than the petals, filaments tapering; anthers terminal, two lobed; petals of female flowers linear; stamens short; ovary ovate, triangular, furrowed; stigmas three-capsule, oblong, three-furrowed, opening at summit; fruit many, compressed, acute; rhizome bulbous, terminating abruptly, 1 inch long; odour faint; taste bitter. Solvents: alcohol, water. ---Constituents---Chamaelirin, fatty acid. Uterine tonic, diuretic, anthelmintic, anti-inflammatory, emmenagogue, emetic, vermifuge. This herb, used by the North American Indians, is one of the best tonics and strengtheners of the reproductive system that we have. Though primarily used for the female system, it can be equally beneficial for men. It is known to contain precursors of the estrogens. However, it acts in an amphoteric way to normalize function. In large doses a cardiac poison. Of the greatest value in female disorders of the reproductive organs. The indication for its use is a dragging sensation in the extreme lower abdomen. It is useful in impotence, as a tonic in genito-urinary weakness or irritability, for liver and kidney diseases. Especially in diseases due to poor action of the liver and not to weakness of the heart or circulation. It is a good remedy in albuminaria. The body may use this herb to balance and tone and thus it will aid in apparently opposite situations. Whilst being of help in all uterine problems, it is specifically useful in delayed or absent menstruation. Where ovarian pain occurs, False Unicorn Root may be safely used. It is also indicated to prevent threatened miscarriage and ease vomiting associated with pregnancy. However, large doses will cause nausea and vomiting. The body may use this herb to balance and tone and thus it will aid in apparently opposite situations. Whilst being of help in all uterine problems, it is specifically useful in delayed or absent menstruation. Where ovarian pain occurs, False Unicorn Root may be safely used. It is also indicated to prevent threatened miscarriage and ease vomiting associated with pregnancy. Encourages the ovaries to release their hormones correctly. Also used to treat endometriosis and uterine infections. ---Preparations---Fluid extract, 5 to 30 drops. Helonin, 2 to 4 grains. Specific helonias, 1 to 20 drops. Remedies For: Decoction: Put 1-2 teaspoonfuls of the root in a cup of water, bring to boiling and simmer gently for 10-15 minutes. This should be drunk three times a day. For threatened miscarriage it may be drunk copiously. Tincture: Take 2-4 ml of the tincture three times a day. Safety: No information available. Some herbs are known to react with your medication. Please consult your physician before starting on any herb. Unicorn in large doses is somewhat narcotic, but when dried, these properties are lost) It can be added to a charm bag to dispel evil. Within the Wiccan tradition of Lothlorien they work with astral unicorns. Unicorn Root is used by those who wish to work with Unicorns as spiritual entities, and it is the patron herb of The Rowan Tree Church. Some use Unicorn Root in baby blessings and protective Magickal work for infants. It can be used in the home to keep evil out. Use Unicorn Root as an incense in hex breaking and uncrossing rituals. Sprinkle about to rid negativity and evil.

Herbal Actions Here are some descriptions of herbal actions in the body...

Adaptogen: Substances which put the body into a state of non-specific heightened resistance in order to better resist stress and adapt to extraordinary challenges. Ashwagandha, Cordyceps, American Ginseng, Panax Ginseng, Siberian Ginseng, Gotu Kola, Maca, Reishi, Schizandra, Shiitake, Suma. Alterative: An herb that will gradually restore the proper function of the body and increase health and vitality. Sometimes referred to as blood purifiers. Alfalfa, Black Cohosh, Blue Flag, Blue Violet, Boneset, Buckthorn, Burdock, Cleavers, Echinacea, Fringetree, Golden Seal, Gotu Kola, Kelp/Bladderwrack, Licorice, Oregon Grape, Pau d' Arco, Pipsissewa, Poke Root, Prickly Ash, Red Clover, Sarsaparilla, Sheep Sorrel, Stillingia, Tayuya, Wahoo, Wild Indigo, Yarrow, Yellow Dock. Analgesic/Anodyne: Analgesics or Anodynes are herbs that reduce pain. Chamomile, Chaparral, Dong Quai, Hops, Passion Flower, Reishi, Valerian, Venus' Flytrap. Anthelmintic: Herbs that work against parasitic worms which may be present in the digestive system. Black Walnut, Helonias, Quassia, Sheep Sorrel, Wormwood. Antibacterial: Herbs with properties that can inhibit bacterial growth. Blessed Thistle, Cloves, Echinacea, Kelp/Bladderwrack, Licorice, Lomatium, Osha, Pau d' Arco, Reishi, St. John's Wort, Turmeric, Usnea. Antibilious: Herbs that help the body to remove excess bile. Barberry, Dandelion, Fringetree, Golden Seal, Wild Yam, Wormwood. Anticatarrhal: Herbs that help the body reduce excess mucous and phlegm. Echinacea, Elderberry, Golden Seal, Marshmallow, Oregon Grape, Poke Root, Uva Ursi, Wild Indigo, Yarrow. Antiemetic: Herbs that reduce the feeling of nausea and can help to relieve or prevent vomiting. Atractylodes, Barberry, Cloves, Fennel, Oregon Grape. Anti-inflammatory: These herbs help the body to combat inflammations. Ashwagandha, Bilberry fruit. Blue Violet, Calendula, Cat's Claw, Chamomile, Cleavers, Devil's Claw, Dong Quai, Fo-Ti, Licorice, Lomatium, Reishi, St. John's Wort, Turmeric, Wild Yam, Wormwood. Antilithic: Herbs that prevent the formation or help remove stones or gravel in the urinary system Sheep Sorrel, Uva Ursi. Antimicrobial: Herbs that can help the body destroy or resist pathogenic micro-organisms. Calendula, Cat's Claw, Cloves, Echinacea, Licorice, Lovage, St. John's Wort, Usnea, Uva Ursi, Wild Indigo, Wormwood. Antineoplastic: Having the specific action of inhibiting and combating tumor development. Blue Violet, Chaparral, Cleavers, Red Clover, Reishi, Sheep Sorrel, Shiitake, Venus' Flytrap. Antioxidant: An antioxidant is a substance capable of eliminating hydroxyl free radicals. Bilberry fruit, Cat's Claw, Chaparral, Ginger, Panax Ginseng, Ginkgo, Kelp/Bladderwrack, Schizandra. Antirheumatic: Herbs used to relieve or protect against rheumatism. Blue Cohosh, Cat's Claw,

Chaparral, Celery, Dandelion, Kelp/Bladderwrack, Poke Root, Sarsaparilla, Wild Yam. Antiseptic: Herbs that can prevent, resist and counteract putrification. Bilberry fruit, Black Walnut, Chamomile, Cloves, Echinacea, Hops, Red Clover, Sheep Sorrel, Uva Ursi, Wild Indigo, Yarrow. Antispasmodic: Antispasmodics can prevent or ease spasms and cramps in the body. Black Cohosh, Blue Cohosh, Boneset, Chamomile, Cramp bark, Culver's root, Dong Quai, Fennel, Helonias, Licorice, Motherwort, Passion Flower, Red Clover, Skullcap, Stillingia, Valerian, Wild Yam. Aphrodisiac: Herbs used to stimulate sexual passion. Catuaba, Damiana, Maca, Muira Puama, Schizandra, Suma, Yohimbe. Aromatic: Herbs that have a strong and often pleasant odor and can stimulate the digestive juices. Angelica, Celery, Chamomile, Cloves, Fennel, Ginger, Valerian. Astringent: Astringents contract tissue and can reduce secretions and discharges. Bilberry fruit, Blessed Thistle, Calendula, Cleavers, Cramp bark, Golden Seal, Hops, Kola nut, Muira Puama, Pipsissewa, Red root, Sheep Sorrel, Slippery Elm, Squawvine, Stillingia, St. John's Wort, Suma, Turkish Rhubarb, Uva Ursi, Yarrow, Yellow Dock. Bitter: Herbs that taste bitter act as stimulating tonics for the digestive system. Barberry, Blessed Thistle, Buckthorn, Burdock, Cascara Sagrada, Chamomile, Golden Seal, Osha, Quassia, Wormwood. Cardiac Tonic: Cardiac tonics are herbs that act beneficially on the heart. Cat's Claw, Fo-Ti, Hawthorn, Kelp/Bladderwrack, Motherwort, Reishi. Carminative: Carminatives are rich in volatile oils and expel gas from the stomach and bowels. Angelica, Celery, Chamomile, Cloves, Fennel, Ginger, Hops, Prickly Ash, Sheep Sorrel, Turmeric, Valerian, Wormwood. Cathartic: In large doses cathartics purge the bowels and stimulate glandular secretions. Barberry, Blue Flag, Buckthorn, Cascara Sagrada, Culver's root, Turkish Rhubarb. Cholagogue: Herbs that stimulate the release and secretion of bile from the gall bladder. They also have a laxative effect on the digestive system. Barberry, Blue Flag, Calendula, Culver's root, Dandelion, Fringetree, Golden Seal, Milk Thistle, Oregon Grape, Turmeric, Wahoo, Wild Yam, Yellow Dock. Demulcent: Herbs that are usually rich in mucilage and can soothe and protect damaged or inflamed tissue. Fenugreek, Licorice, Marshmallow, Slippery Elm. Depurative: Depuratives are herbs that remove impurities and cleanse the blood. Alfalfa, Black Walnut, Blessed Thistle, Blue Flag, Blue Violet, Buckthorn, Burdock, Culver's root, Dandelion, Elderberry, Gotu Kola, Oregon Grape, Pau d' Arco, Red Clover, Sarsaparilla, Stillingia, Tayuya, Watercress, Yarrow, Yellow Dock. Diaphoretic: These herbs will aid the skin in the elimination of toxins through perspiration. Angelica, Blessed Thistle, Black Cohosh, Boneset, Calendula, Chamomile, Culver's root, Elderberry, Fennel, Ginger, Osha, Prickly Ash, Sarsaparilla, Stillingia, Yarrow. Diuretic: Herbs that increase the flow of urine and help in the removal of toxins from the system. Angelica, Astragalus, Atractylodes, Blue Flag, Blue Violet, Buckthorn, Burdock, Celery, Chaparral, Cleavers, Dandelion, Fringetree, Gotu Kola, Guarana, Hawthorn, Helonias, Kola nut, Marshmallow, Pipsissewa, Sarsaparilla, Saw Palmetto, Sheep Sorrel, Squawvine, Uva Ursi,

Wahoo, Yarrow, Yerba Mate. Emetic: Emetics are herbs that cause vomiting when taken in specific doses (generally high doses). Helonias, Poke Root. Emmenagogue: Herbs that stimulate and normalize the menstrual flow. Black Cohosh, Blessed Thistle, Blue Cohosh, Calendula, Chamomile, Cramp bark, Fenugreek, Ginger, Golden Seal, Helonias, Motherwort, Squawvine, St. John's Wort, Valerian, Vitex/Chastetree, Wormwood, Yarrow. Expectorant: Herbs that assist the body in expelling excess mucous from the respiratory system. Angelica, Blue Violet, Fennel, Fenugreek, Golden Seal, Licorice, Marshmallow, Osha, Red Clover, Red root, Reishi, Stillingia, Usnea. Febrifuge: The febrifuges help the body to bring down fevers. Angelica, Blessed Thistle, Calendula, Prickly Ash, Wild Indigo. Galactogogue: Herbs that help breast feeding mothers increase the flow of mothers milk. Blessed Thistle, Fennel, Fenugreek, Milk Thistle. Hepatic: Hepatics strengthen and tone the liver as well as stimulate the flow of bile. Barberry, Blue Flag, Buckthorn, Cascara Sagrada, Celery, Cleavers, Culver's root, Dandelion, Fennel, FoTi, Fringetree, Golden Seal, Milk Thistle, Motherwort, Oregon Grape, Poke Root, Prickly Ash, Turmeric, Wahoo, Wild Indigo, Wild Yam, Wormwood, Yarrow, Yellow Dock. Hypnotic: Hypnotic herbs will help induce sleep (not a hypnotic trance). Hops, Passion Flower, Skullcap, Valerian. Hypotensive: Remedies that reduce elevated blood pressure. Astragalus, Cat's Claw, Codonopsis, Hawthorn, Lovage, Lycium, Reishi, Valerian, Yarrow. Laxative: Herbs that promote the evacuation of the bowels. Barberry, Boneset, Buckthorn, Burdock, Cascara Sagrada, Cleavers, Culver's root, Dandelion, Fringetree, Golden Seal, Licorice, Oregon Grape, Turkish Rhubarb, Wahoo, Yellow Dock. Mucilage: Mucilaginous herbs contain gelatinous constituents and will often be demulcent. Fenugreek, Marshmallow, Slippery Elm. Nervine: Herbs that strengthen and tone the nervous system, easing anxiety and stress. Black Cohosh, Blue Cohosh, Catuaba, Chamomile, Cramp bark, Damiana, Guarana, Hops, Lovage, Motherwort, Oat seed, Passion Flower, Red Clover, Skullcap, Tayuya, Valerian, Wormwood. Nutritive:Herbs that provide nutritional support. Alfalfa, Nettle, Raspberry Leaf, Oat Straw, Seaweeds. Parasiticide: Herbs that can kill parasites in the digestive tract and on the skin. Black Walnut, Cloves, Quassia, Sheep Sorrel, Wormwood. Pectoral: Herbs that have a general strengthening and healing effect on the respiratory system. Angelica, Golden Seal, Licorice, Marshmallow. Purgative: Can produce very strong laxative effects and watery evacuations. Buckthorn, Poke Root, Turkish Rhubarb, Wild Indigo, Yellow Dock. Rubefacient: Herbs that simulate circulation locally when applied to the skin. Cloves, Fennel, Ginger.

Sedative: Herbs that can strongly quiet the nervous system. American Ginseng, Black Cohosh, Celery, Chamomile, Cramp bark, Dong Quai, Hops, Kava Kava, Motherwort, Passion Flower, Red Clover, Saw Palmetto, Skullcap, St. John's Wort, Valerian, Wild Yam. Sialagogue: Herbs that stimulate the secretion of saliva from the salivary glands. Blue Flag, Ginger, Prickly Ash, Quassia, Stillingia. Stimulant: Herbs that quicken and enliven the physiological function of the body. Angelica, Calendula, Cloves, Codonopsis, Dandelion, Fennel, Ginger, Guarana, Kola nut, Muira Puama, Poke Root, Prickly Ash, Red root, Sarsaparilla, Schizandra, Stillingia, Valerian, Watercress, Wild Yam, Wormwood, Yarrow, Yerba Mate. Stomachic: Herbs that promote digestion and strengthen the stomach. Atractylodes, Chamomile, Cloves, Codonopsis, Fennel, Ginger, Sheep Sorrel, Turkish Rhubarb, Turmeric. Tonic: The tonic herbs strengthen and tone either specific organs or the whole body through nutritional stimulation. Alfalfa, Angelica, Ashwagandha, Astragalus, Black Cohosh, Black Walnut, Boneset, Buckthorn, Burdock, Calendula, Cat's Claw, Catuaba, Chamomile, Cleavers, Cordyceps, Culver's root, Damiana, Dandelion, Echinacea, Fenugreek, Fo-Ti, Fringetree, American Ginseng, Panax Ginseng, Siberian Ginseng, Golden Seal, Gotu Kola, Hawthorn, Helonias, Jatoba, Licorice, Lovage, Lycium, Maca, Milk Thistle, Motherwort, Muira Puama, Oat seed, Oregon Grape, Pipsissewa, Poke Root, Prickly Ash, Red Clover, Sarsaparilla, Saw Palmetto, Schizandra, Sheep Sorrel, Skullcap, Squawvine, Suma, Uva Ursi, Watercress, Wild Yam, Wormwood, Yarrow, Yellow Dock, Yerba Mate, Yohimbe. vening Primrose is edible and medicinal and has a long history of use as an alternative medicine . The leaves are cooked and eaten as greens and the roots are said to be sweet succulent and delicious when boiled like potatoes. Flowers are a sweet addition to salads or as a garnish and young seedpods are Steamed. This plant was a staple food for many Native American tribes. Formerly cultivated for its nutritious edible roots, it is being increasingly cultivated for the oil contained in its seeds which contains certain the essential gamma-linoleinc acid (GLA), a very valuable fatty acid that is not found in many plants and has numerous vital functions in the body. GLA is an essential fatty acid that the body does not manufacture. This fatty acid is known to help prevent hardening of the arteries, heart disease, eczema, cirrhosis, rheumatoid arthritis, menopause, PMS, multiple sclerosis, and high blood pressure. It has a positive effect on sex hormone response including the hormones estrogen and testosterone, aids in lowering cholesterol levels, and is important in treating cirrhosis of the liver. Research also demonstrates that primrose oil helps relieve pain and inflammation. The oil also has a positive effect on the uterine muscles, nervous system and metabolism. The bark and the leaves are astringent and sedative. They have proved of use in the treatment of gastro-intestinal disorders, whooping cough and asthma. A tea made from the roots is used in the treatment of obesity. A finely ground powder made from the flowering stems is used cosmetically in face-masks to counteract reddened skins. http://altnature.com/gallery/Evening_Primrose.htm Should my health care professional be advised before I take Evening Primrose? They should be consulted first if you have any of these conditions: * Epilepsy ( may be contraindicated for certain types of epilepsy). * If you are taking anticoagulants (Evening primrose has demonstrated anti-clotting properties). * If you are taking blood pressure medicine. * If you are taking high cholesterol medicine.

* If you are takingestrogen or other hormonal therapies (Evening Primrose may act as a natural estrogen). http://www.rxlist.com/cgi/alt/primrose_faq.htm HOW DOES IT WORK? EPO contains linolenic acid (LA) and gamma linolenic acid (GLA), essential ingredients in the vital production of prostaglandins within the human body. Prostaglandins are hormone-like compounds. They are in constant use throughout the body, controlling the way we feel and rejuvenating cells. Prostaglandins cannot be stored. They need to be replenished regularly. However, the process of prostaglandin production can be blocked or seriously slowed down by the lifestyle and diet of the modern world. Factors such as ageing, high cholesterol, stress, high alchol intake, diabetes, saturated fats, refined carbohydrates and viral infections may result in prostaglandin deficiency. The high GLA content in EPO may be the answer to ensuring prostaglandin production remains at its peak. NATURAL RELIEF FROM PMT The symptoms of premenstrual tension do not only mean tension and irritability. Cramps, depression, breast pain, bloating, headaches and sugar cravings are real problems for many women each month. Dr David Horrobin, a scientist at the forefront of EPO research, reported that a group of women clinically tested at the St Thomas Hospital Medical School in the UK overwhelmingly declared the success of EPO in the treatment of severe symptoms of PMT. What is most interesting is that the majority of the women tested had not responded to ordinary drug treatments. EPO AND ARTHRITIS The anti-inflammatory properties of EPO may be of great assistance to those afflicted by rheumatoid arthritis and may even lead to a reduction in the need for prescribed drugs. In one placebo controlled experiment involving arthritis sufferers, 94 percent of those taking Evening Primrose Oil supplements reported their pain and inflammation had diminished. Of those taking the placebo, 67 percent said they felt no better and in some cases even felt worse. REDUCING THE RISK OF HEART DISEASE EPO is also reputed to assist in circulation, high blood pressure, the reduction of cholesterol and the maintenance of healthy arteries all major factors in the prevention of heart disease. Again it is the GLA content of the oil that is thought to be responsible. Modern western lifestyle habits such as smoking, dietary errors and lack of exercise may lead to a reduction of prostaglandins which are needed to maintain a normal healthy cardiovascular system. The addition of GLA rich Primrose Oil may reduce the tendency of the blood to clot abnormally and may also effectively reduce cholesterol. FURTHER BENEFITS MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS Some Multiple Sclerosis patients report that EPO helps to relieve some of the distressing symptoms of the diease and may even reduce the severity and frequency of relapses. AIDS Regular use of EPO might also assist AIDS sufferers, with the alleviation of skin sores and fatigue being among reported benefits. WEIGHT CONTROL In some cases of obesity, EPO may help by stimulating brown fat tissue to burn up calories and rectify metabolic abnormalities.1

ALCOHOL One medical study reported favourable results for alcoholics in improving withdrawal symptoms. EPO may also prevent hangovers when taken after drinking as it is thought to alter the way in which alcohol is metabolised in the liver Evening Primrose Oil is a natural nutritional supplement with superb benefits and no harmful sideeffects. A general tonic for the better health and well-being of everyone. http://www.naturalfacts.com.au/epo.html

Overview Evening primrose has served as both food and medicine at previous times throughout history, often for upset stomach and respiratory infections. Native Americans ate the boiled, nutty-flavored root, and used leaf poultices from the plant for bruises and hemorrhoids. European settlers took the root back to England and Germany, where it was introduced as food and became known as German rampion because it grew as a crawling vine. The plant was also a Shaker medicine, sold commercially. Today, evening primrose seed oil (EPO) is used primarily to relieve the itchiness associated with certain skin conditions (such as eczema) and to ease breast tenderness from premenstrual syndrome (PMS) or other causes. It is considered to be potentially useful for the treatment of many conditions including: * Allergies, particularly skin rash or hives * Eczema, including redness and scaling in addition to itching * PMS, including mood swings and bloating in addition to breast tenderness * Arthritis, primarily rheumatoid * Dry eyes, from, for example, Sjogren's syndrome (a condition with symptoms of dry eyes, dry mouth, and, often, arthritis) * Peripheral Neuropathy, a nerve condition experienced as numbness, tingling, pain, burning, or lack of sensation in the feet and/or legs, from Diabetes * Menopausal symptoms. Although EPO has gained some popularity for treating hot flashes, the research to date has not confirmed that GLA or EPO is beneficial for these symptoms. With that said, there are individual women who report improvement; therefore, it may be worthwhile to talk to your doctor about whether it is safe for you to try EPO or another form of GLA supplements to alleviate hot flashes. * Weight loss, particularly if you have a family history of obesity * Alcoholism; EPO may help lessen cravings for alcohol and prevent liver damage. More research is needed in this area. Other conditions for which EPO is currently under scientific investigation and may prove beneficial include breast cancer, heart disease, high cholesterol, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, stomach ulcers, and inflammatory bowel disease (such as ulcerative colitis). While some test tube and animal studies seem promising, it is much too early to tell if EPO is helpful or harmful for these conditions. Another condition for which a proprietary herbal product has gained popularity is cellulite. The product combines EPO with several different herbs including ginkgo, sweet clover, sea-weed, grape seed oil, and lecithin. A recent study of this product, however, found that it is no more effective than placebo in getting rid of cellulite.

The main active ingredient in EPO is an omega-6 fatty acid known as gamma-linolenic acid (GLA). See What's It Made Of? for a brief description of GLA. Also, please see the monograph on the supplement GLA for detailed information about the science supporting the uses mentioned and other potential uses for GLA and EPO. Plant Description A circle of leaves grows close to the ground around evening primrose stems after the first year it is planted. Flowers bloom after sunset, June through September, or on overcast days during the second year. Stems are branched, with alternate leaves (which means that the leaves grow on both sides of the stem at alternating levels). This monograph focuses on the seed from which the oil is extracted. What's It Made Of? Oil is extracted from the seeds and prepared as medicine using a chemical called hexane. The seeds contain up to 25% essential fatty acids including linoleic acid (LA) and gamma-linolenic acid (GLA). Both LA and GLA belong to the omega-6 family of fatty acids. The vast majority of North Americans get too much omega-6 fatty acid in their diet. There are differences, though, between the different types of omega-6 fatty acids in terms of whether they are healthy or unhealthy. Please see the monograph on the supplement omega-6 fatty acids for a detailed description of these essential fatty acids, including the effects they have on the body and how to balance them in your diet. Other sources of GLA include borage and black currant oils. Available Forms EPO is available as oil or in capsules (the preferred form). EPO products should be kept in the refrigerator and out of direct sunlight to prevent the oil from becoming rancid. Generally, high-quality oil will be certified as organic by a reputable third party, packaged in lightresistant containers, refrigerated, and marked with a freshness date. EPO is usually standardized to contain 8% gamma-linolenic acid. How to Take It The use of herbs is a time-honored approach to strengthening the body and treating disease. Herbs, however, contain active substances that can trigger side effects and that can interact with other herbs, supplements, or medications. For these reasons, herbs should be taken with care, under the supervision of a practitioner knowledgeable in the field of botanical medicine. Pediatric For skin rash, the recommended total daily dosage for children is 2 to 4 grams (in capsule form). Adult * Skin rash: the recommended daily dosage is 6 to 8 grams for adults. * Mastalgia (breast pain): the recommended dosage is 3 to 4 grams daily. * PMS: the recommended dosage is 3 grams daily. * Arthritis: a dosage of about 3 grams per day is considered safe. Precautions The American Herbal Products Association (AHPA) gives EPO a class 1 safety rating, which indicates that it is safe with appropriate use. Reported side effects are rare and mild, and include nausea, stomach pain, and headache. Stomach pain and loose stools may be indications that the dosage is too high.

Omega-6 supplements, including GLA and EPO, should not be used if you have a seizure disorder because there have been reports of these supplements inducing seizures. Taking EPO while breastfeeding is considered safe as breast milk actually contains both LA and GLA. Borage oil, and possibly other substances containing GLA, should not be used during pregnancy because they may be harmful to the fetus and induce early labor. Possible Interactions If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use EPO without first talking to your healthcare provider. Ceftazidime, an antibiotic GLA from EPO or other sources may increase the effectiveness of ceftazidime, an antibiotic in a class known as cephalosporins, against a variety of bacterial infections. Chemotherapy for cancer GLA from EPO or other sources may increase the effects of anti-cancer treatments, such as doxorubicin, cisplatin, carboplatin, idarubicin, mitoxantrone, tamoxifen, vincristine, and vinblastine. Cyclosporine In animal studies, EPO administered during treatment with cyclosporine, a medication used to suppress immune function after an organ transplant, for example, may protect against kidney damage (a possible side effect of the medication). Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) Theoretically, use of NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen, together with borage oil or other GLA containing supplements like EPO may counter-act the effects of the supplement. Research in this area is needed to know if this theory is accurate. Phenothizines for Schizophrenia Individuals taking a class of medications called phenothiazines (such as chlorpromazine, fluphenazine, perphenazine, promazine, and thioridazine) to treat schizophrenia should not take EPO because it may interact with these medications and increase the risk of seizures. Allspice Gender:Masculine Planet:Mar Powers: Money, Luck, Healing Magical Uses:Allspice is burned as an incense to attract money or luck, and is also added to such mixtures. Allspice is also used to promote healing. ~ Mistletoe ~ From The Good Earth - By Lelanie F. Stone "The Cherokee Lady" Mistletoe - this parasitic evergreen shrub stimulated the imagination of the Celts, Germans and Romans for centuries. These ancient peoples believed that Mistletoe was the key to the supernatural. Mistletoe was recognized as a symbol of fertility and sexual prowess. Thus the custom of kissing under the Mistletoe is a civilized version of this ancient belief. The use of Mistletoe at Christmas time is said to date back to the traditions of the Norseman. The ancient Druids held this plant as sacred, they believed it was a cure for sterility and an antidote for poison. The Druids also believed that Mistletoe would drive away evil spirits and

hung it as protection in the doorways. This "magical act" of hanging Mistletoe in the doorway is still practiced in most homes today during the holiday season. The Gypsies believed that Mistletoe was protection against sorcery and witchcraft and wore it around their necks. The Mistletoe found on the Oak tree is said to be the "most powerful" and is to be gathered with a white cloth and must be knocked down by a rock and must never touch the ground. Mistletoe was used in one of Virgil's poems and called a "golden bough" which is one of the names by which Mistletoe is known, birdlime being the other. The Botanical name for American Mistletoe is Phoradendron flavescens. Mistletoe is usually found in the branches of deciduous tree (trees that loose their leaves) and it grows all over the United States. Small white flowers appear on the branches of the Mistletoe from May until July and the small white berries appear in December. Mistletoe has been used for many different ailments since the beginning of time; as a tonic, tranquilizer, for nerves and arthritic pain. It is said to have be a very effective sedative used in the treatment of Epilepsy and Palsy. The twigs and leaves are the parts of the plant used and it contains eleven proteins, a cardioactive polypeptide, saponins, resin, mucilage, phenolic acids, flavonoids, histamine, and traces of alkaloids. The actions of Mistletoe dilate the blood vessels and lower blood pressure and have strong sedative qualities. It has been noted for its anti-cancer and anti-tumor activities which are presently being studied in European clinics. A long standing controversy over the plants toxic effects on the liver remains to be proven. Mistletoe or as it is known in Cherokee "OO-TAH-LEE" or Missledine, has been used by the Cherokee since time immemorial. The old medicine men say that the Mistletoe grown on the Oak tree is the best. The primary medicinal usage by the Cherokee was for the treatment of Epilepsy and uterine bleeding. The Mistletoe was not to be gathered until the last of November or the first of December as it was more potent during this time. It was dried, pulverized and used as a powder . Mistletoe can be found in the 1903 version of the Materia Medica which states that the twigs and leaves of the Mistletoe plant have been used in the treatment of epilepsy, hysteria, chorea, asthma and other nervous affections. The American plant is said to possess qualities similar to Digitalis (thus the cardiac usage) and to stimulate uterine contractions. (for centuries herbalists have used Mistletoe in the treatment of uterine bleeding.) As with any other medicine overdoses of Mistletoe can result in serious problems and should be used under the supervision of a trained herbalist or physician. This medicinal parasitic plant has many wonderful uses. But, for many it has only been used to grace the overhead of a door during the Christmas and New Years season. Many of us not knowing exactly where or why this ceremony or superstition started. Mistletoe is not just a Holiday ornament, but another of the green medicines given to us from Mother Nature and The Good Earth. Ginger Root (Zingiber officinale) Other Names: African Ginger

GENERAL Although ginger originated in the Far East and was carried to the West by spice caravans, it was known and used in the West for at least 2000 years.Cultivation begain in Europe, in Spain, in the 16th century. Today it is grown world-wide in any areas with high humidity and warm temperatures. About half of all medicinal preparations in Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine include the use of ginger, primarily to offset the toxic or irritating effects on the stomach by other herbs. Dried ginger has different properties for healing and is hotter than fresh ginger, so the two are used to treat different problems. CULTIVATION: Ginger prefers a well-drained, humus-rich and slightly alkaline soil in full sun to partial shade. It requires high humidity and a temperature that never falls below 30 degrees F. It requires a ten month growing period for optimum rhizome production. It is now cultivated in great quantities in Jamaica and comes into this country dried and preserved. The root from the West Indies is considered the best. Also imported from Africa, there are several varieties known in commerce. Jamaica or White African is a light-brown colour with short rhizome, very pungent. Cochin has a very short rhizome, coated red-grey colour. 'Coated or Uncoated' is the trade term for peel on or skinned. Green Ginger is the immature undried rhizome HARVEST AND PRESERVATION: Rhizomes are lifted during the growing season for use where lack of fibrousness is important, or when dormant. Fresh roots can be stored for several months in a cool, dry place. Fresh roots freeze well and can also be preserved by crystalizing them. Roots can be peeled and dried whole or sliced and dried. Grind the dried root as needed in a spice or coffee grinder. Tthe root is considered the most useful part of the plant, and must not be used under a year's growth. The peeling has to be done very thinly or the richest part of the resin and volatile oil is lost. It is sometimes soaked in lime-juice instead of plain water, and the colour is improved by a final coating of chalk. The Chinese fresh Ginger is grated into powder. African and Cochin Ginger yield the most resin and volatile oil. The root must be kept in a dry place, or it will start growing and is then spoilt. The odour of Ginger is penetrating and aromatic, its taste spicy, hot and biting; these properties are lost by exposure. The most common adulterants are flour, curcuma, linseed, rapeseed, the hulls of cayenne pepper and waste ginger. MEDICINAL The fresh root is used medicinally to promote sweating and as an expectorant for colds and chills. Ginger is also used as a circulatory stimulant. Internally ginger is used as a decoction or tincture for motion sickness, morning sickness, indigestion, colic, abdominal chills, colds, coughs, influenza, and peripheral circulatory problems. Externally, ginger is used for spasmodic pain, rheumatism, lumbago, menstrual pain, and sprains. Ginger Root has a proven ability to combat all forms of nausea and vomiting. It has also been taken to loosen phlegm, relieve gas, and tighten the tissues, although its effectiveness for these purposes hasn't been verified. Asian medicine also employs it as a treatment for colds and shortness of breath. How to Prepare:

Chopped Ginger Root can be made into a tea. Pour boiling water over 0.5 to 1 gram (about onequarter teaspoonful) of the chopped root, steep for 5 minutes, and strain. Ginger is also available in tablet, capsule, and liquid form. Typical Dosage: For commercial preparations, the following dosages are typical. Indigestion: 2 to 4 grams a day Motion sickness: 1 gram 30 minutes before travel; for continuing symptoms, 0.5 to 1 gram every 4 hours. To prevent vomiting: 0.5 to 2 grams daily Arthritis: 1 to 2 grams daily Since potency may vary, follow the manufacturer's directions whenever available. Overdosage : Massive doses of Ginger can depress the nervous system and cause heart irregularities. If you suspect an overdose, seek medical attention immediately. CAUTIONS: * NOT to be used for patients with inflammatory skin complaints, ulcers of the digestive tract, or high fevers. * Although proper use is effective in the treatment of morning sickness, this herb should be used with respect during early pregnancy. High doses (6 grams or more) may damage the stomach lining and could eventually lead to ulcers. Allergic skin reactions are also possible, but in recommended doses, Ginger causes no side effects. Possible Drug Interactions: It's best to avoid large doses of Ginger if you are taking a bloodthinning drug such as Coumadin. Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding: Although a trial of Ginger in 27 pregnant women with persistent vomiting revealed no harmful effects, it is still not recommended during pregnancy. MAGICKAL GENDER: Masculine PLANET: Mars ELEMENT: Fire POWERS: Love, Money, Success, Power MAGICKAL USES: * Eat prior to performing spells (especially love spells) will lend them power because you have been "heated up." * Plant whole roots to attract money, or sprinkle powdered root in pockets or on money to do the same. * Used in success spells, or to ensure the success of a magickal working. British Tree Medicine by Anna Fraser

Tree Medicine is usually not spoken about as a separate form of therapy, because it is of course traditionally included in herbal medicine. Herbal medicine has for millennia and longer been the dominant medicine of our earth in a huge variety of different cultures and traditions. I guess that even today, in 2002, the majority of people in the world are still turning to herbs and the old traditions, in which herbal medicine was practiced, when they are ill. Access to modern medicine and pharmacological drugs is simply not yet within most people's reach or within their means! Modern medicine has of course grown out of herbal medicine and many of its successful remedies have been derived from plants. Aspirine, codeine, morphine, quinine, ephedrine, and digitalis are but a handful of the many examples of chemicals, which were derived from medicinal plants and trees. Neither conventional herbal medicine or Tree Medicine can be a substitute for all that modern medicine (in spite of its many shortcomings) has to offer us. If we have a car accident or other medical emergency, we like to be taken to a hospital. When we suffer from any complaint we should consult our GP for diagnosis and advice. But there are many instances were we can help ourselves and enjoy the opportunity Tree Medicine gives us to be involved with the living world around us, whilst taking care of our body, mind and soul. Again, please remember that self-medication is not always appropriate and professional medical advice should be sought in any serious or enduring complaint. All the many different forms of medicine have their own contribution to make in working towards a more healthy, wholesome future. Illness and disease has not only multiple causes, but it tends to be multi-layered. It is therefore wise to approach healing on many levels and make it an enriching, rather than an impoverishing experience in your life! (Please read also Reflections on Healing.) Why Tree Medicine? There are some good reasons to treat Tree Medicine as a 'entity' and subject in its own right. Here are some of the most obvious ones. * Trees are highly evolved creatures, which have nurtured us throughout our evolution from the wooden cradle to the coffin we are buried in. Their many qualities keep the Earth habitable for us and other animals and their countless gifts have enabled us to keep warm (or cool), provide shelter, tools and develop culture. It is natural that we should turn to these friends and healers when we don't feel well. * At this time in our human history, a true appreciation of the role which trees and forests fulfill on this Earth, can be a major factor in repairing some of the enormous environmental damage we have done as a species. Using Tree Medicine is one of many ways in which modern people can begin to rebuild their relationship with trees. * Almost all of the trees that grow in our immediate surroundings have healing properties. And what is more, a great many of these trees have just the sort of depurative and cleansing qualities we need for many of our most common illnesses. Many of these are degenerative conditions or diseases due to the way we 'overload' our bodies, minds and spirits in modern life. *

Most of the trees from which we can harvest material are organically grown. Avoid harvesting medicine from trees which grow near busy roads or other polluted places. * To take herbal medicine for weeks or months takes quite a lot of herbs, which then have to be grown and harvested, something not everyone is able to do. You may not have a garden nor the time required. Gathering herbs from wild places is maybe okay for an emergency, but if we all would get our medicinal supplies from the wild, there may soon not be any wild places left. Some of our great medicinal plants have been greatly reduced in number because of their popularity and efficacy, Cowslip is a good example and Lady Slipper has been collected until it now virtually extinct. The advantages of Tree Medicine are: 1. The resources for medical supplies are often already growing locally (90% of all plant-matter in the world consists of trees). 2. Harvesting them responsibly does not kill or injure these giant beings. 3. The vast majority of the trees we will mention in these pages are extremely common. * The supply of commercial natural remedies is still extremely patchy and consulting herbalists and other practitioners of natural medicine is alas beyond the means of many people. Tree Medicine has the advantage that it is virtually free, although I hope that you will feel inspired to explore how you can help the Trees and our environment in turn. Tree Medicine allows us to reflect and connect Like herbal medicine TM is old fashioned medicine, which takes care, love and nurturing. It takes time to prepare the remedies and to apply them. This is not a disadvantage, because whenever something is wrong with us, this is a usually a sure sign that something needs more attention than we have given it. The slow process of making, preparing and taking Tree Medicine allows us to reflect on ourselves and our nearest and dearest and pay attention to all that needs to be done to heal ourselves. This is in my opinion one of the many beneficial 'side-effects' of Tree Medicine: Nurturing and Caring through the medium of our remedies. All illnesses and diseases can be seen as a disturbance in our personal ecology. Tree Medicine connects us back to Nature, our Nature! We are part of the same intelligence that runs wild and free through the trees. This intelligence is the force, for which different people have different names: Divinity, the Great Spirit, God, Natures Creative Force, etc. When we are ill or unwell connecting with this intelligence, the very source which created us, is a healing experience in its own right. About my Tree Medicine Pages in this Grove In this grove I am working towards compiling an overview of all the different ailments and conditions for which trees that grow in Britain, have traditionally been used, as well as a basic guide on how to harvest and prepare Tree Medicine. As far as I am aware, this has not been done so far. It will take time to complete this work and make it comprehensive and user friendly. As a trained medical herbalist I am in the fortunate position to have a reasonably good idea whether this heritage of traditional usage makes sense or not. However I cannot take any responsibility for the accuracy of information provided and its effects. I can only share these pages with you as documents of historical interest and the responsibility for using it rests firmly on the user! I hope that anyone interested in Tree Medicine will use The-Tree Community Message Boards on this website to exchange experiences, information and any questions which may arise. My very best wishes and love to you all,

Reflections on Healing by Anna Fraser The difference between "being cured" and "healing" When we are ill, we tend to look for a cure. But being cured is not necessarily the same as healing. Being cured is often a passive process, during which drugs or other treatment are received in order to control, to manage or reduce your symptoms. Such a treatment, helpful as it can be, may never deal with all the factors that made us vulnerable to disease in the first place, such as traumatic experiences, painful memories, lifestyle, attitudes, beliefs, relationships, habits, stressful jobs, material circumstances and so on. As long as significant negative factors persist in our life, we will continue to be vulnerable and often be unhappy or unfulfilled. Illness can inspire us to make positive changes Sometimes the shock of being ill allows us see our life in a new light and inspires us to make positive changes. Then we enter the sphere of true healing, which is an active process of replacing all the negative, dis-empowering patterns in our life with life-enhancing self-empowering patterns. A process of becoming whole. In this process we may be able to get invaluable help from other people, from inspirational books and from supportive medical treatment, but nevertheless it must be emphasised that only you can truly heal yourself. Nobody else can come to terms with the traumas of your past and start afresh. Nobody else can change self-destructive beliefs and attitudes for you. Nobody else can feel healthy self-esteem for you. Nobody else can live a healthy lifestyle on your behalf. We are an energy vortex between our inner- and outer world Healing almost always requires changes to be made in our life and that can be uncomfortable or painful, even terrifying. And often there is so much to deal with that we dont even know where to begin. Our suggestion is that you learn to think of yourself as an energy vortex, which flows between your inner and outer world. This helpful because on an energy level healing can be virtually instantaneous. Like all energy, the energy that flows through you is composed of vibrations at particular frequencies. These vibrations and frequencies are created by our thoughts, emotions, beliefs and experiences, etc. and influence and organise the chemistry of our physical body. You dont need to be psychic to know this to be true. Common experiences such as being numbed with fear, glowing with joy, being sexually excited, sick with worry, hot with anger, feeling reduced through loneliness, feeling disintegrated through insecurity, feeling invincible through loving, proof the point. All these conditions will influence our physical wellbeing, vigour and performance quite noticeably. The energy exchange between our inner and outer world is our power-supply for maintaining health and wholeness. All our connections and interactions with the world work similar to electromagnetic circuits. The energy flow tends to be attracted to other power-points, such as people, ideas, activities, places, substances, memories, ideals, or anything else. If the energy exchange is fruitful we feel empowered. But if we let all our energy flow into unequal relationships, stressful jobs, worn-out habits, hurts from the past, addictions and so on, the result can be a significant power-loss. We will eventually end up depleted, powerless and this will sooner or later manifest as disease in our physical body. So if we want to improve our health it is essential that we become aware where we let our energy flow to. We cannot change the whole world, but by changing our behaviour and our attitudes we

can change our own circle of interaction within that world. The rewards are not only improved health, but also a richer, more rewarding life! We cannot change the whole world, but we can change our own .... And of course we need to remember that we are capable of generating our own energy. This is especially important when we are lonely or feel at the mercy of other people or medications to revitalise us. Everything in this world is a manifestation of the Universal Creative Power. We can all make contact with this power for it is part of our own being. We can call it: the Divine Spark within us. In our modern busy lives we often forget it is there, but if we are still and shed the layers of superficiality, for example in meditation, prayer or daydreaming, we will find its power moving deep within us. And this power will make us whole. Connecting with this force requires just a slight shift of consciousness. We are not just a drop in the ocean, but we are part of the infinite ocean. One of the many ancient names of this immense source of power is Mother Nature. Resonating to her essence is like a home-coming and can fill us with an endless potential of creativity and power to set off refreshed and renewed on our path in this life. Being in the presence of trees, Tree Medicine and vibrational tinctures, such as "Mother Nature's Celtic Tree Remedies", are powerful aids to help you open up and attune to this immense source of healing, creativity and power. May your power grow like a mature tree, dance like the Sun on twinkling leaves and be a source of beauty for the greater good of All.

* Herbs Good for Legal Matters * various sources ~Buckthorn ~Cascara Sagrada (Sprinkle an infusion of cascara sagrada around your home before go to any court proceeding. It will help win your case.) ~Celandine ~Hickory ~Marigold ~Skunk Cabbage ~Or how about: carry Deer's Tongue Leaves for your lawyer's eloquence, Calendula Flowers for winning in court, and use Galangal or Court Case Root to chew while you are in court so that the judge will favor you. FLOWERS AND THEIR MAGICKAL USES AND RECIPES Lavender 1)Flower Meanings & Uses = Answers, Healing, and Faith. 2)Color Meanings & Uses = Intuition, dignity, spiritual shield, wear to relax in high stress situations, use in magickal workings that involve the intellect, soothing erratic energy,

and causing inner beauty to radiate outward. 3)Herb Meanings & Uses = Mercury/Gemini/Leo; Love spells, money spells, pain relief, attract good spirits, happiness, peace, sleep, protection, fidelity, purification, anger management, travel, liberation, longevity. 4)Oil Meanings & Uses = Happiness, Love, Peace, anointing, exorcism, healing, purification. 5)Incense Meanings & Uses = Love, anointing, purification, cleansing. 6)Ailment Uses = Anxiety neurosis, coughs, depression, headaches, insect bites, insomnia, stress, pre-menstrual syndrome, childbirth. 7)Aromatherapy Uses = Treats insomnia, anti-bacterial for skin rashes and burns, eases pain of insect bites and stings, relieves headaches and migraines, calming, mild enough for children. 8)Other Uses = Magnetic(attracts men), sleep, purification. 9)Flowery Love Bath = 3 Parts Lavender, 3 Parts Palmarosa, 1 Drop Rose-Bathe in this to attract love and to expand your ability to give and receive love. 10)Evening Bath = To make you calm-4 Drops Lavender, 4 Drops Marjoram. 11)Full Moon(Oil/Incense) = Use to invoke the mother aspect of the Triple Goddess and for any working that involves abundance and fertility-Anise, Lavender, Rosemary. 12)Anger Relief Tea = 2 Tbsp. Catnip, 5 Tbsp. Chamomile, 3 Tbsp. Rose Petals, 2 Tbsp. Lemon Balm, 4 Tbsp. Lavender, 1 and Half Tbsp. Vervain-Mix together. Use 2 Tbsp. of tea for every cup of water. As tea steeps, chant"Fiery anger, go away, calmness come and with me stay, soothe my mind so I can think, steep peace of mind, within this drink." Roses 1)Flower Meanings & Uses = Beauty, love, merit, simple pleasures, mirthfulness, light,

life, passion, silence, romance, unfaithfulness, luck, protection, beginnings, prophetic dreams, psychic abilities. 2)Oil Meanings & Uses = Sensual, love, peace, sexual desire, enhanced beauty, health, healing, luck, psychic awareness, anointing, banishing, clairvoyance, divination, creativity, happiness. 3)Incense Meanings & Uses = Love magick, to return calm energies to the home, clairvoyance, divination. 4)Herb Meanings & Uses = Courage, good luck, healing, love, psychic ability, divination, psychic power, protection. 5)Ailment Uses = Bruises, cuts, sore throats, sprains. 6)Other Uses = Anger management, beauty, luck, premenstual syndrome, prophetic dreams. 7)Aromatherapy Uses = Heart warming aphrodisiac, relieves sexual debilities, frigidity, impotency, treats anorexia, elevating to the mind, confidence, improving, creates a sense of peaceful well being. 8)Good Omen Incense = 5 Rose petals, 1 & half onces myrrh, 1 ounce dragon's blood, half ounce sassafras, half ounce orange blossoms, half ounce juniper, half ounce sage, half dram frankincense oil-Mix all together and burn on a hot charcoal block to attract good luck. 9)Glamour Spell = You will need a big red candle and a pink rose.-"This is to feel (put hand over candle), this is to be(put hand over flower), shape and format for all to see, by the powers of 3 times 3(put hands over eyes),as I will it, so shall it be (put hands in the air)." 10)Love Sachet = Dried rose petals, lavender and orris root. Place also a small piece of copal in the sachet-choose one that is as close to the shape of a heart as possible. Use a rose colored material. 11)A Ritual For A Peaceful Home = 1 Handful jasmine, 2 passion flowers, 1 Tbsp. honey, 1 handful white rose petals, half cup spring water-

Mix together. As you blend, visualize your home being filled with love and light. Place mixture in a jar where you can see it every day. Jasmine 1)Flower Meanings & Uses = Amiability, promotes self-love, self-confidence, helpful when invoking deities of the feminine gender. 2)Incense Meanings & Uses = For luck in general, especially in matters of love, anointing. 3)Oil Meanings & Uses = Love, money, riches, anointing, good luck, meditation, protection, defence, spirituality. 4)Herb Meanings & Uses = Love, money, wealth, prosperity, sleep, heartbreak management, prophetic dreams. 5)Aromatherapy Uses = Aprodisiac, longlasting scent, elevates spirits, decreases depression or nervous tension, strengthens male reproductive system, aids impotency, physically and emotionally relaxing. 6)Other Uses = Magnetic(attracts men), love, meditation, purification. 7)Romance(Oil/Incense) = This is great to bring the light hearted laughter and fun of romance-cinnamon, patchouli, vanilla, jasmine flowers. 8)Drawing Powder = Blue candle. Blue talc. Jasmine(money), violet(luck and wishes), lavender(happiness). Rub on your hands and sprinkle around the altar before calling the spirits. Helps attract good luck. 9)Great Rite Powder = Blue candle. Blue talc. Sandalwood(wishes), sage(wishes), rose(love), orange peel(love), jasmine(love). Burn or scatter in room where lovers are to meet, to please the good spirits and to increase sexual awareness. 10)Peace & Harmony Oil = 3 Drops jasmine oil, 5 drops lilac oil, 2 drops magnolia oil, 1 ounce sunflower oil-Add all together and shake well to mix. Use in oil burner or to anoint a white candle and dedicate to

harmony. Chamomile 1)Flower Meanings & Uses = Energy and calm. 2)Oil Meanings & Uses = Relaxation, love, money, riches, good luck, purification. 3)Herb Meanings & Uses = Prepares the mind for magick, brings peace, marriage proposals, luck in gambling, prevents lightening strikes, purification, sleep, love, money, wealth, hex-breaking. 4)Ailment Uses = Allergies, asthma, hay fever, headache. 5)Other Uses = Anger management, gambling, legal matters, love, nightmare protection, prophetic dreams, prosperity, sleep, stress management. 6)Incense Meanings & Uses = Good luck 7)Aromatherapy Uses = Aids skin conditions, eases migraines, relieves insomnia, soothing, anti-inflammatory, use as a compress for ear aches. 8)Headache Tea = Add equal amounts of the following herbs-white willow bark, chamomile, catnip-mix well and allow to steep in boiling water for 4to5 minutes. 9)Relaxation Tea = Half Tsp. lemon balm leaves, quarter Tsp. lavender, half Tsp. linden flowers and Half Tsp. chamomile. 10)Earth(Oil/Incense) = Use this combination for magickal efforts of a practical nature or personal grounding. Anoint pet collars for added protection-Basil, cinnamon, chamomile, juniper berries, nutmeg, patchouli, rosemary. 11)Love Simmering Potpourri = 3 Tbsp. Rose petals, 2 Tbsp. Chamomile, 1 Tbsp. coriander, 1 Tbsp. cinnamon, Half a vanilla beanMix in small bowl, charge with energy. Simmer while saying, "Love awakens in these rooms, come by the power of these blooms!"

