Anda di halaman 1dari 28

INSIDE:

Ukraines new samvydav: the Internet page 2. The diasporas role in Ukraines parliamentary elections page 8. Ukrainian Canadian writer tackles a difficult subject page 15.

Vol. LXX

Controversial procurator general Harry Potter in Ukrainian? Yes (soon), thanks to Ivan Malkovych remains, despite Herampant rumors by Roman Woronowycz denied during a press conference that
No. 2 THE UKRAINIAN WEEKL Y SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2002 by Roman Woronowycz
Kyiv Press Bureau

THE UKRAINIAN WEEKLY


Published by the Ukrainian National Association Inc., a fraternal non-profit association
records for childrens books when it was introduced in 1997. The series that followed, three books to date, has remained popular not only with the under-13 crowd but with youngsters and oldsters alike. Ivan Malkovych, founder and president of A-Ba-Ba-Ha-La-Ma-Ha, the first private Ukrainian childrens publishing house established after the collapse of the Soviet Union which will celebrate 10 years in business in August said that while he didnt expect sales in Ukraine to attain the astronomical rates that were seen in the West in the year after The Sorcerers Stone hit the racks, he is certain that a niche market exists. He said that he believes readers interested in the fantasy genre devel(Continued on page 3)
Kyiv Press Bureau

$1/$2 in Ukraine

KYIV Soon Ukrainians will be able to determine for themselves what has endeared a generation of kids to the magical Harry Potter and the series of books by J.K. Rowling about the young. On January 9, A-Ba-Ba-Ha-La-MaHa, the respected publisher of Ukrainian language childrens books, announced it had purchased the Ukrainian-language rights to the first book of the Harry Potter series and an option on the rest. Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone caused a sensation in the publishing industry and among children, as well as adults, who purchased it in numbers that demolished previous sales

KYIV Ukraines Procurator General Mykhailo Potebenko remained in his post on January 9 after several uncertain days during which reports circulated that the countrys controversial chief prosecutor would be dismissed. The rumor was based on several events that had taken place during the prior week concerning Mr. Potebenko most notably an announcement that he had been placed on the Communist Party candidate list for the upcoming parliamentary elections and that his office had begun an investigation into illegal arms sales by two former chiefs of Ukraines intelligence service, the Security Service of Ukraine, known by its Ukrainian acronym, SBU. On January 9 Mr. Potebenko disclaimed the report, which he said was floated by those who would have his political head.

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE CONVENTION OF THE UKRAINIAN NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, INC.


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN TO THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY, BRANCH OFFICERS AND TO ALL MEMBERS OF THE UKRAINIAN NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, THAT THE

35th REGULAR CONVENTION


of the

UKRAINIAN NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, INC.


will be held in Chicago, IL at Chicago Marriott OHare Hotel Beginning May 24, 2002
In accordance with the By-Laws of the UNA regarding election of delegates to the Convention, the qualifications for delegates, the number of delegates from each Branch and the credentials of delegates are as follows: The election of delegates and their alternates must be held within 60 days of the announcement of the Convention. Since the Convention was announced on January 11, 2002, the 60-day term for election of delegates and their alternates ends on March 11, 2002. Delegates and their alternates to which the Branch is entitled shall be elected at a regular meeting of the Branch by the members present. Nominations shall be made from the floor and all candidates presented to the membership for vote. The candidate or candidates receiving the highest number of votes shall be elected delegates. Alternate delegates shall be elected by separate vote in similar manner. All tie votes involving alternates shall be immediately resolved by another ballot for the candidates involved. Each member shall be entitled to one vote for each delegate and each alternate authorized to the Branch. Delegates and their alternates must be elected at the same regular Branch meeting. In the event that a delegate fails or is unable to attend a Convention, an alternate shall be seated in his or her place, and remain seated for the balance of the Convention. If a Branch has more than one delegate, the seats of the absent delegates shall be occupied by alternates in the order of the highest number of votes received in the election. Only UNA members in good standing may be present at the meeting and vote for delegates and their alternates. A member in good standing is one who has a certificate of insurance in the UNA on which dues are being paid. A member who has transferred to extended insurance, or paid-up insurance, or is suspended, may not be present at the meeting nor can he (or she) vote. Members in good standing may vote for delegates and their alternates only in that Branch where they pay dues to the Fraternal Fund. No vote by proxy shall be allowed. Only those members may be elected as delegates or alternates who are in good standing and have all the qualifications for an officer of

anybody from above had indicated in any way that he should resign. This is a disgusting provocation by those who either are trying to cover their criminal dealings or those who are looking to gain an advantage for the elections, said Mr. Potebenko, who explained that his agency would be intricately involved in investigating election fraud during the parliamentary campaigns. He said that certain people would like to see a vacant post and an agency thrown into confusion, which would allow them to continue in their lawless ways. Nonetheless, neither President Leonid Kuchma, who appoints the countrys procurator general, nor any other highranking official in the presidents administration has thus far publicly spoken out in support of Mr. Potebenko. On January 7, the press office of the presidential administration said it had no information on the matter because administration officials were observing Christmas. Hearsay first surfaced after Mr. Potebenko was named to the 20th spot on the candidate slate of the Communist Party during its congress on January 5. Mr. Potebenkos placement almost certainly assures him a seat in Parliament because the Communist Party has historically taken some 25 percent, or just over 100 seats, in parliamentary elections. Many political experts said Mr. Potebenko should have immediately tendered his resignation because it would be unethical for a member of the political opposition to hold a position in the law enforcement arm of state authority, especially around election time. Mr. Potebenko told reporters that he had no intention of resigning until he was elected a national deputy. Yulia Tymoshenko, the first vice prime minister who was dismissed from her government post after Mr. Potebenko brought corruption charges against her at the beginning of last year incriminations that were later dropped by a Ukrainian high court reacted to the inclusion of Mr. Potebenko in the Communist slate by calling the move a logical and worthy end to his career. The Communists and the officials in power are a single entity, explained Ms. Tymoshenko. [Mr. Potebenko] buried all the crimes of those in power today in the depths of the Procurator Generals Office, so it is logical that he find his last shelter in the Communist Party of Ukraine. The unfounded rumors of the political demise of Mr. Potebenko could also have been the result of an announcement by the Procurator Generals Office on January 4 that it would open a criminal case into allegations of illegal arms sales by high-rank(Continued on page 25)

(Continued on page 4)

THE UKRAINIAN WEEKL Y

SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2002

ANALYSIS

The Internet: Ukraines new samvydav


by Taras Kuzio
RFE/RL Media Matters

NEWSBRIEFS

No. 2

The rapid growth of the Internet in Ukraine had largely escaped the authorities attention until the December 6, 2001, presidential decree that finally sought to rein in one of the countrys last remaining independent media outlets. The Internet had become the most mobile medium and the least vulnerable to censorship, according to the prestigious weekly Zerkalo Nedeli/Dzerkalo Tyzhnia. Internet use in Ukraine has increased fivefold since 1999. From 2000 to 2001, it jumped by 30 to 40 percent. In recent years, computer prices have dropped, since 85 percent of all computers sold in Ukraine are now assembled domestically. Approximately 400,000 personal computers were sold in 2001 (an annual increase of 22 to 25 percent) plus 10,000 computer notebooks (an annual increase of 60 percent). Due to increased competition among Ukraines 260 Internet service providers which also increased their revenues through higher volume of Internet advertisements the cost of Internet connection has dropped dramatically. Add to that cheap pirated software and cheaper computers. All in all, the Internet is more affordable and accessible in Ukraine. Not surprisingly, Internet usage is most frequent in large cities, particularly Kyiv, which accounts for half of the Internet use, and eastern Ukraine. Lviv represents the only relatively large Internet use in the western part of the country. Rural areas and small towns suffer from more frequent electricity cuts, fewer computer terminals and worse telecommunications infrastructures. Of the 18,301 websites registered in Ukraine as of April 2001, 5,772 were in Kyiv, followed by Odesa (1,309), Dnipropetrovsk (901), Kharkiv (722) and Donetsk (550). The fact that the Security Service of Ukraine (Sluzhba Bezpeky Ukrainy, or SBU) has recently hired 3,000 computer experts is proof of official concern about the expansion of a medium they do not control. The authorities not only feared a new technology they did not fully understand, but also were concerned at Internet use to promote opposition political parties and to expose official misdeeds. Students and young people among whom English is the most popular foreign language are increasingly relying on the Internet to conduct research as well as to read the Western media. President Leonid Kuchma was alarmed that during 1999-2001 the Internet became a key forum for opposition to the executive branch of government. As independent print outlets were increasingly stifled, the Internet was performing the role that samvydav [samizdat] did in the 1960s in the USSR, the newspaper Ukraina Moloda wrote last year. Until the Kuchmagate scandal of November 2000, authorities were unperturbed by the Internet because its audience was limited, compared to the broadcast and print media controlled by them and their oligarch allies. Only in 2001 did the executive branch of the Ukrainian government establish its own website (www.kuchma.gov.ua). The main Internet site to seize on the Kuchmagate scandal was Ukrainska Pravda launched on April 17, 2000, by Taras Kuzio is a research associate at the Center for Russian and East European Studies, University of Toronto.

