Anda di halaman 1dari 9

Material Properties

1 Enchanted Materials (2.2.7) [Alchemy Companion] 1.1 Arinyark 1.2 Black Alloy 1.3 Enchanted Iron 1.4 Enchanted Steel I 1.5 Enchanted Steel II 1.6 Eog 1.7 Galvorn 1.8 Ithildin 1.9 Ithilnaur 1.10 Keron 1.11 Kregora 1.12 Laen 1.13 Mithglin 1.14 Mithril 1.15 Rularon 1.16 Shaalk 1.17 Star Iron 1.18 Ulgond 1.19 White Alloy 2 Magic Items (15.0) [Creatures & Treasures II] 3 (Excerpts from) Metals (6.3) [Treasures of Middle-Earth] 3.1 Celebur ("Burning Silver") 3.2 Eog (Du. "Eols Iron" or "Ang Eol") 3.3 Galvorn ("Shining Black") 3.4 Ithildin (S. "Moon-star") 3.5 Ithilnaur (S. "Moon-fire") 3.6 Kregora 3.7 Mithglin (S. "Gleaming Grey"; W. "Platinum") 3.8 Mithin (S. "Pale Grey"; W. "Beryllium") 3.9 Mithrarian ("Abyss of High Silver") 3.10 Mithril ("S. Grey Brilliance" or "True-silver") 3.11 Ogamur (S. "From Gamur")

Enchanted Materials (2.2.7) [Alchemy Companion]


"Laen itself is neither rock nor metal, but magic, the trapped energy of the unmaking of the world in a mineral. Impurities in the host rock give varied colors and properties, as a rainbow depends on dust for its beauty. Conjure an image of frozen light and you behold Laen, the greatest natural treasure of the world." -- Elor Once Dark, from the Chronicles of the Iron Wind. Enchanted gemstone such as Laen, metals such as Eog and Kregora, and stone such as Ulgond may be formed in the forges of the mightiest Alchemists, but there also exist other sources of magical materials. Some are legendary--the horn of the unicorn, the spine of a manticore, the scales of a dragon--and can be found only in the desolation of their uncivilized, fantastic domains. Often great risk and hardship are entailed in their retrieval. The sources of enchanted materials are too many and varied to describe them all here. However, a few of the more useful magical alloys and glassy materials are discussed along with some specialized equipment needed to work them. The first number following each entry is the bonus of the material; the second number is its resistance bonus versus destructive magic. The cost multiplier should be used if a PC wishes to buy an item made of that material and the value represents the worth of one ounce in gold pieces.

Arinyark
-5 (+30) A bluish-green lustrous mineral which absorbs and retains raw Essence radiations, Arinyark has the capability to store magical energy. Working like a battery or capacitor, it constantly absorbs ambient Essence and can be tapped like a flow of Essence to renew power points. It does not work in the same manner as a spell-adder, however, and cannot store specific spells. The absorptive qualities can be an effective defense as well; a full suit of armor with Arinyark lamination would add 30 to the wearers RR (or subtract 30 from an Elemental spell attack roll) against any Essence spell. The cost multiplier is 1000x or more; the value is 200 gp/ounce.

Black Alloy
+20 (+10) An alloy of iron, titanium, and meteoric metals, Black Alloy is steel grey to black in coloration. It can be worked in an ordinary forge with normal equipment. The cost multiplier is 500x or more; the value is 100 gp/ounce.

Enchanted Iron
+5 (+5) Refined and magically worked iron, this metal is commonly used in weaponry and armor. The cost multiplier is 10x or more; the value is 2 gp/ounce.

Enchanted Steel I
+10 (+10) This alloy of iron and carbon is magically worked to impart greater toughness and strength, creating low steel. The cost multiplier is 50x or more; the value is 10gp/ounce.

Enchanted Steel II
+15 (+15) This alloy of iron and carbon is magically worked to impart greater toughness and strength, creating high steel. The cost multiplier is 250x or more; the value is 50 gp/ounce.