Honeysuckle 1)Flower Meanings & Uses = Fidelity, bonds of love, promotes joy, relieves depression, works well in efforts to increase psychic awareness, finances, good luck. 2)Oil Meanings & Uses = Money, riches, psychic awareness, clairvoyance, divination, creativity, good luck, love, prosperity, protection. 3)Herb Meanings & Uses = Good luck, money, wealth, psychic ability, depression management, heartbreak management, protection. 4)Incense Meanings & Uses = Burn for good health, luck, psychic power, money, love. 5)Friendship Oil = 4 Drops honeysuckle oil, 2 drops basil, 1 ounce almond oil, 2 drops spearmint oil, 1 sprig fresh spearmint-Mix all together and place in bottle. Use on cards or letters to friends. Violet 1)Color Meanings & Uses = Tension, power, sentiment. 2)Herb Meanings & Uses = Good Luck, healing, love, peace, wishes, protection, health, lust. 3)Oil Meanings & Uses = Health, healing, love, luck, peace, protection. 4)Flower Meanings & Uses = Steadfastness, faithfulness, watchfulness, rural happiness, artistic ability, fidelity. 5)Air(Oil/Incense) = Try this mixture when your practical nature starts to cloud your imagination or override your emotional responses. It also works well for efforts involving new beginnings, risk taking, and new projectsViolet petals, rosemary, lavender. 6)Spring Equinox(Oil/Incense) = Use to welcome spring, add warmth and joyful abundant vibrations to the home-Jasmine petals, rose petals, orris root, violet petals.

7)Venus(Oil/Incense) = Use this mixture to gain assistance from the deities of love and romance-Amber, rose petals, lavender, violet petals. 8)Drawing Powder = Blue candle. Blue talc. Jasmine(money), violet(luck and wishes), lavender(happiness).-Helps attract good luck and assistance in important matters. 9)Healing Emotions Oil = 7 Drops sandalwood oil, 3 drops violet oil, 2 drops eucalyptus oil, 1 ounce grapeseed oil, 1 piece sandalwood-Add oils togather, shake to mix well. Place sandalwood piece in bottle. Use in oil burner or to rub over heart to allow feelings to come to surface. 10)Oil Of Irresistibility = Half ounce olive oil, 13 drops jasmine oil, 10 drops anise oil, 6 drops lilac oil, 2 drops lotus oil, 20 drops rose oil, 10 drops narcissus oil, 10 drops violet oil, 13 drops ylang-ylang oil. Lily 1)Flower Meanings & Uses = Use for efforts involving strength, protection, purification, breaking hexes, keeping away unwanted guests, return of happiness, purity, sweetness, falsehood, gaiety, coquetry, high soul, good luck, harmony. 2)Incense Meanings & Uses = Anointing, inspiration, wisdom. 3)Oil Meanings & Uses = Anointing, happiness, peace, protection, defence, inspiration. 4)Other Uses = Depression management, mental powers, protection. 5)Ailment Uses = Anxiety neurosis, bruises, insomnia. Carnation 1)Flower Meanings & Uses = Admiration, pride, beauty, merited, poor heart, forlorn, deep love, refusal, purity.

2)Incense Meanings & Uses = A sweet floral scent used for healing, protection, anointing, blessing, consecration. 3)Oil Meanings & Uses = Anointing, blessing, consecration, energy, power, strength, healing. 4)Herb Meanings & Uses = Healing, strength, protection, psychic healing. 5)Oil Of Lust = Half ounce olive oil, 15 Drops Carnation oil, 13 drops citronella oil, 25 drops orange oil, 5 drops rose oil, 5 drops geranium oil. Geranium 1)Flower Meanings & Uses = Recall, bridal favor, preference, friendship. 2)Oil Meanings & Uses = Love, protection, happiness, peace, basic care, relaxation. 3)Herb Meanings & Uses = Love, protection. 4)Aromatherapy Uses = Regenerates and rejuvinates skin cells and tissue, anti-cellulite, eases stress, balances hormone problems during menopause, relieves PMS. 5)Soothing Splash = 10 drops benzoin, 2 drops nutmeg, 5 drops geranium, 10 drops sandalwood. 6)A Detoxifying Bath = 2 drops lemon, 4 drops juniper, 2 drops geranium. 7)Blessing/Creativity Incense = 1 Tsp. lavender flowers, 1 Tsp. rosemary, quarter cup dried orange rind, 1 Tsp. dried geranium petals, half cup powdered wood. 8)Purification Bath = 3 parts geranium oil, 1 part frankincense oil, 1 part rosemary oil. 9)Cheer-Up Oil = 2 drops geranium, 3 drops bergamot, 2 drops rose-A very flowery scent. 10)Oil Of Lust = Half ounce olive oil, 15 drops carnation oil, 13 drops citronella oil, 25 drops orange oil, 5 drops rose oil, 5 drops

geranium oil. Juniper 1)Flower Meanings & Uses = Asylum and protection. 2)Oil Meanings & Uses = Health, healing, love, protection, defence, purification. 3)Herb Meanings & Uses = Health, love, aphrodisiac, healing, exorcism, hunting, protection, wishes. 4)Ailment use = Asthma 5)Fire Bath = 2 parts basil, half part orange, 3 parts frankincense, 2 parts juniper-For use in attuning with the elements of fire, or rituals involving strength, courage, passion, lust, ect... 6)Good Omen Incense = 5 rose petals, 1 and half ounces myrrh, 1 ounce dragon's blood, half ounce sassafras, half ounce orange blossoms, half ounce juniper, half once sage, .half dram frankincense oil-Mix together and burn on a hot charcoal block to attract good luck. 7)Purification Incense = 1 Tbsp. Pine needles, 1 Tbsp. juniper, 1 Tbsp. cedarGrind together and burn on self-igniting charcoal. 8)Good Morning Bath = 2 Drops peppermint, 2 drops juniper, 4 drops rosemary. 9)A Detoxifying Bath = 2 drops lemon, 4 drops juniper, 2 drops geranium. 10)Earth(Oil/Incense) = Use this combination for magickal efforts of a practical nature or for personal grounding. Anoint pet collars for added protection-Basil, cinnamon, chamomile, juniper berries, nutmeg, patchouli, rosemary. 11)Mind Refresher = 2 drops rosemary, 2 drops juniper, 1 drop lemon-Like a deep breath of fresh air. Patchouli 1)Incense Meanings & Uses = Use in money and attraction spells, love, banishing,

release. 2)Aromatherapy Uses = Sensual rejuvinator, prevents wrinkles and chapped skin, anti-aging, curbs appetite, anti-bacterial. 3)Oil Meanings & Uses = Lust, money, riches, banishing, happiness, peace, love, protection, sexual desires. 4)Herb Meanings & Uses = Fertility, money, wealth, success, passion, love, enemies. 5)Earth Bath = 3 parts cypress, 4 parts patchouli, 1 part vetivert-use in attuning with the earth or for spells invoking money, foundation, stability, creativity, and fertility. 6)Lust Bath = 2 Parts patchouli, 3 parts sandalwood, 1 part cardamon-for promoting lustful desires. 7)Divination Incense = 1 Part patchouli, 1 part juniper, 1 part cinnamon, 1 part sandalwood, a few drops clove oil-Mix all herbs, add oil and mix. Burn on self-igniting charcoal. 8)Toning Splash = 18 Drops lemongrass, 2 drops basil, 5 drops sage, 3 drops black pepper, 3 drops patchouli. 9)Fast Money Oil = 7 Drops patchouli, 5 drops cedarwood, 2 drops ginger, 4 drops vetivert-wear, rub on hands or anoint green candles to bring money. 10)Protection Oil = Equal parts of gardenia, sandalwood, patchouli and blessed salt. 11)Power Oil = Equal parts of patchouli oil, cinnamon oil, vanilla oil-Touch to pulse points prior to going into a situation you need to have power over. 12)Money Sachet = Patchouli, clove, cinnamon and three dimes sewn up into a green cloth. Frankincense 1)Incense Meanings & Uses = Draw upon the energy of the sun to create sacred space, consecrate objects and stimulate positive

vibrations. Also used for protection, anointing, blessing, purification, cleansing. 2)Aromatherapy Uses = Meditative, tightens and tones skin, anti-aging, stimulates cell regeneration, soothes and calms nerves, treats urinary tract infection, anti-bacterial. 3)Oil Meanings & Uses = Courage, anointing, blessing, consecration, energy, power, strength, exorcism, meditation, protection, defence, purification. 4)Herb Meanings & Uses = Spirituality, healing, love spells, purification, protection. 5)Ailment Uses = Asthma and Bronchitis. 6)Circle Bath = 2 parts myrrh, 3 parts rosemary, 1 part frankincense, 2 parts sandalwood-Bathe in before any form of magickal working to strengthen, purify and prepare. 7)Fire Bath = 2 parts basil, half part orange, 3 parts frankincense, 2 parts juniper-Use for attuning with the elements of fire or rituals involving strength, courage and passion. 8)Universal Potpourri = 3 parts frankincense, 1 part sandalwood, 2 parts myrrh, 1 part rosemary-Simmer for all positive magickal purposes. 9)Magickal Moon Incense = 1 Tsp. white sandalwood, 1 Tsp. frankincense-Grind together and burn on self-igniting charcoal. 10)Money Drawing Oil = Mix equal parts of frankincense, myrrh and sandalwood, add a touch of bayberry to liven it up. 11)Powder of Love/Lust = 5 ounces talc, quarter Tsp. cinnamon, 10 drops frankincense oil, 8 drops jasmine oil, 1 Tsp. myrtle, 6 drops patchouli oil, 1 ounce sandalwood powder, half Tsp. sweet basil. Rosemary 1)Aromatherapy Uses = Increases sensitivity, increases creativity, lifts exhaustion, awakens your heart.

2)Incense Meanings & Uses = Anointing, courage, inspiration, wisdom, cleansing, purification, will power. 3)Oil Meanings & Uses = Health, healing, love, lust, anointing, blessing, peace, consecration, courage, happiness, inspiration, protection, defence, purification, energize. 4)Herb Meanings & Uses = Contentment, healing, love, sleep, power, mental powers, beauty, health, lust, prophetic dreams, theft, wishes. 5)Love Potion(Don't drink) = 10 dried rose petals, 1 Tsp. rosemary, 2 Tbsp. vanilla, 1 Tsp. powdered sugar, 1 cup melted ice, 1 Tbsp. honey, 1 piece tumbled rose quartz-This is for romance. 6)Mind Refresher = 2 drops rosemary, 2 drops juniper, 1 drop lemon-Like deep breaths of fresh air. 7)Protection Oil = Blend together the oils of rosemary, rose geranium, and cypress -Use to anoint candles or add to bath. 8)House Blessing Incense = 2 Tbsp. dry lemon peel, 1 Tsp. cinnamon, 1 Tbsp. rosemary, 1 Tsp. allspice, 1 Tbsp. almond extract, 1 pinch garlic skins, 1 pinch salt, 1 Tsp. anise seeds, 1 Tsp. coconut extract. 9)Help Incense = When you need help-1 Tbsp. thyme, 1 Tbsp. cinnamon, 1 Tbsp. rosemary, 2 Tbsp. vanilla extract, 1 Tsp. clove, 1 Tsp. ginger, 1 Tsp. allspice, 1 pinch salt. 10)Herbal Teas For Colds = Yarrow, rosemary, pennyroyal(don't use if pregnant), or peppermint. 11)Sleep Tea = 2 Tbsp. Hops, 1 Tsp. rosemary, 1 Tsp. lavender, 1 Tsp. thyme, 1 Tsp. mugwort, 1 Tsp. sage, 1 Tsp. chamomile, 1 Tsp. wintergreen, 1 pinch valerian root-Use 1 Tsp. mixture to 1 cup boiling water. Sandalwood 1)Aromatherapy Uses = Aphrodisiac, aids in awareness, meditation, peace, inspiring,

healing, psychic powers. 2)Incense Meanings & Uses = An all purpose scent used to heal and protect. 3)Oil Meanings & Uses = Health, healing, protection, purification, spirituality,sensual, meditation. 4)Herb Meanings & Uses = Good luck, healing, spirituality, success, wishes, health, protection, business success, mental powers. 5)Circle Bath = 2 parts myrrh, 3 parts rosemary, 1 part frankincense, 2 parts sandalwoodUse before magickal workings. 6)Healing Bath = 2 parts eucalyptus, 3 parts niaouli, 1 part sandalwood-Use for speedy healing. 7)Lust Bath = 2 parts patchouli, 3 parts sandalwood, 1 part cardamon-For promoting lustful desires. 8)Universal Potpourri = 3 parts frankincense, 1 part sandalwood, 2 parts myrrh, 1 part rosemary-Simmer for all positive magickal purposes. 9)Magickal Moon Incense = 1 Tsp. frankincense, 1 Tsp. White sandalwood-Grind together and burn on self-igniting charcoal. 10)Meditation Incense = 1 part bay leaves, 1 part sandalwood, 1 part damania-Burn a little at a time during meditation. 11)Protection Oil = Equal parts of gardenia, patchouli and sandalwood, add blessed salt to enhance. 12)Healing Ointment = 4 drops cedarwood, 2 drops sandalwood, 1 drop cinnamon, 1 drop eucalyptus. Sage 1)Aromatherapy Uses = Avoid if epileptic, produces vivid dreams, eases migraines, balances female hormones, eases menstrual discomfort/PMS/menopause, retards

excessive perspiration. 2)Flower Meaning & Use = Artistic ability. 3)Herb Meanings & Uses = Health, beauty, protection, wisdom, wishes, longevity, increase lust, purification, hunting, menopause, fortune, long life, removes negative energies. 4)Ailment Uses = Blood clots, blood impurities, dandruff, dehydration, eczema, insect bites, poison ivy/oak rash, sore throats. 5)Cleansing = Burn sage, using the smoke to remove negative energies. 6)Yule(Oil/Incense) = Use this in celebrating the birth of the sun/any work where light overcoming dark is an issue-Chamomile, ginger, sage, pine needles/bark. 7)Pluto(Oil/Incense) = Use this for overcoming difficulties of a personal natureCinnamon and sage. 8)Samhain(Oil/Incense) = Use this for tapping into the spirit world-Nutmeg, bay leaves and sage. 9)Autumn Equinox(Oil/Incense) = Use in celebrating Thanks Giving-Hibiscus, rose petals and sage. 10)Happy House Charm = Make a small pillow, stuff it with; Sage and sandalwood (for blessing & protection), Lavender(for domestic tranquility), Rose petals (for to honor love), Vervain(for bright witchery) and a couple drops cinnamon oil. Cinnamon 1)Incense Meanings & Uses = Used to gain wealth and success, money, good luck, clairvoyance, divination. 2)Oil Meanings & Uses = Health, healing, love, lust, psychic awareness, clairvoyance, divination, energy, power, strength, good luck, meditation, protection, defence, spirituality. 3)Herb Meanings & Uses = Dreams,

healing, love, money, wealth, psychic ability, spirituality, success, cleansing, love, clairvoyance, health, vibrates on a high spiritual level. 4)Ailment Uses = Acid indigestion, cramps, athlete's foot, bad breath, fever, heart burn. 5)Love Potion(Don't Drink) = 1 orange slice, 1 Tbsp. cinnamon, 2 Tbsp. garlic, 1 handful cloves, 1 tiger lily petal, 1 cup muddy water, 1 chip tiger's eye, 1 Tbsp. olive oil, 1 chip rose quartz-This is for intense, exotic love. 6)Powder For Love/Lust = 5 ounces talc, quarter Tsp. cinnamon, 10 drops frankincense oil, 8 drops jasmine oil, 1 Tsp. myrtle, 6 drops patchouli oil, 1 ounce sandalwood powder, half Tsp. sweet basil. 7)Powder For Money = 5 Ounces talc, half Tsp. cinnamon, 12 drops frankincense oil, 10 drops myrrh oil, 13 drops patchouli oil, 1 ounce sandalwood powder, 1 Tsp. yellow dock. 8)Come & Get Me Oil = Half ounce olive oil, 2 drops cinnamon oil, 4 drops rose oil, 5 drops patchouli oil, 7 drops sandalwood oil. 9)Thank You Incense = Just to say thanks-1 Tsp. sage, 2 Tbsp. rosemary, 1 Tbsp. cinnamon, 1 Tsp. allspice, dry peel of 1 lemon, 1 Tbsp. almond extract, dry petals of 3 roses. 10)Cinnamon Love Oil = Charge and blend, two fifth parts baby oil, and three fifth parts cinnamon. Add a honeysuckle leaf. Lilacs 1)Flower Meanings & Uses = First love, first emotions of love, youthful innocence, obsession, youth, children. 2)Incense Meanings & Uses = Clairvoyance, divination, attract harmony. 3)Oil Meanings & Uses = Psychic awareness, creativity, happiness, peace. 4)Herb Meanings & Uses = Protection,

beauty, love, protection, exorcism. 5)Ailment Uses = Abdominal cramps, inflammations, measles, mumps. 6)Irresistibility Oil = Half once olive oil, 13 drops jasmine oil, 10 drops anise oil, 6 drops lilac oil, 2 drops lotus oil, 20 drops rose oil, 10 drops narcissus oil, 10 drops violet oil, 13 drops ylang-ylang oil. 7)Peace & Harmony Oil = 3 drops jasmine oil, 5 drops lilac oil, 2 drops magnolia oil, 1 ounce sunflower oil-Add all together and shake to mix well. 8)Courage Powder = Purple candle. Blue talc. Blue bottle. Vanilla(mental power), rose(protection & psychic powers), lilac (protection), lavender(protection)-Use to give great amounts of courage. Eucalyptus 1)Aromatherapy Uses = Stimulating, antiviral, eases respiratory ailments, soothes sore muscles and sunburn pain, anti-bacterial properties inhibit spread of infection when used in a diffuser, healing. 2)Incense Uses = Psychic awareness. 3)Oil Uses = Health, healing, protection, purification, basic care. 4)Herb Uses = Healing, protection, health. 5)Ailment Uses = Asthma, bladder problems, bronchitis, coughs, fever, leg cramps. 6)Healing Ointment = 4 drops cedarwood, 2 drops sandalwood, 1 drop cinnamon, 1 drop eucalyptus. 7)Protection Incense = 3 parts eucalyptus, 3 parts sandalwood, 1 part cinnamon, 1/8 part dragon's blood-Grind herbs and empower with type of protection needed. 8)Healing Emotions Oil = 7 drops sandalwood oil, 3 drops violet oil, 2 drops eucalyptus oil, 1 ounce grapeseed oil, 1 piece

sandalwood-Place everything in a bottle and shake well to mix. 9)Healing Bath = 2 parts eucalyptus, 3 parts niaouli, 1 part sandalwood-Use for speedy healing. Vervain 1)Incense Uses = Anointing, banishing, release. 2)Flower Meanings = Feminine power, women's power, abilities, problems. 3)Oil Uses = Banishing, energy, power, strength. 4)Herb Uses = Opens new love, purification, sleep, money, wealth, anti-sorcery, astral projection, anger management, health, healing, love, prosperity, protection, wishes. 5)Offering Incense = 1 Tsp. crushed rose petals, 1 Tsp. vervain, 1 Tsp. myrrh, 1 Tsp. frankincense, 1/4 Tsp. cinnamon-Grind together and burn on self-igniting charcoal. 6)Anger Relief Tea = 2 Tbsp. catnip, 5 Tbsp. chamomile, 3 Tbsp. rosepetals, 2 Tbsp. lemon balm, 4 Tbsp. lavender, 1 1/2 Tbsp. vervainMix together, use 2 Tbsp. for every cup of water. As the tea steeps, chant;"Fiery anger, go away, calmness come and with me stay, soothe my mind so I can think, steep peace of mind within this drink." 7)Vervain Wish Bath = Place 2 Tbsp. vervain in a coffee maker filter. Add a full pot of water. As it brews, chant;"Vervain, herb of wishes sweet, bring my wish now, I entreat."-Draw a bath, add infusion to it. Immerse yourself 9 times, say each time; "Wish, fly quickly unto me, as I will, so mote it be."-Step out of tub and dry naturally. 8)Happy House Charm = Make a small pillow. Stuff it with; Sage & sandalwood (blessing and protection), lavender(domestic tranquility), rosepetals(to honor love), vervain(for bright witchery) and a couple drops cinnamon oil. http://www.angelfire.com/ns/LadyNimoway/index.html

Herbal Safety Guidelines Herbal safety guidelines are important because we all have different constitutions, sensitivities, allergic reactions and possible health conditions. While few herbs are actually toxic, almost any food or herb can occasionally trigger an idiosynchratic reaction in someone. In the past herbs were most often taken as teas or syrups, but with the advances of modern times it is possible to ingest very potent standardized extracts which can have a powerful reaction in the body. Making and using your own remedies and farmiliarizing yourself with the actions of specific herbs is a good way to ensure a healthy and appropriate relationship to herbal medicine. EXTERNAL USE ONLY, UNLESS OTHERWISE DIRECTED BY A QUALIFIED EXPERT. DO NOT APPLY TO BROKEN/ABRADED SKIN: Alkanet, Arnica, Balm of Gilead, Blood Root, Borage, Comfrey, Frankincense, Horse Chestnut, Neem, Orris, Patchouli, Poke, Soapwort, Tonka NOT TO BE USED DURING PREGNANCY, OR IF YOU ARE NURSING: Alkanet, Aloe, Angelica, Anise, Anise Star, Arnica, Ashwaganda, Barley Grass, Barberry, Basil, Bitter Melon, Black Cohosh, Bladderwrack, Blessed Thistle, Blood Root, Blue Cohosh, Blue Flag, Blue Vervain, Borage, Buckthorn, California Poppy, Cascara Sagrada, Catnip, Celandine, Celery, Chervil, Cinnamon, Club Moss, Comfrey, Coltsfoot, Cubeb, Damiana, Dong Quai, Elecampane, Ephedra, False Unicorn, Fenugreek, Feverfew, Forsythia, Garcinia, Ginger, Golden Seal, Gravel, Guarana, Gymnema, Horehound, Horsetail, Hyssop, Juniper, Kola Nut, Lemongrass, Licorice, Lobelia, Lovage, Lungwort, Mace, Mistletoe, Motherwort, Mugwort, Muira Puama, Myrrh, Neem, Oregon Grape, Osha, Parsley, Passionflower, Pennyroyal, Pleurisy, Prickly Ash, Red Clover, Rhodiola, Rosemary, Rue, Sage, Sassafras, Sarsaparilla, Senna, Shepherds Purse, Spikenard, Turkey Rhubarb, Turmeric, Uva Ursi, Vitex, Watercress, White Sage, Wild Cherry, Wormwood, Yarrow NOT FOR PERSONS WITH HISTORY OF KIDNEY STONES, LIVER DISORDERS, RENAL DYSFUNCTION OR INFLAMMATION. Black Haw, Cubeb, Essiac, Horsetail, Hydrangea, Juniper Berries, Kava Kava, Parsley Root, Pennyroyal, Poke Root, Sheep Sorrel, Shepherds Purse, Suma, Sumac, Uva Ursi, Yellowdock, Yohimbe NOT RECOMMENDED FOR PERSON CURRENTLY TAKING BLOOD THINNING MEDICATIONS: Alfalfa, Angelica, Cramp Bark, Cubeb, Dong Quai, Ginkgo, Meadowsweet, Red Clover, Sarsaparilla, Yohimbe MAY CAUSE NAUSEA OR VOMITING: Elecampane, Lobelia, Myrrh MAY CAUSE GASTRO-INTESTINAL UPSET: Eucalyptus, False Unicorn, Fo-Ti, gentian, Ginger, Habanero, Kola Nut

NOT FOR PERSONS WITH STOMACH INFLAMMATION/ULCERS SERIOUS DIGESTION AND/OR LIVER PROBLEMS. MAY CAUSE GASTROINTESTINAL UPSET: Black Haw, Blue Flag, Chaparral, Club Moss, Crampbark, Devils Claw, Eucalyptus, Elecampane,

Essiac, Gentian, Ginger, Iceland Moss, Licorice, Lobelia, Parsley Root, Pleurisy, Pygeum, Solomans Seal, Tribulus, Turmeric, Yohimbe NOT RECOMMENDED FOR LONG-TERM USE: Barberry, Bilberry Leaf, Black Walnut, Bladderwrack, Blessed thistle, Borage, Cascara Sagrada, Club Moss, Comfrey, Coltsfoot, Chaparral, Dulse, Elecampane, Ephedra, Epimedium, Flax, Gentian, Goldenseal, Guarana, Horsetail, Hydrangea, Juniper, Kola Nut, Licorice, Lobelia, Lungwort, Mullein, Nettle Root, Rhubarb, Sage, Sassafras, Sarsaparilla, Senna, Sheep Sorrel, Wild Cherry, Wormwood, Uva Ursi, Yohimbe TO BE USED ONLY UNDER THE SUPERVISION OF AN EXPERT QUALIFIED IN THE APPROPRIATE USE OF THIS SUBSTANCE: Calamus, Horse Chestnut, Lobelia, Licorice, Mandrake, Mistletoe. Poke, Tonka DO NOT USE IF YOU HAVE ABDOMINAL PAIN OR DIARRHEA, DISCONTINUE IF THESE OCCUR. CONSULT HEALTH PRACTITIONER PRIOR TO USE IF PREGNANT, NURSING, AND TAKING MEDICATION OR HAVE A MEDICAL CONDITION. DO NOT EXCEED RECOMMENDED DOSE. NOT FOR LONG TERM USE: Aloe, Buckthorn, Cascara Sagrada, Senna, Turkey Rhubarb, Yohimbe MAY CAUSE PHOTO TOXICITY IN SOME INDIVIDUALS AT HIGH DOSAGE. AVOID LONG EXPOSURE TO SUN IF USING INTERNALLY: Angelica, Celery Seed, Orange Peel, Rue, St. Johns Wort SEEK ADVICE FROM HEALTH PRACTITIONER PRIOR TO USE IF PREGNANT, NURSING, HAVE HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE, HEART OR THYROID DISEASE, DIABETES, DIFFICULTY IN URINATION DUE TO PROSTATE ENLARGEMENT, OR IF TAKING MAO INHIBITOR OR OTHER PRESCRIPTION DRUG. REDUCE/DISCONTINUE USE IF NERVOUSNESS, TREMOR, SLEEPLESSNESS, LOSS OF APPETITE OR NAUSEA OCCUR. DO NOT EXCEED RECOMMENDED DOSE. KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN: Ephedra, St. Johns Wort, Yohimbe SEEK ADVICE FROM A HEALTH PRACTITIONER BEFORE USE IF YOU HAVE/MAY HAVE HAD KIDNEY OR LIVER DISEASE. DISCONTINUE USE IF NAUSEA, FEVER, FATIGUE OR JAUNDICE (DARK URINE, YELLOW DISCOLORATION OF EYES) SHOULD OCCUR: Boldo, Chaparral BULK-FORMING LAXATIVES ARE CONTRAINDICATED IN BOWEL OBSTRUCTION; MUST BE TAKEN WITH ADEQUATE LIQUID TO AVOID CONSTIPATION OR OBSTRUCTION. TAKE WITH AT LEAST ShockedZ OF FLUID: Aloe, Flax, Psyllium Seed HERBS AND THEIR MAGIC~ Basil - Used in large quantities as a tonic and cold rememdy. Basil oil is said to repel insects. Bay - Leaves in a tea or decoction form may alleviate gas. Chervil - This winter herb can be used as a digestive aid; some herbalists recommend it to lower blood pressure but there is no scientific proof to support that claim. Chives - Contains sulfer oil, which may lower blood pressure if consumed in large amounts. Coriander - Fresh leaves or seeds may be chewed to ease indigestion.

Dill - Eaten to alleviate intestinal gas. Europeans often give their babies weak dill tea to relieve colic. Mint - As a tea it is a digestive aid; chewing the leaves can freshen the breath. Oregano - Used in a tea it aids digestion; also alleviates the congestion of a cold. Also a stimulant. Parsley - When consumed in portions of at least an ounce, this herb contains useful amounts of vitamin C (fresh parsley only), calcium, iron and potassium; it is also high in bioflavonoids, monoterpenes and other anticancer Compounds. Rosemary - Its leaves contain an oil that is used in liniments to releave muscle aches; as a tea, it is said to alleviate headaches. Sage - The tea is used as a digestive aid and as a mouthwash or gargle to ease painful gums, mouth ulcers and a sore throat. Thyme - A tea to quiet irritable bowels, as a gargle for a sore throat, or as a syrup to treat a cough or chest congestion. Herbs For Every Sign Our lovely planet provides us with many gifts. Stones, crystals, herbs,trees - each one is a container of natural magic, holding a special quality that's perfect to heal whatever ails us. Herbs can be mixed and combined to produce a "recipe" that's just right for each of us. Since the Sun sign you were born under has such an amazing influence on your health and well-being, using the herbs that correspond with that sign alone can be a tremendous help in times of stress or illness. (Editor's note: check with a reliable herb book or herbalist before using herbs.) Here's a short list of herbs that seem to be tailor-made for each of the signs, due to their associations with both the planetary ruler and the positive qualities of that sign. Aries - Mars Allspice, basil, cayenne, garlic, ginger, mustard, onion, pepper. It's no secret that Aries is the astrological equivalent of a bullet. It's a red-hot burst of energy that's capable of overcoming any obstacle by charging straight for it. The ruler of Aries is Mars, the "red" planet, the ancient god of war who was known for his equally fiery temperament. No wonder, then, the herbs that correspond with your sign are also a bit "hot" to the taste. Use them in cooking to raise your endorphins, the substance Mars loves best. Taurus - Venus Apple, apricot, blackberry, cherry, heather, hibiscus, raspberry, rose. Taurus is the sign that's fondest of the pleasures that life inside these bodies can provide. Whether it's a blazing sunset, a symphony by Mozart, or a delicious meal, you folks are experts at enjoying the physical delights of the senses. It's no surprise that the herbs you'll enjoy most are the sweet ones, since your planet, Venus, is the purveyor of sweetness. Use each of them to satisfy that sweet tooth. Gemini - Mercury Clover, eyebright, fennel, lemongrass, lemon verbena, marjoram, parsley. Your quick-witted, fleet-footed energy just loves variety - in fact, the expression "variety is the spice of life" was written with you in mind. Each of these herbs provide a different type of taste, and most can be combined in a light, aromatic tea you can sip on the run. Use clove or slippery elm to protect against gossip and to keep your thoughts and actions grounded. Cancer - Moon Aloe, lemon balm, chamomile, mimosa, lavender, lilac. Nurturing is your business, Cancer, and you distribute your soothing touch to one and all. There's nothing you like better than a home that smells good, too, whether it's because there's something wonderful simmering on the stove, a vase of fresh flowers on the dining room table, or a warm, fragrant bubble bath waiting for you upstairs. Each of the herbs listed above are known for their ability to calm, heal, or bring a wonderful aroma to the environment.

Use aloe to soothe burns and scrapes and chamomile for a wonderful bedtime tea. Leo - Sun Chicory, cinnamon, goldenseal, rosemary, St. John's wort, sandalwood. Your planet is the Sun, Leo, the source of life and warmth that keeps us all alive and provides us with the energy we need to keep pursuing our life's quest. It makes perfect sense, then, that the bright, cheerful sunflower would be the perfect representation of your equally bright and happy sign. Herbs like goldenseal and St. John's wort are tailor-made for you, too, since their ability to keep the body resistant to illness and depression are well-known. Mix a bit of chicory with your morning coffee to help remove any obstacles that come up. Virgo - Mercury Caraway, dill, eyebright, horehound, lily of the valley, marjoram, savory. Your quick-thinking meticulous sign likes nothing better than a mental challenge, Virgo, whether it's organizing a pile of papers at the office, solving a puzzle, or learning a new skill. The herbs listed above are all well-known for their subtle abilities to strengthen the mind, and many can be mixed together in teas to give you a boost you often need at the end of a long day. The lily of the valley seems perfect for you, too, with its subtle, "clean" scent and delicate flowers. Libra - Venus Catnip, passion flower, persimmon, rose, sugar cane, violet. There's no sign as fond of pleasing others as yours, Libra, whether it's by saying just the right thing to bring warring factions together, or by using your polite charm to draw the object of your desires closer. Of course, catnip is famous for its effects on our feline friends, but its also traditionally used in conjunction with rose petals to bring loving relationships that last forever. Since you're ruled by Venus, you're capable of being every bit as sweet as the sugar cane - but if you need a bit of help to attract a beloved, use this potent plant (sugar cane) that's long been used to conjure love sweetly. Scorpio - Pluto/Mars Ginseng, dill, patchouli, pomegranate, saffron, vanilla. As fond as you are of intensity and intimacy, Scorpio, it's no wonder the herbs you'll love best are famous for their use in stirring up passion. Drink ginseng tea (or offer some to your beloved) to induce a magnetic physical attraction. Wear patchouli to arouse lust and silently conjure the magic of the Beltane rituals. Present the object of your desire with a pomegranate, the fruit traditionally associated with seductive Pluto, your ruling planet. Sagittarius - Jupiter Anise, clove, fig, hyssop, mugwort, myrtle, nutmeg, rosemary, sage. There's no sign that hangs on to youth with more fervency and determination than yours Sagittarius. To keep that youthful appearance and disposition going as you travel the world in search of yet another experience, drink a tea made of anise, rosemary, and vervain. To aid in making your dreams more prophetic than they already are, use mugwort. Burn clove incense to attract the wealth you'll need to pay for your travels. Capricorn - Saturn Comfrey, horsetail, mint, poppy, sassafras, woodruff. You've always been described as a very "focused" sign, Capricorn, intent on self-sufficiency and material success. The influence of your planet, Saturn, gives you the ambition and self-discipline to attain those goals, and to

ensure success and prosperity in business matters, too. Each of the herbs mentioned above are known for their ability to attract that success, and most can be mixed together in a tea. Aquarius - Uranus/Saturn Anise, bittersweet, citron, dandelion, lemon verbena, rosemary, sage. Your sign is a cerebral one, Aquarius, and your ability to turn "odd" or eccentric ideas into strokes of genius is well-known. Since communication (and mass communication in particular) is your specialty, the herbs above are all associated with the air principle, which rules the intellectual side of life. To increase your already powerful intuition, use citron, clover, or rosemary. Above all else, listen to that intuition. It will seldom prove to be wrong. Pisces - Neptune/Jupiter Aloe, bay, cotton, eucalyptus, lavender, Norfolk Island pine, rue. As the most sensitive and psychic of all signs, Pisces, yours is the one that requires help to ward off the adverse thoughts and intentions of others. Since you have no boundaries to keep you separate from others, you also need protection against negative influences. To that end, use rue, a powerful herb known to ward off ills of every kind. To stay positive and healthy keep a lavender plant growing either outside or inside your home. Kim Rogers-Gallagher Llewellyn's Witches' Calendar 2000 Herbs for Specific Body Systems

Here's a list of herbs for specific body systems. You can See more about indiviual herbs here. And look up herbal remedies for speficic ailments here. Herbs for the Ears Butcher's Broom, Calendula, Garlic, Ginkgo, Hyssop, Mullein. Herbs for the Eyes Bilberry, Eyebright, Ginkgo, Shepherd's Purse, Yarrow. Herbs for the Mouth Goldenseal, Myrrh, Sage, Tea Tree.

Herbs for Blood Vessels, Veins & Arteries Angelica, Bitter Orange, Butcher's Broom, Cayenne, Hawthorn, Stinging Nettle.

Herbs for Circulation Butcher's broom, Cayenne, Garlic, Ginkgo. Herbs for the Heart Astragalus Bilberry, Cayenne, Garlic, Ginkgo, Hawthorn. Herbs for the Lymph Nodes Bitter orange, Burdock, Dandelion, Garlic, Lobelia, Red Clover, Schisandra.

Herbs for the Hair Alfalfa, Ginkgo, Horsetail, Oatstraw, Stinging Nettle, Sage. Herbs for the Bones Alfalfa, Horsetail, Rose Hips, Stinging Nettle, Yucca. Herbs for the Joints Alfalfa, Devil's Claw, Garlic, Horsetail, Stinging Nettle, Yucca. Herbs for the Skin Alfalfa, Aloe, Burdock, Calendula, Chamomile, Dandelion, Green Tea, Horsetail, Raspberry Leaf. Herbs for the Muscles Diascorea, Horsetail, Stinging Nettle.

Herbs for the Thymus Echinacea, Horsetail, Licorice, Stinging Nettle. Herbs for the Adrenal Glands Astragalus, Ginger, Juniper, Licorice, Rose Hips. Herbs for the Thyroid Bladderwrack, Stinging Nettle, Motherwort. Herbs for the Pancreas Angelica, Bitter Orange, Butcher's Broom, Cayenne, Green Tea, Hawthorn, Horse CHestnut, Stinging Nettle, White Oak.

Herbs for the Central Nervous System Ashwaganda, Chamomile, Ginkgo, Kava, Siberian Ginseng, Skullcap, Valerian. Herbs for the Brain Ginger, Ginkgo, Gotu Kola, Lobelia. Herbs for the Kidneys Astragalus, Cordyceps, Corn Silk, Dandelion Root, Oat Straw, Parsley, Slippery Elm, Uva Ursi. Herbs for the Bladder Butcher's Broom, Celery Seed, Corn Silk, Cranberry, Horsetail, Juniper, Parsley, Uva Ursi. Herbs for the Liver Black Radish, Burdock, Dandelion, Fenugreek, Milk Thistle, Red Clover, Schisandra. Herbs for the Gall Bladder Barberry, Burdock, Dandelion. Herbs for the Lungs Dong Quai, Elderberry, Eucalyptus, Garlic, Ginger, Licorice, Lungwort, Rose Hips, Stinging Nettle. Herbs for the Stomache Aloe, Chamomile, Garlic, Ginger. Herbs for the Intestines Aloe, Fennel, Fenugreek, Garlic, Pau d' Arco, Plantain, Slippery Elm.

Hibiscus Hibiscus plant is one of the most famous plants of the The botanical name of this plant is Hibiscus Sabdariffa. Its common name is Roselle. Hibiscus plant has many varieties and is planted worldwide. There are over 100 cultivars or seed varieties of Hibiscus sabdariffa. The major commercial varieties are those grown in China, Thailand, Mexico and Africa, principally Sudan, Senegal and Mali and Egypt. Its Arabic name is Karkade, which is exactly like the German name. It has many medicinal uses, together with the most appealing flavor as an herbal tea. Hibiscus is a lovely annual flower with beautiful red flowers, commonly grown in flower gardens or indoor pots. The flowers are not just for scenic pleasure, but have amazing flavoring qualities. In Africa, Karkade is the name given to a delicious hibiscus punch. It is also a great contribution to the popular rosehip tea giving it a lemony flavor and lovely red color. Hibiscus sabdariffa is a member of the Malvaceae family. It is an annual herb that grows to 6 feet or more, stems are glabrous; lower leaves are ovate with the upper leaves being 3-5 palmately lobed. The flowers are axillary or in terminal racemes, the petals are white (or pink) with a reddish center at the base of the staminal column, the calyx enlargens at maturity and the fruit is fleshy

and bright red. Its flowers are also light yellow, sometimes with pink, and a dark red eye, and they open, after growing through long, hot summers, when the days become shorter. The calyx becomes fleshy and enlarged creating a bright red, acid fruit of 1 inches. Hibiscus sabdariffa is very sensitive to changes in the length of day.. Sometimes, Roselle and an entirely different species, Hibiscus acetosella (Red Leaf Hibiscus, False Roselle, etc.), are mistaken for each other. Propagation is through its light brown, kidneyshaped seeds in the spring. Most of the plant is used for different things. The calyces are used to make cold and hot beverages in many of the world's tropical and subtropical countries. In China the seeds are used for their oil and the plant is used for medicinal properties. The aroma and taste of Hibiscus is slightly of berry-like aroma. It has a well balanced, tart and astringent flavor. Medicinally, leaves are emollient, and are much used in Guinea as a diuretic, refrigerant, and sedative; fruits are antiscorbutic; leaves, seeds, and ripe calyces are diuretic and antiscorbutic; and the succulent calyx, boiled in water, is used as a drink in bilious attacks; the leaves and powdered seeds are eaten in West Africa. Philippines use the bitter root as an aperitive and tonic. Angolans use the mucilaginous leaves as an emollient and as a soothing cough remedy. Used as a Antibacterial, Anti-inflammatory, Antiparasitic, Antiscorbutic, Antispasmodic, Astringent, Demulcent, Diuretic, Emmenagogue, Hemostatic, Refrigerant Topical Uses: Balding, Dandruff, Hemorrhoids, Wounds Hibiscus flower extract has been used in many folk remedies for liver disorders and high blood pressure. The constituents of the flowers contain gossypetin, anthocyanin, and glucoside hibiscin, which may have diuretic and choleretic effects, decreasing the viscosity of the blood, reducing blood pressure and stimulating intestinal peristalsis. Karkade (dried-flowers minus-ovary) contains 13% of a mixture of citric and malic acid, two anthocyanins gossipetin (hydroxyflavone) and hibiscin, and 0.0040.005% ascorbic acid. Petals yield the flavonal glucoside hibiscritin, which yields a crystalline aglyconehibiscetin .Flowers contain phytosterols. The dried flower contains hibiscic acid .Root contains saponins and tartaric acid. Aspartic acid is the most common amino acid. Dried fruits also contain vitamin C and Ca oxalate; dry petals contain flavonol glucoside hibiscitrin. It is thought that the antioxidant chemicals, such as flavonoids, polyphenolics and anthocyanins, contained in the flower play a large role in preventing the oxidation of low density lipoproteins (the bad cholesterol). This oxidation is what contributes to atherosclerosis, the build up of a waxy plaque on the walls of arteries. Uses Hibiscus has many medicinal uses, of which some are still under research as researchers are learning everyday more and more of its use. It also serves as a very delicious beverage which is refreshing and beneficial. The medicinal uses of Hibiscus were known from a long time ago. It has a major diuretic effect. Many Egyptian now use it to lower their blood pressure, an idea maybe taken from folk medicine. Topical Applications: Mixed with oil and used by Chinese and Indian women to stimulate hair growth and treat dandruff. In China, the juice of the petals is used to darken eyebrows. A wash is made from Hibiscus to treat wounds. Use as a salve for hemorrhoids. It act as an antiseptic, aphrodisiac, astringent, cholagogue, demulcent, digestive, diuretic, emollient, purgative, refrigerant, resolvent, sedative, stomachic, and tonic. Roselle is a folk remedy for abscesses, bilious conditions, cancer, cough, debility, dyspepsia, dysuria, fever, hangover, heart ailments, hypertension, neurosis, scurvy, and strangury. Researchers now are doing studies to see if Hibiscus is indeed active in lowering blood cholesterol levels. This could be due to the high antioxidant content contained in the hibiscus extract that contributes to lowering low density lipoprotein levels in the blood. Aqueous extracts of hibiscus leaves have a relaxing effect on the uterus. In Chinese medicine preparations of the plant are used to treat carbuncles, swelling and inflammation of the skin scalding, conjunctivitis, and herpes zoster.The flowers are used for loss of appetite. Hibiscus tea has a gentle laxative effect on the body. It is also used for colds that affect the respiratory tract and the stomach to dissolve phlegm. Hibiscus flowers also are used as

a diuretic and for disorders of circulation. Culinary uses Roselle's fruity flesh and cranberry-tasting juice produce a variety of different foods, including health foods, sauces, jellies, iced drinks, and herb teas. Hibiscus is a source of a red beverage known as Karkade (jamaica in Mexico), which is said to contain citric acid and salts, serving as a diuretic. Karkade is used in jams, jellies, sauces, syrup, gelatin, refreshing beverages, pudding, and cakes, and dried roselle is used for tea, jelly, marmalade, ices, ice-cream, sherbets, butter, pies, sauces, tarts, and other desserts. Tender leaves and stalks are eaten as salad and as a pot-herb and are used for seasoning curries. Seeds have been used as an aphrodisiac coffee substitute. Fruits are edible. Roselle is cultivated primarily for the bast fiber obtained from the stems. The fiber strands, up to 1.5 m long, are used for cordage. Hibiscus is also used in soap making and bath tea bags. To make a tea, pour 1 cup boiling water over 1-2 tablespoons of the flowers and strain after 5-10 minutes. Contraindications: Avoid giving to a person who is very chilled. Magically: Gender feminine Planet venus Element : water Lust Love Divination The red flowers are brewed into a strong red tea which is drunk for its lust inducing properties. It was forbidden for women in Egypt for this very reason. The blossoms for love incense and sachets. They were placed in marriage wreaths. Sorcerers in Dobu in W. Pacific divine in a wood bowel of water with the flowers placed in it. Holly: Hex aquifolium or I.opaca Caution: may cause nausea, vomiting. Folk Names: Auifolius, Bat's Wings, Christ's Thorn, Holy Tree, Holm Chaste, Hulm, Hulver Bush, Tinne Gender: masculine Planet: Mars Element: Fire Powers: Protection, Anti-Lightning, Luck, Dream Magic Magical Uses: A par excellence protective herb, holly guards against lightning, poison and evil spirits. Planted around the home it protects it and it inhabitants from mischievous sorcerers. When thrown at wild animals, holly-makes them lie down quietly and leave you alone, even if you don't hit them with the plant. Holly water (infused or distilled) is sprinkled on newborn babies to protect them. Holy is also carried to promote good luck especially by men, since the holly is a "male" plant. (Ivy is the corresponding plant for women) It is also hung around the house for good luck at Yule. After midnight on a Friday, without making a sound, gather nine holly leaves, preferable from a non-spiny plant (one that has smooth leaves) . Wrap these up in a white cloth using nine knots to tie the ends together. Place this beneath your pillow, and your dreams will come true. Medicinal Action and uses: Holly leaves were formerly used as a diaphoretic and an infusion of given in catarrh, pleurisy and

smallpox. They have also been used in intermittent fevers and rheumatism for their febrifugal and tonic properties and powdered, or taken in infusion or decoction, have been employed with success where Cinchona has failed, their virtue being said to depend on a bitter principle, an alkaloid named Ilicin. The juice of the fresh leaves has been employed with advantage in jaundice. The berries possess totally different qualities to the leaves, being violently emetic and purgatives, a very few occasioning excessive vomiting soon after they are swallowed, though thrushes and blackbirds eat them with impunity. They have been employed in dropsy; also, in a powder, as an astringent to check bleeding. Culpepper says "the bark and leaves are good used as fomentations for broken bones and such members as are out of joint" He considered the berries to be curative of colic. From the bark, stripped from the young shoots and suffered to ferment, birdlime is made. The bark is stripped off about midsummer and steeped in clean water; then boiled till it separates into layers, when the inner green portion is laid up in small heaps till fermentation ensues. After about a fortnight has elapsed, it becomes converted into a sticky, mucilaginous substance and is pounded into a paste, washed and laid by again to ferment. It is then mixed with some oily matter, goose fat being preferred, and is ready for use. Very little, however, is now made in this country. In the north of England, Holly was formerly so abundant in the Lake District that birdlime was made from it in large quantities and shipped to the East Indies for destroying insects. The leaves of Holly have been employed in the Black Forest as a substitute for tea. Paraguay Tea, so extensively used in Brazil, is made from the dried leaves and young shoots of another species of Holly, growing in South America, an instance of the fact that similar properties are often found in more than one species of the same genus. Growing: Holly likes slightly acid soils, and can tolerate poor, sandy soil. It needs full sun and grows to about 4 feet tall, A male and a female holly plant need to be planted for the shrub to produce berries, enjoyed by many wild birds during the winter months. Extra: Many other magical activities can be done at this time of year. In earlier times, one of the most important was the Yule bonfire. This sacred blaze was built to give power and life to the Sun, which was thought of as being reborn at the Winter Solstice. In later times, the fire was tamed and brought indoors in the form of the Yule log. A huge limb was selected, dragged to the house and prepared for use. Carvings of suns, figures of men and other magical symbols were etched onto its surface, and it was sometimes decorated with greens. If you wish to burn a Yule log, why not decorate it? Whip melted paraffin with a hand beater until fluffy but spreadable. Use dabs of this on the log to secure fir and cedar boughs, pinecones, mistletoe, rosemary, holly or other greens. Along with the remnants of last year's log (if available), set it ablaze on the evening before Yule. Ensure that it will burn until morning, Best of all is a huge log that will tiniue to burn for 3 days or more, but mat many fireplaces can accommodate such a monster. As you sit at the hearth watching the fire, sip cider or ale- traditional beverages on this night. If you don't have a fireplace, you can make a Yule candle. Buy the

largest, fattest red candle you can find. (or better yet, make on) with an ice pick, carve a figure of a blazing sun on the side of the candle, then place it in a holder or on a heat proof tray. Ring its base with holly, pine, mistletoe, cedar, rosemary, bay, juniper and other evergreen plants, Burn the candle of Yule evening. If you want it to burn all night, place it in a cauldron or a large bowls and ring the cauldron itself with the greens. Placing holly, mistletoe and a tree in the house during the Yule season brings the essence of nature and the wilderness inside during the darkest months of the year. It refreshes the home's energies and reminds us of the continuing growth and life of the Earth. Index of POISONOUS Plants Although, most dangerous herbs have been listed as being dangerous, do *NOT* use them unless you are 100% sure that they aren't poisionous, you aren't allergic to them etc.) If you do not feel well after any herbs, stop using them. If you feel worse, contact your Poisons Information Center and your doctor. Some herbs can be harmful to your unborn child, so please make sure. Make sure you check the correct dosage before use. Make sure you are not mixing herbs with other combinations you are taking without checking prior to use. Some herbs should not be taken in conjunction with other medicines. Consult a medical/herbal professional IN PERSON prior to use. The following is a list of most posionous herbs, it is by no means complete (please make sure about all the others): INDEX of Poisonous Plants Aconite Apple (Balsam) Apple (Bitter) Baneberry Belladonna Black Cohosh Bloodroot Bryony, Black Bryony, European White Bryony, White Cabbage Tree Calabar Bean Calotropis Cherry Laurel Clematis Coca, Bolivian Cocculus, Indicus Dropwort, Hemlock Water Foxglove