Heorhii Gongadze and its current editor, Olena Prytula five months before Mr. Gongadzes still-unsolved murder. The Kuchmagate scandal led to public demands for prompt and unbiased information. This is reflected in visits to the Ukrainska Pravda site, which increased from 3,000 per day to 80,000 during the December 2000 parliamentary deliberations over the scandal exceeding the circulation figures for the pro-presidential hard-copy newspapers, such as Kievskie Viedomosti. The authorities were also concerned that the Internet allegedly provided a negative image of Ukraine to the outside world. During the Kuchmagate scandal, Ukraines international image drastically worsened. But the authorities, by blaming the Internet for highlighting their misdeeds, show they do not understand the medias role as the fourth estate in a democratic society. For example, President Kuchma recently complained that the Internet was a killer because it was always pouring out dirt through anonymous information. Reflecting such official concerns, in 2001 a special Internet Administration was set up within the State Committee for Information Policy, Television and Radio. The SBU is also attempting to take over control of the .ua (the Ukraine Internet country code since 1992) domain-name registration. This .ua system is controlled by a San Francisco-based networks administrator, Dmytro Kohmaniuk, through the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN). On October 31, 2001, the National Security and Defense Council (NSDC) passed a resolution On Methods to Improve State Information Policy and Ensure Ukraines Information Security. This was followed by a November 12, 2001 meeting with Internet journalists where Yevhen Marchuk, NSDC secretary and former Ukrainian KGB and SBU chairman, complained that the Internet constituted a threat to Ukrainian national security due to its large volume of compromising material. Mr. Marchuk said, the state cannot ignore a new developing phenomenon, to just stand by and have no influence on it. A presidential decree dated December 6, 2001 implemented the October 31 resolution, which in turn followed an earlier Internet decree dated July 31, 2000, and five previous information policy decrees in July 1997; April, July and December 2000; and April 2001. The December 6, 2001, decree ordered the Cabinet of Ministers to undertake a range of detailed measures within one-, two-, three-, six- and eight-month deadlines. Within one month, the Cabinet was to draw up a draft law on a National Information Policy Concept and Ukraines Information Security. A more detailed licensing procedure for Internet service providers was to be introduced, requiring that they retain copies of Internet traffic for six months. It is disturbing to note the SBU role in the licensing of Internet providers and potential SBU access to Internet traffic in the interests of national security. The SBU was instructed also to come up with proposals to improve its work against information aggression and specialist information-propagandistic operations undertaken by foreign intelligence services. A recent example of how the SBU may deploy the notion that the Internet consti(Continued on page 16)

Communists win legal victory KYIV A Ukrainian high court on December 29, 2001, rejected as unconstitutional a decade-old, blanket ban on the Soviet-era Communist Party, Reuters and other agencies reported. Leonid Hrach, a Communist leader and the chairman of the Crimean Parliament, said, Despite huge regret that we needed 10 years to come to this natural and evident truth, this is a great victory, Reuters reported. Interfax said Mr. Hrach called it a victory for common sense. In its ruling, however, the Ukrainian Constitutional Court rejected calls for Communist assets which included dozens of government buildings, rest homes and health facilities to be returned to the party. Only the courts have the power to exclude political parties, the court said. The prohibition has been largely ignored since it was imposed on the country, where the revamped Communists are the largest party in the 450-seat assembly. (RFE/RL Newsline) Communists aim for majority in Rada KYIV At a congress on January 5, the Communist Party of Ukraine approved its parliamentary election program and 225 candidates who will seek parliamentary mandates on a countrywide list, Interfax and UNIAN reported. The list is topped by Communist Party Chairman Petro Symonenko and includes Crimean Parliament Chairman Leonid Hrach (No. 11) and Procurator General Mykhailo Potebenko (No. 20). Mr. Symonenko told the congress that the partys task in the March 31 election is to win more than 50 percent of parliamentary seats in order to take control of the Verkhovna Rada and form a new government. (RFE/RL Newsline) Marchuk subject of investigation KYIV The Procurator Generals Office has opened a criminal investigation against National Security and Defense Council Secretary Yevhen Marchuk; the former chief of the Security Service of Ukraine, Leonid Derkach; and Derkachs son, National Deputy Andrii Derkach; for alleged involvement in illegal arms trading, Interfax reported on January 4, quoting Deputy Procurator General Oleksander Otamaniuk. The investigation was launched following an inquiry lodged by National Deputies Hryhorii Omelchenko and Anatolii Yermak. Mr. Marchuk has said the allegations of his involvement are provocations aimed at discrediting him and the Security Service. (RFE/RL Newsline) Kuchma vetoes bills related to elections KYIV President Leonid Kuchma has vetoed a bill obliging all candidates in presidential and parliamentary elections to take part in televised debates and requiring that television companies, regardless of their form of ownership, broadcast such debates, Interfax reported on January 8. Mr. Kuchma also vetoed a bill on local elections that stipulated a mixed system in elections to oblast-level councils and a majority system in elections to lower-level councils. (RFE/RL Newsline) Rada urged to pass CD copyright law KYIV Verkhovna Rada ViceChairman Stepan Havrysh said on January 8 that President Leonid Kuchma has urged the Parliament to pass a bill on compact disc production to potentially soften the impact of U.S. trade sanctions imposed for Ukraines failure to fight CD piracy, Interfax and the Associated Press reported. Prime Minister Anatolii Kinakh sent a similar appeal to the Parliament. (RFE/RL Newsline) District election commissions formed KYIV The Central Election Commission drew lots on January 7 to complete the formation of 225 district election commissions in Ukraine, New Channel Television reported. Under the election law, the district election commissions will obligatorily include members of the parties that won no less than 4 percent of the vote in the 1998 election or have their own caucuses in the current parliament. There are currently 17 such parties. The representation of other parties in the district election commissions (which are to consist of 12-20 people) was determined by drawing lots. New Channel Television reported that former Prime Minister Viktor Yuschenkos Our Ukraine and presidential administration head Volodymyr Lytvyns For a United Ukraine electoral blocs got most of the seats on these commissions. (RFE/RL Newsline) Kuchma signs 2002 budget into law KYIV President Leonid Kuchma signed the 2002 budget for Ukraine into law on January 3, Infobank reported. Andrii Chyrva, the deputy head of Mr. Kuchmas information department, said the president also sent a letter to Verkhovna Rada Chairman Ivan Pliusch that urges national deputies to consider the governments proposals to strengthen macroeconomic stability and broaden the (Continued on page 17)

THE UKRAINIAN WEEKLY


The Weekly: Tel: (973) 292-9800; Fax: (973) 644-9510

FOUNDED 1933

An English-language newspaper published by the Ukrainian National Association Inc., a non-profit association, at 2200 Route 10, P.O. Box 280, Parsippany, NJ 07054. Yearly subscription rate: $55; for UNA members $45. Periodicals postage paid at Parsippany, NJ 07054 and additional mailing offices. (ISSN 0273-9348) UNA: Tel: (973) 292-9800; Fax: (973) 292-0900

Postmaster, send address changes to: Editor-in-chief: Roma Hadzewycz The Ukrainian Weekly Editors: 2200 Route 10 Roman Woronowycz (Kyiv) P.O. Box 280 Andrew Nynka Parsippany, NJ 07054 Ika Koznarska Casanova (part time) The Ukrainian Weekly Archive: www.ukrweekly.com The Ukrainian Weekly, January 13, 2002, No. 2, Vol. LXX
Copyright 2002 The Ukrainian Weekly