Eog
+30 (+30) Eog is among the rarest of metals. It is a magical alloy of Mithril, durang, and other unknown materials developed by Elven smiths in past days. Eog requires both hot and cold forging of intensity necessitating magical furnaces (i.e. magical fire and cold of unnatural strength such as the heart of an Elemental). The finished alloy is both incredibly hard and tough. Red and white varieties exist, although it can also occur in black, blue or grey coloration. The cost multiplier is 10,000x or more; the value is 2000 gp/ounce.

Galvorn
+40 (+40) Also extremely rare, Galvorn is highly malleable yet resists cuts or punctures: the ultimate armor material. When forged with specific elements it becomes the hardest substance known. Galvorn is forged in part from meteoric iron, although its other components are known only to certain metal smithing guilds. Extremely hot forges and tough smithing tools are necessary to work this material. The cost multiplier is 90,000x or more; the value is 18,000 gp/ounce.

Ithildin
-20 (+20) Moon-star is a soft, silvery Elven metal developed by smiths from Mithril and other elements. It is used in a decorative manner, almost exclusively for inlay. Craftsmen create secret inscriptions from fine Ithildin wire. The metal appears dull and lusterless during the day, often invisible against the surrounding metal. Under the moon and stars, however, it regains its silvery brilliance and shimmers with a fine, white luminosity. Ithildin is also formed into silver pens and used for writing hidden messages upon paper or parchment. The cost multiplier is 500x or more; the value is 100 gp/ounce.

Ithilnaur
+20 (+20) Moon-fire is a favored alloy of the Elves made from Mithril, titanium, and other metals combined at a very high heat. Once cooled to a nearly solid state in ingot form, it is hammered into an elongated shape to compress the lattice structure, folded, and hammered again. For weapons of this alloy the refolding is repeated dozens of times, creating an extremely strong laminate. It looks like beautifully pure silver. It is a faulously strong substance which is very hard, maintains a superbly keen edge, and yet is somewhat flexible--perfect for weapons and armor. Cost multiplier: 1000x or more; value: 200 gp/ounce.

Keron
+10 (+10) A black, shiny alloy, Keron is strong, flexible and holds a keen edge. When polished it has such a high luster it appears wet or oiled. Useful for weaponry, this material does not corrode. The cost multiplier is 300x or more; the value is 60 gp/ounce.

Kregora
-10 (+500) An extremely rare alloy of Mithril, gold, uranium and other materials, Kregora is extremely ductile and malleable. While this renders it useless for weapons, it is by far the most powerful of the anti-magical materials. Even potent magic items are temporarily rendered dormant when surrounded by a Kregora mesh or netting. Kregoras dampening qualities are equally effective against all realms of magic. Kregora will sap a spell users power points; the rate of drain corresponding to the amount of metal present. Highly specialized, non-magical tools and forging equipment are required to work Kregora. Fortunately for spell users, Kregora is rare beyond description and costly (almost) beyond price. The cost multiplier is 100,000x or more; the value is 20,000 gp/ounce.

Laen
+25 (+30) Laen (of which there are two main types, smokey and white) is an extremely hard volcanic glass which can be forged into very keen-edged, almost indestructible, weapons. Its incredibly long crystal lattice structure explains its great strength. However, this does not explain the bizarre property of smokey Laen: it gains strength and rigidity with heat. Only by chilling to intensely cold temperatures (using a special, magical cold-forge) can it be softened, sculpted, and molded to the desired form. Both smokey and white Laen can be tinted. Laen weapons should always be treated as magic for all purposes. Laen is also a popular medium for magical devices such as amulets, lenses, and enchanted jewels. See C&T II Section 15.0 for more on Laen. The cost multiplier is 5000x or more; the value is 1000 gp/ounce.

Mithglin
+20 (+10) This metal is an alloy of Mithril, Platinum, Titanium, and other substances. It is prized for its shining hue. Difficult to work, Mithglin requires high temperatures and hard labor to forge properly. It makes durable jewelry and weapons. Often it is combined with gold to make it more workable. The cost multiplier is 375x or more; the value is 75 gp/ounce.

Mithril
+20 (+20) Pure Mithril is a malleable, silver-white metal that does not tarnish and alloys with other metals to produce unique enchanted metals. Dwarves value Mithril above all else. Its true value lies not so much in its pure state as in alloys with other rare metals. The cost mulitplier is 2000x or more; the value is 400 gp/ounce.