Gelsemium Hellebore, Black Hellebore, False Hellebore, Green Hellebore, White Hemlock Hemlock, Water Hemp, Indian Henbane Ignatius Beans Ivy, Poison Laburnum Laurel, Mountain Lovage, Water Mescal Buttons Mugwort Nightshade, Black Nightshade, Deadly Nux Vomica Paris, Herb Poppy, White Saffron, Meadow Spurges Stavesacre Strophanthus Thornapple Wake Robin, American Wordwood Yew INFUSIONS Infusions are a very simple and popular way of using herbs, infusions may be taken as remedies for specific ailments or just be enjoyed as relaxing or revitalizing teas. An infusion is made in a very similar way to tea, using fresh or dried herbs. The water should just have begun to boil, since vigorously boiling water disperses valuable volatile oils in the steam. Infusions can be made from a single herb or from a combination of herbs, and may be drunk hot or cold. It is best to make them fresh each day. Parts Used: Leaves, flowers, and most aerial parts (dried or fresh) Standard Quantity: For most medicinal teas with a therapeutic action, add 25g dried or 75g (for best results use a kitchen scale to weigh the herbs) fresh herb to 500 ml (approx. 2 cups) water to make 3 doses. If using a combination of herbs, be sure that the total weight does not exceed the standard quantity. Standard Dosage: Take a teacup or wineglass (approx. 2/3 cup) dose 3 times daily. Repeat doses may be reheated if desired. Add a little honey or unrefined sugar per dose to taste. Reduce the dose for children or the elderly. 1. Warm a teapot with hot water. Add the fresh or dried herb. 2. Pour on hot water that has just boiled. Cover the teapot with the lid and infuse for 10 minutes. 3. Strain the infusion through a tea strainer. 4. Take a dose, adding honey or a little unrefined sugar to taste. Strain the rest into a jug, cover and store in the refrigerator. Herbal Preparations

A "How-To" Guide Harvesting Herbs No matter how you intend to use your herbs after harvesting a few basic rules still apply. * Tree Leaves should be gathered before Midsummer. After that, the percentage of natural insecticides in the leaves are too high. * Leaves are at their most fragrant, and richest in volatile oils, before any flowers have opened. The exceptions to this are: borage, coltsfoot, cowsslip, fenugreek, lungwort and sweet violet; they should be gathered after flowering. Rosemary can be gathered at any stage. Gather early on a dry day, after the dew has dried but before the sun is too strong. Dry in a shady, cool, and airy place away from any strong heat sources. Avoid steamy places such as kitchens or bathrooms. Once dry, crumble the leaves and discard large pieces of stem, store them in a lidded glass or ceramic jar away from the light. * Flowers are gathered on a dry day when the flowers first begin to open. They should always be dried in the shade. Carefully cut each flowerhead off the stalk, remove any insects or dirt, and place on a paper lined tray. Leave to dry in a warm place and turn regularly Small flowers such as lavender, are dried in the same way as seeds - by hanging them upside down and collecting the flowers in a paper bag. Once dried, store in a lidded glass or ceramic jar. Dark colored jars are best because they keep out the light. Calendula petals should be separated from the center part once they are dry. * Roots are generally gathered in the fall after the plant has begun to die back. The exception to this is dandelion roots, they should be gathered in the early spring. Wash them thoroughly to remove any dirt. Chop large roots into smaller pieces to speed up the drying process. Spread the root pieces on a paper lined tray. Preheat the oven and turn it off. Place the trays inside with the door ajar for 3-6 hours (depending on how large the pieces are). Transfer the trays to a warm room away from the sun until completely dry. Store in airtight containers away from the light. Check periodically as dried roots have a tendency to reabsorb moisture from the air, discard any pieces that become soft. * Seeds should be gathered as they ripen, usually in the fall. Seedheads should be hung to dry inside a paper bag. Don't use plastic as any condensation that gathers could lead to mildew and cause the seeds to rot. Once dry separate the seeds from their cases and store in the same manner as leaves and flowers. * Berries are harvested when they are just ripe, usually in the early fall, before they have become too soft to dry effectively. Spread on paper lined trays, discard any that show signs of mold. Preheat your oven and then turn it off. Place the trays of berries inside with the door ajar for 3-4 hours. Transfer the trays to a warm, airy spot, away from the sun until completely dry. Turn regularly to ensure even drying. * Tree barks generally contain the desired medicinal properties in the soft inner layer (cambium) between the sapwood and the dead outer bark, or the bark of the root. Bark should be harvested in the autumn when the sap is falling. This will avoid damaging the tree too much. Never remove all the bark or even a strip of bark completely surrounding the tree. Dust or wipe bark to remove moss or insects. Break into small pieces (about 1-2 inches). Spread the bark on paper lined trays and leave to dry in a warm, airy room away from the sun. Herbal Magic BUCKEYE -- Attracts money and wealth, and can be used to help alleviate the pain of arthritis and rheumatism when held in the hand. Also useful to have near when performing any act of divination. Just don't leave them outside on your balcony, or the birds will take them away...they must have magickal properties we are not yet aware of!!! CATNIP -- Catnip is ruled by the planet Venus, and is therefore useful in love, beauty, and happiness spells. One of my favorite uses for catnip is "cat magick". If you feed your cat some catnip, it will build a psychic bond between you and your cat! You can also make a pink sachet

and fill it with Catnip to wear or carry to draw love to you. Another fun use for catnip is to grow some in your home. Aside from pleasing your cat, this will draw positive vibrations and good luck to you and to your house. CEDAR CHIPS -- Useful in healing, purification, protection, and money-drawing spells. Burn cedar chips on a charcoal disc to purify an area...burning cedar chips is also useful for inducing and strengthening psychic powers. You can keep a little green sachet filled with cedar chips in your purse or wallet to draw money. CHAMOMILE -- I drink Chamomile tea whenever I need to make sure I get a good night's sleep, and it never fails to work for me! Chamomile is useful in spells for luck and gambling as well. Make a green amulet and fill with Chamomile Flowers to carry as a good-luck amulet. CINNAMON -- Cinnamon is a wonderful herb to either burn as an incense or make into a sachet. Fill a green or gold sachet with Cinnamon to draw money and success or to use as a healing charm. A purple sachet can be used to increase your magickal and/or psychic powers. A pink or red sachet of Cinnamon can be worn, carried with you, or placed under your bed to draw love or to promote lust. Use a white sachet filled with Cinnamon to increase your spirituality and to confer protection. CLOVES -- Aside from just plain loving the smell of them, I find many uses for cloves. Their magickal properties include banishing evil (exorcism), clearing your head, protection, love, and money. Burn cloves as an incense to draw wealth and prosperity, drive away hostile and negative forces, produce positive spiritual vibrations, and purify the area in which they are burned. Wear or carry cloves to draw members of the opposite sex to you. Using cloves in your magickal spells is said to ensure that your magickal intention is realized. DRAGON'S BLOOD -- I use this herb in just about everything I do!!! Dragon's Blood is a resin which comes from a palm tree. My favorite magickal use for Dragon's Blood is increasing power. I mix a little bit of it in with my oils, sachets, charms, poppets, and incense to increase the powers of the other herbs that I use. I also place some on my altar to increase the power of my spells. Other uses for Dragon's Blood include love, protection, and exorcism... EUCALYPTUS -- I love this healing herb, probably because it has an affinity with the Moon!!! It is the best herb I know of for healing, and can be used for protection as well. Carry some of the leaves with you for protection. To relieve a cold or other respiratory infection, ring green candles with the leaves and pods and visualize yourself as healed. Allow the candles to burn down completely. FRANKINCENSE TEARS -- Magickal properties similar to Myrrh (below). Use these cute little beads to drive out negativity and enhance positive vibrations. You can crush them and use them as an incense on a charcoal disc. Frankincense incense induces visions and is useful as an aid to meditation. You can also make a little white or purple sachet of Frankincense and carry it with you to aid in your spiritual growth. A sachet of Frankincense Tears can also be used as a protective amulet. HIGH JOHN -- This is an extremely potent herb, probably due to its affinity with the planet Mars. High John is useful in spells for winning and success, psychic powers, protection, love, and "making things happen". Annoint a root with Peppermint Oil and tie up in a green sachet. Carry this with you to attract prosperity, wealth, and success. You can also carry a yellow sachet to stop depression, or pink to draw love. THIS HERB IS POISONOUS IF EATEN, SO BE SURE TO KEEP IT OUT OF THE REACH OF CHILDREN AND PETS!!! IRISH MOSS -- This herb is great to use in spells for money, luck, and protection. You can carry some with you or place some in your home to increase your luck and to ensure a steady flow of money into your house or pocket. Some place it under the rugs in their house for these purposes.

Carry a little amulet filled with Irish Moss with you while travelling, for protection. LAVENDAR FLOWERS -- Wonderful for use in love spells. Lavendar has long been known to be a particularly attractive scent to men...Lavendar Flowers can be sprinkled around the house to bring peacefulness, and can also be burned as an incense to help you sleep. Lavendar has also been used for protection, chastity, longevity, purification, and happiness. MUGWORT -- Mugwort can be used as an incense (mixed in equal parts with Sandalwood) to aid in strengthening Psychic Powers. Try using it while scrying or before divination!!! Mugwort can also be placed next to the bed to aid in achieving astral projection. Its other magickal uses include strength, protection, prophetic dreams, and healing... MYRRH -- Myrrh is a wonderful herb to use in spells for spirituality. Its other magickal uses include protection, healing, and exorcism. It is often combined with Frankincense to increase its power. Burn as an incense to purify an area. Use the smoke from the incense to purify and bless charms, amulets, talismans, magickal jewelry, tools, etc. PEPPERMINT -- Peppermint makes a wonderful tea to increase your psychic ability (drink some before reading the Tarot, consulting runes, scrying, dowsing, etc.). Drinking Peppermint tea is also useful for healing (especially stomach aches), producing visions, and helping with sleep. The herb can also be sprinkled around your home for purification. ROSE BUDS / PETALS -- These are wonderful for use in spells to draw love...use red for passionate love, pink or white for romantic, or true love. You can also place a single rose in a vase on your altar as a powerful love-drawing aid. To make a love candle melt several pink household size (6") candles over low heat. When they are completely melted, remove from heat, add several pink or red rose buds (ground) and 20 to 30 drops of Rose Oil. Pour into a prepared glass jar (with wick and metal tab attached). Allow the candle to cool and harden, and burn on the first Friday after the New Moon to draw love to you. Rose buds/petals can also be used for psychic powers (especially when used for a tea), healing, protection, and luck... ROSEMARY -- This is a wonderful all-purpose herb that you can't afford to be without! Rosemary can be used as a substitute for just about any herb. Its powers include love, lust, protection, exorcism, purification, healing, longevity, youth, mental powers, and sleep...Rosemary is a wonderful incense...smoulder a bit of it to emit powerful cleansing and purifying vibrations and to rid negativity in the area in which it is burned (especially helpful to burn before performing any magick!) Place a bit of rosemary under your pillow to ensure a good night's sleep. Wear rosemary to aid your memory (especially helpful when you are studying for an exam). Add an infusion of rosemary to your bathwater to perserve youthfulness and to purify you. Carry a bit of rosemary with you to remain healthy. Hang a sprig of rosemary above your door posts. SAGE -- Sage is useful for protection, healing, wealth, fulfilling wishes, and spells to increase longevity. One of my favorite uses for Sage is to powder some and add to my homemade yellow candles. These I burn on a Wednesday during the Waxing Moon to increase knowledge and wisdom. SANDALWOOD -- Sandalwood has many magickal uses, including protection, spirituality, exorcism, healing, and wish fulfillment. Scatter sandalwood powder around your home to clear it of negativity. Use in healing and exorcism spells. Write a wish on a sandalwood chip and burn in your cauldron. As it burns it sets your magick flowing. Sandalwood mixed with Lavendar makes a wonderful incense which is intended to conjure spirits. VIOLET FLOWERS -- These are wonderful for using in amulets for good luck and fortune. They also work well in spells for lust and passion -- they are powerful love stimulants and also arouse lust...try mixing them with Lavendar Flowers for a potent combination. They are also useful in spells for protection, wishes, peace, and healing...

YARROW -- A wonderful herb to use in love spells!!! Also works to draw courage and to purify (exorcism). Drink as a tea to increase your psychic powers. Wear a sprig of yarrow for protection. Hold some in your hands when you are afraid. This will stop all fear and give you courage. Carry some with you to draw love and to attract friends. Herbal Capsules

Herbal capsules are often a good choice for taking herbs that have an unpalleteable flavor (such as valerian) and do not lend themselves for making herbal infusions or even tinctures.

Other Advantages to Making Herbal Capsules ~ You can customize your blend of herbs. ~ Capsules are easy to take and easy to carry with you. ~ You can be assured of the freshness & quality of herbs you use. ~ You can customize your dosages. ~ Making Herbal Capsules ~ If you are using herbs from your garden make sure they are absolutely dry. Grind dried herbs in a spice grinder to the finest consistency you can. Place the powdered herbs into Veggie caps. *note from editor: gelatin capsules are often cheaper, but they are gummy and difficult to digest. They are also a by-product of the slaughter industry. Plant based veggie caps are completely digestable and very affordable if you buy them in bulk. Capsules generally come in sizes 00 or 0. 00 are bigger. Dosages for capsules will vary by herb so consult an herbal handbook. Store your capsules in airtight containers away from heat. Back to top View user's profile Send private message Herbal Actions Here are some descriptions of herbal actions in the body...

Adaptogen: Substances which put the body into a state of non-specific heightened resistance in

order to better resist stress and adapt to extraordinary challenges. Ashwagandha, Cordyceps, American Ginseng, Panax Ginseng, Siberian Ginseng, Gotu Kola, Maca, Reishi, Schizandra, Shiitake, Suma. Alterative: An herb that will gradually restore the proper function of the body and increase health and vitality. Sometimes referred to as blood purifiers. Alfalfa, Black Cohosh, Blue Flag, Blue Violet, Boneset, Buckthorn, Burdock, Cleavers, Echinacea, Fringetree, Golden Seal, Gotu Kola, Kelp/Bladderwrack, Licorice, Oregon Grape, Pau d' Arco, Pipsissewa, Poke Root, Prickly Ash, Red Clover, Sarsaparilla, Sheep Sorrel, Stillingia, Tayuya, Wahoo, Wild Indigo, Yarrow, Yellow Dock. Analgesic/Anodyne: Analgesics or Anodynes are herbs that reduce pain. Chamomile, Chaparral, Dong Quai, Hops, Passion Flower, Reishi, Valerian, Venus' Flytrap. Anthelmintic: Herbs that work against parasitic worms which may be present in the digestive system. Black Walnut, Helonias, Quassia, Sheep Sorrel, Wormwood. Antibacterial: Herbs with properties that can inhibit bacterial growth. Blessed Thistle, Cloves, Echinacea, Kelp/Bladderwrack, Licorice, Lomatium, Osha, Pau d' Arco, Reishi, St. John's Wort, Turmeric, Usnea. Antibilious: Herbs that help the body to remove excess bile. Barberry, Dandelion, Fringetree, Golden Seal, Wild Yam, Wormwood. Anticatarrhal: Herbs that help the body reduce excess mucous and phlegm. Echinacea, Elderberry, Golden Seal, Marshmallow, Oregon Grape, Poke Root, Uva Ursi, Wild Indigo, Yarrow. Antiemetic: Herbs that reduce the feeling of nausea and can help to relieve or prevent vomiting. Atractylodes, Barberry, Cloves, Fennel, Oregon Grape. Anti-inflammatory: These herbs help the body to combat inflammations. Ashwagandha, Bilberry fruit. Blue Violet, Calendula, Cat's Claw, Chamomile, Cleavers, Devil's Claw, Dong Quai, Fo-Ti, Licorice, Lomatium, Reishi, St. John's Wort, Turmeric, Wild Yam, Wormwood. Antilithic: Herbs that prevent the formation or help remove stones or gravel in the urinary system Sheep Sorrel, Uva Ursi. Antimicrobial: Herbs that can help the body destroy or resist pathogenic micro-organisms. Calendula, Cat's Claw, Cloves, Echinacea, Licorice, Lovage, St. John's Wort, Usnea, Uva Ursi, Wild Indigo, Wormwood. Antineoplastic: Having the specific action of inhibiting and combating tumor development. Blue Violet, Chaparral, Cleavers, Red Clover, Reishi, Sheep Sorrel, Shiitake, Venus' Flytrap. Antioxidant: An antioxidant is a substance capable of eliminating hydroxyl free radicals. Bilberry fruit, Cat's Claw, Chaparral, Ginger, Panax Ginseng, Ginkgo, Kelp/Bladderwrack, Schizandra. Antirheumatic: Herbs used to relieve or protect against rheumatism. Blue Cohosh, Cat's Claw, Chaparral, Celery, Dandelion, Kelp/Bladderwrack, Poke Root, Sarsaparilla, Wild Yam. Antiseptic: Herbs that can prevent, resist and counteract putrification. Bilberry fruit, Black Walnut, Chamomile, Cloves, Echinacea, Hops, Red Clover, Sheep Sorrel, Uva Ursi, Wild Indigo, Yarrow. Antispasmodic: Antispasmodics can prevent or ease spasms and cramps in the body. Black Cohosh, Blue Cohosh, Boneset, Chamomile, Cramp bark, Culver's root, Dong Quai, Fennel, Helonias, Licorice, Motherwort, Passion Flower, Red Clover, Skullcap, Stillingia, Valerian, Wild

Yam. Aphrodisiac: Herbs used to stimulate sexual passion. Catuaba, Damiana, Maca, Muira Puama, Schizandra, Suma, Yohimbe. Aromatic: Herbs that have a strong and often pleasant odor and can stimulate the digestive juices. Angelica, Celery, Chamomile, Cloves, Fennel, Ginger, Valerian. Astringent: Astringents contract tissue and can reduce secretions and discharges. Bilberry fruit, Blessed Thistle, Calendula, Cleavers, Cramp bark, Golden Seal, Hops, Kola nut, Muira Puama, Pipsissewa, Red root, Sheep Sorrel, Slippery Elm, Squawvine, Stillingia, St. John's Wort, Suma, Turkish Rhubarb, Uva Ursi, Yarrow, Yellow Dock. Bitter: Herbs that taste bitter act as stimulating tonics for the digestive system. Barberry, Blessed Thistle, Buckthorn, Burdock, Cascara Sagrada, Chamomile, Golden Seal, Osha, Quassia, Wormwood. Cardiac Tonic: Cardiac tonics are herbs that act beneficially on the heart. Cat's Claw, Fo-Ti, Hawthorn, Kelp/Bladderwrack, Motherwort, Reishi. Carminative: Carminatives are rich in volatile oils and expel gas from the stomach and bowels. Angelica, Celery, Chamomile, Cloves, Fennel, Ginger, Hops, Prickly Ash, Sheep Sorrel, Turmeric, Valerian, Wormwood. Cathartic: In large doses cathartics purge the bowels and stimulate glandular secretions. Barberry, Blue Flag, Buckthorn, Cascara Sagrada, Culver's root, Turkish Rhubarb. Cholagogue: Herbs that stimulate the release and secretion of bile from the gall bladder. They also have a laxative effect on the digestive system. Barberry, Blue Flag, Calendula, Culver's root, Dandelion, Fringetree, Golden Seal, Milk Thistle, Oregon Grape, Turmeric, Wahoo, Wild Yam, Yellow Dock. Demulcent: Herbs that are usually rich in mucilage and can soothe and protect damaged or inflamed tissue. Fenugreek, Licorice, Marshmallow, Slippery Elm. Depurative: Depuratives are herbs that remove impurities and cleanse the blood. Alfalfa, Black Walnut, Blessed Thistle, Blue Flag, Blue Violet, Buckthorn, Burdock, Culver's root, Dandelion, Elderberry, Gotu Kola, Oregon Grape, Pau d' Arco, Red Clover, Sarsaparilla, Stillingia, Tayuya, Watercress, Yarrow, Yellow Dock. Diaphoretic: These herbs will aid the skin in the elimination of toxins through perspiration. Angelica, Blessed Thistle, Black Cohosh, Boneset, Calendula, Chamomile, Culver's root, Elderberry, Fennel, Ginger, Osha, Prickly Ash, Sarsaparilla, Stillingia, Yarrow. Diuretic: Herbs that increase the flow of urine and help in the removal of toxins from the system. Angelica, Astragalus, Atractylodes, Blue Flag, Blue Violet, Buckthorn, Burdock, Celery, Chaparral, Cleavers, Dandelion, Fringetree, Gotu Kola, Guarana, Hawthorn, Helonias, Kola nut, Marshmallow, Pipsissewa, Sarsaparilla, Saw Palmetto, Sheep Sorrel, Squawvine, Uva Ursi, Wahoo, Yarrow, Yerba Mate. Emetic: Emetics are herbs that cause vomiting when taken in specific doses (generally high doses). Helonias, Poke Root. Emmenagogue: Herbs that stimulate and normalize the menstrual flow. Black Cohosh, Blessed Thistle, Blue Cohosh, Calendula, Chamomile, Cramp bark, Fenugreek, Ginger, Golden Seal, Helonias, Motherwort, Squawvine, St. John's Wort, Valerian, Vitex/Chastetree, Wormwood,

Yarrow. Expectorant: Herbs that assist the body in expelling excess mucous from the respiratory system. Angelica, Blue Violet, Fennel, Fenugreek, Golden Seal, Licorice, Marshmallow, Osha, Red Clover, Red root, Reishi, Stillingia, Usnea. Febrifuge: The febrifuges help the body to bring down fevers. Angelica, Blessed Thistle, Calendula, Prickly Ash, Wild Indigo. Galactogogue: Herbs that help breast feeding mothers increase the flow of mothers milk. Blessed Thistle, Fennel, Fenugreek, Milk Thistle. Hepatic: Hepatics strengthen and tone the liver as well as stimulate the flow of bile. Barberry, Blue Flag, Buckthorn, Cascara Sagrada, Celery, Cleavers, Culver's root, Dandelion, Fennel, FoTi, Fringetree, Golden Seal, Milk Thistle, Motherwort, Oregon Grape, Poke Root, Prickly Ash, Turmeric, Wahoo, Wild Indigo, Wild Yam, Wormwood, Yarrow, Yellow Dock. Hypnotic: Hypnotic herbs will help induce sleep (not a hypnotic trance). Hops, Passion Flower, Skullcap, Valerian. Hypotensive: Remedies that reduce elevated blood pressure. Astragalus, Cat's Claw, Codonopsis, Hawthorn, Lovage, Lycium, Reishi, Valerian, Yarrow. Laxative: Herbs that promote the evacuation of the bowels. Barberry, Boneset, Buckthorn, Burdock, Cascara Sagrada, Cleavers, Culver's root, Dandelion, Fringetree, Golden Seal, Licorice, Oregon Grape, Turkish Rhubarb, Wahoo, Yellow Dock. Mucilage: Mucilaginous herbs contain gelatinous constituents and will often be demulcent. Fenugreek, Marshmallow, Slippery Elm. Nervine: Herbs that strengthen and tone the nervous system, easing anxiety and stress. Black Cohosh, Blue Cohosh, Catuaba, Chamomile, Cramp bark, Damiana, Guarana, Hops, Lovage, Motherwort, Oat seed, Passion Flower, Red Clover, Skullcap, Tayuya, Valerian, Wormwood. Nutritive:Herbs that provide nutritional support. Alfalfa, Nettle, Raspberry Leaf, Oat Straw, Seaweeds. Parasiticide: Herbs that can kill parasites in the digestive tract and on the skin. Black Walnut, Cloves, Quassia, Sheep Sorrel, Wormwood. Pectoral: Herbs that have a general strengthening and healing effect on the respiratory system. Angelica, Golden Seal, Licorice, Marshmallow. Purgative: Can produce very strong laxative effects and watery evacuations. Buckthorn, Poke Root, Turkish Rhubarb, Wild Indigo, Yellow Dock. Rubefacient: Herbs that simulate circulation locally when applied to the skin. Cloves, Fennel, Ginger. Sedative: Herbs that can strongly quiet the nervous system. American Ginseng, Black Cohosh, Celery, Chamomile, Cramp bark, Dong Quai, Hops, Kava Kava, Motherwort, Passion Flower, Red Clover, Saw Palmetto, Skullcap, St. John's Wort, Valerian, Wild Yam. Sialagogue: Herbs that stimulate the secretion of saliva from the salivary glands. Blue Flag, Ginger, Prickly Ash, Quassia, Stillingia.

Stimulant: Herbs that quicken and enliven the physiological function of the body. Angelica, Calendula, Cloves, Codonopsis, Dandelion, Fennel, Ginger, Guarana, Kola nut, Muira Puama, Poke Root, Prickly Ash, Red root, Sarsaparilla, Schizandra, Stillingia, Valerian, Watercress, Wild Yam, Wormwood, Yarrow, Yerba Mate. Stomachic: Herbs that promote digestion and strengthen the stomach. Atractylodes, Chamomile, Cloves, Codonopsis, Fennel, Ginger, Sheep Sorrel, Turkish Rhubarb, Turmeric. Tonic: The tonic herbs strengthen and tone either specific organs or the whole body through nutritional stimulation. Alfalfa, Angelica, Ashwagandha, Astragalus, Black Cohosh, Black Walnut, Boneset, Buckthorn, Burdock, Calendula, Cat's Claw, Catuaba, Chamomile, Cleavers, Cordyceps, Culver's root, Damiana, Dandelion, Echinacea, Fenugreek, Fo-Ti, Fringetree, American Ginseng, Panax Ginseng, Siberian Ginseng, Golden Seal, Gotu Kola, Hawthorn, Helonias, Jatoba, Licorice, Lovage, Lycium, Maca, Milk Thistle, Motherwort, Muira Puama, Oat seed, Oregon Grape, Pipsissewa, Poke Root, Prickly Ash, Red Clover, Sarsaparilla, Saw Palmetto, Schizandra, Sheep Sorrel, Skullcap, Squawvine, Suma, Uva Ursi, Watercress, Wild Yam, Wormwood, Yarrow, Yellow Dock, Yerba Mate, Yohimbe. Heather from Terri Paajanen What is Heather? Scientific and medicinal info Heather is an evergreen shrub that grows all over Northern Europe, and is associated with the moors of Scotland and England. The spikes of flowers come in white, pink, red and purple. Medicinally, teas made from heather flowers is a diuretic and could be used to treat urinary infections. Heather is related to the rhododendron. Also Known As .... Other names Latin: Calluna vulgaris Common names: Scot's heather, heath Magickal Properties Using heather in rituals Heather is used in weather magick, often with fern. Burning the two herbs together can attract rain, or simply wetting them and sprinkling drops of water onto the ground. Another ritual use for heather is to call positive spirits and energy. You can also carry heather flowers for good luck and protection. If you are doing rituals for initiation or self-dedication, you might want to include heather blossoms. They are associated with beginnings and self-discovery. Heather can also bring peace to a home or between 2 people when there is conflict. In the Celtic Ogham alphabet, the letter U (ura) is associated with heather. More Correspondences Other properties Planet: Venus Element: Water Associated Deities: Isis Ginger Root

(Zingiber officinale) Other Names: African Ginger GENERAL Although ginger originated in the Far East and was carried to the West by spice caravans, it was known and used in the West for at least 2000 years.Cultivation begain in Europe, in Spain, in the 16th century. Today it is grown world-wide in any areas with high humidity and warm temperatures. About half of all medicinal preparations in Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine include the use of ginger, primarily to offset the toxic or irritating effects on the stomach by other herbs. Dried ginger has different properties for healing and is hotter than fresh ginger, so the two are used to treat different problems. CULTIVATION: Ginger prefers a well-drained, humus-rich and slightly alkaline soil in full sun to partial shade. It requires high humidity and a temperature that never falls below 30 degrees F. It requires a ten month growing period for optimum rhizome production. It is now cultivated in great quantities in Jamaica and comes into this country dried and preserved. The root from the West Indies is considered the best. Also imported from Africa, there are several varieties known in commerce. Jamaica or White African is a light-brown colour with short rhizome, very pungent. Cochin has a very short rhizome, coated red-grey colour. 'Coated or Uncoated' is the trade term for peel on or skinned. Green Ginger is the immature undried rhizome HARVEST AND PRESERVATION: Rhizomes are lifted during the growing season for use where lack of fibrousness is important, or when dormant. Fresh roots can be stored for several months in a cool, dry place. Fresh roots freeze well and can also be preserved by crystalizing them. Roots can be peeled and dried whole or sliced and dried. Grind the dried root as needed in a spice or coffee grinder. Tthe root is considered the most useful part of the plant, and must not be used under a year's growth. The peeling has to be done very thinly or the richest part of the resin and volatile oil is lost. It is sometimes soaked in lime-juice instead of plain water, and the colour is improved by a final coating of chalk. The Chinese fresh Ginger is grated into powder. African and Cochin Ginger yield the most resin and volatile oil. The root must be kept in a dry place, or it will start growing and is then spoilt. The odour of Ginger is penetrating and aromatic, its taste spicy, hot and biting; these properties are lost by exposure. The most common adulterants are flour, curcuma, linseed, rapeseed, the hulls of cayenne pepper and waste ginger. MEDICINAL The fresh root is used medicinally to promote sweating and as an expectorant for colds and chills. Ginger is also used as a circulatory stimulant. Internally ginger is used as a decoction or tincture for motion sickness, morning sickness, indigestion, colic, abdominal chills, colds, coughs, influenza, and peripheral circulatory problems. Externally, ginger is used for spasmodic pain, rheumatism, lumbago, menstrual pain, and sprains. Ginger Root has a proven ability to combat all forms of nausea and vomiting. It has also been taken to loosen phlegm, relieve gas, and tighten the tissues, although

its effectiveness for these purposes hasn't been verified. Asian medicine also employs it as a treatment for colds and shortness of breath. How to Prepare: Chopped Ginger Root can be made into a tea. Pour boiling water over 0.5 to 1 gram (about onequarter teaspoonful) of the chopped root, steep for 5 minutes, and strain. Ginger is also available in tablet, capsule, and liquid form. Typical Dosage: For commercial preparations, the following dosages are typical. Indigestion: 2 to 4 grams a day Motion sickness: 1 gram 30 minutes before travel; for continuing symptoms, 0.5 to 1 gram every 4 hours. To prevent vomiting: 0.5 to 2 grams daily Arthritis: 1 to 2 grams daily Since potency may vary, follow the manufacturer's directions whenever available. Overdosage : Massive doses of Ginger can depress the nervous system and cause heart irregularities. If you suspect an overdose, seek medical attention immediately. CAUTIONS: * NOT to be used for patients with inflammatory skin complaints, ulcers of the digestive tract, or high fevers. * Although proper use is effective in the treatment of morning sickness, this herb should be used with respect during early pregnancy. High doses (6 grams or more) may damage the stomach lining and could eventually lead to ulcers. Allergic skin reactions are also possible, but in recommended doses, Ginger causes no side effects. Possible Drug Interactions: It's best to avoid large doses of Ginger if you are taking a bloodthinning drug such as Coumadin. Special Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding: Although a trial of Ginger in 27 pregnant women with persistent vomiting revealed no harmful effects, it is still not recommended during pregnancy. MAGICKAL GENDER: Masculine PLANET: Mars ELEMENT: Fire POWERS: Love, Money, Success, Power MAGICKAL USES: * Eat prior to performing spells (especially love spells) will lend them power because you have been "heated up." * Plant whole roots to attract money, or sprinkle powdered root in pockets or on money to do the same.

* Used in success spells, or to ensure the success of a magickal working. Garlic, From Your Kitchen Pharmacy Garlic, From Your Kitchen Pharmacy By Betty Bennett, RN, Columnist at The Blue Star Gazette Herbal Medicine is often thought to be a secret practice known to only a few specialists, whether they be Chinese Herbalists, Naturopaths or Appalachian Wise Women. But, in fact, our kitchens contain plants that can double as prescriptions for common ailments.

Consider garlic: This great tasting addition to any cooks kitchen has a number of properties that make it a useful medicine. Garlic has been used as an antibiotic for years. More recent research has demonstrated activity in cancer prevention and treatment, control of hypertension and diabetes, thinning the blood much as aspirin does, and cholesterol management. Garlic's use as an antibiotic dates from the ancient times of Egyptian pyramid builders. During the days of the Black Plague, people who ate large amounts of garlic were spared from sickness. The French town of Marseilles was protected from a plague that was raging through France in 1722, largely due to a preparation of vinegar and garlic. During World War I British field physicians soaked sterilized sphagnum moss in garlic juice and applied it to wounds, greatly reducing deaths from infection. But aside from these anecdotal reports, there is solid research behind the use of garlic as an antibiotic. In 1935 two Japanese researchers found that the antiseptic properties of garlic were found to be superior to penicillin in treating the typhoid bacillus. Modern researchers have found garlic effective against Candida, Histoplasma, Cryptococcus, Tuberculosis, Influenza B, Herpes Simplex, Staphylococcus Aureus, Leprosy and even the Aids Virus. As a flea, tick and mosquito repellent, garlic protects against diseases caused by these pests.

Evidence points to a role for garlic in preventing cancer. Because of its high selenium content, garlic prevents the production of free radicals which causes many cancers. Researchers in Japan have demonstrated a reduction in breast cancer, for instance. Furthermore garlic protects against stomach and colon cancer by blocking the formation of nitrosamines which are made from the nitrates used to preserve foods such as ham and sausage. In a controlled experiment, Chinese volunteers were given 300 mg of nitrates and 500 mg of proline (a proven chemical that produces nitrosamines). The subjects blood level of nitrosamines rose as expected. But subjects who ate 5000 mg of fresh garlic before their dose of nitrates and proline had no detectable levels of nitrosamines in their blood.

Reports have been published in Science Magazine and The America Journal of Urology and Cancer Research showing that compounds in garlic inhibit a needed chemical reaction inside cancer cells. The John Wayne Cancer Center in Santa Monica, CA, uses garlic as part of the

treatment protocol for leukemia. In another cancer treatment center, garlic extract is administered to treat bladder cancer. Crushed garlic, applied to the skin, has reduced the size of, and occasionally eliminated, basal cell carcinoma. Natural killer cells (white blood cells that kill invading or abnormal cells) became more aggressive in patients who ate raw garlic or took a garlic preparation, called Kyolic.

Other scientifically demonstrate that the medicinal effects of garlic include small but significant reduction in blood pressure (2-5 points), anti-clotting properties similar to aspirin, reduction in blood sugar and triglycerides, reducing LDL and raising HDL, inhibiting inflammation, controlling asthma and bronchitis, increased life span, detoxification from heavy metal poisoning, and improved learning and memory performance.

The way that garlic is administered varies, and the effects of garlic vary with the method of administration. The easiest way is just to eat the raw cloves. The disadvantages of this is that the garlic odor exudes from the pores which can cause some social repercussions. One aficionado claimed that after he persisted in using garlic at a rate of 2 cloves a day for three weeks the effect was not so noticeable. There is no mention of his friends' reaction.

There have been some successful attempts to solve the odor problem. Drs. Eugene Schnell and Manji Wakunaga working in Japan discovered a method for cold pressing whole garlic cloves and aging them for 20 months. The end product, called Kyolic, comes in capsules. Kwai is tablet form of dried garlic. Ajoene is a liquid derived from garlic. Manufacturers of the products claim that they are not only odorless, but contain increased levels of some of the key nutrients, including selenium.

And there we have it, the story of the humble garlic. Is it a delicious condiment or powerful healing herb? You decide.

No article on garlic would be complete without a few recipes to try...

Garlic Spread One popular method, not exclusively for medical use, is to slice the tops off the clove, drizzle with olive oil, place in a garlic baker (or wrap loosely in foil) and bake slowly until soft. The cooked cloves can be squeezed onto bread or crackers as a spread.

Garlic Syrup Peel and mince 1 lb. fresh garlic. Place in wide mouth jar. Add equal parts of vinegar and distilled water to just cover the garlic. Close tightly, shake well and let stand for 4 days. Shake the

container at least twice daily during this time. Add 1 pint of glycerin, shake well and let stand another day. Force through strainer. Filter liquid through linen cloth. For topical application use as is. If given as an oral medication add honey and stir until blended. An alternative to the above recipe is to replace the vinegar in the recipe above with the following liquid: add 3 oz of powdered caraway seeds and 3 oz of sweet fennel seed to 1 Qt. of vinegar. Boil for 15 minutes closely covered. Strain and cool. It can then be used in the above recipe. Garlic Syrup can be used for asthma or cough: 1 tsp. every 15 minutes until spasm is controlled followed by 1 tsp. every 2-3 hours for the remainder of the day, then 1 tsp. 3-4 times a day.

Garlic Paste

Peel and mash one raw garlic clove. Apply directly to bee stings or other inflamed insect bites or stings.

Garlic Plaster

Peel and mash several cloves into a paste. Spread onto cheesecloth or muslin. Fold to close. Apply to skin, taking care that the raw garlic does not come in contact with skin. This is useful for fungal rashes or boils.

Garlic Compress

Boil water. Peel and chop several cloves of garlic. Add to boiling water, turn off the heat, cover and steep for 15 minutes. Cool to less that 180 . Soak small soft cloth in the liquid, wring slightly and apply. Cover with a dry towel and leave until the warmth is no longer felt. Replace with new warm cloth and repeat until tingling is detected (about 30 minutes). Useful for fungal rashes or boils. One resource says that this is effective for muscle spasms as well.

Ear Ache Remedy

Make garlic oil by slicing a peeled clove of garlic into a small quantity of olive oil. Heat briefly. Cool and strain to remove the chunks. Apply a few drops of warm garlic oil extract into affected ear and seal with a small bit of cotton.

Vaginal Yeast Infection Peel a clove of garlic and mash slightly. Wrap in a 4 by 4 gauze square and insert. Replace with new garlic clove every 12 hours until symptoms are relieved. Flowers for Spiritual Upliftment Freesia....Helps with emotional problems. Pink Roses....Helps in sickness,pink the colour of Love. Red Roses....Too strong for the sick room,use with caution,as too much red can be an imbalance of the Aura. Daffodils....Upliftment and aids the healing process. Lily of The Valley....Lifts the vibes and aids recovery. Marigolds....Helps with the well being.

Days of The Week Monday....Silver/Violet.(also known as moonday) Tuesday....Mars....Red. Wednesday....Mercury....Yellow. Thursday....Jupiter....Blue. Friday....Venus....Green. Saturday....Saturn....Indigo. Sunday....Golden Orange.

Colour Candles Red....Protected. Orange....Tranquil. Green....Abstinance. Blue....Healing. Yellow....Idealism.

Colour of Music Slow....Blue. Fast....Red. High Note....Light in Colour. Low Note....Dark in colour. Orange, lifts Depression and lets go of Frustration. Silver,Intuition in Nature. Gold,Cultivates Wisdom.

The Body is held together by lights of colour.Our bodies change like the Seasons. Black affects our muscles. Blue Rays are used to help with Inflamation. Red rays should never be used with a Heart condition. DRAGON'S BLOOD RESIN Dracaena (Gold Seal) - Daemonorops draco - from Indonesia. Use for love, protection, exorcism and sexual potency. Increases the power of any ritual energy. Known as an herb of protection. Can be used to consecrate tools of ritual, magick or divination. Also used to invoke Shiva. Dragon's blood resin creates a very strong herbal and spicy fragrance. It's considered to be cleansing and as such, has been added in small amounts to Frankincense mixtures used in churches. Dragon's blood is a deep red, shiny resin used in incense burning. The fruit of the tree is covered with scales. The resin seeps out between the scales, is collected, cleansed and then melted. ( a type of Palm tree). Dragon's blood resin has been used for thousands of years in India as part of their rituals. DECOCTIONS The decoction method is used for tough plant materials, such as barks, berries, or roots, which need a more vigorous extraction than is possible using the infusion method. Decoction involves heating the plant material in cold water, bringing it to a boil and simmering for 20-40 minutes. Combinations of herbs can be mixed together, or herbs can be used singly. The standard quantity, which can be drunk hot or cold, is enough for three doses and should be make fresh each day. As with infusions, decoctions are frequently used as the basis of other remedies, such as syrups.

Parts Used: Barks, berries, roots (dried or fresh) Standard Quantity: Add 30g dried or 60g fresh herb to 750 ml (approx 3 cups) of cold water. This reduces to approx 500 ml after simmering. If using a combination of herbs, be sure that the total weight of the mixture does not exceed this standard amount. Standard Dosage: Take a teacup or wineglass dose 3 times daily. Repeat doses may be reheated. Honey or unrefined sugar may be used to sweeten each dose, or they may be flavored with a little lemon juice. Reduce the dose for children. 1. Place the herb in a saucepan (do not use aluminum!) and pour in the cold water. 2. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer gently for 20 to 40 minutes, until the volume has been reduced by a third. 3. Take the decoction off the heat and strain through a nylon or plastic sieve into a jug. 4. Pour the decoction into a covered jar or pitcher and store in the refrigerator. CREAMS A cream is a mixture of water with fats or oils, which softens and blends with the skin. It can easily be made using emulsifying ointment (available from most pharmacies), which is a mixture of oils and waxes that blends with water or tinctures. Homemade creams will last for several months, but the shelf life is prolonged by storing the mixture in a cool pantry or refrigerator, or adding a few drops of benzoin tincture as a preservative. Creams made from organic oils and fats deteriorate more quickly. The method shown here is suitable for most herbs. Parts Used: All parts of the plant (fresh or dried) Standard Quantity: Use 150g emulsifying ointment, 70 ml glycerol, 80 ml water and 30g dried or 75 g fresh herb. Standard Application: Rub a little into the affected part 2-3 times a day. Storage: Store in sterilized, airtight, dark jars for up to 3 months in a cool place. 1. Melt the emulsifying ointment in a double boiler or a bowl over a pan of boiling water. Pour in the glycerol and water and stir well. The mixture will solidify slightly when the liquid is added, so keep the bowl over the boiling water and stir to remelt it. 2. Add the herb and stir well. Simmer for 3 hours, regularly adding more boiling water to the lower saucepan to prevent the pan from burning. 3. Use a winepress or a jelly bag fitted to a jug, and strain the hot mixture as quickly as possible into a bowl. Stir the melted, strained cream constantly as it cools, to avoid separation. If it does start to separate, return it to the double boiler and reheat with an additional 10-20 g of emulsifying ointment. 4. When the cream has set, use a small palette knife to fill storage jars. Put some cream around the edge of the jar first, and then fill the middle to avoid any air bubbles. COMPRESSES A compress is a cloth soaked in a hot or cold herbal extract. They can be applied to painful joints and muscles, and are useful for soothing skin rashes and irritations. A cold compress is sometimes used for headaches. The cloth may be soaked in an infusion, decoction, or a tincture diluted with hot or cold water. An old tea towel is ideal, or use muslin or cotton wrapped in surgical gauze. Compresses are sometimes called fomentations. Catnip Nepeta cataria Other Names: Catmint, Catnep, Catswort, Fieldbalm

Catnip is a perennial herb found growing wild throughout North America and Europe where it is thought to have originated. It is easily cultivated in any garden soil. A member of the mint family it has square, erect and branched stems and grows 2 to 3 feet high. The leaves are heart-shaped, toothed, opposite and covered with fine downy hairs especially on the under sides giving the whole plant a grayish green appearance. The small tubular, two-lipped flowers grow in dense whorls atop each stem and are white to lavender with reddish to purple spots. Blooming from June to September the entire plant has a minty fragrance. Gather the above ground parts just after blooms open. Properties

Young leaves are edible raw. They have an aromatic mint-like flavor eaten in salads. As the name (cat-nip) suggests, cats love to nip at it, although watching them it might better be called (cat-roll) for they seem to roll, rub, and totally crush the plant into the ground. They discover that the more they crush it the more oil it releases. Plant constituents include Nepetalic acid, Alpha- & beta- Citral, Nepetalactone, Limonene, Geraniol, Dipentene, Citronella, Nerol, a terpene, Acetic acid, Butyric acid, Valeric acid and Tannin. The leaves and flowering tops are strongly antispasmodic, antitussive, astringent, carminative, diaphoretic, slightly emmenagogue, refrigerant, sedative, slightly stimulant, stomachic and tonic. Catnip has a long history of use in alternative medicine, being employed especially in treating disorders of the digestive system and, as it stimulates sweating, it is useful in reducing fevers. The fresh juice is used as an emmenagogue (to promote menstruation). Mild catnip tea is used to relieve colic in babies, restlessness and nervousness, and is very useful as a mild nervine for children. Stronger tea relieves fevers due to colds and flu as well as calming the stomach and preventing nausea and diarrhea. The fresh young shoots are good in spring salads and rubbed into meat for flavor. Applied externally or added to bath it is good for skin irritations. Catnip oil is great for aroma therapy. A strong infusion can be used to repel fleas from carpets or the fur of animals. An extract from the leaves (called nepetalactone) has herbicidal and insect repellant properties. Folklore

It was once believed that smoking the leaves would produce a mild hallucinogenic effect. Although this use has since been dispelled, it may work in some individuals. It was also believed to deter the (evil-eye) from children given to fits, this because of its ability to calm an extremely agitated child and diminish nightmares.

Recipes To 1 cup of boiling water add 2 tsp. dried herb; steep for 10 min. give warm in cup doses- cup for children 1 tbsp. diluted or in milk for babies. Mintcream: Add 3 tbsp. to cup heavy cream use in cocoa or coffee.

Article by Deb Jackson & Karen Bergeron BUYING AND STORING BULK HERBS

When buying bulk herbs for making your remedies it is vital that you purchase them from reputable sources. Whenever possible, grow your own herbs or buy from local growers who can provide you with information about their growing practices. Certain herbs such as nettle, dandelion and chickweed to name a few, grow abundantly in most areas and can be easily wildcrafted. Most of the time using fresh herbs is most desirable, however, this is not always feasable, and there are some herbs that are best used dried or in specific preparations. Many local health food stores and co-ops carry bulk herbs and often offer a small discount for buying in quantities of 1 pound or more. Always ask the store's merchandiser where they get their herbs and if they're organic. A Word About Tea Obviously, teabags are quite convenient to use, however, in order to fit into those little bags the herbs must be cut quite small which compromises the quality and potency of your tea. The larger the pieces of herbs are, the less chance there is for oxidization to occur, which helps the herb hold it's value better. Consider making your tea in a tea press or loosely in a quart jar which you can strain before drinking. And of course there's always the stainless steel tea ball. When buying from bulk herb bins in local markets look for COLOR Dried green leaves should look very close to their fresh state. Blossoms should have deep strong color. SMELL The smell of dried herbs are a good indication of freshness. Look for strong, fresh aromas. You should be able to recognize the herb by smell with your eyes closed. Fortunately many herbs and herbal products are now widely available through online and mailorder companies. Again, it is extremely important to select a reputable source. A high quality source for buying herbs online is Mountain Rose Herbs, in Eugene, Oregon. This company offers a wide selection of organic and ethically wildcrafted bulk herbs as well as an assortment of tools & accessories for making your own herbal preparations - like organic carrier oils, beeswax, empty veggie capsules and hard to find items like gums and resins. They also guarantee that the herbs they sell are fresh which makes a huge difference in the quality and potency of your remedies.