FOR THE RECORD: Statement ANALYSIS of NATO-Ukraine Commission The government-criminal alliance The NATO-Ukraine Commission (NUC) missile-launching site, demonstrating
No. 2 THE UKRAINIAN WEEKL Y SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2002 met in a defense ministerial session in Brussels on December 19 to review progress in NATO-Ukraine defense and military cooperation in the context of Ukraines commitment to Euro-Atlantic integration and to discuss joint efforts against terrorism. Following is the text of a statement issued after the meeting The NATO-Ukraine Commission (NUC) met today in Defense Ministerial Session at NATO Headquarters in Brussels. NATO ministers welcomed the newly appointed minister of defense of Ukraine, Minister [Volodymyr] Shkidchenko. Ministers discussed the progress in the defense and military cooperation between NATO and Ukraine in the context of Ukraines commitment to Euro-Atlantic integration. They also reaffirmed their commitment to combating terrorism and discussed ways in which their combined efforts in this regard could be made more effective. Ministers noted that this year marked the 10th anniversary of an independent and sovereign Ukraine. Ministers congratulated Ukraine on the destruction of its last SS-24 Ukraines status as a nuclear-free state. The commission noted Ukraines continuing contribution to European security and the measures taken by Ukraine in the fight against terrorism, including Ukraines decision to open its airspace for overflight by U.S. aircraft. NATO ministers expressed appreciation for Ukraines ongoing support for NATO-led operations in the Balkans and the participation of Ukrainian forces in the Polish-Ukrainian Battalion in KFOR. The commission reaffirmed its support for the successful development of the peace process in the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. The commission approved the status report on activities under the Joint Working Group (JWG) on Defense Reform. Ministers noted with satisfaction that the program of activities for 2001 had been fully implemented and that the program planned for 2002 included a broad range of activities aimed at supporting defense and security sector reform. Ministers commended the work of the Joint Working Group at (Continued on page 23) by Roman Kupchinsky
RFE/RL Crime, Corruption and Terrorism Watch

The fight against organized crime is inseparably linked to the question of highlevel government corruption. When a corrupt government forms an alliance with organized crime, domestic law-enforcement agencies become cops on the beat chasing down muggers and pickpockets while aiding, and benefiting from, major criminal activity. Only when the government/criminal alliance is destroyed can the rule of law return. In the former USSR such a situation exists today. The examples are numerous and brazen. The head of the department in charge of battling corruption at the Russian Ministry of Internal Affairs (MVD) recently RFE/RL Crime, Corruption, and Terrorism Watch, reporting on organized crime, corruption and terrorism in the former USSR, Eastern Europe and the Middle East, was inaugurated in November 2001. The report is prepared by Roman Kupchinsky.

fled abroad, fearing arrest for selling protection to criminal groups. The head of Ukraines International Affairs Ministry was fired by the president, and both are suspected of complicity in the murder of a journalist. Members of parliament in Georgia have demanded the resignation of the internal affairs minister and the procurator general for corruption. A Korean businessman recently confessed to having given the president of Kazakstan a bribe of $10 million. Can the criminal/government alliance in the former USSR be defeated? If so, by whom? In the past four years the only serious prosecution of corrupt officials from Ukraine has been undertaken by Western governments. The United States is preparing to try former Prime Minister Pavlo Lazarenko on charges of money laundering and mail fraud. Mr. Lazarenko has already been convicted on money-laundering charges in Switzerland. Belgium is continuing its investigation of the activities of Oleksander Volkov, a close adviser to (Continued on page 23)

Harry Potter...
(Continued from page 1) oped by other renowned British authors who told stories of magical lands and encounters such as J.R.R. Tolkien and Lewis Carroll, who are famous, respectively, for The Hobbit and Alice in Wonderland would take to the books. The business deal comes after extensive and difficult negotiations, explained Mr. Malkovych, who was a poet and not a businessman before becoming a publisher of kids books. Obtaining the rights took a lot of time and a lot of correspondence, explained Mr. Malkovych. At first the British publishers even kept mispronouncing the name, Ukraine. But then again, why should they be familiar with us? Only after he made the publishers understand that Ukraine is a large country with a large market was the agreement completed. A Russian-language version of the book has been out for about a year in an initial run of more than 100,000, which will make selling the Ukrainian book more challenging because those in Ukraine who couldnt wait to get their hands on the story and were not fluent in one of the languages in which it was published prior to that have already read the Russian edition. Mr. Malkovych said he would have to advertise loud and hard to get his Ukrainian version noticed. He explained that the low cost of the Russian-language version already on the Ukrainian market also causes a potential

Year in review: errata


In our 2001: Year in Review supplement (January 6), the section titled Noteworthy in Y2K+1: events, people, etc. was missing a line from the listing of top Ukrainian heroes/heroines. No. 3 on the list was: Ivan Franko (18561916), writer, scholar, publicist, and political and civic leader. Also, the caption to a photo published with the section titled The Gongadze case: a murder still unsolved incorrectly referred to Lesia Gongadze as the wife of Heorhii Gongadze. As correctly noted in the story, she is Mr. Gongadzes mother.

problem of price-competitiveness for his company. A-Ba-Ba-Ha-La-Ma-Ha cannot afford the large initial print run that the Russians could, and does not have the international market that an offering in the Russian language does. In addition, Mr. Malkovych must contend with a Ukrainian value-added tax (VAT) of 20 percent. In Russia book publishers are tax-exempt, which is a central reason that Mr. Malkovych is considering publishing the book in Russia. Unfortunately, we will probably be printing in Russia. We can save nearly 30 percent on the cost that way, explained Mr. Malkovych, who underscored that the creative process, including illustrations to be done by Mr. Malkovychs long-time illustrator, Vladyslav Yerko, will take place in Ukraine. In addition to a competitive price, Mr. Malkovych believes a key to the books success on the Ukrainian market hinges on the quality of the translation. He intends to remain absolutely true to the original story, as is required by his contract, but would like to see an element of Ukrainian culture and national psyche appear in the dialogue. For example he envisions the pleasant Hagrid speaking in the native accent of the Halychyna region of Ukraine with the same good-natured candidness often exhibited there. The persons tasked with fulfilling Mr. Malkovychs vision are Viktor Morozov, a Lviv philologist, and two editors, one of which is Toronto-born Motria Onyschuk, who previously had translated A-Ba-BaHa-La-Ma-Has The Cat and the Rooster into English for Knopf Publishers, owners of the English-language rights. Mr. Malkovych, who would not disclose what he paid for the rights to the blockbuster Harry Potter series, other than to say that it involved a fixed fee plus a percentage of the royalties, explained that he believes it is important that such a globally popular book be published in Ukrainian in order to keep Ukrainian-language speakers apace with the development of modern literature and to send a signal to Western publishers that the Ukrainian language cannot be ignored in their global distribution campaigns. And while that point was a primary reason he pursued the Ukrainian rights so

vigorously, another more basic one was simply that the book will sell because it has universal appeal and will touch Ukrainian children in the same way it has affected youngsters in much of the West who have now been exposed to four books about their beloved young wizard and his friends (and foes) at the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. It is a modern book, which seems at first glance not to incorporate modern themes, but it is quite the contrary, explained Mr. Malkovych. These are normal kids who turn out to have magical abilities. Our kids are given hope that they, too, might have magic within their grasp. It gives them faith in themselves. First million copy printing Also in celebration of the 10th anniversary of A-Ba-Ba-Ha-La-Ma-Ha, Mr. Malkovych has re-issued seven of the most popular childrens stories and folk tales produced by his company over the years. It is the first ever 1-million-copy printing of childrens books in Ukraine, which was made possible by support of Ukraines postal service, UkrPost, in a joint project called Mini Dyvo (Mini Wonder). The books are almost pamphlet-like in size, but more importantly they can be had for a single hryvnia each, which makes them accessible to all Ukrainian children. And they will be available everywhere, almost literally, because UkrPost has agreed to sell them in all of its more than 15,000 post offices nationwide, which are found not only in the largest cities, but also in the most remote and tiny villages. Our books are often called the best, but more often they are called the most expensive, said Mr. Malkovych, explaining why he had decided to pursue the project. In 10 years A-Ba-Ba-Ha-La-Ma-Ha has published some 400,000 copies of nearly 50 different childrens book titles, folk tales, fables and stories from lands near and far, including, of course, Ukraine, but also from Russia, Poland, Germany, Holland and England. Mr. Malkovych, who continues to write poetry for adults and children alike and has done many of the translations of foreign folk tales found in the A-Ba-Ba-HaLa-Ma-Ha collection, said the reason he started to publish was quite simple: I wanted an alphabet book for my son, one that began with A for anhel [(angel],

and not A for akula [shark which was how Soviet alphabet books began]. I also wanted thick cardboard pages that small children would not immediately destroy, explained Mr. Malkovych. And thus A-Ba-Ba-Ha-La-Ma-Ha was born. The name, keeping true to Mr. Malkovychs original intent, comes from a story by Ivan Franko, Hrytss School Lesson, in which a young school child when asked by his father what he had learned in school that day replies a-baba-ha-la-ma-ha, when in fact meaning to say abetka (the alphabet). Mr. Malkovychs first book, Abetka, which still is available today, became a thick, cardboard-paged success after a well-known book distributor bought 3,000 of a very large run of 50,000 books. Ten years down the road, Mr. Malkovych said he believes that the high standards he sets for himself and his coworkers and the quality they produce, are what has allowed A-Ba-Ba-Ha-La-Ma-Ha to keep working for as long as it has. Our credo has always been high quality. We wanted kids to pick our books because they were the most interesting the cover, the illustrations and finally the story they would read later which would, not coincidentally, also be a Ukrainianlanguage book, explained Mr. Malkovych. We wanted those kids to develop a fondness for Ukrainian books.