Rularon
-10 (+20) A dull silver metal, Rularon has the ability to inhibit Mentalism-based spells. A full-helm plated with this metal would protect the wearer from mental attacks, but would also prevent him from casting Mentalism spells. Rularon is very soft and malleable, requiring no special equipment for forging. The cost multiplier is 5000x or more; the value is 1000 gp/ounce.

Shaalk
+20 (+10) Extremely light and flexible, but with perfect resilience Shaalk has a vast number of applications. Neither a true metal nor a glass, Shaalk is used to make powerful bows, but the value of this material makes this impractical in most situations. The +20 bonus only applies in certain situations, normally not used for weapons. Cost multiplier is 500x or more; value is 100 gp/ounce.

Star Iron
+45 (+300) An alloy forged using metal gathered from certain meteorites, Star Iron (or Angil) is extremely strong once worked. The surface has a dull, dark grey appearance. Star iron is inherently anti-magical. It is believed to have other, more arcane powers, known only to specific Alchemy Guilds. The cost multiplier is 25,000 or more; the value is 5000 gp/ounce.

Ulgond
0 (0) An Elven liquid stone which can be poured into wooden or stone molds, Ulgond hardens in several days into a substance harder than most natural rock. Sophisticated forms may be developed by pouring this material into complex molds. Only the most advanced Elven alchemical guilds work with Ulgond. The cost multiplier is 5x or more; the value is 1 gp/ounce.

White Alloy
+15 (+5) An alloy of iron, carbon, and titanium, White Alloy has a bright white coloration and may be worked in a normal forge. The cost multiplier is 100x or more; the value is 20 gp/ounce.

Magic Items (15.0) [Creatures & Treasures II]


The Properties of Laen "Laen itself is neither rock nor metal, but magic, the trapped energy of the unmaking of the world in a mineral. Impurities in the host rock give varied colors and properties, as a rainbow depends on dust for its beauty. Conjure an image of frozen light and you behold Laen, the greatest natural treasure of the world." -- Elor Once Dark, from the Chronicles of the Iron Wind. Laen is an indestructible volcanic glass used as a prime component in the creation of jewelry, weapons, and even huge architectural structures throught ICE fantasy products. Though this short summary is not intended to be the last word on the properties of the various kinds of laen, Gms may look to this as a guide, and may change the information to suit a particular game. There are two main categories of laen: smokey and white. Smokey laen is naturally dark, and must be chilled to freezing temperatures in special cold forges before it is malleable enough to shape. At these bitter temperatures, the laen can be cleared with treatments and tinted with a number of transparent colors. As the forged laen warms, it gains the strength and rigidity which are the hallmarks of this enchanted glass.

White laen, on the other hand, is actually clear and may only be caressed into form after blasting it with incredibly hot forging fires. So difficult to shape (for it can not be cast), even in the hottest flame, eog tools are required. White laen is the purest of all laen forms, and is thus the strongest. Withing the white laen family, there are naturally occurring colored varieties (as opposed to the tinting required of smokey laen). These naturally colored laens have special intrinsic properties. Red laen resists fire, and is thus the most difficult to forge. Green laen has anti-magic properties, being most unreceptive to embedded spells. Blue laen resists cold, and finally, silver laen is particularly receptive to enchantments. Note that it is possible to tint even naturally colored laens. All laen weapons, whether derived from smokey laen or one of the white laen varieties, possess a +25 bonus based on the material alone. Tinted smokey laens, common white laen, and especially silver laen can easily be enchanted with special abilities. Unless otherwise prepared by alchemists or great magicians, laen weapons should always be treated as "magic" for all purposes. Holy arms and slaying weapons are not out of the realm of possibility for this most magical of elements. Laen is a popular medium for other magical devices, such as amulets, lenses, and enchanted jewels. Chart: Colour Property Cold forged. May be cleared and/or Smokey tinted. White (Clear) Heat forged. Strongest variety. Red Resists heat. Green Resists magic. Blue Resists cold. Silver Receptive to embedded magic.