STORING HERBS Store your herbs in a dark cool place in air-tight glass jars with tight fitting lids. Many deli counters or restaurants have a surplus of one gallon glass jars with lids that they will give away or sell to you cheaply. Quart canning jars or recycled condiment jars are great for smaller quantities. A dark pantry shelf or large kitchen cupboard are ideal spots to store your herbs. Always lablel your jars so you don't forget what they contain. Some dried herbs can be hard to identify by sight and smell alone, though eventually you will be able to recognize the subtle distinguishing qualities of your favorites. British Tree Medicine by Anna Fraser

Tree Medicine is usually not spoken about as a separate form of therapy, because it is of course traditionally included in herbal medicine. Herbal medicine has for millennia and longer been the dominant medicine of our earth in a huge variety of different cultures and traditions. I guess that even today, in 2002, the majority of people in the world are still turning to herbs and the old traditions, in which herbal medicine was practiced, when they are ill. Access to modern medicine and pharmacological drugs is simply not yet within most people's reach or within their means! Modern medicine has of course grown out of herbal medicine and many of its successful remedies have been derived from plants. Aspirine, codeine, morphine, quinine, ephedrine, and digitalis are but a handful of the many examples of chemicals, which were derived from medicinal plants and trees. Neither conventional herbal medicine or Tree Medicine can be a substitute for all that modern medicine (in spite of its many shortcomings) has to offer us. If we have a car accident or other medical emergency, we like to be taken to a hospital. When we suffer from any complaint we should consult our GP for diagnosis and advice. But there are many instances were we can help ourselves and enjoy the opportunity Tree Medicine gives us to be involved with the living world around us, whilst taking care of our body, mind and soul. Again, please remember that self-medication is not always appropriate and professional medical advice should be sought in any serious or enduring complaint. All the many different forms of medicine have their own contribution to make in working towards a more healthy, wholesome future. Illness and disease has not only multiple causes, but it tends to be multi-layered. It is therefore wise to approach healing on many levels and make it an enriching, rather than an impoverishing experience in your life! (Please read also Reflections on Healing.) Why Tree Medicine? There are some good reasons to treat Tree Medicine as a 'entity' and subject in its own right. Here are some of the most obvious ones. * Trees are highly evolved creatures, which have nurtured us throughout our evolution from the wooden cradle to the coffin we are buried in. Their many qualities keep the Earth habitable for us and other animals and their countless gifts have enabled us to keep warm (or cool), provide shelter, tools and develop culture. It is natural that we should turn to these friends and healers

when we don't feel well. * At this time in our human history, a true appreciation of the role which trees and forests fulfill on this Earth, can be a major factor in repairing some of the enormous environmental damage we have done as a species. Using Tree Medicine is one of many ways in which modern people can begin to rebuild their relationship with trees. * Almost all of the trees that grow in our immediate surroundings have healing properties. And what is more, a great many of these trees have just the sort of depurative and cleansing qualities we need for many of our most common illnesses. Many of these are degenerative conditions or diseases due to the way we 'overload' our bodies, minds and spirits in modern life. * Most of the trees from which we can harvest material are organically grown. Avoid harvesting medicine from trees which grow near busy roads or other polluted places. * To take herbal medicine for weeks or months takes quite a lot of herbs, which then have to be grown and harvested, something not everyone is able to do. You may not have a garden nor the time required. Gathering herbs from wild places is maybe okay for an emergency, but if we all would get our medicinal supplies from the wild, there may soon not be any wild places left. Some of our great medicinal plants have been greatly reduced in number because of their popularity and efficacy, Cowslip is a good example and Lady Slipper has been collected until it now virtually extinct. The advantages of Tree Medicine are: 1. The resources for medical supplies are often already growing locally (90% of all plant-matter in the world consists of trees). 2. Harvesting them responsibly does not kill or injure these giant beings. 3. The vast majority of the trees we will mention in these pages are extremely common. * The supply of commercial natural remedies is still extremely patchy and consulting herbalists and other practitioners of natural medicine is alas beyond the means of many people. Tree Medicine has the advantage that it is virtually free, although I hope that you will feel inspired to explore how you can help the Trees and our environment in turn. Tree Medicine allows us to reflect and connect Like herbal medicine TM is old fashioned medicine, which takes care, love and nurturing. It takes time to prepare the remedies and to apply them. This is not a disadvantage, because whenever something is wrong with us, this is a usually a sure sign that something needs more attention than we have given it. The slow process of making, preparing and taking Tree Medicine allows us to reflect on ourselves and our nearest and dearest and pay attention to all that needs to be done to heal ourselves. This is in my opinion one of the many beneficial 'side-effects' of Tree Medicine: Nurturing and Caring through the medium of our remedies. All illnesses and diseases can be seen as a disturbance in our personal ecology. Tree Medicine connects us back to Nature, our Nature! We are part of the same intelligence that runs wild and free through the trees. This intelligence is the force, for which different people have different names: Divinity, the Great Spirit, God, Natures Creative Force, etc. When we are ill or unwell connecting with this intelligence, the very source which created us, is a healing experience in its own right. About my Tree Medicine Pages in this Grove In this grove I am working towards compiling an overview of all the different ailments and

conditions for which trees that grow in Britain, have traditionally been used, as well as a basic guide on how to harvest and prepare Tree Medicine. As far as I am aware, this has not been done so far. It will take time to complete this work and make it comprehensive and user friendly. As a trained medical herbalist I am in the fortunate position to have a reasonably good idea whether this heritage of traditional usage makes sense or not. However I cannot take any responsibility for the accuracy of information provided and its effects. I can only share these pages with you as documents of historical interest and the responsibility for using it rests firmly on the user! I hope that anyone interested in Tree Medicine will use The-Tree Community Message Boards on this website to exchange experiences, information and any questions which may arise. My very best wishes and love to you all,

Reflections on Healing by Anna Fraser The difference between "being cured" and "healing" When we are ill, we tend to look for a cure. But being cured is not necessarily the same as healing. Being cured is often a passive process, during which drugs or other treatment are received in order to control, to manage or reduce your symptoms. Such a treatment, helpful as it can be, may never deal with all the factors that made us vulnerable to disease in the first place, such as traumatic experiences, painful memories, lifestyle, attitudes, beliefs, relationships, habits, stressful jobs, material circumstances and so on. As long as significant negative factors persist in our life, we will continue to be vulnerable and often be unhappy or unfulfilled. Illness can inspire us to make positive changes Sometimes the shock of being ill allows us see our life in a new light and inspires us to make positive changes. Then we enter the sphere of true healing, which is an active process of replacing all the negative, dis-empowering patterns in our life with life-enhancing self-empowering patterns. A process of becoming whole. In this process we may be able to get invaluable help from other people, from inspirational books and from supportive medical treatment, but nevertheless it must be emphasised that only you can truly heal yourself. Nobody else can come to terms with the traumas of your past and start afresh. Nobody else can change self-destructive beliefs and attitudes for you. Nobody else can feel healthy self-esteem for you. Nobody else can live a healthy lifestyle on your behalf. We are an energy vortex between our inner- and outer world Healing almost always requires changes to be made in our life and that can be uncomfortable or painful, even terrifying. And often there is so much to deal with that we dont even know where to begin. Our suggestion is that you learn to think of yourself as an energy vortex, which flows between your inner and outer world. This helpful because on an energy level healing can be virtually instantaneous. Like all energy, the energy that flows through you is composed of vibrations at particular frequencies. These vibrations and frequencies are created by our thoughts, emotions, beliefs and experiences, etc. and influence and organise the chemistry of our physical body. You dont need to be psychic to know this to be true. Common experiences such as being numbed with fear, glowing with joy, being sexually excited, sick with worry, hot with anger, feeling reduced through loneliness, feeling disintegrated through insecurity, feeling

invincible through loving, proof the point. All these conditions will influence our physical wellbeing, vigour and performance quite noticeably. The energy exchange between our inner and outer world is our power-supply for maintaining health and wholeness. All our connections and interactions with the world work similar to electromagnetic circuits. The energy flow tends to be attracted to other power-points, such as people, ideas, activities, places, substances, memories, ideals, or anything else. If the energy exchange is fruitful we feel empowered. But if we let all our energy flow into unequal relationships, stressful jobs, worn-out habits, hurts from the past, addictions and so on, the result can be a significant power-loss. We will eventually end up depleted, powerless and this will sooner or later manifest as disease in our physical body. So if we want to improve our health it is essential that we become aware where we let our energy flow to. We cannot change the whole world, but by changing our behaviour and our attitudes we can change our own circle of interaction within that world. The rewards are not only improved health, but also a richer, more rewarding life! We cannot change the whole world, but we can change our own .... And of course we need to remember that we are capable of generating our own energy. This is especially important when we are lonely or feel at the mercy of other people or medications to revitalise us. Everything in this world is a manifestation of the Universal Creative Power. We can all make contact with this power for it is part of our own being. We can call it: the Divine Spark within us. In our modern busy lives we often forget it is there, but if we are still and shed the layers of superficiality, for example in meditation, prayer or daydreaming, we will find its power moving deep within us. And this power will make us whole. Connecting with this force requires just a slight shift of consciousness. We are not just a drop in the ocean, but we are part of the infinite ocean. One of the many ancient names of this immense source of power is Mother Nature. Resonating to her essence is like a home-coming and can fill us with an endless potential of creativity and power to set off refreshed and renewed on our path in this life. Being in the presence of trees, Tree Medicine and vibrational tinctures, such as "Mother Nature's Celtic Tree Remedies", are powerful aids to help you open up and attune to this immense source of healing, creativity and power. May your power grow like a mature tree, dance like the Sun on twinkling leaves and be a source of beauty for the greater good of All.

BEGINNERS GUIDE TO HERBALISM unknown author/source

Advice to the Beginning Herbalism Student: Herbalism, like midwifery skills, is one of the oldest parts of teaching within the craft, but is also one where we have lost a huge amount of information and

where science has yet to catch up. Every pagan culture has utilized the herbalism of its particular region, and I have found no one source or teacher who could possibly know about every herb that grows on the Earth. Yet today we have the opportunity to perhaps achieve this within a lifespan or two, using the electronic communications at our fingertips. Science is now slowly beginning to learn the importance of the natural herbs in healing, but they will take centuries to figure it all out because of the way they go about things, unless nudged. The first step in herbalism is to gather the tools you will need, and that is the main point of this first message. I have found the following useful and in many cases vital to learn and practice the use of herbs. A Good mortar and Pestle, one of stone or metal is preferred. If wood is used you will need two, one for inedibles and one for edibles - make sure they do not look identical, as you do not want to accidentally poison anyone!!! Containers: Although you can buy dried herbs over the counter in many places these days, do not store them in the plastic bags they come in, as these are usually neither reusable nor perfectly airtight. Rubbermaid style plastic containers are good, but expensive. I have used glass coffee and spice jars/bottles to good effect, as well as some medicine bottles. The more you recycle the better ecologically, just make sure they have been thoroughly washed and dried before placing anything inside them. Labels: This is vital! None of us in this day and age can possibly recognize each herb in its various forms simply by sight. Always label your containers as you fill them, and if possible date them when they were filled so you don't keep spoiled stock on the shelf. A Tea Ball: A good metal teaball of the single cup size can be very useful in the long run when your are experimenting, and when you are making single person doses of teas and tonics.

Cheesecloth: Useful for straining a partially liquid mixture and occasionally for the making of sachets. A Good Sized Tea Kettle: preferably one that will hold at least a quart of water. A Good Teapot: for simmering mixtures. I use one from a Chinese import store that has done me well. A good cutting board and a SHARP cutting knife, for just herbal work. A notebook, of some sort to record the information in as you go, both successes and failures. Always record anything new you try that may or may not work, and also and research information you get from various sources. An eyedropper. White linen-style bandages: Some ace bandages are also useful in the long run. A metal brazier, of some sort, or a metal container that can withstand heavy usage and heat from within or without, useful for several things including the making of your own incenses. Reference sources, Shortly you should see a list of books that I have read from in the past that I consider useful, build from this as a starting point to others and to your teachers help. Thats it to start, you'll pick the rest up as you go. Take your time studying, take lots of notes, compare your sources and your own personal results on each herb and on herbal mixtures of any kind. HERBS INDOORS Many herbs will grow well in pots on sunny windowsills, in window boxes, hanging baskets and in tubs or barrels in a sun room or on a balcony. There should even be enough space on one large, south-facing windowsill to grow a selection of the basic flavoring herbs or a row of scented herbs that can be used for making tisanes. If you have a sun room or baloney, then 4 tubs planted with mixed annuals and perennials and a good proportion of evergreen herbs for

winter picking could provide most of the fresh herbs needed by a small household, as well as being decorative and sweetly scented. Light and Temperature The first necessity is light. Few herbs suitable for indoor growing will thrive in the shade. Most need sunlight for at least half the day, so set them in a south facing window, if possible, otherwise one facing east or west. It is possible to grow herbs in a shady room under special fluorescent tubes, which should be set about six inches above the top of the plant. Temperature is important. It is useless to attempt to grow herbs directly above a radiator or stove in an airless kitchen that is often steamy and full of fumes. Ideally, there should be warmth during the day, lower temperatures at night and some humidity. In a centrally heated house, humidity may be lacking so keep a bowl filled with water above the radiator or near the herbs. A direct draft may harm the plants though fresh air is necessary. Clay and Plastic Pots Plastic pots are often used today, being cheaper, lighter and less likely to break than clay. But there are some advantages in using an unglazed clay pot, the most important being that excess water will evaporate through the clay walls so the roots are not likely to become waterlogged. Drowning by over watering is the most common fate of indoor herbs. Another advantage is that the moisture content in the soil can be discovered by tapping a clay container sharply; it will give a ringing sound if the soil is too dry and a dull thud if too wet. Whether plastic or clay, the container should have an adequate drainage hole and be stood in a saucer or tray. A layer of gravel in the tray will ensure that the pot never sits in stagnant water. Boxes and Barrels Wooden boxes or barrels make good containers if you have the space. Boxes should be at least 10 inches deep. Saw barrels in half and use them as tubs,

or cut several holes about 2 inches across in their sides and grow a herb from each hole. If you use a large barrel in this way, put a narrow tube of wire netting down the center from top to bottom, before filling it with earth. By watering down the tube, the moisture will spread evenly through the soil; with no tube, the lower plants may suffer from drought. Do not creosote the insides of wooden containers to sterilize them as the fumes may damage the plants, instead make a small fire of newspaper inside the container, just sufficient to char and sterilize the surface of the wood. Hanging Baskets To make the best use of all available space and light, plant a hanging basket with herbs, the upright species in the center and trailing mints and thymes, nasturtiums or ground ivy round the edge. Special clay bowls or wire baskets can be bought for this purpose or even an old kitchen colander will do. To contain moisture, line the wire basket thickly with sphagnum moss or hay, or with a plastic sheet, before filling it with earth. A large, unglazed, terra-cotta bowl with 6 or 7 2-inch holes bored in it will make an ideal hanging onion pot, if you can buy one or have one made. Fill it with earth, plant chives in the top and press the bulbs of Welsh onion into the holes. You will be able to cut the hanging green shoots throughout the winter. Soil, Water, Food, and Care Put a layer of broken crocks or stones in the bottom of large containers before filling them with soil and sprinkle a few spoonfuls of granulated charcoal over them to prevent the soil souring. Then, fill with a standard potting compost bought from a shop or good, loamy, garden earth mixed with a little coarse sand. Sterilize the garden earth for an hour in the oven if you wish, to kill insect eggs and weed seeds. Be careful not to overwater, especially during the winter when plans are resting

and should not be stimulated into unseasonal growth. It is best to water in the morning so that excess moisture can evaporate during the day and to use only tepid water. During the summer, it may be necessary to syringe the leaves of broad- leafed herbs such as sweet basil with tepid water to prevent them from flagging. The leaves of herbs in city window boxes will also need occasional syringing to prevent their pores becoming clogged with grime and fumes. Each spring, spread a little well-rotted compost over the earth in the herb container and water well. If any other food is needed, use a herbal fertilizing tea. Although the restricted light and space will prevent herbs from growing as large indoors as they would outside, they will need regular cropping or trimming to keep them compact and controlled. Pinch out the center shoots to encourage bushy growth and cut off any runners. Examine the drainage hole regularly and if root fibers are showing, transfer the plant to a larger pot. What to Grow Many people will want to grow culinary herbs indoors that cannot be bought fresh and do not dry well. Three large pots, 12 inches in diameter, filled with the annuals, chervil, basil, and coriander, will provide a good mixture with strong, distinctive flavors. Sow their seeds directly into the pots in the spring in moist, fairly rich soil, and thin out the seedlings. The chervil and coriander will begin to shoot and grow leggy soon after midsummer, but basil, especially the compact bush basil, will continue into the winter months. Sweet marjoram and summer savory also grow well indoors and are both annuals. For a basic supply of perennial, evergreen culinary herbs, plant thyme species, winter savory, a clump of Welsh onions and the prostrate rosemary. Decorative dwarf golden sage can be included, and the biennial parsley. None of these are invasive herbs and can be planted together, but mint needs a pot of its own and plenty of moisture. If you have room for a deep tub or barrel on a

balcony or roof, then it may be possible to grow tall herbs such as angelica, deep-rooted caraway or horseradish; otherwise these species are obviously unsuitable for indoor growing. Another series of pots or a large box could be used for growing herbs for tisanes. Plant peppermint and lemon balm (whose roots may need confining), the annual German chamomile, the little rock hyssop, lady's mantle and trailing ground ivy. Herbs grown for their scent might include dwarf lavender species, clove carnation, dwarf santolina and upright and trailing pelargoniums. There are literally hundreds of pelargonium varieties, each with leaves of a different scent and shape, and all make admirable houseplants, being easy to grow and easy to propagate from cuttings. Use the leaves to flavor custards, creams and gelatins and in potpourri mixtures.

SEVERAL WAYS OF PREPARING HERBS FOR USE Notes: Always keep a record of the work you do. If using herbs for healing, remember you are NOT a doctor, use them only for adjuncts not replacements for medical treatment. The traditional Herbal Craftsperson will meditate as the work is done and after it is completed, in this way learning is continued. The Water in the following preparations is brought to boiling then poured over the herb, the herbs are NOT boiled in the water, for that would cause a breakdown of the vitamins and minerals in the herbs that are so vital to the healing process. Making An Infusion This process draws the properties you want out of the herb for healing. An infusion is basically a strong tea. The normal mixture is 1 pint of water to ounce of herb. It takes experience to learn how long each herb needs to steep,

some take longer than others, the average length of time is hour but with practice you'll learn which take longer and which take less time. This is the easiest method. Making A Decoction This is much the same as an infusion (tea) except you are working with a much more solid herb such as thick pieces of root or bark which can't be ground up or the remedy calls for a much stronger dose.. This is the one case where you should BOIL THE HERB. In fact that's the whole process. Make sure that no steam escapes or the vital oils will go away with it. Also (of course) never use any metal when doing ANY herbal remedies. If you will have more than one ingredient in the decoction begin by boiling the toughest then work down. Start with cold water and after boiling for what you consider long enough allow it to steep usually for at least 30 minutes. Making A Poultice This is used when you need to apply the herbs externally such as for a burn or for acne. Yes it's messy but often essential for healing. Pour boiling water over the herbs using just enough to dampen them or evenly cover the plant matter, you're not trying to extract anything from the herb only to moisten it. When it is all evenly wet remove it with a strainer and place between 2 pieces of gauze (cheesecloth also works well if folded several times). You then apply the gauze with the herbs inside to the affected part and allow the moisture with the herb essence to pass within the person. Making An Ointment This method involves mixing the herb(s) with a fixative such as petroleum jelly or vegetable fat. This is done by heating the fixative until it is quite warm and adding the ground herbs to it. Once mixed up the mixture can be heated more than once and allowed to cool, Once you are satisfied that all the goody has been removed from the herb the whole mixture should be strained and

put into a storage container then allowed to cool. This is the same procedure used to make salves. Making A Wash Same as an infusion (tea) except you use it externally. Making A Tincture These are used when long term storage is required. It requires alcohol of at least a 75% grade which can be safely ingested. Place the following in a jar which can be tightly sealed. 1-4 ounces of the herb 8 ounces of alcohol (drinkable!) 4 ounces of water Seal the jar and keep it safely out of the light for 2 weeks. Each day at least once, check it and make sure that you loosed the mass of herb inside the jar by swirling it about. Continue this process until at the end of the 2 weeks the alcohol has extracted all the constituents without need of heat. This process is best begun on the new moon and completed on the full. AROMATHERAPY - The Art of Herbal Scents... Aromatherapy, the art of healing with aromatic plants, or with the oils of those plants, was well known to the ancient ones. The Egyptians, the Romans and the Greeks all practiced it as an integral part of their medicinal lore. Wise women and men treasured the secrets of precious scents and applied them with great skill. The Romans massaged themselves with sweet-smelling unguents before plunging into their elaborate baths. The Greeks assigned a godlike virtue to each plant, and by inhaling the fragrance, they believed they would assume the attributes of that god. During the Plague of Europe's 17th Century, the perfumers who dispensed the pine, cypress and cedar incense that was burnt in the streets and in the hospitals to mask the dreadful odors, those perfumers were UNTOUCHED by the virulent disease that annihilated great masses of the population.

Of course, medical science has come a long way. Many treatments that were used in the past have been supplanted by more modern, more scientific methods. But, have they thrown out the baby with the bathwater? About a hundred years ago, the great medical minds of the world decided that this herbal scent business was just so much superstition, and that such old-wive's tales had no place in Modern Medicine. Since that time, no medical practitioner would recommend scent, with the exception of the menthol-type scents burnt or inhaled for respiratory complaints, which were already known to be so effective that to forbid them would place a seal of unbelieveability on the entire edict. All other scentmedications were scorned, even though they had proven to be a very effective means of well-keeping. And the public, believing the medical profession to be infallible, went along with it. Today, aromatherapy is enjoying a rebirth in the holistic spirit of New Age Medicine. The mind plays a major role in all bodily ailments, as proven by recent research. That is not to say that the mind can cure the body of all its ailments, but fragrances that can alter the patient's emotional state may be able to leave the way open for a beneficial cure, by accepted means. In other words, why leave anything to chance? What would it hurt to smell an herb when you have a headache? Would it infringe upon the noble Medicine Man's territory if we sniffed flowers when our tummies hurt? IF YOU NEED MEDICATION, TAKE MEDICATION. But, be sure you need it. Are you taking medication because it is required by your condition, or are you popping pills you bought over the counter to self-cure a 'minor' problem? Illnesses that are stress-induced, like asthma, headache, and depression respond very well to inhalation therapy. Skin disorders, respiratory ailments, digestive problems and backache can respond to inhalation and massage with scented oils. The same way a lovely perfume evokes memories, or desires, all fragrances cause the brain to respond in some way. If the fragrance brings about a sense of relaxed wellness, who is to say that that is not the healing element?

Aromatic bathing enhances the benefits of the scents used as inhalants or tactile medicants. Along the same lines, the inhalation of a burning scent, if purely made, would have the same or maybe a more readily-absorbable effect. So, take stock of the fragrances available to you, in the forms of incense, oils, potpourris and even teas. Even if they don't heal what ails you, they can make you feel more relaxed, more well. And isn't that what you wanted, after all? What follows is a list of fragrances and the ailments they have been reputed to affect. I have tried to use only the herbs, plants and seeds you can find most easily in your garden, in the supermarket, and at the corner fruit stand. Also, below are some guides that will help with your plans. An aromatic tea is to be consumed close to the nose, so as to continuously inhale the healing aromas while you drink the beverage. When you use oils for massage, you will need to know the areas of greatest value for that massage. We suggest you consult a chart that shows the accupressure /acupuncture points, used by the great Chinese practitioners for centuries of healing. A foot soak is reputed to be nearly as beneficial to the body as a whole-body soak, since the feet will absorb the medicating herb and propel the journey upward into the body of the healing element. Inhaling is done over a bowl of boiled water in which the herb or its oil are floated, while you lean over it with a towel over your head to simulate a steam tent. A compress is either cool or warm, but always damp, with the herb impregnated within, and is laid gently upon the area, not rubbed or massaged or moved about in any way. For this reason, compresses work quite well for burns, wounds and sores. You can burn an herb in many ways. A purchased herbal incense works well. Or you could place the dried

herb on any burning incense, or an open fire. Scented candles also provide the same scent. Essential oils dropped judiciously upon burning coals will do. You must only decide whether you want just the scent in the air, or if the smoke is what you feel will benefit. Burning always gives a dry scented air, as opposed to steaming, which provides a damp scented air. LEGEND: T - Aromatic Tea, also known as Tisane W - Bathe (Make a tea and add it to your bath M - Massage with a scented oil C - Compress, wet, either warm or cool S - Steam (Best way is with a humidifier) B - Burn I - Inhale, either the smoke or the steam, but also the aroma of the other methods F = Foot Soak, with a stronger tea blend than in the bath SCENT, PRODUCT, HEALTH, CONDITION, AND METHOD OF USE Alfalfa Water Retention (T); Arthritis (T,C,M); Cholesterol Reduction (T) Almond Infant/Child skin care (M,W); Coughs, Colds (M,I) Anise Meditative frame of mind (B,T); abates nightmares (T,M) Baby's Breath Healing frame of mind (B)

Barley Skin care (W,M) Basil Bronchitis, Colds, Internal Cleansing (B,I); Antiseptic (C) Depression (M,W); Fainting (I); Nervousness, Insomnia (T,B); Fever (T,M,W,S,C); Indigestion, Nausea (T,M); Mental fatigue,Peaceful frame of mind (B,T,M,W); Hormone Stimulant (M,T,C); Insect Bites (C,W); Migraine (B,C,W,T); Stimulant (T); Weight Loss, Skin Care (M,W) Bay Antiseptic (W) Decongestant, Colds (S,I,W,T) Internal Cleansing (B,I) Hair Loss (M,W) Cajeput Antiseptic, Acne (W,S) Pain Relief, Neuralgia (M,C) Insecticide, Lung Congestion (B,I) Caraway Calm, Healing frame of mind (T,B,M,W) Catnip

Nervousness, Headache (T) Hysteria, Insomnia (T,B,M) Fever, Hives (W) Stomach Upset, Hiccups (T,I,S) Cayenne Fever, Internal Disinfectant (T) Cedar Internal cleansing (B) Lung congestion, Expectorant (B,M,I,W,S) Digestion (I) Antiseptic, Astringent, Eczema (W,C) Sexual Response (M,B) Sedative (B) Chamomile Burns (C) Depression, Nervous Tension, Calm (T) Nausea, Fatigue, Insomnia (T,W) Diarrhea, Indigestion, Menstrual Cramps (T,M) Eczema, Rheumatism, Arthritis (M,W,C) Fainting (I) Fever (C,T,W) Headache, Migraine (M,I,) Weight Loss, Cellulite (T,M,W) Infant skin care, Inflammations (W) Hemorrhoids (W,C) Menopause (M,W,T,B,S) Pain Relief, Neuralgia (C,W,M,T) Sore or Weak Eyes, Sores, Wounds (W,C,S)

Hysteria, Relaxant, Appetite Stimulant (T,B) Cinnamon Healing frame of mind (M) Bedwetting (B,S) General Weakness (T) Spasms, Circulatory Problems (W,F,M,C,T) Impotence (M,B) Infections (W) Citrus Weight loss, Skin care (W,M,T) Cloves Calm (T,B,I) Muscle Tension, Spasms, Pain Relief (M,W,S,C) Toothache (T,C) Insect Repellent (B,C,W) Stimulant (B,T,M) Infections, Antiseptic (W) Nervousness, General Weakness (T,W,S) Cough, Colds, Gargle (T,W,S,B) Cocoa Depression, Calm, Heartache (T) Coconut Internal cleansing (M,W,I) Comfrey Water retention (T) Cumin Peace, Calm (B,I,S) Cypress

Water retention, Cellulite, Menopause (W,M) Varicose Veins, Hemorrhoids (W,C) Coughs, Sinus, Flu, Colds (I,C) Cramps, Muscle Tension (M) Wounds, Sores, Cuts, Acne (W,C,M) Rheumatism, Arthritis, Aches & Pains, Spasms (F,C,M,W,S) Nervousness (S,B,I) Deodorant, Astringent (W) Dandelion Blood weakness, Water retention (T,W) Eczema (W) Dill Hiccups, Health maintenance (T,I) Eucalyptus Asthma, Bronchitis, Cough, Flu (I,C) Sinus, Migraine (M,W,I) Burns (C) Diarrhea, Indigestion, Kidney/Urinary Infection (W,M) Sore throat, Laryngitis (I,S,C) Rheumatism, Aches & Pains (M,W,F) Antiseptic, Wounds (C,W) Insect Repellant (B,C,W) Fever (C,M) Fennel Colic, Constipation, Cystitis, Flatulence, Indigestion (T,W) Nausea, Weight loss, Reducing hunger pangs (T,W) Health maintenance (T) Fern

Depression (W) Gardenia Calm (B,I,M,W,F,S) Garlic Asthma, Hypertension (C) Intestinal Worms (T) Antiseptic, Antibiotic (W) Toothache (M,T,C) Insomnia (T,W) Coughs, Colds, Congestion (T,M,C,S) Geranium Water Retention, Cellulite (M,W) Insect Repellant (B,C,W) Varicose Veins, Circulation Problems (W,C) Astringent, Wounds, Fractures (W) Burns (C) Neuralgia, Pain Relief (M,W,F,C) Hormone Stimulation (M,B) Fatigue, Exhaustion (M,W,F) Ginger Health Maintenance (T) Menstruation (T,C) Hyacinth Depression, Heartache, Grief (I,B,M) the Pain of Childbirth (I,S,M) Hyssop Asthma, Bronchitis, Colic, Flu (I,S,F,C) Eczema (W)

Fever (W,C) Indigestion, Rheumatism (M,W,C) Jasmine Good spirits, Peace, Calm (B,S,I) Meditative frame of mind (I,B,W,T) Juniper Water Retention, Hemorrhoids (W,C) Rheumatism, Gout (C,M,F) Stimulant, Energizer (W,B) Antiseptic, Sores, Wounds (W) Colic, Cough (T,S,I) Exhaustion, Fatigue (F,M,W) Kidney/Urinary Infections, Cellulite (M,W) Constipation (M) Diarrhea, Flatulence, Indigestion (T,C) Eczema (W,C,S) Lavender Burns, Eczema (W,T,C) Wounds, Spasms, Acne (C) Hemorrhoids, Insect Repellant (W,C) Calm (T) Sore throat, Nausea, Diarrhea, Nervous tension (T,I,S) Depression, Headache, Migraine (W,B,T,I) Hair Loss, Cellulite, Weight Loss, Menopause (M,W) Rheumatism, Fatigue, Exhaustion (M,W,F) Fever, Pain Relief (M,C) Lemon Rheumatism, Gout (W,F)

Aging Skin, Acne, Antiseptic, Astringent (W) Insect Repellant (B,C,W) Water Retention, Gastric Distress (T,I,S) Lemongrass Weight loss (T) Marjoram Asthma, Bronchitis, Colds (I,S) Constipation, Indigestion (M,T) Colic, Headache, Nervous tension, Depression (M,W,T) Health maintenance (I,B) Insect Bites (C,W) Menstrual Cramps (M) Nutmeg Meditative frame of mind (T,M,B,I) Parsley Rheumatism (M,C,W) Water Retention (T) Peppermint Asthma, Bronchitis, Colds, Flu (T,I,S,W) Colic, Indigestion, Nausea, Morning Sickness (T,M) Mental Fatigue, Shock (T,W) Toothache (W,C) Fatigue, Weight Loss (T,C) Headache, Migraine (M,I,W) Insect Repellant (B,C,W) Cooling, Fever, Nerves (M,C) Spasms, Pain Relief (C) Pine

Sinus, Bronchitis, Flu, Decongestant (I,C) Hormone Stimulant (M,B) Fatigue, Aches & Pains, Rheumatism, Gout (B,C,M) Infection, Antiseptic (W) Water Retention (I,W) Rose Calm, Peace, Depression, Insomnia, Fatigue (T) Nausea, Heart, Liver, Uterus, Stomach (T) Weight Loss, Infant skin care (M,W) Sex Drive/Libido (M,B) Headache (W,M,I,T,B,S,C) Astringent (W) Rosehips Weight loss, Nervous tension (T) Rosemary Depression, Healing frame of mind, Stimulant (T) Asthma, Colds, Flu, Decongestant (M,W,F) Constipation, Diarrhea, Cellulite (T,M) Fainting, Headache (T,M,I) Rheumatism, Gout, Arthritis, Aches & Pains (M,F) Weight Loss, Migraine (M,W) Exhaustion, Fatigue (T,M,W,F) Hormone Stimulant (M,B) Sores, Burns (C) Antiseptic, Skin, Astringent (W) Fumigant (B) Heart, Sickliness (T,M,B,I,S) Sprains, Pain Relief (M)

Saffron Meditative frame of mind (B,T) Sage Asthma, Bronchitis, Cold (T,I,S) Burns, Eczema (W,C) Fainting, Low Blood Pressure (T,M,B) Flatulence, Headache, Indigestion, Diarrhea (T) Sore throat, Cough (T,I,S,C) Toothache, Weight loss (T,W) Menopause, Cellulite, Aches & Pains (T,M,W) Menstrual Cramps, Nervousness, Hair Loss, Trembling (T,M) Fatigue (W,M) Memory, Ability to Learn (B,T) Spearmint Depression, Heartache (T) (Use Spearmint for the same reasons as Peppermint, but Spearmint is less powerful and better for children.) Thyme Heartache, Depression, Calm (T) Internal cleansing, Kidney/Urinary Infections (W,M) Asthma, Bronchitis (I,S) Fainting, Restore Energy, Renew Spirits (B,I,T) Rheumatism, Weight loss (M,W,C) Cellulite, Aches & Pains (W,F,M) Insect Bites, Antiseptic, Inflammation, Infection (W,C) Wounds, Sores, Cuts (C) Constipation, Intestinal Parasites (T,M) Fatigue (T,B,M)

Spasms, Hair Loss, Digestion (M,W,T) Turmeric Peace, Calm (T,B) HERBAL CURES (Courtesy of Jeanne Rose) BruisesWitch Hazel Extract: Soak 1 oz. witch hazel leaves and twigs combined in 2 cups of alcohol. Shake daily. Strain. Use full strength on bruises. (You can dilute with water and use as a mouthwash also.) Yerba Santa Poultice: Good for severe bruises and swelling too. Mash the leaves of a Yerba Santa, then soak them in water, and apply while still hot to the bruise. Cover the leaves with a CLEAN cloth. BurnsMari-Gilly Water for Burns and Sunburns: An Actual Case History from the Author: "One day while lighting the oven the book of matches took fire in my hand and stuck there. After shaking it off, I dug into my herbal closet. I was looking for a remedy I had made a month before. Amateurishly I had preserved it beneath a layer of oil, and it was colorful with mold. I filtered it out and plunged the badly burned hand in the liquid. Within two minutes the pain was gone. In 20 minutes the hand was wrapped in cloth and no longer painful. There were no blisters of any kind, but within three days a black, horny layer appeared where the blisters might have been. Very ugly. In another week, this peeled off, and once again the hand was smooth, pink, soft, and completely unscarred." The recipe for the miracle is:

Simmer one handful of balm of Gilead buds and one handful of marigold flowers in an enamel or glass pot with water to cover. Do not boil. After 15 minutes remove from heat, strain and pour liquid into a clean and sterile jar. Add a layer of olive oil to cover. Do not let the oil and liquid mix. It will keep for a few months. To use: Hold breath (as liquid does NOT smell good) and pour through filter paper or paper towel. Use directly on burns, sunburns, and other similar problems. Marshmallow-Comfrey Oil: Simmer 1 handful of crushed marshmallow root and 1 handful of Comfrey root in 1 cup of white wine in an enamel pot. Cover. Simmer for 20 minutes. Strain. When cool apply to burns and sunburns. WartsNote: All these cures will work for pimples, zits, and corns too. Stolen Apple Cure: Get an apple. Cut this apple into as many pieces as you have warts. Rub one peace onto 1 wart, and repeat with all warts. Wrap up the apple bits in a piece of cloth, then bury the whole thing. When the apple bits have rotted, the warts will be gone. Dandelion Juice: Gather together, many dandelions, this includes stems, heads and leaves. Squeeze them. Apply their milky fluid to the wart or corn. Oil of Thuja: Apply this oil to a wart. An infusion used as a wash on the warts will work too. (Note: Thuja is also called White Cedar) Marigold Juice for Warts: Take a fresh marigold, squeeze out the juice and apply it directly to a wart. Let the juice dry. Make applications until the warts fall off. Milkweed Juice:

Take some fresh milkweed, squeeze it, and apply this milk to the warts. The indians say that it will entirely cure warts with just a very few applications. BronchitisIf you use tobacco products, try this instead. Try chewing a combination of gentian root and chamomile flowers every time you feel the need to smoke, then try these tea recipes. Manzanita Cider: Crush a handful of manzanita berries and bruise a handful of the leaves, and pour over 2 cups of boiling water. When settled, strain off the liquid and use throughout the day as a drink. Horehound Tea: Take 1 oz. of the green herb, 1 oz. of honey, and 1 pint of boiling water. Cover, and set aside until cold. Drink 4 oz. at a time for a cough. Other Herbal Teas: Try a combination of coltsfoot, mugwort, and culeb, with lemon and honey. Try a snuff of golden seal; small pinch of the golden yellow powder snuffed into each nostril is sometimes very efficacious in the treatment of bronchitis. If your respiratory passages are particularly painful, slippery elm tea is an excellent demucelent. Sinus InfectionsGolden Seal Snuff: Take powdered golden seal and snuff a bit into each nostril whenever needed. Herbal Inhaler: In a small bottle add 10 drops of each of the following oils. Carry it around with you and sniff the scent of these fine aromatics whenever you wish to clear your nasal passages.

Eucalyptus, Lavender, Rosemary, Bay Leaf, and Cloves -or- Peppermint Sore ThroatsDirty Sock Cure: During the winter, when you get a sore throat, wrap your dirty wool sock around your throat every night and the soreness will soon disappear. Sage Tea: Take equal parts of sage, rosemary, honeysuckle, and plantain. Boil these herbs in sufficient water to cover. Add a small tablespoonful of honey to each pint of liquid and use as required. Yerba Mansa Root: This root, chewed slowly, will ease the pain of sore throats. Colds & CoughsTeas for Colds and Coughs: To help eliminate mucus in the respiratory passage, mix together equal parts of the following ingredients: comfrey root hyssop balm of gilead chamomile or coltsfoot elecampane or wintergreen leaf* For either tea steep 1 heaping teaspoon of the herbs in 1 cup of boiling water. Cover the pot and steep for 10-20 minutes. Strain. Drink this tea as often as you like. You can add lemon and honey. (*: Potentially dangerous. Can cause irritation, allergic reaction, gastric distress or other discomfort.) Tea for Coughs: Mix together equal parts of pennyroyal, licorice, and horehound and make a tea by steeping 1 heaping teaspoon per cup of boiling water for 10-20 minutes.

Strain. Drink with lemon and honey as often as you like. Tea for Colds in the Chest: Mix together equal quantities of birch leaf, horehound, and licorice. Steep 1 heaping teaspoon of herbs per cup of boiling water for 10-20 minutes. Strain. Drink with lemon and honey as often as you like. Sleep Tea for Colds: Mix together equal quantities of dandelion root, chamomile, and valerian. Steep 1 heaping teaspoon of herbs per cup of boiling water for 10-20 minutes. Strain. Drink with lemon and honey to relax you and help you sleep when you have a bad cold. Tooth AchesGarlic: Put a piece of a garlic clove inside the cavity. It kills the pain and seems to slow up the infection process. At night place a peeled garlic between your teeth and your cheek. This is also good to keep a cold from becoming severe. (Make sure you wash out your mouth in the morning though!) Marshmallow Root Poultice: If you have an abscessed tooth and a swollen jaw, place pieces of dried marshmallow root between the tooth and cheek. Renew the poultices in the morning and night. This greatly reduces the inflammation and keeps the pain in check. Bad BacksChamomile Oil: This is an old Egyptian formula. Take flowers of chamomile and beat them up with pure olive oil. Leave to stand until the virtues of the flowers have been extracted. Then with the oil rub over the whole body, especially the back. Go to bed, cover up. Good for over-strained muscles, cramps, strains and stitches. Super Massage Cream: 1 oz. of coconut oil

1 oz. of turtle oil 1 dropper sweet clover oil Mix all the ingredients together. This is an excellent cream, useful for all sore and aching muscles. According to the therapist the author consulted, this cream is superior to anything supplied by the hospital. Lavender Oil: Mix 1 part oil of lavender with 3 parts olive oil, or 1 part oil of lavender with 1 part coconut oil, and use to massage the muscles of the lower back. Use sparingly. Aching JointsParsley Tea to Stimulate the Kidneys: Take a handful of fresh parsley and pour over it 2 cups of boiling water. Steep until cold then strain. Drink 1 cup of this tea before every meal and before going to bed. Indian Tea: The indians drink a tea of rose petals, peppermint, lemon peel, and liden leaves for arthritis. Rheumatism Tea: An excellent tea to take daily for the treatment of rheumatism and arthritis is a mixture of cascara sagrada, poke root, cimicfuga, uva ursi leaves, chamomile and sassafras. Take 1 T. of this mixture and pour it over 2 cups of boiling water. Let it steep for about 10 minutes and strain. Make it fresh in the evening and drink 1 cup, with lemon and honey if you like. Drink the other cup, cold, in the morning. BitesInsect Bite Ointment: Beat some frankincense to a powder and mix it with oil of bay. Use it to anoint the body to ease the itch of insect bites. For the sting, a little

oil of cajeput offers relief. Dog Bites: Four oz. rue, 4 oz. treacle, 4 oz. garlic, 4 large spoonfuls of scraped pewter. Boil all of the ingredients with a bottle of strong ale. (Beer will do.) Strain. Apply the sediment to the wound and drink the clear liquid 9 spoonfuls every day for 9 days. - a seventeenth-century recipe. Athlete's FootSoap & Powder: Mix together 1 oz. powdered gum, benzoin with 4 oz. starch. When washing your feet, use soap bark, a useful detergent, especially good for athlete's foot. Apple Cider Vinegar Bath: Steep 1 oz. sage and agronomy in 2 cups of hot apple cider vinegar for 15 minutes. Keep it covered. When cool enough put your feet in and soak for as long as you can. Repeat two or three times a day. HairOlive Hair Oil: To 4 oz. olive oil, add 1 t. oil of rosemary, and 5 drops oil of lemon grass. Rub a tiny bit into the hair each night. This is version of an old time recipe that helps hair grow. Yucca Root Shampoo: Boil 4 oz. yucca root or soap bark in 2 cups of fresh water until it is reduced to 1 cup. Strain and cool. If not sudsy enough for you, add castille shampoo. Brunettes can substitute rosemary water, and blondes chamomile water, for the 2 cups of liquid-both cleanses and deodorized the scalp. To thicken the hair, and to keep it from falling out: Put 4 lbs. pure organic honey into a still with 4-6 oz grapevine tendrils and 24 oz. tender rosemary tops. Distill as cool and as slowly as possible. Allow the liquid to drop until it begins to taste sour. Rub this into the hair

roots daily. Sage Tea: Drink sage tea daily and rub the infusion onto the roots of your hair to retain its rich, dark color. --------------------------------------TABLE OF HERBS THAT REPEL ANIMALS AND INSECTS REPELLENTS FLIES: Clover flower, oil of sassafras, mixture of clove, bay, and eucalyptus INSECTS: Oil of mint, feverfew, oil of citronella, pennyroyal, and oil of pennyroyal MICE: peppermint pennyroyal BODY LICE: oil of bergamot, oil of pennyroyal FLEAS: rue, chamomile, savory, and pennyroyal CATS: rue, lavender, and ginger DOGS: Ginger

Source: Mystic Moon Herbal Doses The doses indicated in these pages are recommended for 150-lb adults. Children should receive one-half the recommended amount. Infants receive one-quarter dose and newborns should receive the dose through the mother's milk. Basic Herbal Infusions When Using Leaves or Flowers: Steep two teaspoons per cup of water for about twenty minutes. Strain and store in a refrigerated, airtight container. The dose is one-fourth cup four times a day, not with meals. Children take oneeighth cup. When Using Roots, Bark, Seeds, and Twigs: Simmer two teaspoons of the plant matter to one cup of water for twenty minutes, strain and store as above. The dose is one-fourth cup four times a day, not with meals. Herbal teas will stay fresh in your refrigerator for about one week when stored in an airtight container.

Angelica Botanical name Angelica archangelica/OR/CO2 select/Root/Germany For strengthening the mind and spirit. Helpful for anxiety, hoplesness, indecisiveness. Stimulates the immune system. Caution: Photosensitive, do not use before sun or ultra violet light exposure. Allspice Gender:Masculine Planet:Mar Powers: Money, Luck, Healing Magical Uses:Allspice is burned as an incense to attract money or luck, and is also added to such mixtures. Allspice is also used to promote healing. Ague Root Powers:Protection Magical Uses:Sprinkle around your home to keep evil at bay, or carry in a sachet for the same purpose. Also, use in hex-breaking and uncrossing rituals and mixtures. Agrimony Gender:Masculine Planet:Jupiter Element:Air Powers:Protection, Sleep Magical Uses:Use in all protection sachets and spells, also to banish negative eneries and spirits. It protects againts goblins, evil and poison. Agrimony has also long been used to reverse spells sent againts the magician; i.e.,it not only breaks hexes, it also sends them back to the hexer. Agrimony placed under the head will make one sleep as if dead, according to ancient lore, but don't use this for insomnia:the sleeper won't awaken until the herb is removed. At one time agrimony was used to detect the presence of Witches. Adder's Tongue Magickal Uses Adder's tongue is a Witches' herb of healing. It is also used as a magickal herb of divination, dream magick, and lunar magick. Also known by the folk name Dogtooth Violet. The adder's tongue is a sacred flower of all serpent goddesses. Gender: Feminine Planet: Moon Element: Water Powers: Healing Magickal Uses: Soak some adder's tongue in cold water and apply to a wound or bruise(wrap it in a piece of cloth) until the herb grows warm.

Next, bury the wet herb in a muddy place. The wound will be cured. "Wicca Garden" by Gerina Dunwich "Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs" by Scott Cunningham A WITCH'S MAGICKAL HERBAL~Unknown Aurthor/Source There are many herbs that can be used for magickal purposes; Herbs are wonderful for magick - they can be burned or tied up in sachets or made into amulets to wear. (I am not recommending that you ingest any of these herbs) Anise: purification, protection, keeps away nightmares Basil: purification, protection, exorcism, love, prosperity Chamomile: prosperity, meditation, calmness Cinnamon: psychic powers, protection, success, healing, clairvoyance, prosperity Dill: seeds draw money and protection, the flowers are used for love Hazel: mental powers, hazel nuts are used in fertility amulets or spells Lemon Balm: health, success, love Mugwort: divination, clairvoyance, psychic powers, protection, strongest when picked on a full moon night Nutmeg: clairvoyance, prosperity Parsley: purification, protection Peppermint: healing, purification Rosemary: protects from negativity, blessing, consecration, aids memory, protection rituals of all kinds Sage: healing, prosperity, wisdom Thyme: burn for purification, protection from negativity, clairvoyance Yarrow: for a happy marriage, defense, protection Kitchen Witch Herbal The Kitchen Witch Herbal by Estara In the third Grimoire I suggested kitchen herbs for those who can't get away with more exotic, "witchy" herbs in their cabinets. Many of them have a history of magickal, medicinal, and/or ritual use. They are also the easiest herbs to obtain, even for those of us who have the luxury of using others as well; you can get hold of them in an emergency situation at a friend's house, or anywhere that a grocery store is open, which is a real advantage. (Do you know anyone who carries a baggie of mugwort everywhere they go? I

don't.) It has since occurred to me that those who can't be seen using exotic herbs probably also don't have magickal herbal books sitting around their homes. Therefore, in this article I will give you some information about magickal uses of kitchen herbs, as well as a list of my references, so you can branch out when you get the chance. The herbs listed below should be easily obtained at your grocery store, and when sitting in your cabinet they should not get a second glance from even the most rabid anti-magickal person. Some painless ways to include herbs in your spells are to simmer them on the stove in a pot of water, to include them in ritual foods or drinks, to burn them in a fire, or to place them in a bag, doll, or pillow. You can also scatter them on your working altar. You will notice that some of the listings will seem to contradict themselves, especially concerning planets and elements. This is because I have taken information from several different sources, and different people and traditions will often have different uses and associations for an herb. The uses for which there seems to be a consensus will be listed first, followed by other mentioned uses. You are encouraged to experiment with herbs you are interested in, to see which properties they have for you. *Anise* Planet: Mercury/Jupiter Element: Air Main magickal uses: Contacting other planes, divination, love, passion, preventing nightmares, protection, psychic development, psychic protection, purification Other magickal uses: Clairvoyance, cleansing, consecration, fertility, gain, good luck, happiness, money, weddings Lore: Paul Beyerl attributes anise to Mercury and Apollo, and suggests that it be partnered with amber stones for best effect. *Basil* Planet: Mars Element: Fire Main magickal uses: Consecration, divination (esp. about love), exorcism, fertility, fidelity, good luck, happiness, harmony, love, money, passion, peace, prosperity, protection, psychic development, psychic protection, purification, strength, success, tranquility Other magickal uses: Clairvoyance, commanding, courage, dragons, grieving, hatred, honesty, Imbolc, initiation, inspiration, invokation, prevents theft, rituals for the dead, spell-breaking Lore: Paul Beyerl says that basil is attractive to dragons, salamanders, and other fire-oriented creatures. It is sacred to the Hindu god Vishnu and his avatar, Krishna. Magickal herbals occasionally refer to it as St. Joseph's Wort. Many cultures used basil in herbal medicine, which is not covered in this article. *Bay* Planet: Sun Element: Fire Main magickal uses: Clairvoyance, consecration, divination, dreams, exorcism, healing, love, passion, protection, psychic protection, purification, wisdom, wishes

Other magickal uses: endings, good luck, harmony, Imbolc, inspiration, justice, knowledge, magic, memory, money, overcome opposition, peace, psychic development, release, spell-breaking, strength, success, tranquility, transformation, Winter rituals, Yule Lore: Bay leaves come from a tree also called the laurel, and have a strong tradition as a Greek sacred plant. When the nymph Daphne wanted to avoid the passions of Apollo, she turned into the first laurel tree, which Apollo then adopted as his sacred tree. Wreaths were made from the leaves, which were also chewed and burned by Apollo's prophetic priestesses at Delphi. It is not suggested, however, that you try chewing bay leaves, as they are rather volatile, and the amount you would get from chewing might be too much for those not trained in the use of visionary herbs. Other gods include Aesclepius (the god of healing and Apollo's son), Ceres, and Cerridwen. *Caraway* Planet: Mercury Element: Air Main magickal uses: Fidelity, love, memory, passion, preventing theft, protection, retention, sensuality Other magickal uses: consecration, fertility, gain, honesty, keeping secrets, peace of mind, weddings *Celery seed* Planet: Saturn/Mercury Element: Earth Main magickal uses: Psychic development Other magickal uses: Beauty, divination, fertility, love, passion *Cinnamon* Planet: Mercury/Sun/Mars/Uranus (take your pick!) Element: Air/Fire Main magickal uses: Clairvoyance, consecration, divination, energy, good luck, love, money, passion, peace, prosperity, protection, psychic development, success Other magickal uses: communication, happiness, harmony, healing, inspiration, knowledge, meditation, purification, spirituality, tranquility, wisdom Lore: Paul Beyerl suggests that cinnamon be paired with tourmaline for best effect. Cinnamon is important as a purification incense in China. Do not use externally on the body, as it irritates the skin. *Cloves* Planet: Sun/Jupiter Element: Fire Main magickal uses: clairvoyance, divination, exorcism, keeps away negative forces, love, memory, money, passion, peace of mind, protection, psychic protection, purification, stopping gossip Other magickal uses: cleansing, friendship, psychic development, release, spell-breaking Lore: Cloves were originally grown in China, and made their way to Europe in the fourth centure CE (Common Era). They, like cinnamon, are not grown in the United States, but are imported. *Coriander* (also called Cilantro) Planet: Mars Element: Fire

Main magickal uses: love Other magickal uses: clairvoyance, divination, fertility, gain, health, keeping secrets, passion, peace, protection, retention, weddings *Dill* Planet: Mercury Element: Earth/Fire Main magickal uses: love, protection, psychic protection Other magickal uses: Blessings, confidence, determination, dreams, fertility, gain, harmony, keeping secrets, money, passion, peace, prevents theft, retention, rest, sleep, tranquility Lore: Some hold that Dill is such a Mercurial herb that it should not be used when Mercury is in retrograde. It has a long tradition of use as a protection against magic: an old rhyme says, "Vervaine and dill/ Hinder witches of their will." (Another version says, "Trefoil, vervain, St. John's Wort, dill/ Hinder witches of their will." In either case, this is specifically meant against evil witches: the healers actually used all of these herbs.) *Fennel* Planet: Mercury Element: Air/Fire Main magickal uses: confidence, courage, fertility, longevity, love, Midsummer, protection, psychic protection, purification, strength Other magickal uses: Commanding, consecration, divination, energy, gain, meditation, Summer rituals, virility Lore: Fennel was used by the Saxons and by Jewish mystics as an asperger and purifying herb. It also had a history of use by the Greeks, Romans, and Germans, and it followed colonists to the New World. Aoumiel associates it with the God. *Garlic* Planet: Mars Element: Fire Main magickal uses: exorcism, magic, passion, protection, spell-breaking, strength Other magickal uses: clairvoyance, commanding, confidence, consecration, courage, divination, healing, longevity, money, overcoming opposition, prevents nightmares, purification, stopping gossip, success, weather (fair) Lore: Garlic is one of the few "herbs" whose powers have survived into modern superstition, where it gives protection against vampires. (Silver RavenWolf says that it is also helpful against psychic vampires.) The Greeks attributed it to Hecate, the primary goddess of magic. It is also sacred to the Great Mother, Cybele. Its use actually goes back even further to the Sumerians. Besides its strong psychic protection, it also protects health when eaten regularly. It was beloved in most ancient societies that had it, to the extent that the builders of the Pyramids were paid partially in garlic, and at one point went on strike to get more (according to graffiti inside the Pyramids, left by the workers). *Ginger* Planet: Mars Element: Fire Main magickal uses: love, passion, psychic protection Other magickal uses: cursing, health, psychic development, sensuality, success