Cover of the U.S. edition of Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone.

THE UKRAINIAN WEEKL Y

SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2002

No. 2

THE UKRAINIAN NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FORUM


Announcement of the convention...
(Continued from page 1)
the Branch, i. e., have been members of the UNA not less than one year and of their Branch not less than six months, and in which they pay dues to the Fraternal Fund, are over 18 years of age, are of Ukrainian nationality or descent and are not officers or assembly officers, agents or salesmen of any other similar fraternal organization or life insurance company, and are fulfilling all obligations toward the UNA, in particular, have shown active participation in organizational and promotional work for the UNA. No person shall be eligible for delegate or alternate who at any time unjustifiably or maliciously instituted or caused to be instituted any suit, action or proceeding against the UNA either on his own behalf or on behalf of any other member. Every duly established Branch in good standing in the Association, having 75 or more members who pay in such Branch dues in the Fraternal Fund of the UNA, shall be entitled to representation and vote on all matters to be acted upon at the Convention as follows: Branches having 75 to 149 members inclusive, one delegate; those having 150 to 225 members inclusive, two delegates; those having 226301 members inclusive, three delegates; those having 301 or more members, four delegates. Each delegate shall be entitled to one vote. No Branch shall be entitled to more than four votes. A Branch having less than 75 members, for the purpose of representation at the Convention, may unite with another Branch also having less than 75 members and if, when combined, the aggregate of the two Branches shall be no less than 75 members who pay dues in these Branches to the Fraternal Fund, they shall have the right to elect one delegate. Unless otherwise agreed by the mutual consent of both Branches, the Branch having the greater number of members shall be entitled to elect the delegate, and the Branch having the lesser number of members, the alternate. Credentials of delegates and their alternates must be sent to the Home Office of the UNA within 10 days of the election, but no later than 60 days prior to the Convention. Parsippany, NJ, January 11, 2002
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE UKRAINIAN NATIONAL ASSOCIATION: ULANA M. DIACHUK, President STEFKO KUROPAS, First Vice-President ANYA DYDYK-PETRENKO, Second Vice-President REV. MYRON STASIW, Director for Canada MARTHA LYSKO, National Secretary STEPAN KACZARAJ, Treasurer

St. Nicholas visits Maizeville

MAIZEVILLE, Pa. UNA Branch 242 sponsored a St. Nicholas Party for children of St. John the Baptist Church in Maizeville, Pa., on the eve of the feast day of St. Nicholas. The festivities were attended by 80 parishioners, most of whom, according to local UNA activist Joseph Chabon, are members of Branch 242. Seen in the photos above are: (from left) Patrick Semanchik, St. Nicholas, Christina Semanchik, Katie Adukatis, the Rev. D. George Worschak, pastor and Mark Semanchik. Jason Yulich served as liaison to the visiting St. Nicholas.

The Ukrainian National Association exists:


n n

Mission Statement

Frackville children greet St. Nicholas

to promote the principles of fraternalism;

As a fraternal insurance society, the Ukrainian National Association reinvests its earnings for the benefit of its members and the Ukrainian community.

to preserve the Ukrainian, Ukrainian American and Ukrainian Canadian heritage and culture; and to provide quality financial services and products to its members.

Great Rates Low Fees Prompt Approval

Looking for a First Mortgage? Need to refinance? Looking for

UKRAINIAN NATIONAL ASSOCIATION MEMBERS!!!


FRACKVILLE, Pa. St. Michael the Archangel Church sponsored the annual St. Nicholas Party for children of the parish. The parishs catechism classes and youth group acted out a play that included a holy supper scene, Christmas carolers and a Nativity scene. Between the acts of the play, talented young musicians provided music and singing. The pre-school/kindergarten class, playing carolers and singing On this Bright Day, stole the show. Finally St. Nicholas arrived. St. Nicholas spoke with all the children and welcomed Father George Worchak to the parish. St. Nicholas then distributed candy to over 50 children. The party was a great success and special thanks were expressed to Joe Chabon, secretary of UNA Branch 242, for being a major sponsor of the event.

THE UKRAINIAN WEEKLY PRESS FUND: A SPECIAL REPORT


$25.00
M. and Mr. R. Baltarowich Michael Bogira John Bortnyk Sir Roman Hezzey Roman and Marta Juzeniw Eugene Kurdydyk Oksana and Bohdan Maria Matlak Myron Sedorowitz Sonia Solomon Bohdan and Oresta Tkaczuk Roxana Wolosenko Joseph Yurechko Warren, Mich. Chicago, Ill. Forked River, N.J. Ipswich, Mass. Princeton, N.J. Toronto, Ontario Kuzysayn Fords, N.J. Escondido, Calif. Summerville, S.C. Toronto, Ontario Chicago, Ill. Walnut Creek, Calif. Middletown, N.J.

CALL (800) 253-9862 EXT. 3036

$20.00
Evhen Baczynskyj Parma, Ohio

Ihor and Natalia Rudko Zenon Sheparovych Nadia Trojan

Colchester, Conn. Palm Beach, Fla. Watertown, Conn

$15.00
Valentina Poletz Emil Pyk Minneapolis, Minn. Orland Park, Ill.

$5.00
Tekla Husiak Bo Kaluszyk Nadia Palczynski New York, N.Y. Cleveland, Ohio Woodhaven, N.Y.

$10.00
Nadija Chojnacka Mary Hanitz Michael and Dr. Oksana Holian Wolodymyr Jarymowycz Bohdan and Christian Kulchyckyj Chrystyna Lysobey T. Rakoczyi Oak Forest, Ill. West Senega, N.Y. Elmwood Park, Ill. York, Pa. Cinnaminson, N.J. Cherry Hill, N.J. Albany, N.Y.

... AND A SPECIAL THANK-YOU


Total: $490.00
These donations to The Ukrainian Weekly Press Fund were received during the month of November along with payments for The Ukrainian Weekly 2000, Volume II. (The list does not include other donations to the Press Fund received separately.) A huge thank-you to our many contributors for this stupendous response to our book! Please note: The Ukrainian Weekly Press Fund is the sole fund dedicated exclusively to supporting the work of this publication.

No. 2 ANNOUNCEMENT regarding election of delegates in UNA Branches having less than 75 voting members

THE UKRAINIAN WEEKL Y

SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2002

, , 75 , 75 , , , , 75 , . 75 , . , , , , . , , , , . , , , . , 75 , , , .

BR. of NAME AND ADDRESS Mem. OF SECRETARY

078

58

In accordance with the By-Laws of the UNA, a Branch having less than 75 voting members, that is, members whose dues to that Branch include contributions to the Fraternal Fund of the UNA, may unite with another Branch also having less than 75 voting members, for the purpose of electing a mutual representative at the Convention. If, when combined, the aggregate of the two Branches shall be no less than 75 voting members, they shall have the right to elect one delegate. Branches wishing to unite for the purpose of electing a delegate and an alternate, should each adopt a formal resolution at their meeting and after mutual agreement, should conduct an election. Unless otherwise agreed by the mutual consent of both Branches, the Branch having the greater number of members shall be entitled to elect the delegate and the Branch having the lesser number of members, the alternate. Both Branches, which have agreed to unite for the purpose of electing a delegate and an alternate, should immediately notify in writing, the Recording Department of the UNA Home Office, which will send the proper credentials to each Branch. In order to facilitate mutual agreements between Branches which have less than 75 voting members, we have listed these Branches below, showing the totals of voting members and the names and addresses of the Branch Secretaries, as well as telephone numbers, if available.