(Excerpts from) Metals (6.3) [Treasures of Middle-Earth]


Stout steel and ithilnaur are found composing the finest arms born[e] by Men, but the Elves and Dwarves have access to metals with more amazing capabilities. Veins of ore within Endors mountains yield many of these substances, but some are created only by the combination of minerals under the special conditions made possible by manipulating the Essence.

Celebur ("Burning Silver")


This is a form of weak uranium ore, somewhat like radium in its effects. It is known to the Dwarves who avoid it. It is required for the making of mithrarian. It was never forged in any reputable smithy, but was used for a time at Amon Lind.

Eog (Du. "Eols Iron" or "Ang Eol")


Eog is undoubtedly among the rarest of metals. It is a fusion of mithril, durang [ed. durang is titanium] and some unknown materials, apparently from an Elven recipe handed down from the House of Eol. This formula is one the Elves will not trade with the Naugrim, even as the Dwarves will not divulge certain of their own recipes. It requires both hot and cold forging, and so the cooperation of two of the Halls of the Elven Smiths. Both the hottest and coldest of Khazad-dums [ed. Morias] forges would be required to produce it. The finished material is awfully hard, tougher than Dwarven adarcer, and even stronger than ithilnaur. It also has a strange appearance. Both white and red varieties commonly exist; neither has any lustre. Eog also has other properties as a damper against certain enchantments, preventing the manipulation of the Essence within a certain radius depending on the nature of the spell caster. The color is the key to this, and it can be made black, white, red, blue, or grey.

Galvorn ("Shining Black")


This metal is the rarest of all known in Middle-Earth. First developed by Eol, it is malleable yet resists cuts or punctures: the ultimate armor. When forged with certain elements it is the hardest substance known. It is said that galvorn is made in part from meteoric iron: incredibly dense metal fallen from the sky. The only two Smiths in Eregion who might have rediscovered the skill and/or materials necessary are Celebrimbor and Fendome, and neither will speak of it.

Ithildin (S. "Moon-star")


Moon-star is a soft, silvery Elven material invented by Celebrimbor, fused from mithril and other substances. It is used almost exclusively for inlay. Commonly used at the court of Arveleg I at Fornost and in the glorious buildings of Annuminas (now in ruins), it has fallen from common used elsewhere. Rare and strange, ithildin is used for secret inscriptions and other magical purposes. During the day it appears dull and lusterless, and is often invisible against the surrounding metal. Under the moon and stars, however, it regains its silvery brilliance and more: it shimmers with a fine white luminosity. Naturally, the Elves and Dwarves usually employ it outside or beneath windows. Ithildin may be the material used by the Dwarves for writing Moon-letters. These runes could only be read under the light of the moon if it were of the same phase and on the same day of the year as they were written. They were written with silver pens and may have required enchantments to complete.

Ithilnaur (S. "Moon-fire")


Ithilnaur is a favorite alloy of the Elves made from mithril and other metals combined at a very high heat. Once cooled to a nearly solid state in ingot form, it is hammered into an elongated shape to compress the lattice structure, folded and hammered again. Periodic rewarming is done in a small enchanted furnace standing nearby. For weapons of this alloy, the refolding is done literally dozens of times, in essence creating an extremely strong laminate. Edges and additional reinforcements are fused to the rough blade, and the Elven smiths then carefully cool the metal to room temperatures before the sharpening and polishing phases.

Ithilnaur is surprisingly common in Moria, where it is used for prized coin and grand armaments. Elsewhere it is rarer. Like ithildin, since the alloy contains mithril, it looks like beautifully pure celeb [ed. silver]. It is a fabulously strong substance, combining titanium and other metals with the mithril, which is very hard, maintains a superbly keen edge, and yet is somewhat flexible, perfect for weapons and armor.

Kregora
An extremely ductile metal, so malleable as to be useless as a material for weapons, and oxidizing so quickly, forming a dull yellow patina on its surface, as to be equally worthless for jewelry. Kregoras true utility lies in its ability to prevent Mentalism, Channeling, and Essence spells from passing through surfaces lined with wires, threads, or netting forged of the substance.