*Lavender* (a stretch, but it appears in some gourmet recipes) Planet: Mercury Element: Air Main magickal uses: clairvoyance, cleansing, consecration, happiness, healing, love, Midsummer, money, passion, peace, peace of mind, protection, psychic protection, purification, tranquility Other magickal uses: blessings, chastity, divination, dreams, energy, gentleness, good luck, grieving, harmony, keeping secrets, magic (esp. to increase the duration of a spell), meditation, memory, psychic development, retention, ritual, sleep, stability, virility, weddings Lore: Attributed by some to Hecate, Saturn, and snake goddesses. Aoumiel also calls it attractive to elves. *Lovage* Planet: Venus/Sun Element: Earth/Water Main magickal uses: love Other magickal uses: beauty, cleansing, consecration, money, passion, protection, psychic protection, purification Lore: The main uses concern love and beauty, hence, one assumes, the name "Lovage." *Mace* Planet: Mercury Element: Air Main magickal uses: Clairvoyance Other magickal uses: fertility, gain, good luck, love, protection *Marjoram* Planet: Venus/Mercury Element: Air Main magickal uses: grieving, happiness, love, money, protection, psychic development, psychic protection,tranquility, weddings Other magickal uses: Animals, cleansing, courage, dreams (of love), harmony, peace, rituals for the dead, success Lore: Attributed to Venus by the Romans, but also sometimes to Aphrodite, Thor and Jupiter. In case you're confused about the use for both grieving and happiness, it is meant to restore happiness to the grief-stricken. *Mustard seed* Planet: Mars Element: Fire Main magickal uses: fertility, health, love, passion, protection Other magickal uses: commanding, cursing, exorcism, gain, good luck, sensuality, spell-breaking, strength, success, virility *Nutmeg* Planet: Jupiter Element: Fire/Air Main magickal uses: clairvoyance, divination, money Other magickal uses: dreams, fertility, gain, love, meditation, passion, prosperity, protection, psychic development, rest, sleep *Onion* Planet: Mars

Element: Fire Main magickal uses: exorcism, protection Other magickal uses: Clairvoyance, cleansing, contacting other planes, divination, healing, lunar rites, magic, purification, spell-breaking Lore: The link to the moon seems to be mostly due to color and shape. In protective magick, just as in cooking, onion is often combined with garlic. *Oregano* Planet: Venus Element: Air Main magickal uses: happiness, tranquility Other magickal uses: Animals, grieving, harmony, love, peace, protection, psychic development, weddings *Parsley* Planet: Saturn Element: Earth Main magickal uses: divination, happiness, passion, protection, psychic development, purification Other magickal uses: clairvoyance, cleansing, consecration, contacting other planes, fertility, good luck, invokation, meditation, rituals for the dead, speed Lore: Sacred to Persephone, parsley was used in the victory wreaths of the Isthmian games by the Greeks. Some also attribute it to Aphrodite and Venus, and with Mother goddesses. Parsley was thought to come from from the blood of Archemorus, a servant of Death. *Pepper* Planet: Mars Element: Fire Main magickal uses: cursing, exorcism, passion, protection Other magickal uses: commanding, sensuality, spell-breaking, stops envy Lore: Stings the eyes when burned. *Peppermint* Planet: Venus Element: Air Main magickal uses: cleansing, consecration, dreams, happiness, healing, love, money, passion, prosperity, protection, psychic development, purification, release, renewal, rest, sleep Other magickal uses: Animals, divination, endings, energy, exorcism, good luck, grieving, spirit offering, success, transformation Lore: Mints are sacred to the god Hades, because (as happened with Daphne and Apollo--see *bay*) a young lovely named Minthe was transformed into a mint to keep her from Hades' embrace. Peppermint is also sometimes attributed to Zeus. Paul Beyerl suggests pairing peppermint with topaz or chalcedony for best effect. *Poppyseed* Planet: Moon Element: Water Main magickal uses: dreams Other magickal uses: Binding, clairvoyance, consecration, cursing, fertility, prosperity Lore: In Greece, poppies belonged to Hypnos and Somnos, sleep gods. (Remember "The Wizard of Oz?" "Poppies will make them sleeeeep!") They are

also associated with Ceres. If you eat poppyseeds shortly before taking a drug test, you may test positive for heroin, which comes from opium, a kind of poppy. This kinship may also explain some of its magickal functions. *Rosemary* Planet: Sun Element: Fire Main magickal uses: cleansing, confidence, consecration, courage, exorcism, good luck, grieving, happiness, healing, knowledge, love, memory, passion, peace of mind, prevents theft, protection, psychic development, psychic protection, purification, release, ritual, rituals for the dead, water rites/sea rituals, weddings Other magickal uses: blessings, dreams, endings, energy, elves, fidelity, honesty, inspiration, invokation, longevity, meditation, new moon, prevents nightmares, sleep, strength, transformation, wisdom, Yule Lore: Rosemary is associated in Shakespeare's play "Hamlet" with remembrance, so its link to memory is old. Even older are its associations with general magic and healing, with feminine power--folklore had it that a healthy rosemary plant grew where a woman was head of the family--and with goddesses, especially of the sea. Catholic healers associated it with Mary. Aoumiel calls it attractive to elves. Its reputation is that of an all-purpose herb that will help with practically anything. *Saffron* Planet: Sun Element: Fire Main magickal uses: Clairvoyance, divination Other magickal uses: cleansing, commanding, consecration, exorcism, healing, magic, psychic development, purification, spell-breaking, weather (raises wind) *Sage* Planet: Mercury/Jupiter Element: Earth Main magickal uses: cleansing, healing, longevity, money, passion, prosperity, psychic development, psychic protection, purification, wisdom Other magickal uses: business, clairvoyance, consecration, divination, domestic harmony, energy, happiness, inspiration, keeping secrets, knowledge, love, Mabon, meditation, peace, retention, Samhain, tranquility, weddings, Yule Lore: The kind of sage found in the kitchen was brought to the New World by colonists, and was especially popular among Germans. It should not be confused with sagebrush. *Savory* Planet: Venus Element: Air Main magickal uses: passion Other magickal uses: Animals, attracts males, happiness, love, satyrs, sensuality, virility Lore: Savory is ruled by and named after the satyrs, thus its many ties to sexual affairs. It was a favorite of the Romans for parties. *Spearmint* Planet: Venus Element: Air

Main magickal uses: consecration, happiness, love, money, passion, prosperity, protection, psychic development Other magickal uses: Animals, dreams, endings, exorcism, healing, good luck, release, renewal, rest, sleep, spirit offering, success, transformation Lore: see *peppermint.* *Star Anise* Planet: Mercury/Jupiter Element: Air/Water Main magickal uses: clairvoyance, good luck, protection, psychic development Other magickal uses: consecration, contacting other planes, divination, exorcism, fertility, gain, invokation, justice, love, money, passion, preventing nightmares, psychic protection, spiritual places Lore: Primarily used in Japan, around temples and burial sites. It is also called Chinese Anise. *Tarragon* Planet: Mars Element: Fire Main magickal uses: commanding, confidence, courage, passion, protection, strength Other magickal uses: Animals, calming, keeping secrets, love, peace, prevents theft, retention, sensuality, virility Lore: The Latin name, "Artemesia dracunculus," means "little dragon of Artemis." It seems to carry many of Artemis's qualities, in both her Olympian (courage and strength) and pre-Olympian (passion and sensuality) forms. *Thyme* Planet: Venus Element: Air Main magickal uses: clairvoyance, cleansing, consecration, courage, divination, dreams, exorcism, faeries, happiness, healing, love, money, prevents nightmares, protection, psychic development, purification Other magickal uses: compassion, confidence, contacting other planes, grieving, magic, meditation, Midsummer, passion, release, renewal, rituals for the dead, Summer rituals, wishing Lore: Thyme has strong ties to faery lore. Paul Beyerl pairs it with pearls. *Turmeric* Planet: Mars Element: Fire Main magickal uses: passion Other magickal uses: commanding, confidence, courage, exorcism, magic, sensuality, spell-breaking, strength *Vanilla* Planet: Jupiter Element: Fire Main magickal uses: love, passion Other magickal uses: Energy, new moon *Wintergreen* Planet: Mercury Element: Earth Magickal uses: Animals, contacting other planes, good luck, money

)O( And now, because I'm a beautiful person, I provide at no additional cost to you, a SPELL TYPE CROSS-REFERENCE *Animals* marjoram, oregano, peppermint, savory, spearmint, tarragon, wintergreen *Beauty* celery seed, lovage *Binding and Cursing* ginger, mustard seed, pepper, poppyseed *Blessings* dill, lavender, rosemary *Business* sage *Calming* tarragon *Chastity* lavender *Clairvoyance* anise, basil, bay, cinnamon, cloves, coriander/cilantro, garlic, lavender, mace, nutmeg, onion, parsley, poppyseed, saffron, sage, star anise, thyme *Cleansing* anise, cloves, lavender, lovage, marjoram, onion, parsley, peppermint, rosemary, saffron, sage, thyme *Commanding* basil, fennel, garlic, mustard seed, pepper, saffron, tarragon, turmeric *Communication* cinnamon *Compassion* thyme *Confidence* dill, fennel, garlic, rosemary, tarragon, thyme, turmeric *Consecration* anise, basil, bay, caraway, cinnamon, fennel, garlic, lavender, lovage, parsley, peppermint, poppyseed, rosemary, saffron, sage, spearmint, star anise, thyme *Contacting other planes* anise, onion, parsley, star anise, thyme, wintergreen

*Courage* basil, fennel, garlic, marjoram, rosemary, tarragon, thyme, turmeric *Death rituals (rites for the dead)* basil, marjoram, parsley, rosemary, thyme *Determination* dill *Divination* anise, basil, bay, cinnamon, cloves, coriander/cilantro, fennel, garlic, lavender, nutmeg, onion, parsley, peppermint, saffron, sage, star anise, thyme *Dragons* basil, tarragon *Dreams* bay, dill, lavender, marjoram, nutmeg, peppermint, poppyseed, rosemary, spearmint, thyme *Elements* Air--anise, caraway, cinnamon, fennel, lavender, mace, nutmeg, oregano, peppermint, savory, spearmint, star anise, thyme Fire--basil, bay, cinnamon, cloves, coriander/cilantro, dill, fennel, garlic, ginger, mustard seed, nutmeg, onion, pepper, rosemary, tarragon, turmeric, vanilla Water--lovage, poppyseed, rosemary, star anise Earth--celery seed, dill, lovage, parsley, sage, wintergreen *Elves* rosemary *Endings* bay, peppermint, rosemary, spearmint *Energy* cinnamon, fennel, lavender, peppermint, rosemary, sage, vanilla *Envy, stopping* pepper *Exorcism* basil, bay, cloves, garlic, mustard seed, onion, pepper, peppermint, rosemary, saffron, spearmint, star anise, thyme, turmeric *Faeries* thyme *Fertility* anise, basil, caraway, celery seed, coriander/cilantro, dill, fennel, mace, mustard seed, nutmeg, parsley, poppyseed, star anise *Fidelity* caraway, rosemary

*Friendship* cloves *Gain* anise, caraway, coriander/cilantro, dill, fennel, mace, mustard seed, nutmeg, star anise *Gentleness* lavender *Good luck* anise, basil, bay, cinnamon, lavender, mace, mustard seed, parsley, peppermint, rosemary, spearmint, star anise, wintergreen *Gossip, stopping* cloves, garlic *Grieving* basil, lavender, marjoram, oregano, peppermint, rosemary, thyme *Happiness* anise, basil, cinnamon, lavender, marjoram, oregano, parsley, peppermint, rosemary, sage, savory, spearmint, thyme *Harmony* basil, bay, cinnamon, dill, lavender, marjoram, oregano, sage *Hatred* basil *Health/healing* bay, cinnamon, coriander/cilantro, garlic, ginger, lavender, mustard seed, onion, peppermint, rosemary, saffron, sage, spearmint, thyme *Honesty* basil, caraway, rosemary

*Initiation* basil *Inspiration* basil, bay, cinnamon, rosemary, sage *Invokation* basil, parsley, rosemary, star anise *Justice* bay, star anise *Keeping secrets* caraway, coriander/cilantro, dill, lavender, sage, tarragon *Knowledge*

bay, cinnamon, rosemary, sage *Longevity* fennel, garlic, rosemary, sage *Love* anise, basil, bay, caraway, celery seed, cinnamon, cloves, coriander/cilantro, dill, fennel, ginger, lavender, lovage, mace, marjoram, mustard seed, nutmeg, oregano, peppermint, rosemary, sage, savory, spearmint, star anise, tarragon, thyme, vanilla *Lunar rites* onion, rosemary, vanilla *Magic* bay, garlic, lavender, onion, saffron, thyme, turmeric *Meditation* cinnamon, fennel, lavender, nutmeg, parsley, rosemary, sage, thyme (Yes, there they are! Go and meditate on "Scarborough Fair.") *Memory* bay, caraway, cloves, lavender, rosemary *Money* anise, basil, bay, cinnamon, cloves, dill, garlic, lavender, lovage, marjoram, nutmeg, peppermint, sage, spearmint, star anise, thyme, wintergreen *Nightmares, preventing* anise, garlic, rosemary, star anise, thyme *Opposition, overcoming* bay, garlic *Passion* anise, basil, bay, caraway, celery seed, cinnamon, cloves, coriander/cilantro, dill, garlic, ginger, lavender, lovage, mustard seed, nutmeg, parsley, pepper, peppermint, rosemary, sage, savory, spearmint, star anise, tarragon, thyme, turmeric, vanilla *Peace* basil, bay, cinnamon, coriander/cilantro, dill, lavender, marjoram, oregano, sage, tarragon *Peace of mind* caraway, cloves, lavender, rosemary *Planets* Sun--bay, cinnamon, cloves, lovage, rosemary, saffron Moon--poppyseed Mercury--anise, caraway, celery seed, cinnamon, dill, fennel, lavender, mace, marjoram, sage, star anise, wintergreen Venus--lovage, marjoram, oregano, peppermint, savory, spearmint, thyme Mars--basil, cinnamon, coriander, garlic, ginger, mustard seed, onion, pepper, tarragon, turmeric

Jupiter--anise, cloves, nutmeg, sage, star anise, vanilla Saturn--celery seed, parsley *Prosperity* basil, cinnamon, nutmeg, poppyseed, sage, spearmint *Protection* anise, basil, bay, caraway, cinnamon, cloves, coriander/cilantro, dill, fennel, garlic, lavender, lovage, mace, marjoram, mustard seed, nutmeg, onion, oregano, parsley, pepper, peppermint, rosemary, spearmint, star anise, tarragon, thyme *Psychic development* anise, basil, bay, celery seed, cinnamon, cloves, ginger, lavender, marjoram, nutmeg, oregano, parsley, peppermint, rosemary, saffron, sage, spearmint, star anise, thyme *Psychic protection* anise, basil, bay, cloves, dill, fennel, ginger, lavender, lovage, marjoram, rosemary, sage, star anise *Purification* anise, basil, bay, cinnamon, cloves, fennel, garlic, lavender, lovage, onion, parsley, peppermint, rosemary, saffron, sage, thyme *Release* bay, cloves, peppermint, rosemary, spearmint, thyme *Renewal* peppermint, spearmint, thyme *Rest* dill, nutmeg, peppermint, spearmint *Retention* caraway, dill, lavender, sage, tarragon *Ritual (general)* lavender *Satyrs* savory *Sea/water rituals* rosemary *Sensuality* caraway, ginger, mustard seed, pepper, savory, tarragon, turmeric *Sleep* dill, lavender, nutmeg, peppermint, rosemary, spearmint *Speed* parsley *Spell-breaking*

basil, bay, cloves, garlic, mustard seed, onion, pepper, saffron, turmeric *Spirit offering* peppermint, spearmint *Spirituality* cinnamon *Spiritual places* star anise *Stability* lavender *Strength* basil, bay, fennel, garlic, mustard seed, rosemary, tarragon, turmeric *Success* basil, bay, cinnamon, garlic, ginger, marjoram, mustard seed, peppermint, spearmint *Summer rituals (Spring Equinox through Fall Equinox)* fennel, lavender, thyme *Theft, preventing* basil, caraway, dill, rosemary, tarragon *Tranquility* basil, bay, cinnamon, dill, lavender, marjoram, oregano, sage *Transformation* bay, peppermint, rosemary, spearmint *Virility* fennel, lavender, mustard seed, savory, tarragon *Weather* garlic (fair), saffron (raise wind) (Note: since you don't get any rain-making herbs, one of the very few shortcomings of the kitchen herbal, I will tell you that another folk method of bringing rain is to dip a broom into water and shake it out in the air. Or, you can go the modern route and wash your car.) *Weddings* anise, caraway, coriander/cilantro, lavender, marjoram, oregano, rosemary, sage *Winter rituals (Fall Equinox through Spring Equinox)* basil, bay, rosemary, sage *Wisdom* bay, cinnamon, rosemary, sage *Wishes* bay, thyme

The Magick Pantry Let me first say that while these are magickal procedures, they are not Intended to be taken literally. They are taken purely for their historical Value, hence quite archaic. With this in mind it is suggested that you keep An open mind realizing that perhaps someone did use them at one time. These posts were written to assist those participating in CrystaLink's ASTRAL_CHEF and ASTRAL_GARDEN echoes, or anyone for that matter that can Benefit from its content. These were referenced from "The Book of Spells" By David Norris & Jacqueline Charrott-Lodwidge, with additional references Were by Greg Edwards. It is intended as a general historical reference which gives those familiar With a Larder, a touch of past history and what items might have been Included. Some of the items my not be considered ethically sound, so please Use your own discretion and training to make these decisions for yourself. Purpose and Directions: The larder or Magick Pantry must be kept secret and secure. It is a place To store all of your magickal herbs and various plants that the magician Needs to rely on in the day to day practice of magick. It is a perfect Accompanist for the plants grown in your Magick Garden. Find a cupboard or recess in the house, preferably one with a solid oak Door. Be careful not to let in too much light. Damp must be kept out. Open The door swiftly, put in and takes out what is needed and closes the door Again. Keep all the herbs separate and in labeled jars. Rose water and Orange water must be placed in earthenware pots since glass would allow the Light to draw their potency. Similarly, precious substances such as Ambergris and Caviar should be stored in boxes of Almond-Wood as this is The safest of all of the known woods. To prepare well all spells and magick potions, the vessels, including Mortar and pestle, spoons, and knives should be perfectly clean and in some Cases brand new. For the more demanding spells the utensils can be used Only once. More difficult spells or those requiring open cooking, may need the Construction of a tripod of sticks from which to hang the pot. Keep a Selection of Efficacious Sticks. Elder, Almond, Oak, Apple, Rowan, Medlar, Vine, Cypress and Laurel branches can be gathered for this purpose. For spells promising fertility and youth Hippomanes is needed. (Of course This is definitely NOT used by all magicians, and therefore I'd suggest Using your own discretion.) This is the foamy white substance found on the Head of a newly born foal. The vital parts of a wolf as well as its skin, Teeth and feet will be useful in many spells, particularly those warding Off injury and attack. To inspire, excite or please the pet cat, a supply Of its favorite herb, Catnip is also needed. For making spells stay or even last for ever, dissolved gold, silver and Pearls are necessary. To ease all pains, to secure death for oneself or to

Bring it under control and make a slave of it Hemlock is the classic herb. Legend said that to eat only a little of the herb will make someone your Slave for life. I don't know if that it actually the case, as I've never Really wanted a slave, so I've never tried using it in this manner. It Sounded dangerous anyway... <smile> Varied additional supplies that are available thru some Herbalists and Which are good for the Magick Pantry is: Camel Oil, Dragon's Blood, and Unicorn Milk (of course these are simply the man-made names) again, check With your local herbalist for recipes of this nature. If you have recipes For either of these three, I'd certainly appreciate and welcome your Posting them. In the next post labeled "The Magick Pantry" you will see some of the herbs To include as well as their names and some of their magickal uses. These Are some of the most important ones to read: Marigold, Nettle, Wild Teasel, Celandine, Periwinkle, Pennyroyal, and Hounds tongue, Henbane, Lily, Mistletoe, Centaury, Sage, Vervain, Celery, Rose, and Snakeweed. The Magick Pantry - Contents of Stock Summary The following items should be included in your Magick Pantry. Following This post, additional posts will follow describing each in some detail, as Well as giving the Magickal uses of each. I certainly hope that you will Enjoy them. ALCHONE, ASPHODEL, BASIL, BELLADONNA, BETONY, BLOOD ROOT, BRIMSTONE, CELANDINE, CELERY, CENTAURY, CHICORY, CORIANDER, DILL, ELECAMPANE, ERINGO, GINSENG, HENBANE, HOUNDSTONGUE, IVY, LETTUCE, LILY, MANDRAKE, MARIGOLD, MISTLETOE, MUGWORT, MUSK OIL, MYRTLE, NETTLE, ORRIS, PENNYROYAL, PERIWINKLE, PEONY, ROSE, ROSEMARY, RUE, SAGE, SNAKEWEED, SPIKENARD, SUNTULL, TONKA BEANS, VERVAIN, WHALE OIL, WILD TEASEL, and WORMWOOD. The Magick Pantry - Alchone If this herb can be obtained, it must be kept and preserved as something precious. It is the herb of the sun itself. It can heal the passions and secret griefs of any sufferer. It can also soothe the stomach. Moreover, it increases a man's sexual potency if the juice is taken prudently. To carry the root is tot keep the eyes free from infection or even from seeing anything to grieve them. A little Alchone tucked inside a shirt will preserve the wearer from fits. It is also an anti-congestant and an anti-depressant. Your selection of canisters should be glass, ceramic, or earthenware, and properly labeled. Remember, it is a very vital root for any magician to stock. The Magick Pantry - Asphodel This is the same beautiful flower that covered the fields of Elysium but it is useful, too. It works best under the influence of Saturn, since it belongs to this planet. Use Asphodel for pains in the legs or bladder. Boil

a little of the root in water and drink the resulting infusion. <see the infusion recipe if you are not sure how to make one> A little of the root itself, carried in a clean white linen cloth, will protect against all negativity <evil influences>. keep some wrapped up and hidden in the house for the same effect. Teething children should carry a little Asphodel and their teeth will break through and grow painlessly. It also offers ver good nighttime protection against fears and enemies alike. The Magick Pantry - Basil Some say that this is the most controversial of all the herbs. To many it is sweet and charming. To others it is poison. In all ancient writers Basil excites rude abuse. A French physician of the Middle Ages has claimed that to inhale the herb causes a scorpion to be born in the brain, or as the modern doctor might say, madness. Of course, opinion again vary.. although many myths have their basis of fact. On the other hand, Basil is a popular and harmless cooking herb. Include it fresh in the Magick Pantry. Grow a new sprig in the garden and it will keep you safe. The Hindus solemnly hold it to be a sacred herb and worship it. So dear to them is the Basil that they place a sprig of it in each room of their house to bring safety and prosperity. Hang it on the inside of the door of each room. Sprinkle a pinch on food just before it is eaten and your soul will be joined to that of the goddess of love. The married partner who has eaten Basil will be truly loved, but may also become quarrelsome. The Magick Pantry - Belladonna The term deadly nightshade accurately describes the strength of this powerful Herb. Sweno's army, when it invaded Scotland, was lulled into repose while its leaders were negotiating a truce which the Scots never intended to accept. The Scottish side provided the drinks and refreshments by mutual agreement. The drink given to Sweno's army was laced with Belladonna. The wretched army fell into a deep slumber and, thus made vunerable, was overwhelmed by the Scots. The name Belladonna derives from two sources. The herb has its cosmetic uses and can make a lady twice as beautiful by enlarging her pupils into a seductive wide-eyed look. But also it is named after a notorious Italian poisoner, Leucota, who viciously used the herb to poison all her beautiful female friends. The Magick Pantry - Betony This herb is also known as Bishopswort but in the Magick Pantry it may not be given an ecclesiastical name. Call it Betony or Wood Betony and hold it in awe. It has both a good and evil reputation. The physician to the Emperor Caesar Augustus used it to treat his master for liver trouble, to protect him from Epidemics and to assist in his digestion. <as you can see it's great for the digestive part of the quinary> It was said that the Emperor used it to guard against Witchcraft although this term was mistaken in those days. On the other hand, Betony is said to have been invaluable to sorcerers' spells. It's forbidden name was bestowed upon it because it tended to grow around old abbeys and derelict churches. Many people said that the herb was hiding on consecrated ground from the may occultists who would use it for evil purposes.

In opposing various forms of witchcraft, it may be used as follows: Gently flake the dried leaves and strew them in an unbroken circle around the outside of the house or place you want to protect. Make the ring thicker under windows and outside the door. A wall of good enfluences will arise and no evil deed will be able to pass through it. Caution: If Betony is consumed it is sure to cause death by vomiting. Please do not use this herb in edible recipes! Betony is a natural enemy of the vine, for their tendrils repel one another. Keep them far apart in the Magick Pantry for this simple reason. Like described in the Astral_Garden, there are those herbs and trees that simply will not tolerate each other. The Magick Pantry - Blood Root Store this herb in a jar labelled with a false name but remember that the Blood Root is within. This herb is the root of deception. The Indians of North America used it to stain their bodies, and it is used still to dye fabrics. Taken internally it can produce a hypnotic trance. (use with caution as with all magickally oriented herbs) Carried on a person, inside a leather pouch or a money-purse, Blood Root will protect that individual from negativity or evil influences. But keep it close to money for it demands payment. If a home is suffering from an evil influence, put a sprig of Blood Root under the doorstep or windowsill and all will be well. Any definite spell or curse placed by a witch can be reversed by flinging broken pieces of the root onto his/her doorstep. However, never trust Blood root unquestioningly, as it often times will suprise you. The Magick Pantry - Brimstone No substance is more powerful in invoking or in driving off the forces of evil. Find a piece of red paper and lay this on a metal plate or dish. On the paper place a pinch of Brimstone. do this four times and put each dish in one of the four corners of the room in which the spell is being cast. At midnight set light to the Brimstone. Address each dish with the following words: * I command all evil to flee this house never to return * Remember to leave all windosw wide open during this rite or the smoke of the brimstone will be unable to escape and with it the spell. Some say that Brimstone is actually a resin like that of Frankinsence. The Magick Pantry - Celandine Never confuse this important plant with the lesser Celandine or Pilewort used traditionally in the treatment of haemorrhoids. The true Celandine is at once a more disagreeable and more potent herb. It has black seeds; its taste is bitter and caustic; and its smell is foul. But its influence is not to be sneered at. Swallows and Eagles build their nests in May, and the flowering of the Celandine in that month is linked with this annual domestic impulse in the animal kingdom. the herb has its human uses and it is a useful medicine for jaundice, corns, warts, sore eyes, toothache,

ringworm and scurvy. John Parkinson, in a manual published in 1640, writes that he has it on good authority that any sufferer from yellow jaundice will benefit by putting a sprinkling of Celandine herb beneath his bare feet and treading it. But its influence is wider still. If the heart of a mole can be obtained, cooked with this herb and then consumed, it will vanquish all enemies and win any law suits that may be contested. More somberly, when placed on the head of a dying man, the Celandine will disclose whether or not the sufferer is bound to lose his fight. If the man must die, he will sing out in a loud voice, but he will weep if he can be saved. I thought that was interesting indeed. Something that I simply must try when given the unfortunate opportunity. The Magick Pantry - Celery Known traditionally as smallage, this plant has always been one of the prime aphrodisiac foods and more will be made of this kind of magick in the final set, probably located in the Astral_Home echo. The rumour is that the famous cola drinks contain elements of this particularly stimulating tonic. Gather the root when it is still green, drench it in the oil of the Cypress tree and place the greenery in a pot of gruel. Leave the gruel for one year. Worms will appear, and those who carry these worms with them will be gentle and kind and able to triumph over their enemies. discusting, although it has been said to be quite powerfull> To make Oxen etc, faithfull and certain to follow their masters, tie a pouch of the celery herb around their necks. The length of time unfortunately was not specified. The Magick Pantry - Centaury The Sun dominates this herb as it does many of the other Magick Plants. A Centaury opens its flowers just as the sun comes out and closes them as the sun goes in. Often the Centaury is described as an agreeable herb and is prescribed for Dyspepsia, but care is advised. If this herb is mixed with the blood of a female lapwing or a black Plover and poured with oil into a lamp, all those who circle the light will believe themselves to be magickal and will live in a world of delusions, so it is stated. Throw the same mixture into a fire when the stars are shining and then watch the heavens. The stars will seem to clash and collide. Put some of the herb and the birs's blood on a bandage and push it under a foe's nostril, it is said that he/she will suddenly be filled with groundless fears and run for his/her life. The Magick Pantry - Chicory Do not despise Chicory or Endive and exile it to some anaemic salad. Endive was a divinely chosen herb among many cultures. Traditionally, it is a herb of love. To prepare it and bring it to usefulness, chop the Chicory and let it dry. Grind it to a powder and as a love philtre add it to your food or drink. (especially to flavour coffees) It is said to do so without telling anyone and, if the secret is well kept, this philtre will arouse passion in the lover of one's choice. For good fortune in romance an Endive must be carried on the person. Be sure to renew it every two weeks with a fresh

plant as its period of potency is not more than fifteen days. Legend states that in certain ceremonies, if carried out with Chicory, can make the man who eats the plant invisible to human view. Crusaders hung it on their banners, explorers carried it as they wen venturing into a new land, and prospectors looking for gold in California kept a sprig of it in hand for good luck. Gather Chickory at midnight on the 25th of July. Force a sprig into any lock that will not open, and pass another sprig over parchment bearing a description of any problem to be solved; all obstacles and difficulties will be resolved according to legend about this herb. The Magick Pantry - Coriander In many religions Coriander is honoured. Several references have been documented that the Gods demanded that this herb should be used with four others at each feast. Its other uses are not so godly however. Grate the seeds into a glass of your best, matured wine. Give them to a lover and strong passions will be arroused. But as the powder is placed in the wind, the lovers must chant together with the following couplet: "Warm seed, warm heart, Let us never be apart" Nothing else must be said according to legend. When the wine is drunk its influence will be felt sruging in the blood, so it is written. The Coriander seed is round and has an appearance like that of a small nut. Its shell is eaisly broken once dried, and has a very pleasent fragrance. The Magick Pantry - Dill Like with most herbs, the myths are endless for this one as well. It was said that many attributed this herb as a cure for the common hiccough. Many even thought that the common hiccough was a result of a witch with a frog in the throat. The power of the Dill shouldn't be taken lightly, as it should be greatly appreciated by any magician. To cure the common hiccough, stir a small pinch of Dill into a syrup made from Black Cherries which have been laying in the Magick Pantry for at least (3) days. When the powder is well dissolved in the liquid/syrup, allow a few drops to trickle down the throat without swallowing. The hiccoughs will cease. Dill was also included in many love potions. Here's an old recipe used here as an example. Steep a few sprigs in hot sweet wine. A few minutes after drinking on half of a pint, it is said that passions will be excited. Dill is also quite effective in removing negative energies throughout the household. As with Basil, the same techniques are applied. The Magick Pantry - Elecampane Make a light distillation of this herb and bathe the face with it. Do not use a mirror and trust the herb. It is said that by utilizing this tincture on the face that it will profit the complexion by removing unwanted

blemishes etc. Elecampane is of course also an effective love potion. Aristotle himself taught how to make them, using this herb as follows. Take Vervain and Mistletoe and place these herbs in a got oven with the Elecampane. Dry and mingle the sprigs thoroughly. Pound the three herbs into a powder and put this into the food or drink of the one desired. The magickal combination of each herb bound together by this process is said to achieve a potency far beyond that of your basic aphrodisiac's strength. The Magick Pantry - Eringo This unique herb has many benefits, not to mention its tremendous powers in the healing plane. It is a necessary part of any Magick Pantry, one that should never be left out. To heal broken bones or simply to draw out thorns from lacerated flesh, make a paste of the herb by brusing the root and boiling it with pig fat (bacon, fatback etc. although salted lard works best) Apply the mixture as a poultice. The bones will heal, the thorns will spring out and the skin will mend without a any trace of a scar. Again, this herb has many benefits. Like most herbs it too can be used in Love Potions. To improve a love affair or invigorate a marriage bed, grind the root into small pieces or into a powder. Add this to your food or better still, to that of the uninspired partner. Legend says that the ancient Greek women always wore a sprig of Eringo to ensure that they kept the love of a man. The Magick Pantry - Ginseng With the exception of tea's, Ginseng is the most celebrated plant in all the Orient. The Chinese have great faith in its curative and strengthening properties and call it the "Chinchona of China". The Manchurian Genseng comes from the Emperor's mother country, from the soil from which legend says sprang the `God of Heaven'. It is, therefore, gragrded as more efficacious than the Ginseng grown anywere else. When the plant grows wild its root resembles the shape of the human body, and like Mandrake, it is thought to be most appropriate for most any Magickal spell. Medicinally, Ginseng is a cure for colds, skin diseases and poor circulation of the blood. It's anti-spasmodic properties relieve certain forms of hiccoughs too, like Dill. But it is also a very powerful remedy for rheumatism. When taken regularly it removes general fatague and promotes good health. Combined with the juices of a ripe pineapple, it is an excellent medication for indigestion. Ginseng is particularly useful in the treatment of young children as well as the aged. Ginseng tea can be made from the dried leaves or blossoms of the herb. After the berries are gathered select the brightest, cleanest leaves from a mature plant. Place them above the kitchen stove in thick bunches turning and mixing well until they are very dry. Store away in paper sacks. When the leaves are steeped in boiling water, just like ordinary tea, the liquid may be drunk with cream and sugar if preferred. Another recipe for general use in the home is the following: Take a piece

of the root when it is very hard and dry. Break it up with a hammer and grind it through a coffee mill several times until it is reduced to a fine powder. To three ounces of the powder add one ounce of milk, sugar and sixty drops of oil of wintergreen. Mix all the ingredients well and store in a glass jar. The correct dosage in one teaspoonful to a small teacup of boiling water. When the drink is cooled it should be taken before each meal. It may also be filtered served with cream and sugar, and consumed with the meal. Made as directed this is a most pleasant aromatic tea and has a good effect on the stomach, brain and the nervous system. If the evening cup of ginseng is much larger, it is a good and safe hypnotic, producing a deep restfull, natural sleep. I would also like to point out that Ginseng does not always have to be considered as a medicinal herb, as that is simply not true. It is a food, a plant that can be consumed as food. Therefore one should consider Ginseng as a food rather than a medicinal remedy. Long before the Chinese used herbs medicinally, they realized the benefits of Ginseng as a food. When the warring states began, they began to search out its benefits medicinally. Now that we are once again a peace loving lot, we once again should realize these `food' related benefits as opposed to the medicinal ones. The Magick Pantry - Henbane Mystery has shrouded this herb for centuries. Many legends both true and false as also accompanied it for this reason. To begin with let's discuss the hard cold facts.. NEVER play with Henbane. It is as powerful as Opium and a deadly poison if taken unprepared. NEVER let a child sleep near a Henbane as if he/she does, they will never wake. Not suprisingly, it was a traditional means of putting down a mad dog in years gone by. The dog was induced to eat meat mixed with this herb and the animal quickly died. Curiously, too, if the juice of the henbane is poured into a silver cup, the cup will shatter into thousands of fragments. For those who enjoy a dish of Hare in season but cannot endure the hunt, the following is recommended. Mix Henbane with the blood of a young hare and hang the hare's skin, smeared with the potion, outside the kitchen door. According to English legend, every Hare from the neighborhood will gather there and will not move until the skin is removed. Truly a Magickal enchantment, if the legend holds true. The benefits of Henbane to human life are more controversial. It is said that if the feet are washed in Henbane a peacefull sleep ensues. Sniffing the flowers can have the same effect. Hundred of years ago, dentists would burn Henbane in a sizzling dish of charcoal surrounded by water, and the desperate patient would be prevailed upon to inhale the fumes. The charlatan would then claim that he could see the wicked, achebearing worms make their escape from the painful tooth into the water around the coals. The chronicler of this story notes that the dentist had usually arranged for an accomplice to drop tiny pieces of lute strings into the water, as the patient closed his eyes against the smoke. When he looked again he would feel less pain, owing to the numbing effects of the Henbane, and he could actually see his toothache wriggling in the dish. Truly an interesting herb that does warrent some serious considerations,

both in the preperation and storage of the plant. Please do be careful when working with this herb. The Magick Pantry - Houndstongue If you are squeemish please pass this entry as it's quite detailed, although an interesting addition to the Magick Pantry. The herb is however a part of the pantry. Whether or not this herb does neutralize the bite of a mad dog cannot be stated authoritatively. But it is recorded that when strewn under the feet of a barking dog Houndstongue will silence the nuisance.. hence the name. The full spell is a bit more complicated. Capture a frog (it must be a young female) remove its heart and reproductive organs and crush them into the powdered plant. Put the paste in an open dish outside your door or wherever the annoying dogs choose to bark. Soon all the dogs in the neighborhood will gather around the pot. Take enough sprigs of the herb and push one under the front toe of each of the dogs assembled. They will be dumb henceforward. A more infuriating yapping can be even more effectively silenced. Tie a small sachet of Houndstongue around the dog's neck, where it cannot be ripped by the creature's teeth. The animal will turn round and round wildly and finally drop down in a state of paralysis, barely distinguishable from death. These techniques are of course totally used at the magicians own personal descresion. The Magick Pantry - Ivy (General) Ivy should have been planted into the very stones of the house. It is also a necessary part of the Magick Garden (see the Astral_Garden echo for details). When it has wrapped itself around the home, it is said that everyone within will be well guarded against negative influences and illness. However, it is said that if the ivy withers and does not thrive around the outside walls, financial storms will follow. Old legends tell us that wine merchants, and innkeepers, or anyone who is making wines or throwing a party, must have a pring of Ivy outside their door. Bacchus owns this plant and he will bring special merriment to any house where it is honoured. It is also said that in doing the above that there will be gaiety but no drunkenness. Another legends states that if a girl who wants to find herself a spouce, takes a sprig of Ivy, laying it gently on her breasts and repeats these words, will find her awaited mate. "Ivy, ivy, I love thee, In my bosom I put thee, The first young man who speaks to me, My future husband he shall be.." It is also said that the concentrated essense of Ivy dropped into the nostrils will cure the common cold.

In many religions the Evergreen Ivy is a symbol of everlasting life. To others, more pessimistic, the gentle Ivy is a poison. Which ever view you choose, the Ivy is definately an essential accompaniment to your Magick Pantry. The Magick Pantry - Lettuce This is a very powerful plant, homely as it is. Lettuce seems to be woman's enemy, and is said to be a chief cause of infertility. Never let more than twelve lettuces grow in the garden and never keep more than one lettuce in the pantry or the house will lack children. Legend sometimes says otherwise, although many still swear by this today. For the Romans lettuce was a good counter to drunkenness and titillated the sexual appetite after a good dinner. The earliest English sources use in severe cases of insomnia. The Egyptian Pharahos prized the Lettuce and offered it in worship to the high gods. It has been said that nutritionally, some forms of Lettuce are perhaps absent of nutrients. It is also documented that Lettuce contains 70% vegetable fats and water, which unlike popular thought, is not the best choice of dieters using this philosophy. The Magick Pantry - Lilly This is the flower of the moon and its best known action is to cool and pacify. Medically, its strength lies in settling fevers and particularly in soothing madness. Freckles and sunburn respond to the gentle application of the distilled water of the Lilly. In some phases of the Magickal world the power of the Lily is somewhat different however. Some say it produces madness, as does the moon herself, although these cases are few and far between. Again, the following may not be pleasent for some. If you tend to be squeemish, I'd simply go to the next entry. <smile> Gather the flowers when the sun is in the sign of Leo. Mix the dried flowers with the juice of the Laurel or of the Bay tree and leave the paste under a pile of cow dung. Worms will breed. Catch the worms, dry them and make up a powder. Secretly sprinkle this powder on the chosen victim's clothes or even try to drop some down his neck. So long as this powder sticks to him, never again will the enemy rest or sleep. The oil drawn from the origional dung will cause an instant fever, if you can succeed in anointing the victim's brow with it. However, if the enemy is just to be given a severe warning, drop some of the oil into his milk churns and endeavour to cover these with the skin of a cow of a single colour. His cows will dry up till the spell is undone. As you can see from the above, many cultures have abused the essences of the Lily, which in itself is a shame. The herb/plant is a beautiful creation with many benefits to mankind. Why someone would want to harm another using this addition to the Magick Pantry does not seem to be logical. The Magick Pantry - Mandrake

The root of Mandragora crudely suggests the appearance of a man. It hardly needs saying that this plant is probably the most famous in magick lore. Superstition decrees that Mandrake must not be plucked from the ground by human hand or else the plant will kill. Instead, a cord was wound round the plant and then tethered to the collar of a manageable dog. When the dog was chased, the root was pulled up and a hideous cry was heard to come from the plant. Again, according to superstition, the dog did not survive the ordeal. Many superstitions of this nature shroud this mysterious herb. The great sorcer Merlin knew of ways to call upon the Mandrake's powers, as well as the proper method of harvesting the herb. Legend has it that it was from the Mandrake that Morgan Lefae' was bewitched into Merlin's dominion. Some say that they still are incased together for eternity below Stonehenge as a result of the Mandrake's influence. It is said that a little of the juice makes a man vain. More makes him an imbecile. Mandrake is dedicated to Circe, the goddess of fecundity, celebrated for her golden hair and notorious for her knowledge and application of Witchcraft. Circe's Island, the basis of many legends is said to hold the true key to the Mandrake and it's uses. Although no man has ever returned from the island sane, according to legend. To keep this herb in the house sufficiently guarantees against sickness and peril. When it was impossible to find a single uncloven root, again legend says that some of the ancient ones formed peices of Mandrake into human figures. These also held tremendous magickal powers. A man would order a female form and a woman would order a male form. Each believed that the affection of the opposite sex could be secured thereby. Many people burried their entire wealth by the Mandrake plant in the belief that the pot of gold would increase. Moreover, the powder is an indispensable aphrodisiac. Even the sceptical Pliny has no doubt about this. In parts of Asia the root was worn to increase vertility and provide protection against attacks on the person. Most magicians value the potiency of the Mandrake, and heed the cautions thereby. Many spells will be useless unless the herb is burned as an incense while an incantation is being chanted. Never forget that the Mandrake is supposed to be a living creature, engendered underground from a dean man's seed dropped on the earth as he was hanged for murder. The Magick Pantry - Marigold Taken as a mouthwash, this is an ancient remedy for a toothache. The marigold is a well known stimulant too. For hundreds of years, particularly in Holland, it has been the favourite flavouring for stews and potions. As it is the flower of the sun and a summer flowering plant, it must be kept in a dried state. The ancients believed that the Marigold's power to turn with the sun was a highly magickal property. Rightly used it would ensure perfect peace and prosperity to the bearer. But the following spell must be worked with the Marigold before it can succeed. Always gather this flower in August when the sun is in Leo. Wrap the head from one of the flowers in a Laurel leaf or in the leaves of the May tree or Hawthorn. Add a wolf's tooth. No one will say a bad word against the wearer of this charm. Let him sleep with this small parcel under the pillow

and if any man secretly wrongs him the enemy's identity will be made known. If a marigold is left in your circle, or church, it is said that no woman that has commited adultery against a wronged and faithful husband will be able to leave the spot where they stand or sit. If any spell demands that the marigold is eaten, make sure that this is done at breakfast time ONLY! The Magick Pantry - Mistletoe Legend and superstition place this plant on the higest plane of magickal power and influence. Most of us involved in magick, have heard stories of the Mistletoe, or have utilized it in one fashion or another. It is said that to hang Mistletoe round the neck would ward off negative influences. Its habit of growing on trees, and particularly the mighty Oak has been attributed to the plant's anxiety never to touch the ground. It's a benefical exchange as the Mistletoe actually protects the Oak from the dangers of lightning. The Anglo-Saxons worshipped Mistletoe as a present form of heaven and as the sprem of the holy Oak tree. It has been written that only the Druid, robed in white and carrying his golden sickle, could gather it, and then but once a year during a ceremony dignified by the sacrifice of two white bulls. At this ritual sacred songs were sung in honour of the plant and prayers to the gods were addressed to it. Every New Year the Mistletoe was distributed to each family and used throughout the following twelve months as a remedy against all ills and as an antidote to all poisons. More specific among its uses is its power to open all locks. How to perform this ritual is unfortunately not recorded in any text that I could find. If you know or have read it somewhere, I'd certainly appreciate the post. It has also been said to test whether a man's prophecy is valid, lay a pinch of Mistletoe mixed with rosinweed on his tongue. If the prophecy is true the man will repeat his statement. Otherwise he will forget it. It is also a well-authenticated phenomenon that if the mixture just described is rubbed into a swallow's wing and the wing is the left hanging from a tree, the birds from miles around will spped to the spot and hover there indefinitely. Exactly why anyone would want to do the above with the swallow is not recorded. The Magick Pantry - Mugwort This is definitely a female herb and its medical uses are generally in the interest of women. With ordinary field daisies, it may be used to smooth away all hard cysts and bumps that grow in the neck. In medieval witchcraft and in some modern traditions, Mugwort could bestow gifts of Clairvoyance if respectfully used. One of its names is Witch Herb. Crystal Gazers/Scryers valued the plant and would strew their tables and tabernacles with sprigs of dried Mugwort. The plant's tendency to lean to the north as it grows made many people believe that it was magnetic and responsive to many supernatural messages. To dream about the future, take three leaves of Mugwort and tuck them inside a hemp bag. Put the bag under the pillow at night. After three

nights have passed it is said that one will dream of the days to come. When a magician had to be consulted, they frequently took a long time to complete the spell. To prevent fatigue, they would often give their clients a sprig of Mugwort as they journeyed homeward. The Magick Pantry - Musk Oil Never feel that this is too exotic for the larder. Many spells are made sweeter or more insidious by the lingering scent of musk. To bless a Talisman of Venus and ensure good health, prosperity and love, Musk can be utilized in the following ways.. Bring the talisman for blessing on a friday; come at the tenth hour of the day or at the eighth hour of the morning. Make a fire of Myrtle wood and throw Musk Oil and Lignum into the flames. Place the talisman (used for defense, protection, or allurement) in front of the vessel that bears an offering to Venus, and as the incense rises chant the following invocation: "Conjuro et confirmo Super vos angeli fortes, Sancti atque potentes, Sancti atque potentes." After this invocation a special request is made and the Talisman will be blessed. It is important not to touch the talisman until the next day. Leave it to rest, or the spell will be undone. As you can see, Musk Oil is traditionally used in incenses, bath oils, and elixers for love. This recipe simply allows the maker to invoke the talisman with a purpose. I would like to add here that in many traditions, the difference between a Talisman and an Amulet is that while the Talisman is used for protection, love ect.. the Amulet is usually agressive, and promotes agressive magickal properties. Do not confuse the two, as the "Purpose" must be clearly stated prior to the invocation of any magickal tool. The Magick Pantry - Myrtle Out of all of the primary ingredients, Myrtle is one of your best resources. If one is ever afflicted by bad dreams sent by one's enemies, it has been written that Myrtle is the perfect remedy. Here's what you do: Make a small glass of the liquid and keep it by the bedside. It is said that any negative night spell at work will be cancelled. The reason for this is unclear, however based on research and from personal experience, it is definately worth the effort. Myrtle was a particular favourite of the goddess Venus. Both the Greeks and the Romans believed that the plant contained the secrets of eternal youth and passionate love. The theory was as follows: To gain these benefits for ever, a brew of Myrtle must be drunk once every three days since the spell lasts only that long without renewal. The taste of the plant is undeniably disagreeable. It is, therefore,

permissible to mix Myrtle with food. But mix it only with meat for when it is added to another substance it will taste of blood. Remember for this charm to work both lovers must eat or drink from the same container, otherwise no good effect will be felt from the Myrtle. It is said that for thinning hair, you can use Myrtle berries together with rosemary, southernwood, hazel-bark and maidenhair in equal amounts. Burn them together in a fresh fire and collect the ashes carefully. Stir this powder into white wine and use the liquid as a shampoo, rubbing and massaging into the scalp. make this a daily ritual. <please understand that this is not for those experiencing Male Pattern Baldness, as that is a totally different issue all together. It is rather used for sudden hair loss cases etc. I have to admit however, I've not tested this on myself, so who knows for sure, it may just work..<smile>> Some old cultures believed that if Myrtle was eaten, it would empower anyone to spot those delving into evil magickal art forms. Be forewarned however, that most expert in these arts are also able to counter these actions. It is not something to play with to say the least. It is said that when a fresh Myrtle sprig is picked and crackles in the hand that the beloved person is always true and faithfull. Many legends refer to this herb with affection calling it the bleeding tree, since it was connected with blood and sorrow in Greek mythology. Phaedra pricked these leaves with a hairpin in her anxious frustration as she awaited Hypolytus, who was already dead. The leaves still bear the sorrowful marks. Therefore, when storing Myrtle leaves, never crush or bend them before they are dried or used. The Magick Pantry - Nettle Nettle is an agressive plant with many properties. The Nettle in England was traditionally supposed to have been planted by the Roman legions of Julius Caesar. Unused to England's miserable and freezing climate, they frequently found their limbs chilled or even numbed by the frost or sleet. As a remedy they plucked the Nettles and then scorged their legs and arms with them. After this they enjoyed the warmth of the inflammation. Legend has it that to hold the Nettle in one's hand <how tightly was not mentioned> insures one against any fears of hallucinations. Take some Nettle leaves and mix them with the common houseleek, which is a soothing agant against Nettle stings. Anoint the body with this essence and sprinkle the rest on any stretch of water where fishing has been unseccessful. Then enter the water treading with dignity and respect for the magick, and the fish will leap into your hands. If they are unacceptable or too small, just withdraw the hand and the fish will happily jump back into the water of their own accord. The Magick Pantry - Orris This is an ordinary herb to all appearances but its two magickal uses must be known. In the middle ages it was mixed with food and drink to promote love. Ground into a fine dust and blown over the clothes of a loved one, it will ensure that the lover's affection is returned.