MARY PETRUNCIO 306 ARLENE STREET MINERSVILLE PA 17954 570-544-3522 OLGA MARUSZCZAK 7420 ROBINDALE DEARBORN HEIGHTS MI 48127 313-274-3807 MRS. NADIA DEMCZUR 152 ST. PAULS AVENUE JERSEY CITY NJ 07306 201-216-1788 NICK HORBULYK 4265 NE HALSEY ST. PORTLAND OR 97213-2010 503-284-1526 OLGA DUDISH 435 W. CENTRE STREET SHENANDOAH PA 17976 570-462-3956 ALICE OLENCHUK 2625 BONNY BLVD. PARMA OH 44134 440-884-5126 MICHAEL SHEAN 402 HILL AVE. APT. #3 LATROBE PA 15650 724-520-3298 OLGA BEREJAN 2324 W. THOMAS CHICAGO IL 60622 773-278-1404 STEPHAN SHILKEVICH 109 GENESEE STREET TRENTON NJ 08611 609-695-8867 HELEN HEIM 7328 COLEMAN MILLS RD. ROME NY 13440 315-339-2823 GLORIA PASCHEN 1438 SHIRE CR. INVERNESS IL 60067 847-705-1870 WALTER HORBOWYJ 617 SOUTH AVE. HOLMES PA 19043-1023 610-586-1379 LEW BODNAR 1120 S. CANFIELD RD PARK RIDGE IL 60068 847-825-4649 JAROSLAW LESKIW 1132 STATE HIGHWAY FRENCHTOWN NJ 08825 908-996-3772 IOURI LAZIRKO 5 BRANNON CT. CLIFTON NJ 07013 973-881-1291 STEPHEN KOLODRUB 3801 HAUPT STREET EASTON PA 18045-5038 610-253-6966 PETRO PYTEL P.O.BOX 535 TWIN LAKES WI 53181-0535 262-877-3539 RODNEY S. GODFREY 188 LAKE AVE COLONIA NJ 07067 732-381-1212 JANICE MILINICHIK 1220 PENNSYLVANIA STREET WHITEHALL PA 18052-6018 610-434-0824 JURIJ DANYLIW 503 LAWLER ST APT.A PHILADELPHIA PA 19116 215-464-2858

082

60

086

48

092

098

112

54

113

62

114

61

BR. of Mem.

NAME AND ADDRESS OF SECRETARY

BR. of NAME AND ADDRESS Mem. OF SECRETARY

116

36

001

31

GEORGE POLLYNIAK 1001 N. SHAMOKIN ST SHAMOKIN PA 17872 570-648-2657 MICHAEL STOCK 349 CHESTNUT ST ST. CLAIR PA 17970-1315 717-429-0117 LUBOV STRELETSKY 9804 HARDY RD. PHILADELPHIA PA 19115 215-677-3020 EUGENE GULYCZ 183 COLUMBIA ST. APT.#3 NEW BRITAIN CT 06052 860-826-1802 VASYL LUCHKIW 49 WINDMILL LANE NEW CITY NY 10956 914-634-9353 PETER BYLEN 6510 VIKING AVE. PORTAGE IN 46368-3895 219-764-3922 ROMAN J. KUROPAS 24619 HILL WARREN MI 48091 810-756-1627 MARIA K.ZOBNIW 247 LOWER STELLA IRELAND ROAD BINGHAMTON NY 13905 607-798-9148 KATHERINE PROWE 10 MARGARITA ST. TOMS RIVER NJ 08757 732-349-1673 CHRISTINE BRODYN 187 HENSHAW AVE. SPRINGFIELD NJ 07081 973-376-1347 OLHA DUB 7925 AIRLINA DR. HOUSTON TX 77037 281-820-6132

037

55

OLGA OSEREDCZUK 21 COLLINS STREET CRANFORD NJ 07016-3450 908-276-6228 EDWARD M. GUZYLAK 177 WASHINGTON STREET AUBURN NY 13021 315-252-4385 MARTIN SHESKA 1857 TROXELL STREET ALLENTOWN PA 18103 610-868-8483 EUGENIA CAP 4529 BETHLEHEM PIKE TELFORD PA 18969 215-453-7220 MYRON STASIW 18 LEEDS ST. TORONTO ON M6G 1N7 416-531-9945 JOHN HOLOWATYJ 5034 CAROLYN DR. PITTSBURGH PA 15236-2506 412-653-1510 PETE S. KOHUT JR. 115 GLENN AVE. ST.CLAIRSVILLE OH 43950 614-695-1812 MICHAEL SAWKIW 18 BERKLEY AVE. COHOES NY 12047 518-237-4700 WALTER KOWALEWSKY 1778 BIG EDS RD. BOONVILLE NY 13309 315-942-5794 BASIL WASYLKIW 7638 ELMWOOD AVE. PHILADELPHIA PA 19153 215-365-2854 PETER LESHCHYSHYN 3601 CULVER RD. ROCHESTER NY 14622-1826 716-342-3874 FRANK F. STUBAN 8 COLONY ST. EXT. SEYMOUR CT 06483-3502 203-888-9935

009

57

038

20

121

36

010

72

044

16

125

48

012

10

048

27

128

049

42

131

58

016

57

053

55

133

46

017

29

056

36

134

42

020

57

057

50

137

60

021

20

058

17

139

31

026

13

062

21

142

39

027

63

066

58

147

61

028

067

37

153

53

THE UKRAINIAN WEEKL Y

SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2002

No. 2

BR. of Mem.

NAME AND ADDRESS OF SECRETARY

BR. of NAME AND ADDRESS Mem. OF SECRETARY

BR. of NAME AND ADDRESS Mem. OF SECRETARY

154

ANNA YAREMKO 1035 66TH AVE. PHILADELPHIA PA 19126 215-549-8529 STEVE MATYSZCZAK 1239 EAST 11TH STR. EDDYSTONE PA 19022 610-874-7540 GEORGE B. FEDORIJCZUK 3520 SUSSEX LANE PHILADELPHIA PA 19114 215-632-8560 TEODOR DUDA 3212 GUILFORD STREET. APT #2 SECOND FLOOR PHILADELPHIA PA 19136 215-332-8949 BONNIE L.SCHOLTIS 9 WEST MAPLE LANE BERWICK PA 18603 570-759-7156 MARY K. PELECHATY 3318 STICKNEY AVE. TOLEDO OH 43608-1351 419-726-4712 OKSANA A. MELNYK 10086 SONYA LANE CINCINNATI OH 45241-3603 513-779-3788 JOHN BABYN 350 LEON AVE. PERTH AMBOY NJ 08861 732-442-4674 GISELA STEFURYN 211 CARVERTON RD. TRUCKSVILLE PA 18708 717-696-1572 STEFKO KUROPAS 105 S. SALEM DR. SCHAUMBURG IL 60193 847-923-7458 JOHN LABA 24 CAVALCADE BLVD WARWICK RI 02889-1605 401-737-2915 SARAH B. LAZOR 2 PARTRIDGE LANE E. KINGSTON NH 03827 603-642-5955 GREGORY KLYMENKO 7-C LOWRY CT. CLIFTON NJ 07012 973-478-0831 JOHN J.PRYHODA 104 ADDIS DRIVE KERHONKSON NY 12446 845-626-2925 MYCHAJLO SPONTAK 32-72 46TH STREET ASTORIA NY 11103 718-545-6671 IRENE PENDER 47 LAUREL ST. CARTERET NJ 07008 908-541-1341 ANNA TWARDOWSKA 943 GARDEN STREET UNION NJ 07083 908-688-8323 LUBA MUDRI 2920 GEORGE AVE. PARMA OH 44134 440-885-4960 MARKO ZAWADOWYCH 637 MARION ST. DENVER CO 80218 303-832-5502