Mithglin (S. "Gleaming Grey"; W. "Platinum")


Also rare, it is prized for its shining hue--although it does not compare to mithril. It is difficult to work, requiring high temperatures and hard labor to forge properly, but the resulting jewelry is more durable than work made of mal [ed. gold] or celeb [ed. silver]. It can be mixed with mal to make it more workable, resulting in white-gold, strong and resistant to corrosion.

Mithin (S. "Pale Grey"; W. "Beryllium")


Used mostly in jewelry, it is a rare, strong, yet light material. Few smiths, even among the Elves, know how to work it. Dwarves enjoy its strength, and delight in creating seemingly fragile baubles from it for their amusement.

Mithrarian ("Abyss of High Silver")


Beyond rare, this alloy is legendary. Annatar [ed. Sauron in disguise] introduced the concept to the Gwaith-i-Mirdain, and though it attracted much interest, not even Finculin or Celebrimbor would undertake its making. If the Lord of Gifts himself ever created any in the Elven Halls, it was alone and with no ones aid. Mithrarian is said to be an alloy of mithril, eog, and another metal celebur ("burning silver" or "uranium"). The resulting material, Annatar claimed, defied Ardas pull, so that a boat or other object with even the thinnest layer of mithrarian on the lower surfaces would float without weight. What made this more significant than enchantments which do the same thing is that mithrarian resists all counter-spells. Celebrimbor found the concept of the stuff somewhat disturbing, and also admitted reluctance to work with celebur, a material the Dwarves knew of but shied away from, saying that it caused sickness and death. The material was indeed found to perform as described, but this achievement was only perfected at Amon Lind in the Misty Mountains.

Mithril ("S. Grey Brilliance" or "True-silver")


Pure mithril is in many ways like normal silver: shining white and very malleable--but it does not tarnish and alloys with other metals to produce unique enchanted metals of incomparable quality. It always appears polished. There are many tales of the mithril from Numenor, but that Isle is no more, and Moria may now be the only source of true-silver. It no doubt contributes to the vast wealth held by Durins Folk. Wherever one travels to lands where it is known, it is considered the richest of metals. Mithril is loved above all materials by the Dwarves and is also treasured by the Elves, the Dunedain, and the dark forces of Morgoth. Very little true-silver made its way westward to Nargothrond, and the samples which did were highly prized. Celebrimbors recommendations that the Noldor journey toward Eregion when he left Beleriand, in hope making contact with the Dwarves of Durin, and gaining access to true-silver, gives some idea of how highly the Eldar regarded the metal. Their eventual alliance brought more mithril into the hands of the Noldor than they imagined could have existed. From this true-silver many wondrous alloys emerged. The famed mithril lode is but a single vein. Running northward from the Seventh Deep of Moria, it extends well under the mighty Redhorn. The Dwarves dug so deeply after mithril that they released the Balrog imprisoned under Barazinbar. After the release of the Balrog, even Orcs refused to mine the Deeps for mithril, and so no more silver-steel came from Moria after T.A. 1980.

Ogamur (S. "From Gamur")


Dwarves use ogamur for items requiring extreme flexibility and elasticity (an unusual quality in a metal). Few fabrics, much less metals, can stretch like this black substance. Its properties make it ideal for springing devices and works designed to absorb impact. It is difficult to make, however, which accounts for its sparing use. It is an enchanted mix, derived from an eastern Dwarf-house in the late Second Age. The Noldor also have many uses for it in their mechanical devices. It is an endless frustration for them that they must purchase it from Durins people, who refuse to relinquish the recipe.

Tasarang (S. "Willow-iron"; W. "Shalk")


At first sight, tasarang looks like white ogamur, but one quickly realizes ones error when first handling the stuff. Although it bends easily and has tremendous spring, it doesnt stretch. Tasarang is also extremely light, even lighter than galnin [ed. aluminum], like wood or pumice. Because its ore is as white as chalk, weighs little, and is found below limestone intrusions, it is called "shalk" in the Common Tongue. The tremendous heat and cold used make the metal change its texture, yet it only enhances the white hue. Actually, more than one metalworker will swear that it glows. The Mirdain have a vast number of applications for it, but the lack of material limits them. It has been used with some success to make powerful bows, but the value of the material makes this impractical in most situations.