Orris is a powerful incense in many magickal arts. When making a benign incantation during the casting of a spell favourable to oneself, sweeten the breath with an Orris root. Offer a sprig to a baby, if he takes it and puts it in his mouth, his teething will be easy and his whole life is said to be a happy one. If he seems to be refusing it, encourage him, since to embrace the Orris is to learn to enjoy all that is moderate and pleasant in life. The Magick Pantry - Pennyroyal Any ordinary domestic larder will certainly contain this common flavouring even before a Magick Pantry is assembled. But grow the plant in your Magick Garden. A brew of the plant is useful as a remedy for spasms or hysteria. The oil will deter mosquitos and gnats as well. A garland of the flowers worn round the brows will relieve giddiness and a swimming head. By far the most mysterious powers of the herb possesses bear on the animal world. Take some dried Pennyroyal, grind it with a stone taken from the nest of a lapwing or a black plover, and smear the belly of any female beast with this powder. The animal will quickly produce an offspring that is deep black in colour. An ailing animal can be miraculously healed of any sickness by sniffing a pinch of Pennyroyal mixture. At first the poor beast will drop as if dead but presently it will rise again completely cured. A little more of the mixture placed among bees will ensure that they never desert the hive. Any bees or flies that have been drowned can be placed in the warm ashes of this herb and it is said that they will return to life within the hour. The Magick Pantry - Periwinkle Beware of treating this herb as mearly decorative and removing it to a vase or a display. Recently its strength was further revealed. It was claimed by some medical opinion that the Periwinkle or Vince Rosea, was an effective cure for diabetes. More interesting to most of us is the power the plant has to reconcile man and wife and revive their passions. Note: This may not be appropriate if you are weak stomached. <grin> To effect this atonement, beat the Periwinkle into a powder and mix it with earthworms and the herb named Houseleek. Unfortunately, no further information was available as to the specific way this balm should be applied, except to say that it should be given with meat to the unhappy couple. Furthermore, put this herb in the mouth of a young bull and the animal will run amok directly at your enemy. For those of you that like special effects at your circles, and enjoy outside fires within them, sprinkle some Periwinkle powder into the fire and the flames will turn bright blue. The Magick Pantry - Peony It is said that this herb cured the gods injured in the Trojan wars. From time immemorial, the seeds have been dried and worn in ticht neckband by men and women as a sure protection against those that work in the black arts. In Christian philosophy, it was Lucifer himself that was credited with the creation of the Peony, but its dedication has long since been

transferred to the sun. Therefore, work spells with it only on the seventh day, and then only after sunrise. It contains a remarkable cure for a swimming head or for those sensations of unreality that may afflict on at any time. Take the root and the seed of one and the same Peony flower. Ensure that the weight of both is equal. Pound them together into as much powder as will balance a nutmeg on the scales. Now grind the netmeg, shake the powder and grind it again. Mix together both the powders and sprinkle fine sugar into them. Put a pinch under the toungue every morning for a month. This will steady and calm any being. In Ireland it is widely used and is helpful to women suffering after childbirth. The Magick Pantry - The Rose (General) The Rose is beautiful both in appearance and in scent. Yes, it is a flower but it's also considered to be a very powerfull herb. The magickal effects of the Rose can be devastating. Take a center from the whole flower or just one dried petal. A mustard seed and a weasel's foot are also needed. Hang all these together in a hempen bag on a branch of ANY tree; that tree will never again bear fruit. A dried Rose, entwined in a fisherman's net, will charm into it a full shoal of fish. To create an optical illusion, if illusion it be, take some of the origional Rose and some mustard powder and mix it together with purest Olive oil and a little Brimstone <Sulphur>. Sprinkle this potion over the roof and the outside walls of the chosen house. When the sun shines this house will appear to be on fire. The Magick Pantry - Rosemary It is traditional it is said to wear Rosemary at weddings. This was always done in ancient times and the herb was a much a symbol of marriage as was the colour white. The power of Rosemary is to remind and to bind. For many years occultists have appreciated Rosemary as a stong agent. One spell, enabling a virgin to see her future husband, had to be carried out on the eve of St. Mary Magdalene. The herb was dipped into a mixture of wine vinegar and water in a glass dish, and the juice was then used to anoint the virgin's breasts. She had to be accompanied by two of her closest friends under the age of twenty-one, who would then conduct her back to her bedroom after the ritual, all without speaking a word. The virgin would then inevitably dream of her future husband. An alternative to the anointing was for the three girls to take three sips of the liquid. They then fastened a sprig of Rosemary to their bosoms and retired confidently to bed. All three would that night dream of their future husbands and learn the secrets of their lives thereafter. Rosemary can also be used to retain or gain power over a man. To do this, aquire some water or wine already touched by the man himself. Place the Rosemary in four boxes, set out at the four polls of the compass, (Northe, South, East, and West) which must be placed in the center of the room. Pour a little water or wine into each of the boxes and say the following:

(Again, a Latin translation would be nice) "Tibi impero ut quaedam viluero, et velim adimpleas et facias" When two days have elapsed take out the Rosemary, swathe it in silk and bury it in the earth, no less than six inches deep. Let it lie there for three days and then remove the bundle one hour after sunset. Burn the herb, collect and powder the ashes. When this powder is discreetly placed into the food or drink of the chosen man, he will return your love. Rosemary is a long slender leaf tapered on the ends. It smells sweet, and when crushed it is quite palatable. It is also said that one can make a Rosemary infusion, to rid the household pet of fleas. The Magick Pantry - Rue Many cultures have adorned this herb for centuries. It is said that Rue is helpful in rescinding unwanted magickal workings, and to reverse decisions. It is the herb of repentance, the herb of grace. Roman Catholics sprinkle the petals of Rue on the surface of their holy water. During a symbolic ceremony to guard against disease, it is also strewn in some courts of law. Its uses in removing negative entities are astounding. This includes the art of excorsism, in some faiths. Here was an instruction from a priest recorded in 1664 that I though was interesting regarding excorsism. His origin was never mentioned... To remove the influence of someone's Familiar First they are to try the entity by dousing with prepaired holy water, or water blessed by the faith. To this would include the addition of incense, sulphur, and rue which from thence, as we suppose can, came to be called herb of grace, along with St. John's wort which therefore they call the evil out, yet they may do good to the patient. Other uses would be to make a tea and some incense from Rue. Drink the tea and burn the incense simultaneously. Although Rue is not an aphrodisiac, it has been known to attract a desireable lover, clear the mind, and enable one to solve many problems. The Magick Pantry - Sage Many traditions utilize this powerful herb in many ways. Of these, smudging, incenses, as well as cooking are among the most popular. Again, this herb must be grown fresh. <see the Astral_Garden echo> Never use the remnants of your cooking supply for magickal workings. Red Sage is an exotic plant in spite of its conventional uses. The herb may be used for throat gargles and mouthwashes, but it also has many magickal properties. This magickal working is not for those that are squimish. (I found it interesting, and am in hopes that others will as well.) Dry, purify and select the best pieces of the plant and put them in a small pile of cow dung on a glass dish. If discretion and respect are used, soon a worm will issue forth or perhaps a bird with black tail feathers. The blood of the creature that wriggles or hops out of the glass vessel is

powerful and dangerous. Place a drop of it on the brest of anyone to be disposed of. The person will loose his/her wits and feel nothing for fifteen days or more. Once the magick creature is killed for its blood, burn the carcass and collect the ashes. Scatter them on a fresh fire. A magnificent rainbow will appear in the sky and a horrible thunderstorm will follow. If a woman wishes to dominate her home she must grow plenty of sage in her garden. The Magick Pantry - Snakeweed No herb is stranger in its powers than Snakeweed. It is also called Bistort and under this name it was used by doctors as a gargle and as a treatment for haemorrhages. But regard it as Snakeweed and treat it accordingly. One legend says... Bury a sprig of it in the ground with a leaf of Clover. Red and Green snakes will spring out from this patch of earth. Catch and kill them and dry their skins. Make a powder out of them and scoop a little of hte substance onto a burning lamp in a darkened room. Again red and green snakes, wreathing and coiling in multitudes, will sprout from the light. Place the same powder under the sleeping head of any man troubled by recurring dreams and he will never again dream of himself. The Magick Pantry - Spikenard This plant is more common in North America rather than Europe, but international legend has much to say about its powers. It is particularly well known in the German occult world. But the herb originally grew in India and it has a deep history and significance among the Hindus. In the Christian faith for example, the Bible claims that Jesus Christ was anointed with ointment distilled from Spikenard. It is a most useful herb to keep a lover faithful. Take a sprig of the herb and try to make the lover touch it with his right hand. Better still, make him/her wear it for a short time against his/her heart. Retrieve the Spikenard and enclose it in a leather pouch. Tie the bag very securely and bury it in the ground. The best place to do this is within the circle of stones in the Magick Garden. As long as the bag remains in the earth, the lover will be true. Check the bag twice a month, for on those occasions a new sprig of Spikenard must be added to continue the spell. The Magick Pantry - Suntull This root can be acquired under the name of skunk cabbage or meadow cabbage. It has both the appearance and the reputation of being a nasty and anti-human herb. Medically, its only use seems to be for producing saliva and helping to calm fevers. But to the magician, its powers are more precise and more important. Take a Suntull leaf which must have been gathered on a Sunday in August, on hour after sunrise. Fold a single yellow dandelion flower within the leaf. Around this a bayleaf must be wrapped. Carry this talisman in your pocket to guard against those who wish to do you harm. Every person henceforth will become a friend and justice will be obtained in any court of law. The Magick Pantry - Tonka Beans

These beans are native to Guiana so some hardship may be experienced in acquiring them. But their uses are various so it is worth wile to persevere. They are important in the making of incense on account of their strong and lasting smell. To consume them is a perilous venture, since their power is to paralyse the heart. However, when the bean is used with caution, its power is good. Take one or three of the beans and put them in a locket or pouch. To give the cham grace and greatly added power, attach a cross (made of wood, metal or other substances, just as long as it's not a crucifix) Aquarian Star, or a Pentagram/Pentacle to the chain on the locket. To make a more powerful talisman <used for positive purposes> or an Amulet <used for destructive purposes> pierce the bean at the sharp end and thread it with a thin gold wire. Onto this wire tie a golden cross, or any of the above suggestions. Try to use a wishing stone or tool as this will bring about greater power. Charge this amulet or talisman with a purpose, and release the energy into the universe. It is said that by carrying this talisman, you will be protected against even the greatest harm. Likewise, if employing an amulet the same is true only in the agressive nature. The Magick Pantry - Vervain Many traditions utilize this powerful herb in many ways. Here are some of the more interesting possiblities... It is certainly a strong drug and widely used as a tranquilizer. Traditionally, a weak Vervain water creates merriment among the guests at a formal gathering. An old custom was to steep Vervain in hot water, strain off the herb itself and diluting the solution further, to use the liquid as a detergent or a spray around the home. It was said that all negativity would be kept at bay by its use. The water was commonly referred to as Juno's brew. The dry herb has often been carried as a charm against similar forces. To cure fainting fits, gather the herb when the sun is in Aries. Mix the dried substance with a pinch of Peony or a single Peony pod which is one year old. The brew will remedy the sickness. If the herb is buried in a garden, after eight weeks worms will be engendered. These worms are fatal to the touch. A sprig of the plant, placed in a dovecot, will keep the doves happy and stop them from flying away. If a man keeps two mistresses, a pinch of this powder will set the two women at each other's throat. Vervain is not the best smelling herb out there, especi Thistle, Holy (Cnicus benedictus) Other Names: Blessed Thistle GENERAL Thistle, however, that has been cultivated for several centuries in this country for its medicinal use is known as the Blessed or Holy Thistle. It is a handsome annual, a native of Southern

Europe, occurring there in waste, stony, uncultivated places, but it grows more readily in England in cultivation. It is said to have obtained its name from its high reputation as a heal-all, being supposed even to cure the plague. It is mentioned in all the treatises on the Plague, and especially by Thomas Brasbridge, who in 1578 published his Poore Man's Jewell, that is to say, a Treatise of the Pestilence, unto which is annexed a declaration of the vertues of the Hearbes Carduus Benedictus and Angelica. Shakespeare in Much Ado about Nothing, says: 'Get you some of this distilled Carduus Benedictus and lay it to your heart; it is the only thing for a qualm.... I mean plain Holy Thistle.' The 'distilled' leaves, it says 'helpeth the hart,' 'expelleth all poyson taken in at the mouth and other corruption that doth hurt and annoye the hart,' and 'the juice of it is outwardly applied to the bodie' ('lay it to your heart,' Sh.), 'therefore I counsell all that have Gardens to nourish it, that they may have it always to their own use, and the use of their neighbours that lacke it.' DESCRIPTION: The stem of the Blessed Thistle grows about 2 feet high, is reddish, slender, very much branched and scarcely able to keep upright under the weight of its leaves and flowerheads. The leaves are long, narrow, clasping the dull green stem, with prominent pale veins, the irregular teeth of the wavy margin ending in spines. The flowers are pale yellow, in green prickly heads, each scale of the involucre, or covering of the head, ending also in a long, brown bristle. The whole plant, leaves, stalks and also the flowerheads, are covered with a thin down. It grows more compactly in some soils than in others. CULTIVATION: Grown as a crop plant. Prefers well-drained soil in the sun. Being an annual, Blessed Thistle is propagated by seed. It thrives in any ordinary soil. Allow 2 feet each way when thinning out the seedlings. Though occurring sometimes in waste places in England as an escape from cultivation, it cannot be considered indigenous to this country. The seeds are usually sown in spring, but if the newly-ripened seeds are sown in September or October in sheltered situations, it is possible to have supplies of the herb green, both summer and winter. HARVEST AND PRESERVATION: The whole plants are cut when flowering and dried for use in infusions, liquid extracts, and tablets. MEDICINAL Tonic, stimulant, diaphoretic, emetic and emmenagogue. In large doses, Blessed Thistle acts as a strong emetic, producing vomiting with little pain and inconvenience. Cold infusions in smaller draughts are valuable in weak and debilitated conditions of the stomach, and as a tonic, creating appetite and preventing sickness. The plant was at one time supposed to possess very great virtues against fevers of all kinds. Also used internally for the treatment of anorexia, poor appetite associated with depression, dyspepsia, flatulent colic, diarrhea, and excess mucus. Externally it is used for wounds and ulcers It is said to have great power in the purification and circulation of the blood, and on this account strengthens the brain and the memory. It is chiefly used now for nursing mothers the warm infusion scarcely ever failing to procure a proper supply of milk. It is considered one of the best medicines which can be used for the purpose.

Holy Thistle is used to strengthen the heart, and is useful in all remedies for lung, kidney, and liver problems. It is also used as a brain food for stimulating the memory. It is used in remedies for menopause and for menstrual cramping. Preparation and Dosage: . The warm infusion - 1 OZ. of the dried herb to a pint of boiling water - in doses of a wineglassful, forms in intermittent fevers one of the most useful diaphoretics to which employment can be given. The leaves, dried and powdered, are good for worms. CAUTIONS: * Excess use can cause vomiting * This herb is subject to legal restrictions in some countries. MAGICKAL GENDER: Masculine PLANET: Mars ELEMENT: Fire POWERS: Purification; Hex-breaking MAGICKAL USES: * Wear to protect yourself from evil * Add to purificatory baths * Used in hex-brealing spells TINCTURES Tinctures are made by steeping the herb in a mixture of alcohol and water. They should be make individually, and then prepared tinctures may be combined as required. As well as extracting the plant's active ingredients, the alcohol acts as a preservative, and tinctures will keep for up to two years. The liquid is usually composed of 25% alcohol and 75% water, but for some resinous herbs the amount of alcohol is increased to 45%. Commercially prepared tinctures use ethanol, but diluted spirits are suitable for home use: vodka is ideal since it does not contain additives, but rum helps disguise the flavor of less palatable herbs. Parts Used: All parts of the plant (dried or fresh) Standard Quantity: Use 200g dried or 600g fresh herb to 1 liter of alcohol/water mixture (25% alcohol and 75% water - e.g. dilute a 1 liter bottle of 75 proof vodka with 500 ml water). Standard Dosage: Take 5 ml 3 times a day diluted in a little warm water. A small amount of honey or fruit juice can often improve the flavor. Storage: Store in dark glass bottles for up to 2 years

1. Put the herb into a large jar and cover with the alcohol/water mixture. Seal the jar and store in a cool place for 2 weeks, shake the jar occasionally. 2. Fit a muslin bag inside a winepress. Pour the mixture through. 3. Press the mixture through the winepress into a jug. The residue can be added tot he garden compost heap. Alcohol-reduced Tinctures There are times when giving tinctures made from alcohol in a normal way is unsuitable, for example in pregnancy, in gastric or liver inflammation, or when treating children or recovered alcoholics. Adding a small amount (25-50 ml) of almost boiling water to the tincture dose (usually 5ml) in a cup and allowing it to cool effectively evaporates most of the alcohol, making it safe. TINCTURES - ALTERNATE METHOD Tinctures can be made by grinding the leaves, roots, or other plant parts with a mortar and pestle (or a blender) and just barely covering them with high-quality vodka, whiskey, or grain alcohol (Everclear). After 21 days, add a small quantity of glycerin (about two tablespoons per pint) and about 10 percent per volume of spring water. Strain and store in amber glass airtight containers. Keep the herbal tinctures in a cool, dry place for up to five years. The dose is generally twenty drops in a cup of herb tea or warm water four times a day. In acute or emergency situations the dose is given more frequently; in the case of labor pains, for example, it might be a dropperful every five minutes. Tonka Beans Scientific and medicinal info The tonka bean is the bean from the tonka tree (go figure). The beans are black, wrinkly, and about the size and shape of a large almond. The tree is native to South America. The beans are quite aromatic with a sweet, herby smell. It has been used as a flavouring in the past, but recent studies have shown that the main ingredient in the beans (coumarin) may be carcinogenic. Also Known As .... Other names Latin: Dipteryx odorata or Coumarouma odorata Common names: Tonquin beans, coumaria nuts Magickal Properties Using tonka beans in rituals Tonka beans are excellent for use in charm bags because of their large, solid nature. You can even just carry them alone in a pocket or purse. These beans are used for all forms of good luck, be it in finances, love, health or anything else. They can also help keep your spirits up during difficult times. Sometimes the oil from the tonka plant is used, but it's most commonly the beans. Tonka beans are a common item in Vodou magick. No tonka in the house? You can use woodruff or vanilla beans instead. More Correspondences Other properties Planet: Venus Element: Water Deity: What is Mugwort? Scientific and medicinal info

Mugwort is a shrubby perennial that can grow up to 6 feet high and it loves direct sun. Its leaves are dark green on top and whitish underneath. Though it is closely related to tarragon, they are NOT the same plant. Mugwort is also related to wormwood Mugwort is somewhat toxic and should not be taken internally until you have done further research on the effects it can have on your body, especially pregnant women. When it is used medicinally, mugwort isused to ease menstrual problems in women, and as a liver stimulant. Aso Known As.... Other names Latin: Artemisia vulgaris Common Names: Artemis, witch herb, felon herb, old man, old uncle Henry Magickal Properties Using mugwort in rituals Mugwort is best known for its effect on psychic ability, astral travel and divination. It can used as an incense (on charcoal) and burned while you are scrying or meditating. Crystals or other divination tools could be stored with dried mugwort to enhance their power. It's often used (alone or with other herbs) when stuffing herbal dream pillows. These herbal pillows are tucked under your pillow while you sleep to encourage psychic or prophetic dreams. Mugwort is also considered good for protection during travel, and the ancient Romans used to put sprigs of mugwort in their shoes to prevent exhaustion on long journeys. Its also used for protection, and bundles of it are sometimes hung over doors to keep out unwanted spirits. For most magickal purposes, the leaves and stems of mugwort are used.

More Correspondences: Other properties Planet: Venus Element: Earth Associated Deities: Diana, Artemis What is Myrrh? Scientific and medicinal info Myrrh is not an herb, but a resin (hardened tree sap). It comes from a short bushy tree in Africa.

Also Known As .... Other names Latin: Commiphora myrrha

Common names: myrrh gum Magickal Properties Using myrrh in rituals As will all resins or gums, you will need charcoal blocks if you want to burn this as an incense. Myrrh is often associated with frankincense and it possesses many of the same qualities. Myrrh is burned to promote spirituality, protection and healing. Myrrh is also used in rituals to help overcome loss (physical or emotional). It's a common incense to burn at Yule. Myrrh has spiritual associations throughout the world, particularly within Christianity, Catholicism and Judaism. It's used in various church incense blends, mainly on account of the nativity story. Myrrh was one of the gifts brought to the infant Jesus (along with frankincense and gold). The popular Egyptian incense blend Kyphi is made up mostly of myrrh. More Correspondences Other properties Planet: Moon Element: Water Deities: Isis, Nepthys The magical meaning of herbs and incense

ALFALFA Element is Earth Abundance and fertility. Deities Green Goddess, Demeter, Ogun, Venus Planet is Jupiter and Venus

Alum: (Destroys Negativity) Alum can be placed in a dish, in a room infested with negative energies, as it absorbs the watery energy they live in. Can also be used in magickal inks. Not to be eaten.

Alum Root Herb: (Protection, Sleep) Profoundly protective. Can be carried in red cloth, added to bath water, or made into an infusion and sprinkled about the home or ritual space. Strew herb beneath the bed for protection while sleeping.

Amber Resin Element is Earth. Stability, self-confidence, protection, peace. Planet is Junipter and moon

Anise: Used in: Divination, Fertility, luck, Happiniess, Love, Meditation, Prosperity, Protection

Asafoetida (Devils Dung): (Protection, Exorcism, Purification) An appropriately named, legendary magickal herb. Asafoetida is one of the most potent ingredients to destroy negetivity. It is said to destroy psychic attacks, curses, hexes, jinxes, and nasty spirits cannot stand the stuff.(Neither can most humans..so it is usally a last resort!)

Angelica: Protects, the dried leaves are burnt during exorcisms. Angelica root can be carried as an amulet. Apple: Great for making wands, used in love spells and for charms to bring good luck.

ASH (es) Protection, prosperity, fertility, loyalty and fidelity. ASPEN (esp) Clairvoyance and healing.

BALM OF GILEAD Element is Water and Fire. Inspiration, knowledge, new love, mend broken heart, protection, strength. Planet is Junipter and Venus

BANYAN Good luck and wealth.

Basil: Protective, good for love spells and promotes wealth if you carry it in your purse or wallet. Use it for healing relationships and to find out if a partner is genuine

BAY Element is Fire. Wisdom, protection, clairvoyance, purification. Planet is Jupiter and the Sun

BAYBERRY Element is Earth. Money, good luck, peace, harmony, well-being. Planet is Jupiter BEECH Wishes, divination, happiness. BELLADONNA Belladonna(Deadly Nightshade):This herb is little used in modern witchcraft, because of its high toxicity. In days gone by, it was used to encourage Astral Projection, and to produce visions, and was probably an ingredient in the legendary flying ointments used by witches in long ago times. (Warning!!! Poison!) Benzoin: energy, astral projection and purification BERGAMOT Element is Air. Hex-breaking, Money. Planet is Mercury

Betony: Use in purification incenses. Can be used in herb pillows to help prevent nightmares BIRCH Protection, exorcism, purification. Birch Bark: Highly protective. Boil some of the bark in water, then add this water to the bath, to cocoon yourself in protective energy. Can be burned on charcoal to remove negetive energies from the home or place of business. Hang some over the front door to protect the home.

Bistort: Can be carried for purification and protection. Used in magickal formulas, or sprinkled in the purse or wallet, to promote prosperity. Dwellings can be cleared of ghosts by burning the root as an incense or making an infusion and sprinkling about the house. BLACKBERRY Healing, money, protection. Black Sampson(Echinacea): Used in spells and incenses, for gay men to attract a partner.

Carry wrapped in red cloth.

Bladderwrack: To attract customers, and bring good vibrations to your business, make a tea of the herb, and wash shelves, doors and floors with it. Also used to summon the spirits of wind or sea. BLEEDING HEART Love, attraction, fidelity. Blessed Thistle: Energizing and protective-wards off thieves. Place in a bowl in the home or work space. Particularly good in sick rooms BLOODROOT Love and luck. Bloodroot:Burn on charcoal, or add an infusion of the herb to bath water to counter hexes and negetive spells. Can be carried in black cloth for protection. Can be carried in red cloth for love BLUEBELL Luck, truth, friendship. BORAGE Courage, phychic abilities. Borage:Its basic powers are to give strength and courage. Carry in yellow cloth whenever extra strength is needed. Borage: Traditionally used in drinks to lift the spirits. Usefull during stressfull times, it brings courage and 'good heart' and is very good for fevers and infections. Starflower oil (an alternitive to Evening Primrose oil) comes from borage. Brimstone(Sulphur): Used in exorcism rituals. Burn a small amount on charcoal with all windows and doors open, sprinkle over candles and add to bath water. Do not eat!! BROOM Purification, divination, prophetic dreams. Buckeyes(Horse Chestnut): A famous magickal herb used in the magick of drawing money, and making money. Carry in green cloth with 2 gold colored coins. Add powdered nut to any money incense or potions. Can also be carried in the pocket to attract success.

BURDOCK Element is Earth and Water. Protection, healing, Earth magick. Planet is Venus

Burdock Root:Basic powers of purification and protection. Cast in the home, or ritual space to ward off negativity. Add to all protection sachets.

Calamus Root: Can be used to bind, or strengthen spells. Also has a good reputation for overturning malicious spells or energies. Often used in spells and potions to attract a lover.

Calendula Flowers(Maricgold): Basic powers of love and clairvoyance. Can be added to love sachets. Place flowers under the pillow at night to promote clairvoyant dreams.

CAMELLIA Love, healing, protection, riches. CAMPHOR Element is Water. Awakens past life memories, stimulates psychic awareness, health, divination. Planet is Moon and Saturn Cardamon: Used in love or lust spells. Add to love sachets or incense. Add ground seeds to warm wine or mead for a quick lust potion.

Cassia Bark: Prosperity and love. Can be added to formulas for extra strength. Carry in green cloth to attract money. CAPER Potency, love, luck, trust. Cardamon: potency for love CARNATION Protection, love, strength, healing. CATNIP: Used in: Cat Magik, Animals, Dreams, Luck, Healing

Cedarwood: Burned as an incense to consecrate wands, for baby blessings, and wiccanings. Also burned to invoke Odin. Can be carried in the wallet or purse to attract money. Also good in moth repellent sachets.

Celery Seeds: Burn with Orris Root to increase psychic powers, or with a drop of Basil oil to increase psychic powers.

Chamomile: As an incense Chamomile creates a peaceful atmosphere and helps with centering. Sprinkle it around the house for protection, health and wealth. Good for purifing, it can be burnt to break bad habits and drive out negative thoughts. The tea helps digestion, nervousness and sleep, when cooled use as a rinse for fair hair. Chamomile in hot water used as a facial steam helps acne and greasy skin

Chamomile Flowers: Used to promote restful states of sleep. Can be used in sleep pillows, with Hops and Lavender. Can also be used in perosperity charms and incense.

Chaparell: Highly protective. Can be used in spells and charms, or scattered around the home, or ritual space, for peotection. CHERRY Love, direction, magickal potency, money, lust. Cinnamon: Good for spells for love, success, psychic ability, healing and cleansing. Use in charms for prosperity, cinnamon oil makes a good oil for anointing

Cinnamon Bark: Burn to raise high spiritual vibrations, and to aid clairvoyance. Also used for prosperity CLOVER Money, protection, potency, love. COLTSFOOT

Love and visions. Comfrey: Used for travel and spells for wealth and healing. Comfrey honours the Godess' Crone state. Don't eat or drink comfrey as some parts may be toxic and especially dangerous to the liver. Coriander: Protects the home and is used to promote peace. Good for love spells and to encourages long life.For personal worth and esteem

Cowslip: Brings luck in love, and helps induce contact in dreams with loved ones who have passed away

Cumin: exorcism and protection

CYPRESS Longevity, healing, protection, comfort. DAFFODIL Love, fertility, luck. DAISY Lust and luck. DAMIANA Element is Fire. Lust, love, visions. Planet is Mars Damiana is used in magick and herbalism as a powerful aphrodisiac. It may be used as an infusion in bath water, or used in spells. It can also be burned to induce visions. Dandelion: Mainly used for divination, wishes, and calling upon spitits. Folklore says that, if you blow the seeds off a dandelion head, you will live for as many years as there are seeds left on the head. To tell the time, blow three times at the dandelion head, however many seeds are left is the hour. The dandelion root, when roasted and ground, can be made into an infusion that will promote psychic powers. The same tea, steaming and placed beside the bed, will call spirits. Dandelion: Used for communication and divination. It aids digestion, make dandelion tea, take it each day for a week as a general 'pick me up'. The root is said to help psychic ability. Blow the seeds off the head of a dandelion and send a message with them.

Datura(POISON):

Datura has long been used in shamanic practices and religious rites, and the Aztecs considered the plant to be sacred. Datura is used in magick to break spells, by sprinkling it around the home. It also protects against evil spirits. It may be used to aid insomnia by doing the following: Place some Datura leaves into a pair of shoes, and then setting the shoes under the bed, with the toes pointing toward the nearest wall. Datura is extremelly poisonous, and skin may be irritated simply by touching it. Use with care!

Devil's Bit:When worn around the neck, devils bit drives away evil spirits and offers protection to the wearer. It may also be used to attract women, and to bring luck..

Devil's Shoestring:T his herb, when warn around the neck, protects its bearer from accidental poisoning. It may be worn as a good luck charm when gambling. Carry a piece in your pocket while seeking employment, or while having problems at work. It will either help you get hired, or smooth things over at your current job. Also carry when asking for a pay rise.

Dill:This herb is protective when hung at the door and carried in protective sachets. Placed in the cradle, it protects children. If you place Dill over the front door, no-one ill-disposed or envious of you can enter your house. Also usefull in money spells, as the plant produces plentifull seds, representing wealth and abundance. Also stimulates lust when eaten or smelled, and if added to the bath, it makes the bather irresistible! Dill: Used in love charms. Can be hung in a child's room to prevent nightmares and protect against bad spirits.

Dittany of Crete:When burned, Dittany is an excellent base for manifestation of spirits: the wraiths appear in the smoke rising from the censer. It may also be mixed with equal parts of vanilla, benzoin and sandalwood to make an astral projection incense. To use, burn a small amount just prior to attempting astral projection. The juice of Dittany drives away venemous creatures, so smear some on your body if you are venturing out into the wilderness.

Dogbane:Can be added to love mixtures to increase their potency.

DOGWOOD Wishes, protection, good health. Dragon's Blood: This is the name given to the resin from a plant called the Dracaena Draco. The dried resin may

be burned to entice errant lovers to return to you. The powdered resin may be sprinkled around the house, smouldered as incense, or carried, to act as a poerful protectant. It will drive away negativity when burned. Just a pinch of dragons blood, when added to any incense, will increase its powers.

Dragon's Tears: These are the blood red seeds of a magickal herb, believed to overcome hexes, crossings, and all negativity. To use, add the seeds to one cup of boiling water, and leave to steep. The resulting liquid is then added to the bath water

EBONY Protection, magickal power, strength. Ebony wood is protective and so used in making amulets. Ebony wands give the magician pure, unadulterated power. Never stand beneath an ebony tree during a storm. Echinacea(or Black Sampson): Echinacea was used by American Indians as an offering to spirits to ensure and strengthen spells EDELWEISS Healing, attraction, heightening the senses. Made into a wreath and worn, Edelweiss confers invisibility. To be protected against daggers and bullets, pull up a whole Edelweiss by its roots during the day on a Friday of the full moon. Wear it wrapped in white linen. Eldelweiss also grants your hearts desire; you need only grow and care for the plant.!

Elder: strength and mother nature's power. The elder was used in burial rites in ancient British long barrows. It is sacred to the Mother Goddess figures, due to its white flowers. Spirits were thought to live within the elder, and this is why it bled red sap when cut. Before felling an elder, the following formula was recited: "Lady Ellhorn, give me of thy wood, And I will give thee of mine, When I become a tree." This is recited while kneeling before the tree, prior to making the first cut. This allows the spirit time to vacate. If worn, Elder wards off attackers of every kind. Hung over doorways and windows, it keeps evil from the house. When grown near the home, elder will bring prosperity, and protect against robbers. Elder is used at weddings to bring good luck to a couple. Also carry elder to preserve you from the temptation to commit adultery.

Elecampane: When worn, Elacampane attracts love. Sew up some leaves and flowers in some pink cloth to make a sachet, and carry this with you. It is also carried for protection, and the herb smouldered on charcoal aids in sharpening psychic powers, particularly when scyring

Endive: When using endive in magick, it is best gathered in the following manner: Dig it up on June 27, or July 25 with a piece of gold, or stags horn. But no matter how gathered, endive is worn as a talisman to attract love. It is used fresh, and should be replaced every 3 days. It can also be served in salad as an aphrodisiac

Eucalyptus: Used in healing spells, charms and amulets. It is said that if you put eucalyptus leaves around a blue candle and burn then healing energies are increased.

Fennel:(Protection, Healing, Purification) In ancient greece, the Thyrsus, which figured in Dionysian ceremonies, was often made of giant fennel stalks with pine cones attached to the ends. Grown around the home, fennel confers protection. Wearing a piece of fennel in your left shoe with prevent ticks from biting your legs. Fennel is also hung up above windows and doors to ward off evil spirits. The seeds may be worn for the same purpose. Fennel is also used in purification sachets and healing mixtures. Fenugreek:(Money) To bring money into a houshold, a few fenugreek seeds can be added to the mop water (or a small amount of fenugreek infusion). Also, half fill a small jar with fenugreek and leave open in the home to attract money. Add a few seeds everyday untill the jar is full, then empty the fenugreek out and start again. Return the spent herb to the ground. Fern:(Rain-Making, Protection, Luck, Riches, Eternal Youth, Health, Exorcism) The fern is included in vases of flowers for its protective properties, and is also planted at the doorstop as well. Inside the home, it is also protective. Throw dried fern onto hot coals to exorcise evil spirits. When burned outside, fern is used to bring on rain. The smoke from burning fern also drives away snakes. Fern sap, if you can obtain any, is said to confer eternal youth if drunk. The "seed" is carried for invisibility.Rainmaking, eternal youth, riches.

Feverfew:(Protection)

Carry with you for protection against colds and fevers, as well as accidents. Fig:(Divination, Fertility, Love) Small phallic images are carved from fig wood and carried by woman who wish to conceive. They are also used by men to evercome infertility or impotence. Fresh figs are eaten for the same reasons. Write a question on a fig leaf. If the leaf dries slowly, the answer is yes, or it is a good omen. If it dries quickly, just the opposite. A fig tree grown in the home brings good luck to the inhabitants. Grown in the bedroom, it ensures restful sleep, and in the kitchen, will mean that the family never goes hungry. Before leaving home on a journey, place a branch of teh fig tree before your door, so that you will return home safely and happily Flax:(Money, Protection, Beauty, Psychic powers, Healing) Flax seeds are used in money spells. A few can be placed in the purse or wallet to attract wealth. Some flax worn in the show will help ward off poverty. The blue flax flowers are used to protect against sorcery. To protect yourself while asleep, mix equal parts flax seed and mustard seed and place this mixture next to your bed. On the other side of the bed, place a pan of cold water. You will be guarded in your sleep. Sprinkle upon your alter while performing healing rituals to enhance their power. May also be added to healing mixtures. Fleabane:(Exorcism, Protection, Chastity) Has been used since ancient times to exorcise evil spirits, and also to protect againt their entry into the home. To ward off evil, mix fleabane, some St. Johns Wort, wheat, and a few capers into a sachet and hang above the door. Foxglove(POISON):(Protection) Grown in your garden, it protects it, as well as your home. In older times, in wales, the women of the house would use foxglove to make a black dye, with which they would paint crosses on the stone floors of the home to prevent evil from entering. Frankincense:(Exorcism, Protection, Spirituality) The ancient Egyptians burned Frankincense at dawn to honour the sun god Ra. It is still used in incense in many modern churches. When burned, it releases powerful vibrations which drive out all evil and negativity in the area. Frankincense is used in so many different incense blends, but inparticular, those for consecration, exorsism and protection. Also, when burned, can induuce visions and aid in meditation. Hightens spirituality. It is also added to sachets for luck, protection and spiritual growth. Rosemary may be used in place of Frankincense if neccesary. No which should ever be without a stash of

Frankincense!!

GALANGAL ROOT Element is Fire. Courage, strength, avoiding legal problems, hex breaking, adding power to spells. Planet is Mars Galangal:(Lust, Protection, Health, Money, Psychic Powers, Hex Breaking) Galangal can be used for many different magickal needs. Worn or carried it protects the bearer and draws good luck. Placed in a sachet of leather with silver it brings money. Powdered Galangal can be burned on charcoal to break spells and curses. It is also carried or sprinkled around the home to promote lust. When worn, it aids psychic development and guards health. Ginger may be substituted for Galangal if it is unavailable, as they belong to the same family

Garlic:(Protection, Healing, Exorcism, Lust, Anti-Theft) Garlic was eaten on festival days to Hecate, and was left at crossroads as a sacrifice to her. Garlic was once worn to guard against the plague. It is still used to absorb diseases. Simply rubfresh, peeled cloves og garlic into the affected area, then throw it into running water. Garlic can be placed in the home to guard against the intrusion of evil, to keep out robbers and thieves, and is hung over the door to prevent envious people from entering. Guards against foul weather when worn, and also shields you from blows from your enemies. When evil is around, bite into a clove of garlic to drive it away, or splinkle powdered garlic on the floor. In natural medicine, it is a potent anti-bacterial and anti-viral. When eaten, garlic acts as a lust inducer, and when a magnet or loadstone is rubbed with garlic it loses its magickal powers. Garlic: Protects, heals and gives courage. Garlic cleanses the blood and helps to cure infections. It works best when eaten raw as cooking takes away it's usefullness. It repels all kinds of negativity and bad stuff. Gentian:(Love, Power) Gentian is added to love baths and sachets. When added to any incense or sachet, Gentian adds a great deal of extra power. It is also used to break hexes and curses.

GERANIUM Fertility, love, healing, power. Ginger:(Love, Money, Success, Power) Eating some Ginger before performing magick wil lend your workings extra power, as you have been "Heated Up" by the Ginger. This especially true for love spells, in which Ginger is much used. Whole ginger roots are planted and grown to attract money, or the powdered root is sprinkled into pockets or onto money for the same purpose. Ginger is also used in success spells, or to ensure

the success of your magickal workings. Ginger: Used to gain power and sucess, especially in love and finance. Works well in all spells as it enhances magickal vibrations. Great for travel sickness when eaten-but when I tryed it, it tasted gross! Ginger stimulates digestion and circulation. Don't eat too much, as large doses can irrate the stomach. Ginseng:(Wishes, Healing, Beauty, Protection, Lust, Love) The root is carried to attract love, as well as to guard ones health, to draw money, and to ensure sexual potency. Ginseng will also bring beauty to all who carry it. Burn Ginseng to ward off evil spirits, and to break hexes and curses. A tea of Ginseng is used as a powerful lust inducing drink, whether alone or mixed with other like herbs. Hold a Ginseng root in your hands, visualize your wish into the root, and then throw it into running water, or alternatively, carve your wish into the root, then throw it into the water. Ginseng can be used as a substitute for Mandrake. Ginseng: Said to aid love and lust, and enhance beauty. Good for relieving stress and preventing disease. In China the elderly take small doses to keep healthy. Ginseng is good as a short term remedy to fatigue. All types of ginseng improve concentration and clarity of mind. GOLDENROD Storms, elemental magicks, healing, dreams. To see your future love, carry a piece of Goldenrod. He or she will appear on the morrow. When held in the hand, the flower nods in the direction of hidden or lost objects. If Goldenrod springs up suddenly near the house door, unexpected good fortune will soon rain upon the family living there.

GOLDEN SEAL ROOT Element is Fire. Healing, money. Planet is the sun. Gorse:(Protection, Money)

Gorse is a good protectant against evil. In Wales, hedges of the prickly Gorse are used to protect the home against fairies, who cannot penetrate the hedge. Gorse is also used in money spells, and attracts gold. Gotu Kola:(Meditation) Use in meditation incense. Burn prior to (but not during) meditations. Grains of Paradise:(Lust, Luck, Love, Money, Wishes)

Grains of Paradise are used in love, lust and money spells and sachets. It is also one of the herbs used for wishing. Hold some in your hand and make a wish, then throw a little of the herb to each direction, beginning in the North and ending in the West.

HAZEL Luck, fertility, dreams, wishes. Hawthorn:(Fertility, Chastity, Fishing Magick, Happiness) This herb has long been used to increase fertility. Because of this power it is incorporated weddings, especially those performed in the spring. The leaves, curiously enough, are also used to enforce or maintain chastity or celibacy. The leaves are placed beneath the mattress or around the bedroom for this purpose. Carried in a sachet on a fishing trip hawthorn ensures a good catch, and worn or carried it promotes happiness in the troubled, depressed, or sad.

Hawthorn protects against lightning, and in the house in which it resides, no evil ghosts may enter. Protects the home against damage from storms. The Hawthorn is sacred to the fairies, and is part of the tree fairy triad of Britain: "Oak, Ash and Thorn", and where all three trees grow together it is said that one may see fairies Hazel: The wood if good for making wands, and i the only wood that is really good for divining. Promotes good luck, especially when it has red and gold thread tied around it. Heather:(Protection, Rainmaking, Luck) Heather is carried to guard against rape and other violent crimes, or lust to bring good luck. White Heather is the best for this purpose. Heather, when burned with Fern outside attracts rain. Heather has also long been used to conjure ghosts.HEATHER: Used in: Beauty, Friendship, Immortality

Heliotrope(POISON):(Exorcism, Prophetic Dreams, Healing, Wealth, Invisibility) Placed beneath the pillow, Heliotrope induces prophetic dreams. This is especially useful when you have been robbed - the thief will appear in a dream. Heliotrope is used in exorcism incenses and mixtures, as well as healing sachets. When placed in the pocket or purse, it attracts wealth and money. Also ring green candles with it, then burn them right down. To become invisible, fill a small horn with Heliotrope. Wear or carry and your actions will not attract attention.

Hemlock(POISON):(Astral Projection, Purification, Empowerment) Another poisonous plant, Hemlock was once used in magick to induce astral projection, and in spells to destroy sexual drive. Its juice was rubbed into magickal knives and swords to empower and purify them before use. Hemp:(Healing, Love, Visions, Meditation) Marijuana, or Hemp as was commonly named, was once widely used in magick. Due to laws brought in during the 1930's, restricting its use and sale, many of these practices are dying out. Hemp has long been used in love spells and divination. Hemp was also part of many vision and scrying incenses, the smoke of which opened the psychic senses. Mugwort and Hemp were prescribed to be burned before a magick mirror to gain visions. It was also added to meditation incenses. Scourges made of Hemp were used in China as imitation snakes, which were beat against the beds of the sick to drive away the malicious, illnes causing demons.HEMP Healing, love, visions, meditation, relaxation. Henbane(POISON):(Love, Rainmaking) Henbane is still sometimes used for its love-bringing properties. To bring love, one should gather Henbane naked, early in the morning, while standing on one foot. It will also bring love when worn or carried. Burned out of doors, it will bring rain, but the fumes are toxic. Henna:(Healing, Love, Protection) Place on the forehead to relieve a headache. Attracts love if worn near to the heart. Also protects from illness and the evil eye. HICKORY Love, lust, protection. Holly:(Protection, Anti-Lightning, Luck, Dream Magick) An excellent protective herb, Holly guards against lightning, poison and evil spirits. Planted around the house it protects it and its inhabitants from mischievous sorcerers. When thrown at wild animals, Holly makes them lie down quietly and leave you alone, even if you don't hit them with the plant. Holly water (infused or distilled) is sprinkled on newborn babies to protect them. Holly is also carried to promote good luck, especially by men, since the Holly is a "male" plant (Ivy is the corresponding plant for women). It is also hung around the house for good luck at Yule HONEYSUCKLE Money, prosperity, psychic powers, trust. Honeysuckle: Planted outside it brings good luck. Honeysuckle is used in prosperity spells and love charms. Said to enhance psychic skills.

Hops:(Healing, Sleep) A pillow stuffed with dry Hops will bring on sleep and rest. Hops is also used in healing spells and sachets. Hops: Good for healing and sleep. A hop tonic improves digetion and stops restlessness. Do not use hops if you are suffering from depression as it could make the condition worse. Horehound:(Protection, Mental Powers, Exorcism, Healing) Horehound is used in protection sachets, and is carried to guard against sorcery and fascination. Horehound is also scattered as an exorcism herb. Drink an infusion of the herb and it will clear your mind and promote quick thinking, as well as strengthen the mental powers. When mixed with Ash leaves and placed in a bowl of water, it releases healing vibrations, and should be placed in sick rooms. Horse Chestnut(POISON):(Money, Healing) Carry to ward off rheumatism, backaches, arthritis and chills. Carry three to guard against giddiness. Wrap a dollar bill around a Horse Chestnut, place into a sachet, and carry to attract money. Also carry for success in all things.

HYACINTH Love, protection, happiness. HYDRANGEA Curse-breaking, hex-breaking, dispelling negativity.

Hyssop:(Purification, Protection) Hyssop is one of the most widely used purification herbs in magick. It is added to baths in sachets, infused and sprinkled objects or persons to cleanse them, and hung up in the home to purge it of evil and negativity.

IRIS Purification and wisdom.

Irish Moss:(Money, Luck, Protection) Irish Moss is carried or placed beneath rugs to increase luck and to ensure a steady flow of money into the home or pockets of the person.

Irish Moss is also carried while on trips for protection and safety, and is used to stuff luck or money poppets

Ivy:(Protection, Healing) Ivy is carried by women for good luck in general, and is worn by brides for the same reason. Where Ivy grows or is strewn, it guards against negativity and disaster. Ivy is also used in fidelity and love charms. It is magickally "paired" to Holly.

JASMINE: Used in: Balance, Astral projection, dreams, fertility, happiness, Justice, sleep Element: Water Jasmine:(Love, Money, Prophetic Dreams) Dried Jasmine flowers are added to sachets and other love mixtures. They will attract a spiritual(as opposed to a "physical")love. The flowers will also draw wealth and money if carried, burned or worn. Jasmine will also cause prophetic dreams if burned in the bedroom, and the flowers can be smelled to induce sleep. Jasmine: Said to attract men. The oil is soothing, uplifting and good for stress and depression.

Job's Tears:(Healing, Wishes, Luck) The seeds are strung into a necklace and placed around a child's neck to aid in teething, and are also worn by adults in the same manner to aid sore throats and colds. The seeds will absorb the pain or illness. Three seeds may be carried for good luck. For wishing magick, make a wish holding seven seeds (or "tears" as they are known) and then throw into running water. Alternatively, count out seven seeds while thinking of your wish. Carry these seeds for a week and your wish should come true. Juniper:(Protection, Anti-Theft, Love, Exorcism, Health) Used throughout Europe as a protective herb, Juniper guards against theft. It was probably one of the earliest incenses used by Mediterranean Witches. Juniper hung at the door protects against evil forces and persons, and is also burned in exorcism rites. A sprig of the herb, when worn, guards its bearer against accidents and attacks by wild animals. It also guards against ghosts and sickness. Juniper is added to love mixtures, and the berries are carried to increase male potency. When carried or burned, Juniper helps the psychic powers and breaks hexes and curses, and drives off snakes Juniper: Gives protection againt accidents, harm and theft. Dry the berries and wear a a charm to attract a lover. Juniper is said to break curses and hexes.

Kava Kava:(Visions, Protection, Luck) This herb has long been used in rites in Polynesia and Hawaii. The plants root is infused and the resulting tea is drunk to offer protection against evil, and to invite in good luck. Infused and left to steep overnight, it is then drunk to enhance psychic powers and to induce visions. Too much of the infusion, however, is damaging to the kidneys. Knotweed:(Binding, Health) To bind woes and miseries, hold some Knotweed in your hand. Pour your problems into the herb; see it absorbing them, and then burn it outdoors. When carried, Knotweed strengthens and protects the eyes.

LADY SLIPPER Protection and purification. Lavender:(Love, Protection, Sleep, Chastity, Longevity, Purification, Happiness, Peace) Lavender has long been used in love spells and sachets. Clothing rubbed with the fragrant flowers attracts love. A piece of paper on which you have rubbed lavender is excellent for writing love notes on. The scent of lavender particularly attracts men, and lavender water or essential oil was worn by prostitutes several centuries ago to both advertise their profession, and also to attract men. Lavender also protects against cruel treatment at the hands of a spouse if worn. The flowers can also be burnt or smouldered to induce sleep and rest, or scattered around the home to maintain peacefulness. The plant is so powerful that, if when depressed, one gazes upon the plant, all sorrow will depart and a joyous feeling will settle upon the observer. Lavender is also used in healing mixtures, carried to see ghosts, and worn to protect against the evil eye. It is also added to purification baths. Despite its love associations, in renaissance times, it was believed that Lavendar, when worn with rosemary, would preserve a women's chastity. Leek:(Love, Protection, Exorcism) It is said that when two people eat leeks together, that they will fall in love with each other. Leeks may also be carried as protective amulets, and are bitten to break hexes and drive away evil. Lemon:(Love, Longevity, Purification, Friendship) Lemon juice may be mixed with water, and the resulting mixture can then be used for washing amulets, jewellery, and other magickal objects which have been obtained second hand. This was ensures that all negative vibrations are cleansed from the object in question. The juice is also added to bath water at the time of the full moon for its purificatory powers.

The dried flowers and peel are added to love sachets and mixtures, and the leaves used in lust teas. Lemon pie, served to a spouse, will help preserve fidelity, and a slice of fresh lemon placed beneath a visitors chair will ensure a lasting friendship. Lemon Balm: Is an aprodisiac, helps fertilty and is an anti-depressant. Lemon Balm also helps with deigestion, relaxation and anxienty when drunk as a tea.