233

28

JULIA KRYSCHTAL 3908 PEARL AVE. LORAIN OH 44055 440-277-8440 ALEX PRYSZLAK 5127 N. 15TH ST. PHILADELPHIA PA 19141 215-329-8988 JANET BARDELL 544 WINTER ST. WOONSOCKET RI 02895-1176 401-769-7132 LUBOMIRA SZEREMETA 120 CHERRY LANE NEW CASTLE DE 19720 302-652-8104 IRENE PASHESNIK 76 GAP ROAD COATESVILLE PA 19320 610-384-7285 PETER HAWRYLCIW 23 KAREN DRIVE LUDLOW MA 01056 413-589-0056 BASIL ROMANYSHYN 117 FAIRWAY DRIVE NEW BRITAIN CT 06053 860-229-7843 CYRIL M. BEZKOROWAJNY P.O.BOX 1238 RIVERHEAD NY 11901 516-727-3325 MYRON DUDYNSKY 12818 FRIAR STREET NORTH HOLLYWOOD CA 91606 818-505-6887 JAREMA DYKAN 2408 GARWOOD RD. ERIAL NJ 08081-4902 609-560-1118 BOHDAN HRYSHCHYSHYN 701 TRALEE DR. BETHEL PARK PA 15102-1333 412-833-2551 GLORIA TOLOPKA 293 W.5TH STREET DEER PARK NY 11729 631-667-6483 JOHN P. SNYDER 2267 KENNEDY ST. PHILADELPHIA PA 19137 215-533-3981 MICHAEL P. FELENCHAK 24 WESTWIND RD. HORSEHEADS NY 14845-1173 607-739-7440 HELENE SENEDIAK 484 S.RACCOON RD.APT.E27 YOUNGSTOWN OH 44515 330-792-5157 HRYHORIJ HAWRYSHKIW 15 WRIGHT AVE. AUBURN NY 13021 315-253-5517 ALEX SKIBICKYJ 619 HARD ROAD WEBSTER NY 14580-8903 716-671-8544 PAULINE BALUTIANSKI 11 MAC ARTHUR AVE. CRANFORD NJ 07016 908-276-2477 DANA A. JASINSKY 7 HEDGEWOOD RD. HOWELL NJ 07731 732-972-3545 WALTER HOYSAN 1906 PENNSYLVANIA AVE. BETHLEHEM PA 18018 610-866-1767

290

15

MYCHAJLO CHOMA 1420 ELMTREE STREET BALTIMORE MD 21226 410-355-3968 VERA NAPORA 3926 BROOKLYN AVE. CLEVELAND OH 44109 216-749-7851 ROMAN FOROSTYNA 4404 SIXTH AVENUE APT. #2A BROOKLYN NY 11220 718-438-1326 PETER LOBUR 2601 CHESTNUT STREET NEW KENSINGTON PA 15068 412-337-8184 LINDA LESCHUK 5290 APPLEWOOD DR. FLUSHING MI 48433 810-659-9407 THEODOR P. GOSKO 17765 W. ITHACA ROAD BRANT MI 48614 NETTIE SHERBY 1446 FRANCES LANE PLAINFIELD NJ 07062-2125 908-757-6157 STEPHEN SAYUK 161 W. 16TH STREET NORTHAMPTON PA 18067 610-262-9408 PAUL G. FENCHAK 7422 BROOKWOOD AVE. BALTIMORE MD 21236 410-663-9348 KATHERINE FEDYSZYN P.O.BOX 189 CHESTER SPRINGS PA 19425 215-771-2603 ANDREW KEYBIDA 9 RUTGERS STREET MAPLEWOOD NJ 07040 973-762-2827 MICHAEL BILYK P.O. BOX 13 BASEHOR KS 66007 913-724-2131 BARBARA CHUPA 240 E. 6TH STREET NEW YORK NY 10003 212-674-5340 BOHDAN KURCZAK 294 CHESTNUT AVE. EAST MEADOW NY 11554 516-542-1380 IWAN KUJDYCH 654 N. MAIN ROAD VINELAND NJ 08360 856-691-4497 DEBORAH HOLTER 1162 FERRIS AVE. BERWICK PA 18603-2803 570-752-6882 OLGA PISHKO 344 HELEN AVE MONESSEN PA 15062 724-684-3421 MICHAEL LUCIW 1009 MELROSE AVE. MELROSE PARK PA 19027 215-635-5109 EUGENE MAKAR 1098 SUNNY SLOPE DR. MOUNTAINSIDE NJ 07092 908-654-9568 ANNA PETRICHYN 2409 MEIGHEN RD. WINDSOR ON CANADA N8W 4C2 519-948-1127

156

22

239

30

291

38

162

15

241

14

293

50

163

52

247

31

296

23

164

63

248

14

303

23

165

46

253

39

309

12

166

254

46

312

168

42

256

13

318

11

169

38

257

33

320

57

176

26

261

19

321

13

177

16

264

30

322

29

178

267

42

323

22

182

43

268

20

325

74

200

74

271

69

327

56

204

56

274

22

331

16

209

18

283

64

333

16

214

70

285

48

338

63

222

63

286

29

339

23

226

19

287

65

340

16

288

25

341

32

No. 2

THE UKRAINIAN WEEKL Y

SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2002

BR. of Mem.

NAME AND ADDRESS OF SECRETARY

BR. of NAME AND ADDRESS Mem. OF SECRETARY

BR. of NAME AND ADDRESS Mem. OF SECRETARY

343

30

MARY SWERYDA 90 KARLAN DRIVE ROCHESTER NY 14617-5247 716-342-2089 MICHAEL KARKOC 708 5TH STREET N.E. MINNEAPOLIS MN 55413 612-378-1675 HALINA K.ARCHETTO P.O.BOX 112 MINOTOLA NJ 08341 856-691-2038 MICHAEL ZACHARKO 135 S. 18TH AVE. MANVILLE NJ 08835 908-725-8062 STEPHEN BAKAJ 133 KNICKERBOCKER AVE. STAMFORD CT 06907 203-359-1834 OSYP RINNYK 71 VAN LIEW AVENUE MILLTOWN NJ 08850 732-545-9171 SEMEN HASIAK 530 KENTUCKY ST.JOSEPH MO 64504-1408 816-238-5237 OLEKSA PRODYWUS 908 AVERY ROAD BELLEVUE NE 68123-4001 402-292-2551 OLGA LITEPLO 941 57TH STREET BROOKLYN NY 11219 718-854-6992 FEDIR PETRYK 1800 GRIEB AVENUE LEVITTOWN PA 19055 215-946-3962 WLADEMER WLADYKA 7031 SEVEN HILLS BLVD. SEVEN HILLS OH 44131 216-524-9005 CHRISTINE DZIUBA 36 CLOVERDALE ROAD ROCHESTER NY 14616 716-621-5230 OLGA MAKSYMOWICH 1784 WEST AVE. MIAMI BEACH FL 33139 305-532-2934 PAUL KREPICZ 8618 REXTOWN RD. SLATINGTON PA 18080 610-767-8681 SOPHIE LONYSZYN 66 CEDAR GROVE LANE APT. 45 SOMERSET NJ 08873 732-356-2045 WANETA GWIAZDA 19991 COUNTY X LOT #11 CHIPPEWA FALLS WI 54729 715-723-9292 JOHN GAWALUCH 2261 SWEDISH DR. APT.#25 CLEARWATER FL 33763-2609 813-791-4040 KATHERINE PANCHESINE P.O.BOX 445 WOODBINE NJ 08270 609-861-2239 WALTER FICYK 327 EVERGREEN CT. APOPKA FL 32712-3601 407-889-2567

381

36

BARBARA O. BOYD 12922 S.W. DOUG DRIVE LAKE SUZY FL 34266 941-627-1082 JULIA H. CRESINA 312 N. NICE ST. FRACKVILLE PA 17931 570-874-0727 MYRON KRAMARCZUK 3438 SILVER LANE N.E. ST. ANTHONY MN 55421 612-788-7957 IRENE OLIYNYK 103 BIRCH STREET WILLIMANTIC CT 06226 860-423-3815 ANDREW MARYNIUK 9111 E.BAY HARBOR DR. APT.6-B BAY HARBOR ISLAND FL 33154 305-868-1594 TATIANA MISKIV 636 RUNNYMEDE ROAD TORONTO ON CANADA M6S 3A2 416-767-0628 EMILIA SMAL 217-16 DIXIE RD ST. CATHERINES ON CANADA L2N 7N5 905-646-8158 GLORIA HORBATY 3 PEQUOT RD. WALLINGFORD CT O6492 203-269-5909 KATHERINE ONUFRYK 6 GLENDEE RD. HAMILTON ON CANADA L8K 1Y8 905-547-4843 ILKO CYBRIWSKY 3313 ELLIS WAY LOUISVILLE KY 40220 502-458-6168 VERA GOJEWYCZ 199 DUBLIN CT. UNIT#2 SCHAUMBURG IL 60194-4903 847-882-6991 MARY DOLISZNY 182 WOODSIDE DR. ST. CATHERINES ON L2T 1X6 CANADA 905-935-7779 KATHERINE SARGENT 2330 PARK AVE. EASTON PA 18045-2811 610-252-3289 WOLODYMYR ZACERKOWNY 540 MC KIM STREET SUDBURY ON P3C 2L6 CANADA 705-673-9824 SOPHIA KUCYJ 151 LA ROSE AVENUE APT. 901 WESTON ON CANADA M9P 1B3 DMYTRO ZANEWYCZ 2115 FREEMAN DRIVE RR.1 THUNDER BAY ON P7C 4T9 CANADA 807-475-0245 HALYNA PETRYK 601 HARTFORD AVE. WINNIPEG MB R2V 0X5 CANADA 204-338-6324

450

345

43

382

37

MOTRIA M.MILANYTCH 529 W. 111TH STREET APT.#51 NEW YORK NY 10025 212-749-1664 11 BOHDAN LAWRYNIW 404 BIRCH ST S. TIMMINS ONT. CANADA P4N 2B8 705-264-7487 PETRO TYMKIV 15 COLMAR PLACE DUNDAS ON L9H 4L1 CANADA 905-627-1759 MYRON GROCH 16 KEVIN DR. FONTHILL ON CANADA L0S 1E4 905-892-4336 JOSEPH R. FARENECH 77 GRAHAM AVENUE SO. HAMILTON ON L8K 2M2 CANADA 416-544-3060 ANNA KRUTYHOLOWA 21 ALICE STREET BRANTFORD ON N3R 1Y1 CANADA 519-756-5825 STEPHANIA KOCHY 836 N. OAKLEY BLVD CHICAGO IL 60622 773-384-7137 SERGUEI DJOULA 4740 LACOMBE MONTREAL PQ H3W 1R3 CANADA 514-733-3686 ANGELA HONCHAR 36 SIGRID DR. CARNEGIE PA 15106 412-429-1536 NATALIE CHOLAWKA 709 JAMES ST. UTICA NY 13501 315-724-3584 MYKOLA KIS 476 MAPLE AVE. SAN BRUNO CA 94066 650-588-3133 MYKOLA DENYSIUK 87 W. WINIFRED STREET ST.PAUL MN 55107-1138 651-224-9896 VICTOR SZWEZ 5818 W. CIELO GRANDE GLENDALE AZ 85310 602-516-9812 HALYNA KOLESSA 100 MONTGOMERY ST.APT.23-H JERSEY CITY NJ 07302 201-200-1915 LIDA HEWRYK 11440-37A AVENUE EDMONTON AB T6J 0J5 CANADA 403-435-1533 JOHN PAWLUK 920 CANNELL RD S.W. CALGARY AB T2W 1T4 CANADA 403-281-0280 MRS. IRINA DANILOVITCH 17 PERMFIELD PATH ETOBICOKE ON M9C 4Y5 416-621-2461

51

456

347

50

385

71

458

52

349

54

387

39

461

37

350

18

388

52

353

63

462

12

407

48

355

18

466

20

412

56

356

25

472

62

414

67

361

41

473

60

416

11

362

32

481

22

364

53

417

20

484

74

367

51

423

50

486

31

368

40

427

53

487

14

369

23

438

13

488

19

372

55

439

45

489

46

376

440

16

498

24

377

43

441

44

500

12

378

445

34

888

16

380

THE UKRAINIAN WEEKLY Convention countdown 2002

THE UKRAINIAN WEEKL Y

SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2002

No. 2

The front page of this issue, readers will notice, carries the official announcement of the 35th Regular Convention of the Ukrainian National Association, which begins on May 24 in Chicago. The announcement is published in accordance with the UNA By-Laws, which state that notice of the convention must be given at least four months before its starting date. The announcement also notes that branches have 60 days from the date of the announcement (in this case, January 11, for that is when the announcement appeared in the Ukrainian-language Svoboda) to elect convention delegates and their alternates. Readers will also notice that this issue contains three pages of addresses of secretaries of UNA branches that have less than 75 members. The purpose of this listing is to let branches know with whom they are eligible to unite for the purpose of electing a common delegate to the convention. Why is this important? Because the UNA operates in democratic fashion: members elect delegates from their branches, who then attend the convention to represent their interests before the highest decision-making body of the Ukrainian National Association. Branches having between 75 and 149 members are eligible for one delegate; those having 150 to 225 can elect two delegates; while those having 226-301 can elect three; and those with 301 or more members are eligible for four. However, to guarantee that each UNA member truly has a voice, smaller branches may unite for the purpose of electing a common representative to the convention. At the convention delegates will elect a new UNA General Assembly, vote on changes to the UNA By-Laws, act on reports of General Assembly members and adopt resolutions and recommendations that direct the work of the oldest and largest Ukrainian fraternal organization in the world. (This year the UNA observes the 108th anniversary of its founding.) As one of the two official publications of the Ukrainian National Association we feel it is our duty to underline the importance of having all UNA members in good standing attend the meetings of their branches at which delegates to the quadrennial UNA convention are elected. Every convention, to be sure, is a potential turning point for the Ukrainian National Association. Some, however, are more important than others, as they come at key points in the history of the organization. The 2002 convention will consider a range of weighty issues that will affect the future of the UNA. Among the priority items are the future of the UNAs Soyuzivka resort, which has been suffering serious financial losses; downsizing the General Assembly (some have proposed an assembly consisting of four executive officers, three auditors and seven advisors, instead of six officers, five auditors and 14 advisors); and the future of the UNA in Canada, where the UNAs business has been dwindling. A potential item on the agenda is a merger with the Ukrainian Fraternal Association, as renewed overtures recently have been made by the UFA leadership. (Well keep you posted.) Thus, as the 2002 convention of the Ukrainian National Association approaches, we encourage all UNA members to become involved. You have a voice, and that voice can be heard. You, and the delegates you elect, will chart the course for the UNA as it continues its beneficial work in the 21st century.

Parliamentary Elections in Ukraine and the Ukrainian diasporas role


NEWS AND VIEWS
Elections to Ukraines Verkhovna Rada, as well as local government have been scheduled for March 2002. While details regarding the Election Law need to be worked out between the Rada and the president, one can assume that the elections will be held as scheduled. Since independence Ukraine has held two national parliamentary, three presidential, and numerous local elections. The consensus has been that elections in Ukraine since independence have been conducted in a democratic fashion with only minor violations, certainly not of any significance so as to affect election results. We anticipate that this trend will continue and that both local and international observers will be afforded every opportunity to monitor unimpeded. However, elections are often decided well in advance of election day. Freedom of information, particularly the press is one issue that needs to be addressed. Another is equal access for candidates whether it be through government or private media. In most instances money is the key. While private media outlets are entitled to endorse candidates, they should be required to provide unbiased reporting and reasonably equal access. The Ukrainian World Congress (UWC) urges the people of Ukraine to make informed choices predicated on an opportunity to garner adequate information about candidates and political parties/blocs. Towards that end, the UWC urges political candidates as well as blocs to insist on equal access to voters through the media and on a personal level and to seek redress through the UWCs network and its ability to intervene with the gov-

ernment of Ukraine. Further, the UWC suggests to the Ukrainian voter that he/she study Ukraines history and recognize that no nation in the world suffered or lost as many people as the Ukrainians during the XX century. The major reason for this was the oppression imposed upon the Ukrainian people not only by a foreign power but its surrogates as well. Further, Ukraine has been abused by some people intent on exploiting a transitional period for personal gain. Ukraines future lies in democracy and reform with the rule of law as its mantra. Additionally, we encourage our constituent organizations, particularly in the West to become involved in the electoral process via support, which includes funding for a free press, civic education and election monitoring. The fulcrum for Ukraines democracy must be an open and fair exchange of ideas, resulting in an informed electorate. Western governments, while not involving themselves in the elections of a foreign state, nevertheless have a vested interest in the ability of Ukrainians to exercise their will and freely decide their political and economic orientation. Our constituent organizations representing Ukrainian diaspora communities throughout the world should work to ensure that the election in Ukraine is fair and free. An independent and democratic Ukraine has been a dream of the Ukrainian people for centuries. This dream has become a reality. Lets ensure its perseverance. For the Ukrainian World Congress: Askold S. Lozynskyj, President Victor Pedenko, Secretary General

Jan. 1998

14

Turning the pages back...