Lemongrass:(Lust, Psychic Powers, Repels Snakes) Lemongrass planted around the home will repel snakes. It is also used in some lust potions, as well as an infusion to aid in development of psychic powers. Lemon Verbena:(Purification, Love) If this plant is hung around the neck, or a bit of its juice is drunk, it will preserve you from dreaming. Lemon Verbena is also worn to make oneself attractive to the opposite sex, and may be used in love spells and mixtures. The herb is added to other mixtures to increase their strength, and is sometimes utilized to purify an area, or added to bathwater for purificatory purposes. Liquorice:(Lust, Love, Fidelity) Chewing on a liquorice stick (the root, not the candy) will make you passionate. It is also a good practice to use whilst quitting smoking. Liquorice is added to love and lust sachets, carried to attract love, and used in spells to ensure fidelity. Licorice: Helps digestion and bowel movements. Good for imflammatory conditions such as eczema and arthritis. Not recommened for people with high blood pressure. Life-Everlasting:(Longevity, Health, Healing) Use in spells of Longevity, as well as for restoring youth. It is also kept in the home or carried to prevent sickness or ill health. Drink an infusion of Life-Everlasting every morning, before eating or drinking, whilst saying "Chills and ills, pains and banes, do your fasting with life everlasting". This will ensure a long life comparatively free from illness. Lilac:(Exorcism, Protection) Lilac drives away evil where it is planted or strewn, and indeed in New England lilacs were originally planted to keep evil from the property.LILAC Exorcism and protection. Lilly of the Valley:(Mental Powers, Happiness) Use to improve the memory and mind. When placed in a room, these flowers cheer the heart and lift the spirits of those present.

Lime:(Healing, Love, Protection) Take a fresh Lime, pierce it with old iron nails, spikes, pins and needles, and throw it into a deep hole in the ground. This will rid you of all hexes. Wear a necklace of Limes to cure a sore throat. Lime peel may be used in love mixtures and incenses. To cure a toothache, drive a nail into the trunk of a lime tree(but thank the tree first). Twigs of a Lime tree will protect against evil eye when carried. LIVERWORT Peace, love, protection. Liquidambar:(Protection) The seed pods are placed on the alter or held during magickal rites for protection against evil forces. Liquidambar bark may be substituted for Storax bark. Lotus:(Protection, Lock-opening) Anyone who breathes the scent of the Lotus will receive its protection. Place the root of the Lotus under the tongue, and say the words "Sign, Argis" toward a locked door. It will miraculously open. Lotus seeds and pods are used as antidotes to love spells, and any part of the lotus may be carried or worn to ensure blessings from the Gods and Goddesses. Lovage:(Love) Place Lovage in the bath water (in a sachet). This will make you more attractive and love inspiring. Such baths are best taken directly before going out to meet new people. Lovage: Putting the dry powdered root into a bath for purification helps release negative energy. Carry it when meeting new people, to atrract love and to get the attention of a potential lover. Love Seed:(Love, Friendship) Pawnee Indians used this herb in magick. The herbs are carried to attract love and new friendships. Lucky Hand:(Employment, Luck, Protection, Money, Travel) This root of an orchid plant is one of the most famous New Orleans magickal botanicals. It has long been placed in sachets and conjure bags for luck and general success, carried to obtain and maintain employment, and to secure protection from all ills. Fill a jar with rose oil. Place several lucky hands into the oil and let them soak there. When you need something, take out one of the roots and wear it. If you need love, wear it near your heart; if you wish to travel, place it in your shoe; if you need money, carry one in your pocket or wallet, and so on.

Mace:(Psychic Powers, Mental Powers) Mace, the outer covering of the nutmeg, is burned to increase psychic powers and carried to improve the intellect. Magnolia:(Fidelity) Place some Magnolia near or beneath the bed to maintain a faithful relationship. Maidenhair:(Beauty, Love) Immerse some maidenhair in water, then remove. If worn on the person or kept in the bedroom after this process, it will grant you grace, beauty and love. MAHOGANY Storms, elemental magicks, peace. Mallow:(Love, Protection, Exorcism) If your love has left you, gather a bouquet of mallow and place in a vase outside your door (or in a window). This will cause him or her to think of you, and after that they may return. To make an effective protective magickal ointment, steep mallow leaves and stems in vegetable shortening, then strain. This ointment rubbed onto the skin casts out devils as well as protects against the harmful effects of magick worked against you. Mandrake(POISON):(Protection, Fertility, Money, Love, Health) A whole Mandrake root, placed on the mantel in the home, will give the house protection, fertility and prosperity. Mandrake is also hung on the headboard for protection during sleep, carried to attract love, and worn to prevent contraction of illness. Where there is mandrake, demons cannot reside, and so the root is used in exorcism. To "activate" a dried mandrake root(bring its powers out of hibernation), place it in some prominent place in the house and leave it there undisturbed for three days. Then place it in warm water and leave overnight. Afterwards, the root is activated and may be used in magickal practice. The water in which the root was bathed in can be sprinkled on the windows and doors of the house to protect it, or onto people to purify them. Money placed beside a Mandrake root(especially silver coins) is said to double, and the scent of the Mandrake causes sleep. MAPLE Love, Longevity, money, wealth, good luck. Maple leaves are used in love spells and money rituals, and branches of the maple have long served as magickal wands.

A child passed through the branches of a Maple tree will have a long life.

Marigold:(Protection, Prophetic Dreams, Legal Matters, Psychic Powers) Marigolds, picked at noon when the sun is at its hottest and strongest, will strengthen and comfort the heart. Garlands of Marigolds strung on the doorposts stop evil from entering the house, and scattered under the bed they protect you while you sleep and make your dreams come true. Marigolds added to the bath water help win the respect and admiration of everyone you meet. If a girl touches the petals of the Marigold with her bare feet, she will understand the languages of the birds. Marigold: Good for: divination and prophecy dreams, business and legal matters, love, seeing magical creatures and the physic. Marigold should be gathered at noon, it is also very good for finding someone who has 'done you wrong.' Marjoram:(Protection, Love, Happiness, Health, Money) Marjoram is used in love spells, and is also added to food to strengthen love. Carried, it is protective, as it is when placed around the home, a bit in each room, and renewed once a month. Grown in the garden it offers shielding powers against evil. Violets and Marjoram, mixed together, are worn during the winter months as an amulet against colds. Given to a depressed person Marjoram brings happiness. It is also used in money mixtures and sachets. Marjoram: Protects against evil, aids love and healing and is good for those who are grieving Mastic:(Psychic Powers, Manifestations, Lust) Mastic is burned in magickal operations wherein a manifestation of a spirit is desired. It is also used as an incense to aid the psychic powers and has long been dissolved and used in lust potions by Witches in the Middle East. Added to any incense mastic lends potency and power. Meadowsweet:(Love, Divination, Peace, Happiness) Fresh Meadowsweet is placed on the alter for love spells, or dried is used in various love mixtures. Also strewn about the house to keep peace. The scent of Meadowsweet cheers the heart. If gathered on Midsummer, Meadowsweet will give you information regarding thieves: if you have been robbed, place Meadowsweet on water. If it sinks, the thief is a man. If it floats, a woman. Love, divination, happiness.

Mint:(Money, Lust, Healing, Travel, Exorcism, Protection) Mint has long been used in healing potions and mixtures, and the fresh leaves rubbed against the head are said to relieve headaches. Mint worn at the wrist assures that you will not be ill. Stomach upsets can be alleviated by stuffing a green poppet with mint and anointing it with healing oils. Mint is also used in travel spells and to provoke lust. Its bright green leaves and crisp scent led to its use in money and prosperity spells; the easiest of which is to place a few leaves in the wallet or purse, or rub it where your money is kept. To rid a place of evil, sprinkle salt water with a sprinkler made of fresh sprigs of Mint, Marjoram and Rosemary. Fresh mint laid on the alter will call good spirits to be present and aid you in magick. Mint is also kept in the home for protection. "Mint" is the general term used for the Menthe family, which includes Spearmint, Peppermint etc. Mint: Promotes healing, wealth and helps with stressful travel. Good for digestion and also calms all emotions. Mistletoe(POISON):(Protection, Love, Hunting, Fertility, Health, Exorcism) Long used for protection against lightning, disease, misfortune of every kind, fires and so on, it is carried or placed in an appropriate spot for those uses. Mistletoe is placed in cradles to protect children from being stolen fairies and replaced with changelings. A ring carved of Mistletoe wood will ward off sickness when worn, and the plant will cure fresh wounds quickly when carried (do not apply to the wound). Laid near the bedroom door, Mistletoe gives restful sleep and beautiful dreams, as it does when placed beneath the pillow the pillow, or hung on the headboard. Burned, Mistletoe will banish evil. Wear it around your neck to attain invisibility. MOSS Luck and money. MUGWORT Planet is the Moon and Venus Mugwort:(Strength, Psychic Powers, Protection, Prophetic Dreams, Healing, Astral Projection) Place Mugwort in the shoes to gain strength during long walks or runs. For this purpose pick Mugwort before sunrise, saying: "Tollam te artemesia, ne lassus sim in via". A pillow stuffed with Mugwort and slept upon will produce prophetic dreams. Mugwort is also burned with Sandalwood or Wormwood during scrying rituals, and a Mugwort infusion is drunk (sweetened with honey) before divination. The infusion is also used to wash crystal balls and magick mirrors, and Mugwort leaves are placed around the base of the ball (or beneath it) to aid in psychic workings. When carrying Mugwort you cannot be harmed by poison, wild beasts or sunstroke, according to ancient tradition.

In Japan, bunches of Mugwort are used to exorcise spirits of disease who are thought to hate the odour. In China, it is hung over doors to keep evil spirits from buildings. Mugwort is also carried to increase lust and fertility, to prevent backache, and to cure disease and madness. Placed next to the bed it aids in achieving astral projection. Mustard:(Fertility, Protection, Mental Powers) The Hindus used mustard seed to travel through the air. A more down-to-earth use is carrying mustard seed in a red cloth sachet to guard against colds and to increase mental powers. Italian peasants sprinkle mustard seed on the doorsill for protective reasons, and mustard seed buried under your doorstep will keep all manner of supernatural beings from your home. When eaten, Mustard seed increases fertility in women. Myrrh:(Protection, Exorcism, Healing, Spirituality) Myrrh was burned to Ra at noon in ancient Egypt, and was also fumed in the temples if Isis. Burned as an incense, myrrh purifies the area, lifts the vibrations and creates peace. However, it is rarely burned alone; usually in conjunction with Frankincense or other resins. Myrrh increases the power of any incense to which it is added. Myrrh is also included in healing incenses and sachets, and its smoke is used to consecrate, purify and bless objects such as talismans, amulets, charms and magickal tools. Myrrh also aids meditation and contemplation. It is often added to sachets, usually with Frankincense. Mytle:(Love, Fertility, Youth, Peace, Money) Myrtle has long been considered a love herb. A chaplet of fresh leaves and flowers worn on the head while performing love spells is highly appropriate. Myrtle may be added to all love sachets and spells to give them extra strength, especially those designed to keep love alive and exciting. It is also used to increase fertility, but interestingly enough, it is also worn by brides at weddings to ensure that they do not quickly fall pregnant! Myrtle wood, when carried, preserves youthfulness. A cup of Myrtle tea, drunk every three days, will do the same, but it must be drunk every three days without fail. When carried, Myrtle preserves love. If grown on each side of the house, love and peace will reside within, and it is a lucky plant to grow in window-boxes, but only if it is planted there by a women. Myrtle is also used in money spells.

NETTLE

The protective powers of the nettle have long been used in magick. To remove a curse and send it back, stuff a poppet with Nettle, or carry some in a sachet. Also, sprinkle nettle around the house to keep evil out and to send it back. Nettle is also thrown onto a fire to avert danger, held in the hand to ward of ghosts, carried with Yarrow to allay fear, and worn as an amulet to keep negativity away. A pot of freshly cut nettles placed beneath a sickbed will aid in the persons recovery. Nettle has sometimes been used as a lust-inducing herb, and contemporary Mexican spiritualists recommend its use in purification baths because it is "more carnivorous" than other herbs, and so will work efficiently. Nutmeg:(Luck, Money, Health, Fidelity) Nutmegs have long been carried as a good luck charms, and are strung with star anise and Tonka Beans for a potent herbal necklace. Specifically, Nutmegs are carried to ward off rheumatism, cold sores, neuralgia, boils and sties. A Nutmeg hung from a string around a baby's neck will aid in its teething. Nutmeg is included in many money/prosperity spells, and, when ground, is sprinkled onto green candles for this purpose. To ensure a lovers fidelity, cut a Nutmeg into exactly four pieces. Bury one part in the Earth; throw one off a cliff into the air; burn the third part, and boil the fourth in water. Drink a sip of the water and take this last piece of Nutmeg with you everywhere; sleep with it under your pillow at night. No one will tempt your mate. Nuts:(Fertility, Prosperity, Love, Luck) All nuts are potent fertility-inducers, and are carried for such uses. They are also included in many prosperity and money mixtures. Heart shaped nuts are carried to promote love, while double nuts are very lucky charms indeed

Oak:(Protection, Health, Money, Healing, Potency, Fertility, Luck) A tree as long lived and strong as the Oak naturally offers magickal protection. Two twigs of oak, bound with red thread so that they form an equal armed cross, makes a potent safeguard against evil. It should be hung in the house. Acorns placed in windows guard against the entrance of lightning, and a piece of oak wood, carried, protects its bearer from all harm. If you can catch a falling oak leaf you shall have no colds all winter. When a sick person is in the house make a fire out of Oakwood and warm the house with it to "draw off" the illness(do this only if you have a fireplace of course!). Carry an acorn against illness and pains, for immortality or longevity, and to preserve youthfulness. Planting an acorn in the dark of the moon ensures that you will receive money in the near future.

Carrying an acorn increases fertility and strengthens sexual potency. Carrying any piece of the oak draws good luck

OAKMOSS Element is Earth.Money drawing. Planet is Jupiter

Oats:(Money) Use in prosperity and money spells. Oleander(POISON):(Love) Although Italian magickal thought says that keeping any part of an Oleander in the house brings sickness, disgrace and misfortune of every kind to its inhabitants, Oleander is occasionally used in love spells, but never internally. Olive:(Healing, Peace, Fertility, Potency, Protection, Lust) On an Olive leaf, write Athena's name. Press this against the head or wear on the body and it will cure a headache. Olive oil has long been used as an anointing oil to aid in healing. Olive leaves scattered or placed in a room spread a peaceful vibration throughout the area. When eaten, olives ensure fertility as well as sexual potency in men, and are lust-inducing. Athenian brides wore crowns of Olive leaves to ensure their fertility. A branch of Olive hung over the door guards the house against all evils, and on the chimney wards off lightning. Olive leaves, worn, bring luck. Onion:(Protection, Exorcism, Healing, Profectic Dreams, Money, Lust) Take a small white onion, stick it with many black headed pins, and place in a window. This will guard against the intrusion of evil into the house. Carried, the onion gives protection against venomous creatures. Grown in pots or in the garden, they will also guard against evil. Halved or quartered onions, placed around the house, will absorb negativity and evil, as well as disease. For healing, rub the cut edge of an onion against the afflicted part of the body, visualising the disease going into the onion. After, destroy the onion (burn, or smash to pieces and bury). To cure warts, rub them with a piece of onion and throw it over your right shoulder. Walk away without looking back. A large red onion tied to the bedpost will protect its occupant's sickness, and aids in recuperation. Never throw onion skins and peelings onto the ground; if you do, you throw away your prosperity. Instead, burn them in the fireplace or stove to attract riches.

An onion placed beneath the pillow will produce prophetic dreams. If you are faced with making a decision, scratch your options on onions, one to each onion. Place them in the dark. The first one that sprouts answers you. Orchid:(Love) Orchids have long been used in love spells, especially the root, which is carried in a sachet. The flower is currently one of the commoner floral symbols of love in the west, and when given, clearly conveys this message. Some types of orchids are used in creating visions, trance-states and inducing psychic powersORCHID Love, peace, calming anger, attraction, beauty. Orris:(Love, Protection, Divination) The Orris root has long been used to find and hold love. The whole Orris root is carried, the powder added to sachets, sprinkled on sheets, clothing and the body, as well as around the house. Orris root powder is sometimes known as "Love Drawing Powder". In Japan the Orris was used as protection against evil spirits; the roots and leaves were hung from the eaves of the house and added to the bath water for personal protection. Suspend a whole root from a small length of cord or yarn and with this pendulum find answers to your questions. PALM Fertility, focus, divination. Pansy:(Love, Rain Magick, Love Divination) Worn or carried, the pansy draws love. It is also potent for love divinations: plant pansies in the shape of a heart; if they prosper, so too will your love. A woman whose sailor love goes to sea can ensure that he thinks of her by burying sea sand in the pansy bed and watering the flowers before sunrise. If pansies are picked while dew is on them, it will soon rain.PANSY Love, rainmaking, storms, magickal power. PAPAYA Love, protection, attraction. Parsley: festivity, feasts Papyrus:(Protection) Place in boats to protect against attacks by crocodiles. Parosela:(Love) Parosela has been used by native Americans as a magickal aid to hunting. Parsley:(Lust, Protection, Purification)

When eaten, parsley provokes lust and promotes fertility, but if you are in love don't cut parsleyyou will cut your love as well. Though the plant has associations with death and is often regarded as evil, the Romans tucked a sprig of parsley into their togas every morning for protection. It is also placed on plates of food to guard it from contamination. Parsley is also used in purification baths, and those to stop all misfortune. A wreath of parsley worn on the head prevents (or delays) inebriation. Passion Flower:(Peace, Sleep, Friendships) Contrary to its name, the passion flower is placed in the home to calm problems and troubles, and to bring peace. Carried, it attracts friends and great popularity. Placed beneath the pillow it will aid sleep. Patchouli:(Money, Fertility, Lust) Patchouli smells like rich earth, and so has been used in money and prosperity mixtures and spells. It is sprinkled on money, added to purses and wallets, and placed and placed around the base of green candles. Also, owing to its earthiness, Patchouli is used in fertility talismans, and is substituted for "Graveyard Dust" where it is called for. Patchouli is added to love sachets and baths. Although in contemporary American voodoo-based herbal magick, Patchouli is used for "separation", but this is a modern concept and has no long tradition. Patchouli is actually more widely used for attracting people and to promote lust PEACH Love, exorcism, longevity, wisdom, peace. Pennyroyal:(Strength, Protection, Peace) Pennyroyal placed in the shoe prevents weariness during travel and strengthens the body in general. When worn it acts against the evil eye and aids in making business deals. When given to quarrelling couples it will cause them to cease their fighting, and so Pennyroyal is a herb of peace. It is also carried on board ships to prevent seasickness. Peony:(Protection, Exorcism) The peony has long been revered for its protective powers. Worn, it guards the body, spirit and soul; placed in the home it wards off evil spirits, and planted in the garden it protects it against evil and storms. The seeds or roots are hung around a child's neck to guard it from mischievous fairies and imps. A variation of this entails carving Peony roots into small beads (called "piney beads"), and then stringing them. These are also worn for protection. Peony roots worn with coral and flint keeps away the incubus. Peony is also used in exorcism and the root is carried to cure lunacy. It should only be gathered at night, when its seeds are said to shine with an eerie light. Its root is sometimes substituted for the mandrake.

BLACK PEPPER Element is Fire. Protection, strength, irritation, lust, warding charms. Planet is Mars

PEPPERMINT:(Purification, Sleep, Love, Healing, Psychic Powers) Peppermint has long been used in healing and purification spells. Its presence raises the vibrations of an area. Smelled, it compels one toward sleep, and placed beneath the pillow it sometimes offers one a glimpse into the future in dreams. It is rubbed against furniture, walls and floorboards to cleanse them of evil and negativity. Pliney stated that peppermint excites love, and so can be added to this type of mixture.

PERIWINKLE Love, lust, money, protection, attraction, peace. Persimmon:(Changing Sex, Healing, Luck) Until recently, in Alabama, it was supposedly believed that if a girl wished to become a boy all she had to do was to eat nine unripe Persimmons. She would surely change her sex within two weeks! If you are plagued with chills, tie a knot in a piece of string, and tie the string to a Persimmon tree. This should halt them. If you wish to have good luck, bury green Persimmons. Pimento:( love) Pimento has been used in love spells and sachets for centuries, especially among the continental Gypsies. Eaten it has the same effect. Pimpernel:(Protection, Health) The Pimpernel is carried for protection and to keep people from deceiving you. When placed in the home it wards off illness and prevents accidents. Its power is supposed to be great that when dropped into running water it will move against the current. Magickal knife blades are rubbed with Pimpernel juice to purify and empower them. Pine:(Healing, Fertility, Protection, Exorcism, Money) Cones from Pine trees are carried to increase fertility and to have vigorous old age. A Pine cone gathered on Midsummer (still retaining its seeds) is an awesome magickal object, for if its

possessor eats one pine nut from it every day, it will make him or her immune to gunshots. Pine needles are burned during the winter to purify and cleanse the house. Scattered on the floor they drive away evil, and when burned, exorcise the area of negativity. They are also used in cleansing baths. Pine needles are burned to reverse and send back spells. Branches of the pine placed on or over the bed keeps sickness far away(or aid the ill). In Japan it is customary to place a pine branch over the door of the house to ensure continual joy within, for the leaves are evergreen.

PLUMERIA Love, attraction, relaxation. Poke(POISON):(Courage, Hex-Breaking) Poke is used at the new moon to break hexes and curses. Make an infusion sprinkle around the home. Add a bit to the bath water as well, but do not drink!! When carried, Poke gives courage. To find a lost object, mix Poke with Hydrangea, Violet, and Galangal. Sprinkle this around the area where the article was last seen. The berries are crushed and the resulting juice is used as magickal ink. Pomegranate:(Divination, Luck, Wishes, Wealth, Fertility) The seeds have long been eaten to increase fertility, and the skin carried for the same reasons. The Pomegranate is a lucky, magickal fruit. Always make a wish before eating one and your wish may come true. A branch of Pomegranate discovers concealed wealth, or attract money to its possessor. The skin, fried, is added to wealth and money incenses. Women who wish to know how many children they will have should throw a Pomegranate hard on the ground. The number of seeds that fall out indicate the number of her offspring. Branches of Pomegranate hung over doorways guard against evil, and the juice is used as a blood substitute, and a magickal ink. Poplar:(Money, Flying) The Poplar buds are carried to attract money or are added to money incenses. They have also been added to flying ointments, which were used to facilitate astral projection, and so are sometimes placed upon the body or made into an ointment when working with this procedure. Primrose:(Protection, Love) Blue and red Primroses grown in the garden protect it from all adversities, and they also attract fairies.

Though Primroses, to some, represent wantonness, women carry them to attract love. They are also worn to cure madness and sewn into children's pillows to gain their undying respect and loyalty Pomegranate:(Divination, Luck, Wishes, Wealth, Fertility) The seeds have long been eaten to increase fertility, and the skin carried for the same reasons. The Pomegranate is a lucky, magickal fruit. Always make a wish before eating one and your wish may come true. A branch of Pomegranate discovers concealed wealth, or attract money to its possessor. The skin, fried, is added to wealth and money incenses. Women who wish to know how many children they will have should throw a Pomegranate hard on the ground. The number of seeds that fall out indicate the number of her offspring. Branches of Pomegranate hung over doorways guard against evil, and the juice is used as a blood substitute, and a magickal ink.

Quassia:(Love) Quassia is in love mixtures, both to draw and to maintain love. The powdered wood is used in incense bases. Quince:(Protection, Love, Happiness) Quince seed, carried, protects against evil, physical harm, and accidents. In Roman times, a quince was shared by a bridal couple to ensure their future happiness. Pregnant women who eat quinces often will cause their child to be ingenious. Serve quinces to loved ones to ensure fidelity Ragwort:(Protection) The ancient Greeks used Ragwort as an amulet against spells and charms, and Witches were said to ride upon Ragwort stalks at midnight in the bad old days of the persecutions. Raspberry:(Protection, Love) The brambles (branches) of the Raspberry are hung up at doors and windows for protection. This is also done when a death has occurred, so that the spirit won't re-enter the house once it has gone. Raspberry is served as a love-inducing food, and the leaves are carried by pregnant women to alleviate the pains of pregnancy and childbirth. Rattlesnake Root:(Protection, Money)

An infusion of Rattlesnake Root added to the bath and to the rinse water for clothing, offers from others trying to harm you. The root was used by some native Americans to guard against Rattlesnake bites, and the infusion is rubbed onto the hands and feet to lead one to money. RICE Protection, rainmaking, fertility, good luck, money. Rose:(Love, Psychic Powers, Healing, Love Divination, Luck, Protection) Roses have long been used in love mixtures, owing to the flowers associations with the emotions. A chaplet of roses worn when performing love spells (remove the thorns first), or a single rose in a vase on the alter are powerful love-magic aids. Rose water distilled from rose petals is added to love baths. The magic of Garlic by Elizabeth Coughlan

Most of us are familiar with garlic as a flavoring as it has become a common ingredient in home cooking all over the world, far more than would have been the case twenty years ago. Although its global popularity has occurred relatively recently, garlic has been used, and highly regarded, in many cultures for over five thousand years, both as a culinary aid and as a cure for almost any disease of the human body. The ancient Egyptians worshiped garlic and even placed it in the tombs of their dead. The remains of six garlic bulbs were discovered in the tomb of Tutankhamen and clay models of garlic were found in other graves, thought to be offerings of less wealthy Egyptians who couldn't afford the highly prized herb. It is also the oldest known medicinal herb which was used in Ancient Egypt, Greece, Rome, the Orient and China; the first Chinese writing refers to suan the Chinese name for garlic.

In early medieval times garlic was bound up with superstition. Bunches of garlic were hung on doors or under the eaves to keep vampires at bay, or worn around the neck or waist as a protection against the evil eye. It must have worked as vampires no longer bother us and the evil eye hasn't been seen in aeons! In the later middle ages, monks chewed garlic all day to protect themselves from the Black Death, although their breath probably kept the disease ridden, and their fleas, far enough away for this to be no longer a problem!

Many people have believed that garlic improves physical and mental strength. Roman soldiers ate garlic before battle, Greek athletes took

it before a race, Syrian peasants before harvesting and the workers building the pyramids were issued garlic with their rations so that they could chew it all day long as they man-handled the heavy blocks into position! In our own times garlic has been used to combat all forms of illness. During World War II, when antibiotics were scarce, garlic was placed on wounds to prevent infections. It has also been used to reduce blood cholesterol levels, reduce the risk of further heart attacks in cardiac patients and as a stimulant for the immune system. Garlic is also on top of the list of foods being investigated by the US National Cancer Institute as a weapon in the fight against cancer.

The best way to preserve garlic's magical properties, and to ensure that you are gaining full benefit from this herb, is not to cook it for too long. It should be added only at the end of cooking, rather than at the beginning, and, if you are not too keen on the taste, use only half a clove, finely chopped, and gradually increase the amount; then you too will be able to benefit from this glorious herb. The Herbal Medicine Cabinet As a mother I have gained so much from educating myself about the various home remedies that are effective in treating imbalances in my children's health. Not only does it bring peace of mind knowing that I can provide relief from common ailments like colds and flus, and bumps and bruises, but I've also really come to appreciate getting to know the delicate intricacies of each of my children's constitutions. There's an intimacy involved in treating your children's imbalances yourself - an opportunity to strengthen the mother-child bond. In addition, I feel like I'm setting the groundwork for my children to be responsible for their own health and well-being as they grow to maturity. Of course herbs can be a wonderful ally for preventing imbalances. Here are some herbs to have on hand to treat the minor conditions that you would normally treat yourself:

ALOE VERA GEL (ALOE VERA) Soothes cuts, scrapes and minor burns, including sunburn. Apply topically to wound site. Look for preparations that contain at least 98 percent aloe vera or better yet, keep a big aloe plant growing in your home so you'll always have plenty of fresh juicy leaves on hand!

ARNICA CREAM (ARNICA MONTANA) Offers pain relief, heals bruises and reduces inflammation, easing muscle aches, strains and sprains. Rub into injured area as needed. Look for preparations that contain at least 15 percent arnica tincture.

HOMEOPATHIC ARNICA TABLETS Good to have on hand to give to kids when they fall down or get bumped and bruised.

BACH FLOWER REMEDIES' RESCUE REMEDY Quells anxiety and nervousness. Place 4 drops in drinking water as needed throughout the day.

BLACK COHOSH TINCTURE (CIMICIFUGA RACEMOSA) Relieves abdomen, lower back and leg cramps associated with premenstrual syndrome. (For adults only - never give to growing children.)

CAYENNE POWDER (CAPSICUM FRUTESCENS) Stops pain immediately and bleeding from minor cuts and scrapes. Sprinkle wound with cayenne powder (it will probably sting) and apply pressure until bleeding stops. Then wash it out, disinfect the wound and bandage it. Kitchen variety is OK; also available in cream preparations.

CRYSTALLIZED GINGER CUBES (ZINGIBER OFFICINALIS) Contains antispasmodic components to relieve nausea. Anti-inflammatory components may bring relief for migraine headaches.

FRESH GINGER You can make a teat by boiling several cups of water and a few slices of ginger for about 10 minutes. Strain, sweeten with honey and drink to relieve nausea and coughs.

ECHINACEA TINCTURE (ECHINACEA ANGUSTIFOLIA; E. PURPUREA) Fights upper respiratory, urogenital, fungal and parasitic infections. This is one herb I always have plenty of. It is very effective at stopping nasty bugs if given at the very first signs of imbalance. I've discovered that if I put a dropperful of tincture in a small glass with the juice of 1 freshly squeezed orange and 1/2 of a packet of Alacer's vitamin C powder, even small children will drink it down. We've had incredible results fighting off colds and flus with this mixture at our house! Making your own tinctures is very economical.

EYEBRIGHT (EUPHRASIA OFFICINALIS)

Clears eye infections and soothes red, tired eyes from allergies or pollution. Make an infusion with capsule contents or loose herb and apply as a compress. If you can't find eyebright, substitute chamomile tea bags. Fennel also works well.

FENNEL SEEDS (FOENICULUM VULGARE) Alleviates gas and stomach upset. Chew several seeds. Make a tea by steeping a teaspoon of seeds in boiling water for about 10 minutes; strain and drink.

GOLDENSEAL TINCTURE (HYDRASTIS CANADENSIS) Eliminates traveler's diarrhea caused 'by exposure to unfamiliar bacteria in food and water. Also works well with echinacea to fight colds or flu.

LAVENDER ESSENTIAL OIL (LAVANDULA OFFICINALIS) Disinfects cuts and scrapes, works as an analgesic to relieve pain. Relaxes muscles and restless or anxious mind. Apply topically. Rub on temples to relieve headache. Put 10-15 drops in a warm bath to soothe a cranky child (or mom!)

HOMEOPATHIC NUX VOMICA TABLETS Calms headaches, stomachaches and even hangovers. Given at the first signs of nausea, this remedy can really calm an upset tummy fast.

ST. JOHN'S WORT SALVE (HYPERICUM PEFORATUM) Relieves the discomfort of hemorrhoids. Apply topically.

SLIPPERY ELM LOZENGES (ULMUS RUBRA) Soothes sore throats and suppresses coughs.

TEA TREE ESSENTIAL OIL (MELALEUCA ALTERNIFOLIA) Disinfects cuts and scrapes, dries acne and eliminates nail fungus and athlete's foot Apply to

wounds, acne, nails and feet straight from the bottle. If tea tree oil is too drying, make a topical solution with 4 parts tea tree to 6 parts water.

VALERIAN TINCTURE OR CAPSULES (VALERIANA OFFICINALIS) Works as a tranquilizer to relieve insomnia and anxiety.

VITAMIN C Stimulates immune system to fight infections ranging from the common cold to urinary tract infections. Available in capsules, tablets and powders. I keep a box of Alacer's vitamin C powder on hand for mixing with nasty tasting tinctures.

ZINC LOZENGES (GLUCONATE OR ACETATE FORMS) Reduces duration of cold or flu. Take with food to avoid nausea. SYRUPS Honey or unrefined sugar can be combined with infusions or decoctions to make syrups. As well as helping to preserve the active plant ingredients, the sweetness is useful for disguising the flavor of some herbs, such as goldenseal. Syrups are frequently used to treat children. Honey has a particularly soothing effect and is often combined with herbs with and expectorant action to make cough syrups. Parts Used: Aerial parts, bark, flowers, leaves and roots Standard Quantity: Use 500 ml infusion or decoction and 500g honey or unrefined sugar. Standard Dosage: Take 5-10 ml 3 times a day. Storage: Store in sterilized, dark glass bottles with cork stoppers for up to 3 months. 1. Make a 500 ml standard infusion or decoction or your chosen herb. 2. Strain the infusion or decoction into a clean saucepan. 3. For each 500 ml of infusion add 500 g of warm honey or unrefined sugar and stir constantly until dissolved. Simmer gently until the mixture has a syrupy consistency and then remove from the heat and allow to cool. 4. Pour into bottles and seal with a cork stopper. Syrups can ferment and cork stoppers will simply pop out, whereas screw-top bottles can explode! ALTERNATE METHOD Syrups can be made by boiling three pounds Sucanat (desiccated sugar cane juice) in one pint of water until a syrupy consistence is obtained and then steeping the herbs in the hot mixture for twenty minutes. The herbs can also be simmered directly in honey or maple syrup for about ten

minutes. Use two teaspoons of herb for every cup of liquid. Strain the syrup and store it, well sealed, in the refrigerator. SUBSTITUTIONS FOR MAGICAL PURPOSES *Rosemary can be substituted for any other herb *Rose can be substituted for any other flower *Frankincense can be substituted for any gum resin *Copal can be substituted for any gum resin *Tobacco can be substituted for any poisonous herb * ACACIA-Gum Arabic * ACACIA, GUM-Gum Arabic * ACONITE-Tobacco * ARABIC, GUM-Frankincense; Gum Mastic * AMMONIAC GUM-Asafetida * ASAFOETIDA-Tobacco; Valerian * BALM OF GILEAD-Rose Buds; Gum Mastic * BELLADONNA-Tobacco * BENZOIN-Gum Arabic; Gum Mastic * CAMPHOR OIL-Eucalyptus Oil; Lavender Oil * CARNATION-Rose petals anointed with a few drops of Cinnamon Oil * CASSIA-Cinnamon * CASTOR BEANS-A few drops Castor Oil * CEDAR-Sandalwood * CINQUEFOIL-Clover; Trefoil * CITRON-Equal parts Orange Peel and Lemon Peel * CLOVE-Mace; Nutmeg * CLOVER-Cinquefoil * COPAL-Frankincense; Cedar * COWBANE-Tobacco * CYPRESS-Juniper; Pine Needles * DEERS TONGUE-Tonka Bean; Woodruff; Vanilla * DITTANY OF CRETE-Gum Mastic * DRAGON'S BLOOD-Equal parts Frankincense and Red Sandalwood * EUCALYPTUS OIL-Camphor Oil; Lavender Oil * EUPHORBIUM-Tobacco * FRANKINCENSE-Copal; Pine Resin * GALANGAL-Ginger Root * GRAINS OF PARADISE-Black Pepper * GUM AMMONIAC-Asafetida * GUM BDELLIUM-Copal; Pine Resin; Dragon's Blood * HELLEBORE-Tobacco; Nettle * HEMLOCK-Tobacco * HEMP-Nutmeg; Damiana; Star Anise; Bay * HENBANE-Tobacco * HYSSOP-Lavender * IVY-Cinquefoil * JASMINE-Rose * JUNIPER-Pine * LAVENDER-Rose * LEMON GRASS-Lemon Peel * LEMON PEEL-Lemon Peel * LEMON VERBENA-Lemon Grass; Lemon Peel * MACE-Nutmeg * MANDRAKE-Tobacco

* MASTIC, GUM-Gum Arabic; Frankincense * MINT-Sage * MISTLETOE-Mint; Sage * MUGWORT-Wormwood * NEROLI OIL-Orange Oil * NIGHTSHADE-Tobacco * NUTMEG-Mace; Cinnamon * OAKMOSS-Patchouli * ORANGE-Tangerine Peel * ORANGE FLOWERS-Orange Peel * PATCHOULI-Oakmoss * PEPPERMINT-Spearmint * PEPPERWORT-Rue; Grains of Paradise; Black Pepper * PINE-Juniper * PINE RESIN-Frankincense; Copal * RED SANDALWOOD-Sandalwood mixed with a pinch of Dragon's Blood * ROSE-Yarrow * ROSE GERANIUM-Rose * RUE-Rosemary mixed with a pinch of Black Pepper * SAFFRON-Orange Peel * SANDALWOOD-Cedar * SARSPARILLA-Sassafras * SASSAFRASS-Sarsaparilla * SPEARMINT-Peppermint * SULFER-Tobacco; Club Moss; Asafetida * THYME-Rosemary * TOBACCO-Bay * TONKA BEAN-Deerstongue; Woodruff; Vanilla Bean * TREFOIL-Cinquefoil * VALERIAN-Asafetida * VANILLA-Woodruff; Deerstongue; Tonka Bean * VETIVERT-Calamus * WOLFSBANE-Tobacco * WOOD ALOE-Sandalwood sprinkled with Ambergris Oil * WOODRUFF-Deerstongue; Vanilla * WORMWOOD-Mugwort * YARROW-Rose * YEW-Tobacco Skullcap Scutellaria lateriflora Other Names: Blue Skullcap, Common Scullcap, Hairy Skullcap, Hooded Skullcap, Helmet Flower, Hoodwort, Madog Skullcap Habitat Skullcap is a Native N. American perennial herb, found from New York to West Virginia and southward to South Carolina, Alabama and Missouri. Growing in rich woods, thickets, bluffs and along roadsides. Cultivation: Skullcap is easy in a sunny position and any ordinary garden soil. Sow seed in early spring after danger of frost is past. The root is a creeping short rhizome, which sends up hairy, square stems, 6 to 18 inches high, branched, or, in small specimens, nearly simple, with opposite downy leaves, heart-shaped at the base, 1/2 to 2 1/2 inches long, scalloped or toothed edges. The blue to lavender flowers are in racemes and grow from the leaf axils of the upper plant. They are hooded, tube shaped, and two lipped the upper lip being the hood and the lower lip having two shallow lobes. Flowers bloom from May to August, gather above ground parts, in the summer as flowers bloom, dry and store for later herb use. Properties Skullcap is a powerful medicinal herb, it is used in alternative medicine as an anti-inflammatory,

abortifacient, antispasmodic, slightly astringent, emmenagogue, febrifuge, nervine, sedative and strongly tonic. Some valuable constituents found in the plant are Scutellarin, Catalpol, other Volatile oils, bitter iridoids and Tannins. Scientific studies are proving this to be a valuable plant in many areas for mental disorders. Skullcap is used in the treatment of a wide range of nervous conditions including epilepsy, insomnia, hysteria, anxiety, delerium tremens, withdrawal from barbiturates and tranquilisers. A medicinal infusion of the plant is used to promote menstruation, it should not be given to pregnant women since it can induce a miscarriage, the infusion is also used in the treatment of throat infections. The infusion is given for nervous headaches, neuralgia and in headache arising from incessant coughing, pain, and inducing sleep when necessary, without any unpleasant symptoms following. Skullcap is currently being used as an alternative medicine to treat ADD and a number of nerve disorders. Should be used with some caution since in overdose it causes giddiness, stupor, confusion and twitching. Folklore Well known among the Cherokee and other Native American tribes, as a strong emmenagogue and female medicinal herb. Used in some tribes as a ceremonial plant to introduce young girls into womanhood. Once believed of use in the treatment of rabies and schizophrenia. Also used to induce visions. Recipe "Medicinal" tea: To 1 oz. of the powdered herb add a pint of boiling water, steep 10 min. give in 1/2 teacup doses, every few hours. Laterifolia is the species most often used by herbalists, Its flowers are small and leaves triangular. However, you can use any species of skullcap for herbal teas and tinctures. skullcapseed_sm.jpg (5265 bytes) All Skullcaps have this unique seed pod and distinctive hooded flowers. Skullcap leaf size and shapes vary widely amongst the species. Color of flowers range from red-violet to blue-violet often with white markings. Article by Deb Jackson & Karen Bergeron SALVES Herbs that are useful for skin conditions (such as comfrey, lavender, calendula, pine needles, aloes, elecampane root, burdock, and elderflowers) can be made into salves. The ideal time to make a salve is summer, when the herbs are fresh and abundant, but dried herbs may be used as well. Green walnut hulls and whole, smashed horse chestnuts may be added to the basic mix for their skin-healing and painkilling virtues. Simmer herbs in good quality olive oil in a large pot. In a separate pot, melt and simmer three to four tablespoons of fresh beeswax (the beeswax should be of a golden color with a strong honey scent) per cup of oil. Put enough oil in the pot to cover the herbs. Simmer the herbs in the oil for about twenty minutes. When wax and oil reach the same temperature, pour in the wax. Strain and pour into clean jars. Tincture of benzoin may be added as a preservative (about one ounce per quart) while the salve is still liquid although it is not strictly necessary. The most important factor in controlling mold is to have immaculately clean and dry jars and utensils. Boiling followed by a thorough drying is all that is usually needed. Persons living in very hot and damp climates may wish to take the extra precautions of adding the tincture of benzoin. Red Clover Tops Magical Properties: Botanical Name: Trifolium pratense Common Names: Honeystalks, Shamrock, Trefoil, Trifoil Planet: Mercury Element air gender male Deities: Rowan Magical uses: Luck, protection, success, anti-hexing, love, exorcism, fidelity. Use 2 leaves: You soon find yourself a lover. # heads used for protection, 4 heads, helps men avoid military service, protection against madness, strengthens psychic powers, help you detect spirits , and said to lead wear to riches of gold, money or treasure.

.If 2 eat it together said mutual love will result. If 4 tops are left on will help one to see fairies.5 tops: Powerful money amulet. Add to your bath to increase money and also to induce lust, and rid of evil and negativity. Grow near your house for protection and luck. A great mineral supplement. Acts as a blood and lymph purifier and cleanser, an antibiotic and a relaxant. Good for bacterial infections, HIV and AIDS, inflamed lungs, kidney problems, liver disease, skin disorders and weakened immune system. Acts as an appetite suppressant. Not recommended for people taking blood thinning agents. Traditional Chinese medicine and western folk medicine used this plant for similar purposes. It was well regarded as a diuretic, to stop coughing, and as an alterative.1 Alterative plants were considered beneficial for all manner of chronic conditions, particularly those afflicting the skin. Has customarily been used for removing toxins, cleansing the blood and liver, lungs, digestionconstipation, cancer (because of its beneficial effect on protein assimilation), stomach cancer, acne, appetite loss, arthritis, athlete's foot, boils, bronchitis, burns, childhood disease, coughs, wheezing, douche, eczema, eyewash, flu, hay fever, leprosy, Leukemia, nervous energy, psoriasis, rheumatism, rickets, scarlet fever, scrofula, skin cancer, skin diseases, sores, spasmodic affections, syphilis, ulcers, urinary problems, vitality and weak chest, whooping cough, and wounds. Some say not to take this herb during pregnancy. See DRUG interactions HOMEOPATHY Tincture of fresh flower heads PREPARATION & DOSAGES (3x/day) Dried Inflorescence: 4 g or by infusion Liquid Extract: 1:1 in 25 % alcohol, dose 1.5-3.0 ml Tincture: 1:10 in 45% alcohol, dose 1-2 ml Internally: Dried flower heads, 2-4 g or in infusion, liquid extract: 1:1, 25% ethanol, 2-4 ml Externally: Infusion or extract; ointment containing 10-15% of flower heads It is important to note that in a loose-leaf tea, you are getting the entire herb. Not the broken and little cut pieces of herbs that are used to make up the tea bags. using the whole herb ensures that all of the medicinal properties and strengths are intact. Red Clover tops have been used by women for years to help with their fertility issues. It is one of the most important herbs for this. Red clover is a source of many valuable nutrients including calcium, chromium, magnesium, niacin, phosphorus, potassium, thiamine, and vitamin C. Red clover is also considered to be one of the richest sources of isoflavones (water-soluble chemicals that act like estrogens and are found in many plants). How to use as a tea: For every one cup of water (or so) add one Teaspoon of herb. Put your water to heat, add your herbs and steep for 15 minutes and strain. Or, you can put the herbs in a mesh tea ball, muslin bag or bamboo strainer, inside your cup and pour in the boiling water into the cup. Let steep for 15 minutes or so. Enjoy! Makes approximately 30-40 cups of tea. DRUG INTERACTIONS Anticoagulants (coumarin derivatives may potentate anticoagulants), hormone therapy. Due to the diuretic action of this herb the following drug interactions are possible: increased risk of toxicity with anti-inflammatory analgesics; if hypokalemia occurs possible antagonism with antiarrhythmics and potentiation of muscle relaxants; antagonizes antidiabetic (hypoglycemic) drugs; may potentate and/or interfere with antihypertensive; may potentate lithium therapy; when taken with corticosteroids there is a risk for hypokalemia; may potentate other diuretics and increase the risk of hypokalemia. Use of this herb may interfere with and/or reduce the effectiveness of oral contraceptives and sex hormones. Primrose Botanical: Primula vulgaris (HUDS.) Family: N.O. Primulaceae --Parts Used---Root, herb. ---Habitat---The plant is abundant in woods, hedgerows, pastures and on railway embankments throughout Great Britain, and is in full flower during April and May. In sheltered spots in mild

winters it is often found in blossom during the opening days of the year. The Primrose possesses somewhat similar medicinal properties to those of the Cowslip. It has a root-stock, knotty with the successive bases of fallen leaves and bearing cylindrical, branched rootlets on all sides. The leaves are egg-shaped and oblong, about 5 inches long when fully developed, tapering into a winged stalk, about 1 1/4 inch broad in the middle, smooth above, the veins and vein lets prominent beneath and hairy, the margins irregularly toothed. The young leaf appears as a stout mid-rib, with the blade rolled on itself on either side into two crinkled coils laid tightly along it, in similar manner to the Cowslip. The flowers are each on separate stalks. There are two kinds of flowers, externally apparently identical, but inwardly of different construction. Only one kind is found on each plant, never both, one kind being known as 'pin-eyed' and the other as 'thrumeyed.' In both, the green-tube calyx and the pale yellow corolla of five petals, joined into a tube below and spreading into a disk above are identical, but in the centre of the pin-eyed flowers there is only the green knob of the stigma, looking like a pin's head, whereas in the centre of the thrum-eyed flowers there are five anthers, in a ring round the tube, but no central knob. Farther down the tube, there are in the pin-eyed flowers five anthers hanging on to the wall of the corolla tube, while in the thrum-eyed, at this same spot, is the stigma knob. At the bottom of the tube in both alike is the seed-case and round it the honey. ---Parts Used Medicinally and Preparation for Market---The whole herb, used fresh, and in bloom, and the root-stock (the so-called root) dried. The roots of two- or three-year-old plants are used, dug in autumn. The roots must be thoroughly cleansed in cold water, with a brush, allowing them to remain in water as short a time as possible. All smaller fibers are trimmed off. Large roots may be split lengthwise to facilitate drying, but as a rule this will not be necessary with Primrose roots. ---Constituents---Both the root and flowers of the Primrose contain a fragrant oil and Primulin, which is identical with Mannite, whilst the somewhat acrid active principle is Saponin. ---Medicinal Action and Uses---Antispasmodic, vermifuge, emetic, astringent. In the early days of medicine, the Primrose was considered an important remedy in muscular rheumatism, paralysis and gout. Pliny speaks of it as almost a panacea for these complaints. Has been used for treating PMS, asthma, allergies, arteriosclerosis, chronic headaches, inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, lupus, scleroderma, complications arising from diabetes and poor circulation, cirrhosis of the liver, prostate health, and cholesterol regulation. The whole plant is sedative and in modern days a tincture of the fresh plant in bloom, in a strength of 10 OZ. to 1 pint of alcohol, in doses of 1 to 10 drops has been used with success in America in extreme sensitiveness, restlessness and insomnia. The whole plant has somewhat expectorant qualities. An infusion of the flowers was formerly considered excellent against nervous hysterical disorders. 'Primrose Tea,' says Gerard, 'drunk in the month of May is famous for curing the phrensie.' The infusion may be made of 5 to 10 parts of the petals to 100 of water. In modern herbal medicine the infusion of the root is generally taken in tablespoonful doses as a good remedy against nervous headaches. A teaspoonful of the powdered dry root serves as an emetic. Migraines, often brought on by the arachidonic acid cascade, may also benefit from the use of the seed oil. The above are mainly preventative measures. But the seeds or seed oil have been used for symptomatic treatment as well. Other internal uses involve taking leaf infusions to increase mental alertness, and to relieve anxiety and depression. How Evening Primrose works in these cases is not exactly known. But it is believed that the plants mucilage has a beneficial effect on the stomach, liver, and spleen, and that the feelings of well-being stem follow these physiological effects. Leaf infusions are also used to ease coughs and sore throats. In this case the action is directly attributed to the mucilage. Oenothera infusions have been used to relieve dyspepsia, and the root tea was used to treat obesity. It is high in potassium and magnesium. Every part of the plant is edible. Beginning with the taproot, which can be steamed, boiled, or fried, the young leaves of the basal rosette can be used in salads (although I have used the smallish leaves growing up the mature stalk, too), or as a potherb. As with most wild edibles, the younger leaves are always best (dont forget the downy texture; use sparingly). But the older leaves can be used as you would the younger leaves. The flowers make a pretty addition to

salads. In ancient cookery the flowers were the chief ingredient in a pottage called 'Primrose Pottage.' Another old dish had rice, almonds, honey, saffron, and ground Primrose flowers. (From A Plain Plantain.) The Primrose family is remarkable for the number of hybrids it produces. The garden 'Polyanthus of unnumbered dyes,' as the poet Thomson calls it in 'The Seasons,' is only another form (probably of the Cowslip or Oxlip) produced by cultivation. The Oxlip is distinguished from the Primrose by its flowers being stalked umbels and of a deeper shade of yellow and by its leaves becoming suddenly broader above the middle. It varies from the Cowslip by its tubular, not bellshaped calyx and flat, not concave corolla. The following note is from the Chemist and Druggist (March 5, 1921): Magically Protection, love gender feminine planet Venus Element Earth Deity: Freya Wear it attract love, grow to bring fairies to your garden. Was worn to prevent madness and sewn into childrens pillows to gain their undying respect and loyalty. other references" Cummingham's Enecyclopedia of Magical herbs Herbal therapy & supplements by Merrily A. Kuhn and David Winston POULTICES A poultice of bread or mashed potato soaked in herbal extract was once a favorite household remedy for minor injuries and ailments. Today, poultices are generally made with chopped fresh herbs. They are usually applied hot. Parts Used: Whole plant (dried or fresh) chopped Standard Quantity: Use sufficient herb to cover the area. Standard Application: Apply the poultice every2-4 hours or more frequently if necessary. 1. Boil the fresh herb, squeeze out any surplus liquid, and spread it on the affected area. Smooth oil on the skin first to prevent the herb from sticking. 2. Apply gauze or cotton strips to hold the poultice in place. To protect against stains, clear plastic wrap may be wrapped around the gauze after the poultice has been applied. OINTMENTS Ointments contain oils or fats, but no water. Unlike creams, they do not blend with the skin, but form a separate layer over it. They are suitable where the skin is already weak or soft, or where some protection is needed from additional moisture, as in diaper rash. Ointments were once made from animal fats, but petroleum jelly or paraffin wax is suitable. Infused oils may be used instead of the herb itself. Parts Used: All parts of the plant (dried or fresh) Standard Quantity: Use 500 g petroleum jelly or soft paraffin wax and 60 g dried or 150 g fresh herb. Standard Application: Rub a little into the affected part 2-3 times a day. Storage: Store in sterilized, airtight, dark jars, for 3-4 months in a cool place. 1. Melt the jelly or wax in a bowl over a pan of boiling water or in a double boiler. Add the herbs and heat for 2 hours or until the herbs are crisp. Do not allow the pan to boil dry. 2. Pour the mixture into a jelly bag fitted with string or an elastic band to the rim of a jug, or else use a muslin bag and a winepress. 3. If using a jelly bag wear rubber gloves, since the mixture is hot. Squeeze the mixture through the jelly bag into the jug. 4. Quickly pour the strained mixture, while still warm and melted, into jars.

Medicinal Uses For Common Culinary Spices by Lord Riekin Please note that this is in no way meant to take the place of regular medical advice or treatment. Please see a doctor if conditions persist or worsen. ALLSPICE Active ingredient is eugenol, same as cloves. Topical pain relief, tea and mouthwash. ANISE Seven tsp. of seed to one quart water, boil down by half, add 4 tbsp. of honey, take two tsp to calm a cough. Drink tea for memory, aid digestion, and a wash for oily skin. ANNATO (Lipstick tree) Lightly crushed seeds added to food is like natural gas-x. ARROW ROOT POWDER One tbsp in a cup of juice every few hours to relieve diarrhea. Poultice to soothe skin inflammations. ASAFOETIDA Buy the tincture in Indian shops. They add a drop to many dishes to relieve stomach pains (gas). Insect repellent. Topical use to heal ulcerated sores. ASPARAGUS Boil in water and drink the water for kidney problems. Dissolves uric acid deposits and promotes urination. BASIL Add fresh herb or seeds to boiled water to make tea for migraines and bed time restlessness. Douche for yeast infections, eliminates candida, gargle and mouthwash. Pregnant women should avoid medicinal use of basil. BAY LAUREL Heat leaves in a little olive oil to make a bay oil salve for arthritis and aches. CARAWAY Bring 2 cups of water to a boil and add 4 tsp lightly crushed seeds. Simmer for 5 minutes, then steep 15 min. Drink with meals to prevent gas, even for infant colic. Promotes menstruation and relieves uterine cramping. CARDAMON Digestive aid, eases gluten intolerance (celiac disease). Sprinkle powder on cereal. CAYENNE PEPPER Capsicum speeds metabolism. Capsicum cream and oils relieve

arthritis and aches, not just by warming and stimulating blood flow, but also by blocking pain transmission by nerves. (blocks substance P) Prevents blood clots, heals ulcers. "Jewish" penicillin, cayenne and garlic in chicken soup really IS as effective as antibiotics after the onset of cold or flu. Cayenne dramatically drops blood sugar levels and should by avoided by hypoglycemics. Cayenne promotes excretion of cholesterol through the intestines. It increases energy levels and aura brilliance. CELERY Sedative. Active ingredient thalide. Seed and stalk, reduces hypertension. Celery seed tea for the kidneys as a cleanser. CHERVIL Steep in boiled water and apply with an eye cup for a wide range of eye complaints. CHICORY Liver cleanser, fat cleanser, dissolves gallstones. Prepare like coffee. CILANTRO Leafy part of coriander plant. Food poisoning preventative. CINNAMON Mouthwash, good for upset stomach. Simmer sticks with cloves for 3 min, add 2 tsp lemon juice, 2 tsp honey, 2 tbsp whiskey - as cold medication. Cinnamon is good for yeast infection and athlete's foot. A 2% solution will kill both of these conditions. Boil 8-10 sticks in 4 cups water, simmer 5 min, steep 45 min, then douche or apply to athlete's foot. Cinnamon reduces cancer causing tendencies of many food additives. CLOVE Use oil for pain relief for sore gums and toothache. Add clove oil to neutral oils for topical pain relief of arthritis. Small amounts of clove in a tea for nausea. 3 cloves in two cups of boiled water, steeped for 20 minutes, as an antiseptic and mouthwash. Former alcoholics can suck on one or two cloves when the craving strikes to curb the desire. COFFEE Although not a spice, it is commonly available in the kitchen. The caffeine in coffee can be used to alleviate headaches (particularly those caused by caffeine withdrawal.) Coffee enemas with olive oil are used to cleanse the bowels and are one of the safest and most thoroughly cleansing enemas available. Caution and common sense must be used to avoid dependency. Hot black coffee sipped through a straw helps break up mucus congestion in the lungs. CORIANDER

Coriander tea can be used topically to remove unpleasant odors in the genital area for men and women. The tea can be held in the mouth to relieve the pain of a toothache. Can also be drank to relieve flatulence and indigestion. DILL Bring one pint of white wine almost to a boil, remove from heat and add 4 tsp of dill seeds, let steep 30 minutes and strain. Drink 1 cups a half hour before retiring to sleep well. To the same directions, but substitute for the 4 tsp of dill, instead add 1 tsp each of anise, caraway, coriander and dill tostimulate the flow of breast milk in nursing mothers. Chewing dill seeds removes bad breath. FENNEL Chewing fennel seeds relieves bad breath. Fennel seed tea sweetens breastmilk. Fennel tea relieves colic in infants. FENUGREEK Use as a tea as an excellent relief for colic and fever in children. 1 tbsp ground fenugreek seed taken in the diet daily can reduce cholesterol. 8 tsps of seed presoaked in 4 cups cold water for 4 hours, then boil for 2 minutes, strain and drink 1 cup a day to ease hay fever attacks. GARLIC Ultimate antibiotic. Useful even for sexually transmitted diseases. Strongly recommended for hypoglycemia, and diabetes. Destroys intestinal parasites. Reduces cholesterol. Repels insects, and reduces sting effects of insects and red ants. GINGER Anti-nausea tea, blood thinner, substitute for coumadin. Boil 2/3 cup of freshly chopped root in 1 gallon water, wrapped in cheesecloth (or old nylon stocking) until the water is yellow. Then soak towel and lay on bruises and sprains while still hot, to ease them. Stimulates a delayed period. Warm ginger tea is good to break up congestion and fever. Ginger is one of the few herbs that easily passes the blood/brain membrane and is used in conjunction with other herbs that are meant to have an effect on the mind. Pregnant women should avoid medicinal concentrations of ginger. HORSERADISH Freshly dug root is added to a cold-pressed oil of choice (such as safflower or olive) to make a massage oil for muscle aches and to break up chest congestion. Grate fresh ginger and horseradish together and make a tea to stop post nasal drip. LEMONGRASS 1/2 cup dried leaves to 2 pints of water, simmer for 10 minutes, and sip to bring down fevers. LICORICE Tranquilizer. Balances nervous system, stimulates liver functions. Long term usage (over 3 months) could cause liver

damage. LOVAGE Steep root for 15 min in a cup of boiled water, drink after every meal to prevent flatulence. MARJORAM AND OREGANO Over 2 dozen related species. Use as a tea to help reduce fevers and break up bronchitis. Drink tea to relieve cramps and irregular menstruation. Eases suffering of childhood diseases like mumps and measles. MINT (Peppermint and spearmint) Peppermint tea for migraines, nervousness, stomach disorders, heartburn, and abdominal cramps. Herpes sufferers can take 2 cups of tea a day to ease the symptoms when the virus is active. Mints are used to buffer the action of other herbs that have uncomfortable effects on the stomach and intestines. Can be used in any combination for flavor. MUSTARD 1 1/2 cups of dry yellow mustard in a bathtub of water for sprained backs. Make a paste with water and apply to knee and elbow sprains till blisters appear! Mustard and ginger plaster for deep rattling coughs - 1 tsp each mustard and ginger powder mixed with 2 1/2 tbsp of olive oil. Rub over chest and back and put on an old T-shirt (or cover with cloth diaper). NUTMEG AND MACE Gas, indigestion, nausea, vomiting, and kidney problems - make a paste of powder with cold water and then add to boiled water. 1 tbsp of powdered nutmeg produces a floating euphoria for between 6 and 24 hours. Can cause near constant erections for men during that time. Side effects are bone and muscle aches, burning eyes, sinus drainage, and limited diarrhea. ONION Egyptians swore their oaths on onions; Grant refused to move his army until he got 3 railroad cars full of onions; interviews with hundreds of people who lived to 100 plus all indicated a heavy intake of onions in the diet. Onion is an excellent dressing for burns. Crush sliced onions with a little bit of salt and apply to burns. Apply sliced onion to bee and wasp stings. For asthma: puree an onion, cover it with brandy and let sit overnight, strain it, filter it through a coffee filter, and refrigerate. Take 2 tbsp 20 minutes before expected onset or before going to bed. PARSLEY The purifier. Chew for halitosis. A few sprigs provide 2/3 the vitamin C of an orange, lots of vitamin A, and the important amino acid histidine, which is a tumor inhibitor. Parsley tea is good for kidney problems, painful urination, and kidney stones.

One cup of parsley to 1 quart of water makes a strong tea. Two cups of parsley to 1 quart of water, steep an hour and drink warm, as an aphrodisiac. In Spain they have found that feeding parsley to sheep will bring them into heat at any time of year! PEPPER (black) Pain relief from toothache, brings down a fever. ROSEMARY Flower tea for the breath. Boil water with rosemary in it to make it safe to drink. Diuretic and liver aid, increases bile flow. Two handfuls of flowering tips into 2 cups of good brandy, soak 10 days, strain and seal. Mouthful twice daily. Oil of rosemary is a natural anti-oxidant, and stress reliever; sniff for headaches. Chop a double handful of twigs and put in a pint of olive oil for one week, and use as a muscle liniment. SAGE Chew a fresh leaf and put on insect bite to reduce sting and swelling. Sage tea for the throat. Two cups of sage tea a day for a week will dry up mother's milk. For the itching of skin problems, steep a handful of freshly crushed leaves in a pint of boiled water for one hour, and bathe the area, then sprinkle with whole wheat flour. Sage tea prevents blood clots. SAVORY (the herb of love) One quart boiled water, 3 tbsp fenugreek seed, and steep for 5 minutes. Remove fenugreek and add 2 handfuls of savory leaves, steep 50 minutes and drink 2 cups, as an aphrodisiac. TARRAGON 1 1/2 tsp cut dried herb in 1 3/4 cups boiled water, steep 40 minutes, drink warm for insomnia, hyperactivity, depression, or nervous exhaustion. (or anything "jittery") For digestion steep a handful of dried leaves in a jar with apple cider vinegar, stand 7 hours, strain and seal. Take 1 tbsp before each meal. TEA Caffeine relieves migraines. Tea drinkers suffer less hardening of the arteries than coffee drinkers. Black tea kills dental plaque. THYME Antibiotic. A tsp in 1/2 cup boiled water to make a gargle or mouthwash, to prevent bad breath, tooth decay, and cold sores. Drink for cold, flu, fever, and allergy symptoms. As a bath for nail fungus and athlete's foot, and also as a douche. Compress for bumps and bruises. Health liqueur - 6 sprigs of thyme in 1 1/2 cups of brandy for 5 days, shaking daily. Take several times daily when you feel a cold coming on. Thyme is good for killing bacteria and for relaxing tense muscles. Relieves migraine headaches and stomach cramps.

TUMERIC Anti-oxidant. Powdered turmeric on any ulcerated skin condition or mix with enough lime juice to make a paste and put on herpes sores, mumps, chicken pox, etc. Dip a cloth in turmeric solution to wash away discharges from conjunctivitis and opthamalia. As an anti-inflammatory, turmeric's properties are as good as 1 % hydrocortisone and phenylobutazone. Take 1/2 tsp in juice in the morning and evening to aid in removing fat around the liver. Turmeric, bay leaf, clove, and cinnamon all tripled insulin performance in metabolizing blood glucose in a test tube! Field tests proved to greatly enhance production of insulin by the pancreas. "Spicecaps" from Great American Natural Products have a pinch of cinnamon, 2 cloves, 1/2 bay leaf, and 1 tsp of turmeric per capsule. VANILLA Sexual stimulant. Soak a cotton ball with vanilla extract, squeeze it out, put it under the tongue and it will quickly calm hysteria. VINEGAR Naturally brewed apple cider vinegar deserves a course all on it's own. It is one of the finest blood cleansers and arthritis cures known. Take 1 tbsp per day of equal parts vinegar and honey in water to taste to cleanse the blood and reduce inflammation from arthritis. Be sure to use naturally brewed vinegar, as the white cheap stuff in the grocery store is actually acetic acid, a petroleum by-product, and pretty well useless. (except as a window cleaner!) Bibliography: The Herb Book, by John Lust. "Heinerman's Encyclopedia of Healing Herbs and Spices", by John Heinerman. "The Healing Herbs: The Ultimate Guide to the Curative Power of Nature's Medicines", by Micheal Castleman "The Vinegar Book", by Emily Thacker NAME : MEADOWSWEET LATIN NAME : Filipendula ulmaria. COMMON / FOLK NAMES : Bridewort Dolloff Meadsweet Meadow Queen Meadow-wort Pride of the Meadow Queen of the Meadow Bride of the Meadow Dollor Gravel Root Lady of the Meadow Little Queen Steeplebush Trumpet Weed

MEDICINAL PART : The plant. PLACES OF ORIGIN : Europe Eastern U.S. and Canada HABITAT : Damp meadows. DESCRIPTION : Meadowsweet is a perennial plant, a creeping rootstock sends up a reddish, angular stem, branched near the top and bearing alternate, pinnate leaves, the leaflets are entire or irregularly cleft, serrate, and downy white beneath. The terminal leaflet is 3- to 5-lobed and doubly serrate. FLOWERING PERIODS : The small, yellowish-white or reddish flowers grow in panicled cymes from June to August. PROPERTIES : Astringent Diaphoretic Diuretic USES : Meadowsweet contains salicylic acid, which makes it useful for influenza problems in the respiratory tract, gout, rheumatism, arthritis, and fever. Meadowsweet tea is also recommended for dropsy and other problems with water retention, and for bladder and kidney ailments. As a astringent, it can also be taken for diarrhoea. Externally. the decoction can serve as a wash for wounds or sore eyes. Preparation : MAGICAL PROPERTIES GENDER : Masculine. PLANET : Jupiter. ELEMENT : Air. POWERS : Love Divination Peace Happiness MAGICAL USES Fresh Meadowsweet is placed on the altar for love spells, or dried is used in various love mixtures. Also strewn about the house to keep peace. The scent of Meadowsweet cheers the heart. If gathered on Midsummer, Meadowsweet will give you information regarding thieves: if you have been robbed, place Meadowsweet on water.

If it sinks, the thief is a man. If it floats, a woman.

Making Tree Medicine by Anna Fraser

Gathering Tree Medicine As a general rule, gather/pick all your medicinal material when it is at the peak of its growth. Leaves, flowers and berries which are picked when they are still wet with dew or rain will turn moldy more easily. Therefore choose a dry day ideally, before the sun is too hot and has evaporated any oils or fragrances which may be present, but after the dew has evaporated. You can choose to pick medicines for drying on the waning moon. * Leaves: Young leaves, or even newly opened buds possess concentrated medicinal powers. Pick your leaves always early in the season before they become insect eaten or tired looking. * Flowers: Pick flowers when they have first opened and before they have been much visited by bees and other pollinated insects. * Berries and Seed: Leave to sun-ripen as much as possible. Keep a close watch and gather before they are dispersed by the wind, are eaten by birds or fall off the tree naturally. * Roots: In the few cases where the roots are required as medicine, it is a good idea to look for a place where there is an abundance of young trees, which won't all be able to grow to maturity and whose roots are still relatively shallow. Dig up the roots from a tree, which may need thinning out anyway. If there is no such a tree available, only take a small amount, so the tree will be able to recover easily. Roots gathering is best done early in the spring or after the plants sheds its leaves, i.e. before the sap has risen or after it has descended again. Roots are more tender when the moon is waxing. * Bark: The outer bark is the protective skin of the tree. Just below that is the inner bark which carries water and minerals upwards to the branches and leaves and carbohydrates, made by photosynthesis in the leaves, downwards to feed the tree. Therefore, the inner bark does for a tree what our blood circulation does for us. So, we must never take bark from the tree trunk as it can kill the tree. Even if you don't take the bark from all around, the wounds are very injurious to the tree and will make it vulnerable to infection by fungi or other organisms. The best way to gather bark is from 2-3 year old branches, which are carefully pruned from the tree. This is best done in early spring or autumn. Caution: Don't pick medicinal material from trees growing along busy roads or other polluted places, as the tree will be covered in pollutants and may also have absorbed heavy metals, etc. Also avoid trees which have been sprayed with pesticides. Drying Tree Medicine

Leaves, flowers, berries and seeds can all be used when in season, but in order to have a supply all the year round, we will need to dry what we have harvested. Dried tree medicine is more concentrated than fresh, so the quantities you have to take to be effective are generally smaller. Like our own human bodies, a large part of the fresh material consists of water. Example: To make a cup of Birch leaf tea, you need a heaped teaspoon of dried leaves or 3x that amount if the leaves are fresh. Dosage, when mentioned in books on this website, usually refers to the dried material. The best drying places are warm, dry, dark and airy, for example an airing cupboard, or an airy shed. If you do not have such a place, try wrapping your material up loosely in newspaper sheets or brown paper and hang in front of a sunny window. Basically avoid light and damp air, such as air from cooking or drying clothes in the same space. Light changes the chemistry and wet air, apart from obviously not helping in the drying process increases the chances of everything going mouldy. Dryness is more important than warmth and if you plan to dry large quantities, a domestic dehumidifier is a handy gadget to have or to borrow and makes a good quality dried product. Different materials take of course different times to dry, so check often. Rots have to be washed and/or scrubbed first. Large roots can be sliced lengthwise to facilitate drying. Hang in warm, dry, airy spaces or place on flat trays, not touching each other. The roots should loose about of their weight in drying. This may take about 10 days, depending on the size of the root, drying facilities and so on. Then dry the roots further until they are brittle near a source of warmth, such as central heating radiator or stove (may take another week to 10 days) or in a cool oven. After drying chop leaves up finely before storage. Roots may be ground in a pestle and mortar or chopped to bits in a food processor. Storing Tree Medicine Light, heat and moisture will all deteriorate the medicinal qualities of Tree Medicines. Store in tightly closed glass jars away from direct sunlight or heat and ideally in a dark cupboard. Earthenware or metal containers with tight fitting lids are also suited. For example: Store different leaves in brown paper bags in biscuit tins with tight fitting lids. Plastic absorbs oils from plant material, so plastic bags or plastic containers are best avoided. Different forms of Tree Medicine As with ordinary herbal medicine, there are a multitude of different ways in which Tree Medicine can be applied. Below I will give a description of all the most commonly used applications and how to prepare them. But first a list to stimulate your imagination of the versatility of using plant materials as medicine. Reading the list will make you realise that there is a lot of room for creativity. * Tea, which is traditionally known as an infusion. * Decoctions. * Fresh leaves, buds, flowers, berries and leaves in salads or sandwiches. * Cooked as vegetables, in stews, stir-fries, taken with stewed fruit, etc. * Extract juice from fresh produce in liquidiser or juice extractor. * Make berries, fruit, flowers, leaves or tree sap into wine, beer or cider. * Macerations. * Distilled water (e.g. witch hazel).Tinctures.Liquid extracts. * Oils.

* Syrups (especially useful for children).Linctus (e.g. from cherry bark for coughs and respiratory infections). * Washes (for holes and cavities in the body, for example: eyewashes, mouth washes, gargles, vaginal douches, enema's, etc.) * Drops (eye, ear, nose). * Steam inhalations.

* Powders. * Pills. * Lozenges. * Capsules. * Baths (whole body, sit bath, footbath, hand bath), e.g. juniper oil baths for rheumatic pains. * Direct application of bruised leaves. * Hot or cold compresses or fomentations. * Poultices. * Plasters. * Liniments or embrocations (usually oil with active ingredients for application into the skin by rubbing). * Lotions (usually a very high alcohol content, just dab on). * Ointments and creams. * Suppositories (torpedo shaped for rectal application). * Pessaries (cone shaped for vagina). * Bougies (to fit any other hole in the body). * Vibrational Remedies

Infusions or 'Tea' An infusion is a fancy word for making a tea the old fashioned way. This method can be used for leaves, buds, and flowers, because pouring boiling water over this material is sufficient to break the plant cells open and release their medicinal content. Leave to infuse for 5 minutes. Can be drunk hot or cold. If you are taking medicinal teas, it may be worth buying a wire tea-infuser from a kitchen shop (about 1.50 each) which can be used for an individual cup and saves you the hassle of cleaning out the teapot afterwards. Infuse material, which contain volatile oils (i.e. most plants with heavy scents) in a cup with a saucer or top or in a thermos flask to stop the valuable medicinal oils from evaporating. Quantities are 30 grams of dried herb to litre or 1 pint of water or 1 heaped teaspoon per cup. With fresh plant material use 3x these quantities for medicinal purposes. Decoctions A decoction is plant material boiled in water and simmered for 5 - 15 minutes. This method is most suitable for roots, rhizomes, wood, bar, seeds and any other material with tuff cell walls. The simmering process is required to soften the hard cell walls of the plants, so the cells can break open and release their medicinal content. Don't use metal or aluminium pots, as these materials can interfere with the plant chemistry. Enameled cooking ware is preferable. The quantities used are the same as for infusions. Tinctures

Tinctures are preparations made with plant material, whose medicinal qualities have been extracted by an alcoholic solution. The great advantage of a tincture is that it will dissolve resins, gums and oils (which often possess important medicinal qualities) far better than water. Another bonus is that the medicine will be easy to take: a few milliliters or a teaspoon in a little water. If the tincture is made with 30 % alcohol or stronger (and if it is well made) it will keep almost indefinitely. Commercial tinctures are often made with ethanol, an industrial alcohol exempt from tax for licensees. For making tinctures at home we can use Vodka, Brandy or any other high proof spirit of your choosing. On the labels of commercially available tinctures you will find a variety of ratio's between the plant material used and the alcoholic liquid, for example 1:3, 1:4 or 1:5 and so on. The reason for this is that some plant materials are more 'fluffy' and therefore take up more volume, so it takes a greater amount of alcohol to cover it. This means that giving recipes for the exact quantity of plant material and alcohol to use have little value, but it is more practical to give you the general rule: Use about 4 ounces (112 grams) of dried herbs (double this amount for fresh plant material), or proceed as below. In order to make your tinctures as strong as possible, place the finely chopped up plant material (leaves, buds, flowers, berries, bark, roots, etc.) you have collected in a clean jar with a good airtight lid. Large empty coffee jars are good for this purpose. Don't pack the plants so tight that the liquid won't be able to circulate around it. Then cover all with your chosen spirit (Vodka, Brandy, etc.). Close the container and keep in a warm place (windowsill in summer, airing cupboard or near a source of heat such as radiators). Over the course of 2-4 weeks (depending on temperature and the degree of hardness of the plant-cells, etc.) the cell walls will break down to release their medicinal content into the liquid. Shake the container vigorously every morning and night to promote this process. Finally strain the mix through a clean cloth and wring out all liquid. Put the tincture in a dark bottle (brown or dark green), close the bottle properly and store in a cool place away from sunlight. N.B. Most commercial herbal tinctures are made with DRIED herbs in a particular ratio of plant material to liquid in order to obtain a product of a reasonably consistent strength. The average dose of most tinctures would be: 5 ml (a British teaspoon) 3 times a day. There are obviously exceptions to this rule, for example with poisonous or dangerous plants, but these should never be used for self-medication. When we make tinctures at home, it is not always practical to dry the herbs first, so you are able to take twice the normal dosage to make up for the fact that fresh herbs are not as concentrated in medicinal strength as the dried ones (unless you have already made your tincture with roughly 8 oz of fresh plant material per pint, instead of the usual 4 oz of dried material). Vinegar and Glycerine Tinctures Tinctures can also be made in the same way, as described above, with vinegar. Always use Apple Cider Vinegar as this is an excellent medicine for all sorts of complaints in its own right. The acetic acid in the vinegar acts as a solvent of the medicinal substances in the plants, as well as a preservative. Tinctures for tea-totallers and people with a sensitive digestive tract, who cannot take alcohol can be made with vegetable glycerine. The resins, gums and oils in the plants are not as efficiently dissolved in glycerine as in alcohol, but it does a better job than water with these substances. As with alcoholic tinctures: Use about 4 oz of dried finely chopped or ground plant material to a pint of liquid (half glycerine and half water). When you use freshly gathered plant material use 8oz and 1 pint of liquid made up from 75% glycerine and 25% water. The process of making the tincture and dosage is the same as for the alcoholic tinctures

described above. Syrups Syrups are useful, if children or older people need a little sweet persuasion to take Tree Medicine. They are also excellent as cough medicines (for example made with cherry bark) or as medicinal substitutes for lemonade syrups. If desired the sugar in the recipes below can be partly or completely replaced with honey. Dissolve lb of sugar (350 grams) into a pint of infusion or decoction and heat gently until the sugar is dissolved. Alternatively make a simple syrup of 1 pint of water and 1 kilo of sugar and mix this syrup with tincture in a ratio of 3 parts of syrup to 1 part of tincture. Infused Oils Cold infused oils can be applied straight to the skin, thickened with beeswax to make an ointment or may be used as massage oils. Chop up the plant material finely and cover with a good oil (such as Olive oil, Sunflowers Oil, Almond Oil, etc.) in a glass jar. Put the jar in a sunny window sill or warm place for 2 - 6 weeks and shake the jar every morning and night. Strain and put in a dark glass container. Ointments There are many different way of making an ointment. As with other herbal preparations we need our plant of choice and we need a substance in which the plant material can be dissolved and to which it can impart medicinal qualities. Fats, oils and creams are easily absorbed by the skin and so help to transport the remedy across the skin. This is very useful where you want to relieve pain or stiffness or inflammation within the tissue by applying the remedy locally. Ointment bases like vaseline and waxes are not quite as easily absorbed by the skin and they are an excellent medium to apply antiseptic, healing and soothing substances to cuts, sores and minor burns. Ointments can also be used as a carrier medium for volatile oils and resins, which then evaporate with the warmth of the body. Examples are chest rubs and anti-catarrhal balms. METHOD 1 Have about 60 grams (a good handful) finely cut herbs ready and 200 grams of ointment base, for example: * vaseline (also known as petroleum jelly); * aqueous ointment (a creamy substance, which can be bought ready made at a chemist) * lard (used a lot in the past in home-made ointments as it was one of the most easily available fats) * vegetable trex (a good modern, vegetarian, cheap substitute for lard, available in supermarkets

and grocery stores * emulsifying wax (can be bought or ordered in a chemist shop. It comes in the form of a bag of wax flakes, which can be dissolved in warm water to make the ointment base. It takes a little experimentation to achieve the right consistency, because when it is still warm, your emulsion may look quite thin and liquid, but of course it will stiffen as it cools!) * beeswax Gently warm your ointment base in a non metallic container, such as an enameled pan. Add the plant material and simmer for 10-30 minutes. The purpose is again to break open the plant cells, so they release their medicinal qualities into the base. The cells of a flower petal will break down quicker than a tougher leaf or stem, etc. Just like the water become coloured with the plant material when you make a herbal infusion, so your ointment should become coloured too. Strain the ointment through a cloth or sieve. Add 1% of Tincture of Benzoin as a preservative if desired (This is a tincture made from the gum, or tree sap, of a South-east Asian tree called Styrax benzoin, also available from the chemist or herbal suppliers) . Without a preservative the ointment will have a very limited life and needs to be kept in the fridge or cool place. Pour the ointment in containers and seal.. METHOD 2 Again we need an ointment base, which can be any of the substances mentioned in method 1 or simply a good quality oil, for example: Almond Oil, Olive oil, Sunflower oil, Wheat germ oil, etc. To this base we can add an already made plant extraction, such as an infusion or decoction. Put your ingredient in an enameled saucepan and stir and simmer gently until the water in your mixture has completely evaporated (when this happens the bubbling stops) and the extracts of the medicinal plants is therefore incorporated into the ointment base. Take care not to overheat the ointment. Depending on which base you have chosen, you may now want to add a thickener, for example if your base was a simple oil. Beeswax, white wax, cocoa butter and lanolin can all be used as thickeners which help us to get the consistency of cream or ointment we require. Grate the wax or cocoa butter and stir in slowly until melted and blended. Finally a 1 drop of tincture of benzoin as a preservative for every 30 grams of perishable base such as lard, which without preservative would go mouldy quite soon. All sorts of combinations are possible. Here is a basic recipe for an ointment base from a Victorian British Pharmacopoeia, which is a good 'all-rounder' as far as skin absorption or delivering medicine to a wound is concerned: * 60 grams of wax (grated) * 90 grams of lard or vegetable trex * 90 ml of oil. Mix the fat and oil together. Add the appropriate (strained) decoction or infusion of your plant material. Gently simmer and stir until the water has completely evaporated. Add the wax and stir until completely blended. Add 8-10 drop of Tincture of Benzoin as a preservative. Pour the finished ointment in separate containers.

METHOD 3 Start off with a cold infused oil, which already incorporates the plant material. Warm gently in an enameled pan and add some grated beeswax (or other wax) to thicken the oil in order to create the right consistency. Suppositories, Pessaries and Bougies The most time consuming thing about making suppositories (torpedo shaped for the rectum), pessaries (cone shaped for the vagina) and bougies (shaped for any other orifice in the body) is shaping them. If you're intending to make lots of them and want them all the same it may be worth making a mould. You can improvise by moulding aluminium foil around a ball point top or similar to get a nice torpedo shape and use an old cereal box with holes cut in to stand your little mould in upright. You can also make a tablet, which you then cut in pieces and finish rolling and shaping them by hand. This is easy to do, since the material you use should melt at body temperature. Cocoa butter (which you can order from your chemist) is an excellent material to use as a base (also called "carrier"), since it melts soon after being inserted into the body. The advantage of using suppositories, pessaries and bougies is that you can deliver medicine right where you want it, without having to worry about what the digestive system will have on your medicine and whether the blood will carry enough of it to the body part where it is most needed. Here are two basic recipes: RECIPE 1: Gently warm a quantity of carrier or base, such as cocoa butter "Au bain Marie" (= heat in a bowl placed in a pan of boiling water). Saturate this with finely powdered herb of your choice (powder with pestle and mortar or in a food processor). Stir well and pour into your individual moulds or tablet shape. RECIPE 2: Dissolve 10 parts of Gelatine in 40 parts strained Infusion, Decoction or Tincture by heating gentle ("Au bain Marie" - see recipe 1). Add 15 parts of Glycerine. Heat again "Au bain Marie" to evaporate the water from the infusion, decoction, etc.. The consistency of the final product depends on how much water is removed. Pills, Capsules and Powders If people cannot take tinctures or teas (infusions and decoctions), making pills may be a good way of taking Tree medicine internally. Because most people are only able to swallow small pills, you may have to take several as one dose, because the amount of plant material, which can be put in a pill is of course only limited. Here are two old-fashioned ways to make home-made pills: 1. Roll finely powdered plant materials (Ground in a pestle and mortar or in a food processor) into a small pill made of fresh bread, cream cheese or whatever else you can think of. 2. Bind the powdered plant materials into a firm paste with molasses or thick honey and corn flour. Roll into small balls. The medicinal powder can also be put into a small bit of folded paper. Allow the powder to slide off the paper straight into the mouth. Have a glass of water ready to rinse the mouth. Drink the remaining water as this will help the powder along its journey into the digestive tract. Plant materials often have a bitter taste, which is actually very good for us, even if our modern palate is no longer used to it. The bitterness stimulates the nervous system into producing digestive juices. However, if taste is a problem plant powders can be taken in the form of edible capsules, which disintegrate in the stomach to release their medicine. You can buy empty capsules in varying sizes from most chemists. They are made of two parts which slide over each other, thus it is simply a matter of filling them with powder. Capsules are often made from gelatine, which is usually made from animal bones, but there are also vegetable based capsules available. So please ask your chemist if you are a vegetarian to order you some.

Compress Soak a clean cloth (iron to sterilise if the compress is applied to a wound) in a hot infusion or decoction. Apply this to wounds, ulcers or other sore areas, to help the healing process. Compresses are also an excellent gentle way to treat sore or inflamed eyes. Warmth will enhance the healing action of the plant medicine, so when the compress becomes colder, re-soak the cloth again in the hot infusion or decoction. Alternatively, you can cover the cloth with a hot water bottle. Protect the rubber hot water bottle by putting a sheet of plastic or aluminum foil between the cloth and the bottle. Poultice A poultice is used for similar purposes to that of a compress, except we use bruised leaves or other plant material such as pulped root or bark paste instead of a cloth soaked in an infusion or decoction. The plant material can be applied directly on the skin or put between two thin layers of gauze. If you frequently use a poultice, for example for rheumatic joints, it may be worth sewing a couple of thin muslin bags to put the poultice in. Cover the skin with a little oil to protect the skin and the make removal of the poultice easier if you are applying the plant material straight unto the skin. Leaves can be briefly scalded in hot water and then bruised with a rolling pin or clean bottle. Dried plant material is made into a paste with hot water or cider vinegar. Like a compress, the poultice can be kept warm with a hot water bottle. Making Tinctures Herbal tinctures are potent, spirit based, liquid extracts. They are made using fresh plant material and liquid base such as vodka, brandy, vegetable glycerine, or even apple cider vinegar.

SELECTING YOUR SPIRIT Most commercial preparations are made with 198 proof grain alcohol. A simple and very effective choice is 100 proof vodka. It's clear, affordable and easy to obtain. 100 proof means it is exactly half water and half alcohol. this makes figuring dosages easy as most dosages recommended by herbalists are based on the assumption that a tincture was made at 50% - 1/2 water, 1/2 alcohol. If you are concerned about ingesting the alcohol, Rosemary Gladstar recommends placing the bottle of tincture in boiling water for 1-2 minutes which will remove about 1/2 the alcohol. You may also use glycerin or cider vinegar. These won't be as strong as alcohol based ones, but they will still be effective and are often a good choice for children's remedies. *note: If using vinegar heat it slightly before pouring. It should be warm, not hot.

HOW TO MAKE HERBAL TINCTURES ~ After picking your fresh herbs, pick through them and remove any dirty or damaged parts but don't wash them.

~ Coarsley chop stems, leaves and roots. You can leave flowers whole. ~ Put your herbs in a clean & dry glass jar and fill with the liquid of your choice. The herbs need to be completely immersed in liquid. ~ Cap the jar tightly with an airtight lid. ~ Label your creation with the ingredients and date and store in a dark place for 6-8 weeks, shaking occasionally. ~ Strain out the herbs and pour tincture into clean, dry bottles. Label with the date and ingredients used.

Joined: Nov 27, 2005 Posts: 1665 PostPosted: Thu Dec 15, 2005 11:44 pm with quote Making Herbal Infusions Post subject: Making Herbal Infusions Reply

Herbal infusions are potent water-based preparations. They are superb for extracting the medicinal properties of dried herbs. You can drink them or use them externally as skin washes, compresses, douches, sitz baths,or poultices.

How are they different from a tea? They are made using larger amounts of herbs and are steeped in an air-tight container for at least several hours. You can drink them at room temperature, reheated, or over ice. Quart size canning jars are ideal to use because they rarely break when you pour boiling water into them as long as they are at room temperature when water is added. They also allow for a tight seal. USING DRIED LEAVES ~ Put 1 ounce (a large handful) of dried leaves into a quart jar and fill the jar with boiling water.

~ Screw the lid on tight and let steep until completely cool. ~ Strain out plant material.

USING DRIED ROOTS OR BARKS ~ put 1 ounce (a large handful) of dried roots or bark into a pint jar and fill the jar with boiling water. ~ Screw the lid on tight and let steep until completely cool. ~ Strain out plant material.

USING DRIED FLOWERS ~ put 1 ounce (a large handful) of dried flowers into a quart jar and fill the jar with boiling water. ~ Screw the lid on tight and let steep 2 or 3 hours. ~ Strain out plant material. USING DRIED SEEDS ~ put 1 ounce (a large handful) of dried seeds into a pint jar and fill the jar with boiling water. ~ Screw the lid on tight and let steep for 1/2 hour - no more or the taste will be bitter. ~ Strain out seeds. Printer friendly instructions for making infusions ` ~ Herbal Baths ~ When used in the tub, the medicinal properties of an herbal infusion will be absorbed through the skin. Add 2 quarts of a strained infusion to your bath water and enjoy! ~ Herbal Sitz Bath ~ For a sitz bath, fill a large, shallow bowl or pan with at least 2 quarts of strained infusion and have a seat! ~ Herbal Poultices ~ For an herbal poultice you will retain the plant material from your infusion and apply it directly to the desired area. The liquid can be used to wash the area first if desired. This is an effective way to treat infections or wounds.

~ Herbal Compress ~ For an herbal compress you retain the plant material from an infusion and place it in a clean cloth or peice of gauze. Place it on desired area. You can dip it in the liquid from your infusion if desired. Compresses are useful for treating eye styes or when you don't want plant material to enter open wounds. Magickal Uses of Herbs Amaranth (cockscomb): Repair a broken heart Apples: Healing and Love Basil: Love, Wealth,and Protection Birch: Cleansing Carnation: Protection and Healing Catnip: Cat Magick Cedar: Purification and Healing Cinnamon: Spirituality, Healing and Cleansing Clovel: Money, Protection and Cleansing Clover: Money, Protection, and Cleansing Cornflower: Psychism Garlic: Protection and Healing Ginger: Money, Success, and Power Holly: Dream magick and Balance Iris: Wisdom Ivy: Protection and Healing

Lilac: Protection, Beauty, and Love Marigold: Dreams, Business, and Legal affairs Marjoram: Protection, Love and Healing Mint: Money, Luck, and Travel Mistletoe: Protection, Fertility, Healing and Psychism Orris root: Divination Rose: Love, Psychic power, and Divination Rosemary: Love, Power, Healing, and Sleep Sage: Protection and Wisdom Thyme: Healing and Psychic powers Willow: Love, Divination, and Healing Lily of the Valley L liliaceae N.O. Liliaceae Names: Known as Lilium convallium in the 16th century., Our Ladys' Tears, Convall-lily, Lily Constancy,May Lily, Convallaria,Ladder-to Heaven, Male Lily, Convallaria magalis (LINN),Lily of the Valleys' specific name, Majalis, or Maialis connotes "that which belongs to May".Historic astrology has the plant under the dominion of the planet Mercury, since Maia, the daughter of Atlas,was mother of Mercury or Hermes in Greek mythology Wild Lilyof the Valley is called Canada Mayflower (Maianthemum Canadense). Properties: Used to regulate heart action similarly to and considered safer than the foxglove. Considered an important drug in some national pharmacopeias, it is seldom used as such outside Eastern European countries.Cardiovascular: Weiss states that although convallatoxin has marked cardiac properties, the variety of other constituents found in the whole herb appear to modulate its effects. Further, the absorption of convallatoxin is only about 10%, with a loss of action of 50% per day (Weiss 1988, 146). Convallatoxin was found to inhibit palytoxin (PTX) induced contraction and the loss of tissue potassium in rabbit and rat aortas. Other cardioactive glycosides such as convallatoxigenin, strophanthidin, digoxin and digitoxin failed to inhibit the PTX-responses. The authors report that the results of the study suggest that the specific sugar moiety of cardiac glycosides is important for the inhibitory effect exerted (Ozaki et al 1984). Convallatoxin was found to interact with membrane phospholipids and promote the binding of calcium ions (Ivanov et al 1987). The effect of dietary cardiac glycosides upon blood pressure regulation was

investigated in Sprague Dawley rats fed a synthetic diet. The administration of convallatoxin in the drinking water was shown to delay the onset of the increase in blood pressure observed in the controls for 4 weeks. Plasma aldosterone levels were approximately doubled in the cardiac glycoside-treated groups. Higher plasma Na+ levels and hematocrit values present in the synthetic diet group were also normalized by the glycoside supplements. These results suggest that supplemental dietary cardiac glycosides exert bidirectional effects on blood pressure regulation through actions that modulate extracellular fluid and electrolyte balance (Tamura et al 2000). Toxicity: Although Convallaria contains potentially toxic constituents, most experienced practitioners believe the whole herb to be remarkably well tolerated and unlike Digitalis, noncumulative. Duke lists the LDLlo (lowest published lethal death) for the intravenous administration of convallatoxin in rats as 38 mg/kg (1985, 529). The LD50 for the intraperitoneal administration for convallamarin is listed as 3400 mcg/kg (Duke 1988, 529). At least one case of animal poisoning is reported in the literature (Moxley et al 1989). The red berries are reported to be highly toxic (Weiss 1988, 145). Herbal action: cardiotonic, diuretic, purgative, emetic Indications: Heart irregularities due to organic tissue changes, mitral valve insufficiency, congestive heart failure, palpitation and arrhythmia, shortness of breath, diminished arterial pressure Contraindications and cautions: functional cardiac disturbances, hypertension, pregnancy, lactation Contra- Indications: POISON: TO BE ADMINISTERED BY PHYSICIANS ONLY Medicinal uses: The primary indication for Convallaria is cardiac debility, when there is evidence of obstruction and congestion. Palpitation, arrhythmia, feeble pulse, dyspnea, diminished renal excretion, hepatic torpor, venous stasis and generalized edema are typical symptoms of this form of cardiac insufficiency. Felter and Lloyd state however that Convallaria is not so much indicated in cases of organic degeneration as much as it is used for cardiac conditions of an obstructive nature, particularly where the mitral valves are involved (1893). In small doses Convallaria is considered a tonic to the heart, strengthening its action; in moderate doses it is indicated in cardiac excitation; and in while large doses Convallaria will increase heart action. Compared with digitalis, Felter and Lloyd state that Convallaria is generally as efficient, both as a heart tonic and as a diuretic, and in many cases is said to act better. It is safer than digitalis, which may destroy life by paralyzing the heart, an effect never produced by convallaria. Moreover, it is freer from cumulative effects. Vomiting, anorexia, disordered digestion, cerebral excitation, and pupillary dilatation, in addition to its acrid taste, make digitalis often an unpleasant remedy (1893). According to Boericke the thoughts of the Convallaria are dull and the tongue is broad, with a thick heavy coating. Typically, the patient feels better in open air and worse in a warm room (1927). Pharmacy and dosage: Fresh Plant Tincture: 1:2, 95% alcohol, 5 20 gtt Dry Plant Tincture: 1:5, 65% alcohol, 5 20 gtt. Hot Infusion: 1:20, 30 60 mL Constituents: Cardio-active glycosides (Cardenolides) simialr to foxglove glycoside. History: The species name majalis refers to the goddess Maia, mother of Hermes, and in all the old herbals Convallaria was placed under his dominion. Although not commonly used in North America, Convallaria is an important remedy in Europe, and its use dates back at least as far as classical Greece, where the herbalist Apuleius describes that it was given to Asclepius by the god Apollo. Grieve describes a legend in which it is the fragrance of Convallaria that draws the nightingale from hedge and bush, and leads him to choose his mate in the recesses of the glade. Magical properties: Gender male Planet Mercury Element air Deities: Apollo & Aesculapius Used for calming and blessing. Peace, harmony, love, Happiness and mental powers. Use to improve your memory and mind. When placed in a room cheers your spirits and the heart. References: P 179, The Encyclopedia of Herbs and Herbalism, edited by Malcolm Stuart, Orbis Publishing, London P 480, A Modern Herbal, Mrs. M. Grieve Tiger Books International, London

P 66, Referencing Wild Lily of the Valley Flower, A Field Guide to Wildflowers Northeastern, North central North America Peterson, Mc Kenny, Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, Publisher ~ Mistletoe ~ From The Good Earth - By Lelanie F. Stone "The Cherokee Lady" Mistletoe - this parasitic evergreen shrub stimulated the imagination of the Celts, Germans and Romans for centuries. These ancient peoples believed that Mistletoe was the key to the supernatural. Mistletoe was recognized as a symbol of fertility and sexual prowess. Thus the custom of kissing under the Mistletoe is a civilized version of this ancient belief. The use of Mistletoe at Christmas time is said to date back to the traditions of the Norseman. The ancient Druids held this plant as sacred, they believed it was a cure for sterility and an antidote for poison. The Druids also believed that Mistletoe would drive away evil spirits and hung it as protection in the doorways. This "magical act" of hanging Mistletoe in the doorway is still practiced in most homes today during the holiday season. The Gypsies believed that Mistletoe was protection against sorcery and witchcraft and wore it around their necks. The Mistletoe found on the Oak tree is said to be the "most powerful" and is to be gathered with a white cloth and must be knocked down by a rock and must never touch the ground. Mistletoe was used in one of Virgil's poems and called a "golden bough" which is one of the names by which Mistletoe is known, birdlime being the other. The Botanical name for American Mistletoe is Phoradendron flavescens. Mistletoe is usually found in the branches of deciduous tree (trees that loose their leaves) and it grows all over the United States. Small white flowers appear on the branches of the Mistletoe from May until July and the small white berries appear in December. Mistletoe has been used for many different ailments since the beginning of time; as a tonic, tranquilizer, for nerves and arthritic pain. It is said to have be a very effective sedative used in the treatment of Epilepsy and Palsy. The twigs and leaves are the parts of the plant used and it contains eleven proteins, a cardioactive polypeptide, saponins, resin, mucilage, phenolic acids, flavonoids, histamine, and traces of alkaloids. The actions of Mistletoe dilate the blood vessels and lower blood pressure and have strong sedative qualities. It has been noted for its anti-cancer and anti-tumor activities which are presently being studied in European clinics. A long standing controversy over the plants toxic effects on the liver remains to be proven. Mistletoe or as it is known in Cherokee "OO-TAH-LEE" or Missledine, has been used by the Cherokee since time immemorial. The old medicine men say that the Mistletoe grown on the Oak tree is the best. The primary medicinal usage by the Cherokee was for the treatment of Epilepsy and uterine bleeding. The Mistletoe was not to be gathered until the last of November or the first of December as it was more potent during this time. It was dried, pulverized and used as a powder . Mistletoe can be found in the 1903 version of the Materia Medica which states that the twigs and leaves of the Mistletoe plant have been used in the treatment of epilepsy, hysteria, chorea, asthma and other nervous affections. The American plant is said to possess qualities similar to Digitalis (thus the cardiac usage) and to stimulate uterine contractions. (for centuries herbalists have used Mistletoe in the treatment of uterine bleeding.) As with any other medicine overdoses of Mistletoe can result in serious problems and should be used under the supervision of a trained herbalist or physician.

This medicinal parasitic plant has many wonderful uses. But, for many it has only been used to grace the overhead of a door during the Christmas and New Years season. Many of us not knowing exactly where or why this ceremony or superstition started. Mistletoe is not just a Holiday ornament, but another of the green medicines given to us from Mother Nature and The Good Earth. Lemongrass Lemongrass is native to Malaysia, and is an important ingredient in Southeast Asian cooking. It is a tender yearly plant with a mild lemony fragrance and a lemon-citrus type taste. The stalks are too tough to eat, but they can be chopped and pounded to add flavor to fish or poultry sauces, and stir fry. It has long, thin, sharp grass-like gray-green leaves, and a scallion-like base. It grows to up to 6 feet under ideal conditions in the tropics, and to about 3 feet in more northerly climates, so use it as a mid to back of the border plant. It makes a nice contrasting backdrop for most any shorter annual or perennial flower or herb. Lemongrass is not frost-hardy, so in the colder climates it should be dug and potted to be grown indoors for the winter. Use it in chicken and seafood dishes, curries, casseroles, soups, and stews. Ground stalks can be added directly to dishes. It can be frozen, dried, or used fresh. Lemongrass has insect repellant properties and is an ingredient in citronella. Medicinal Uses of Lemongrass Lemongrass is an herb with a plethora of uses medicinally, from being a stomach soother to being an effective insect repellant and fungicide. A limited study done at the University of Wisconsin revealed that some people taking prepared Lemongrass capsules (140 mg) daily for three months experienced a significant reduction in cholesterol levels, and that their cholesterol levels returned to their previous highs when they stopped taking the preparation. Obviously, this indicates that Lemongrass may help reduce cholesterol in certain individuals. Magical useages: gender male Planet Mercury Element air powers purification, lust, repel snakes, psychic powers to increase 3rd eye. About home to& garden to repel snakes,Also powerful for psychic abiliy developement, great in a sachet, or mojo bag for this reason. What is Sandalwood? Scientific and medicinal info For aromatherapy purposes, there are 2 species of sandalwood that are popular. The white sandalwood has a much stronger scent than the red. The sandalwood is a small tree that grows native in southern Asia. Sandalwood oil is used medicinally to treat skin infections, and the powdered wood is a common base for loose incense. Sponsored Links Also Known As .... Other names Latin: Santalum album (white) or Santalum rubrum (red) Common names: Red Sanders Magickal Properties Using sandalwood in rituals Sandalwood is another of those herbs (well, it's a wood actually) that are used for a wide range of magickal purposes. And since sandalwood is a wood, you can get it in either chips, powder or oil. Both the red and the white varieties are used in magick. I would say the primary magickal uses for sandalwood is to aid in astral projection, divination, and working with the chakras and with spirits. Sandalwood can also promote psychic dreams. And the scent of sandalwood inspires spirituality in any form. If sandalwood is not available, cedar makes a good substitute.

In Indian mythology, the God Ganesha was created by Parvati from sandalwood paste that She had rubbed over her body before a bath. More Correspondences Other properties Planet: Moon Element: Water Deities: Ganesha