Lvivs Sheptytsky Hospital needs support of diaspora


by Dr. Volodymyr Semeniv and the Rev. Andriy Nahirnyak January 2001 marked the 10th anniversary of the reopening of the Andrey Sheptytsky Hospital. The Narodna Lichnytsya association carried out the general management of the hospital from 1992 through 1995. Thereafter, the curia of the Lviv Eparchy of the Ukrainian Greek-Catholic Church (UGCC) became the proprietor of the hospital. From 1992 to 1995 the hospital functioned as a 24-hour therapeutic center for 75 patients; since July 1995 it has functioned as a day hospital with 60 beds. Additionally, the hospital has become a diagnostic consultative center. Presently, the hospital contains an office for: consultants (neuropathologist, surgeon, psychologist, phytotherapeutist) ultrasound diagnostics, echocardiography, roentgen scopia and x-ray scopia, fibrogastroscopy, electrocardiography and electroencephalography, a gynecologist, a proctologist, a dentist, an otolaryngologist, in addition to an office for massages, physiotherapy and a laboratory. The department for Home Care Services, which is financed by Caritas Germany, has been working since December 2000. Dr. Volodymyr Semeniv is administrator and the Rev. Andriy Nahirnyak is chaplain at the Andrey Sheptytsky Hospital in Lviv.

Four years ago The Ukrainian Weekly reported that Ukraines lawmakers had voted 317 to 27 to ratify the Treaty on Friendship, Cooperation and Partnership with the Russian Federation, which established new conditions for a relationship with Ukraines largest economic partner. The historic vote came on January 14, 1998. Ukrainian Foreign Affairs Minister Hennadii Udovenko presented the document to lawmakers for their approval and urged them to ratify the treaty, saying it would build a legal base for economic cooperation with Russia, which then accounted for 47 percent of Ukraines exports. The political treaty had been signed by Ukrainian President Leonid Kuchma and Russian President Boris Yeltsin on May 31, 1997, after more than five years of discussion. Since Ukraine became independent in 1991, its leaders had worked with Russia to sign an agreement on friendship, but Russian President Boris Yeltsin had postponed his visit six times, citing the unresolved dispute over the former Soviet Black Sea Fleet and particularly the status of its main base, the Crimean port of Sevastopol, which became part of independent Ukraine. The treaty means the affirmation of the territorial integrity and inviolability of borders of Ukraine and Russia, and in this way all questions about territorial ownership of Sevastopol and Crimea are removed, Ukrainian Prime Minister Valerii Pustovoitenko told lawmakers before the vote. The signing of several Black Sea Fleet agreements days before Presidents Yeltsin and Kuchma signed the big treaty had set the stage for the final document, but some Ukrainian lawmakers charged President Kuchma and his government with making a lot of concessions during talks with Russia, including allowing Russian forces to remain on Ukrainian land in Crimea. National-patriotic factions tried to have the Treaty on Friendship, Cooperation and Partnership and the Black Sea Fleet agreement discussed jointly. They hoped that by linking the big treaty with the more controversial BSF pact, both would sink. But the attempt at linkage was not supported by a parliamentary majority. Ratification of the treaty shows the whole world that we want normal relations with Russia. This is a unique chance to make the Russian-speaking population of Ukraine loyal to the authorities, said Taras Stetskiv, lawmaker and head of the Lviv regional organization of the National Democratic Party. With parliamentary elections scheduled for March 1998, the Verkhovna Rada and the president were seeking ways to win the votes of the Russian-speaking population, which (Continued on page 23)

The department takes care of about 90 elderly people in Lviv. In November 2001, a modern kitchen and laundry room were installed. Presently, we are trying to arrange to have a 20-bed neurorehabilitation department for the elderly ready by the autumn of 2002. Currently 50,000 patients are served at the hospital each year. The mission statement of the hospital is to provide the poor and needy of the city of Lviv and its surrounding area with medical and social care regardless of their ethnic background or religious beliefs. The Sisters of St. Vincent and the nursing staff take care of the patients. A chaplain has been working full-time in the hospital. Doctors from the Ukrainian Medical Association lend us considerable help as volunteers. Thanks to Caritas Ukraine the hospital received a two-year grant from Caritas Germany in order to cover current expenses. This grant will expire by the end of 2002. These funds enabled us to renovate rooms and buy new equipment. Our goal is to create a specialized geriatric hospital. The hospital is funded totally from donations from abroad and locally. Regrettably, since the creation of a medical insurance system is at a deadlock in Parliament, there is no possibility of our hospital receiving any financial support from our federal govern(Continued on page 16)

No. 2

THE UKRAINIAN WEEKL Y

SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2002

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Moral rejuvenation is whats needed


Dear Editor: Myron Kuropas addresses two extremely important points in his Christmas year round? (December 23) column that are fairly obvious to anyone who has spent time in Ukraine and/or any of the other former Soviet republics, but for some reason have escaped any systematic analysis or study. The two related points are that (i) Soviet reality infected its populace with an unparalleled moral debasement, and (ii) a singular peculiarity of Soviet life was that it became routine for people to say one thing, think a second and do a third. These two issues prompt two reflections. First, when one reads something like Maria (Marichka) Sawchin Pyskir s extraordinary memoirs of life in the UPA, the Ukrainian Insurgent Army, and then compares the idealism, dedication to and love for the people of Ukraine on the part of many members of the UPA with the utter cynicism and total disregard for the welfare of Ukraines people among some of Ukraines present leadership, the contrast is stunning. Second, anyone and this probably includes most people in Western governments and agencies who are working to advance reform in the newly emerging states who thinks that economic or political reform can be instituted in a post-Soviet state without a concomitant moral rejuvenation are whistling in the wind. Bohdan Vitvitsky Summit, N.J.

How we can help their Ukraine


Dear Editor: Ukraine has been independent for a decade. Dr. Myron B. Kuropas asked in his article Ukraines Cultural Divide, why is their Ukraine not our Ukraine? Recently I visited Donetsk, Ukraine, with a delegation from the Pittsburgh Community Connections Program, partially sponsored by the U.S. State Department. As this is Ukraines most prosperous, most Russianized, most eastern center, we were to investigate grassroots concepts encouraging Western ideals. I found their Ukraine is mostly unaware, yet curious about our Ukraine. When we visited the central library in Donetsk I donated several English-language how to books on traditional Ukrainian crafts. They took us to a room as big as a church filled with books donated from Canadian libraries on Ukrainian subjects. These once poorly circulated books now have a 100 percent yearly borrowing history. As we gave Yevshans Ukrainian-English Learning Cassettes to the curriculum director for the regions educational system, Catherine Pryhodchenko, she said, Even if we dont learn English we will The Ukrainian Weekly welcomes letters to the editor. Letters should be typed (double-spaced) and signed; they must be originals, not photocopies. The daytime phone number and address of the letter-writer must be given for verification purposes.

improve our Ukrainian. The Society of Vasyl Stus in Donetsk reverently showed the KGB and trial transcripts they had obtained of the case against this Soviet-era dissident.. As we presented them with an English copy of selected works and a biography of Stus by Lassowsky they were surprised. When we gave them a sampling of buttons from the 1970s to independence, with messages ranging from Kiss me Im Ukrainian to Free Moroz, they were amazed that we promoted Ukraines plight and openly claim Ukrainian lineage. They wanted more information on the flyers, publications, demonstrations, marches, meetings, lectures, symposiums and concerts the West was involved in. Only at the Mariupol Institute of Humanities of Donetsk State University did Dr. Konstantine Balabanov know to thank us for the U.S. Congressional probe documenting the Terror-Famine of 1932-1933. Their Ukraine is indeed curious about our Ukraine. As Andrew Fedynsky suggested in his article The Ukrainian Smithsonian we shouldnt just pitch those flyers, posters, periodicals and books when we want space, we should give them to where they will do good. Finger-waving will not promote our Ukraine, but sharing with the Ukrainian Smithsonians in their Ukraine may. Our old job as Ukraines State Department in exile and charitable activities of sending used goods need to continue but with a new twist. For those interested, books and periodicals may be sent to: Olena Bashun, c/o Donetsk Central Library, 84 vul. Artema, Donetsk region, 34005 Ukraine. Ukrainian dissident movement memorabilia may be sent to: Donetsk Society of Vasyl Stus, c/o Oleh M. Fyodorov, Academic Ukrainian Technological Academy, 14 Belhorodska St., Horlivka, Donetsk region, 84639 Ukraine. Dont just think about it, do it. Do it for Ukraine. Michael Jula Carnegie, Pa.

PERSPECTIVES
BY ANDREW FEDYNSKY

Cold War monuments


Lasting nearly half a century and costing trillions of dollars, the Cold War was the longest and most expensive conflict in U.S. history. It began soon after World War II and ended only a decade ago. Most of the worlds countries and nearly every sector of American society became involved, even children. When I tell my own kids now 7 and 11 how we used to duck under our desks in grade school for air raid drills, their jaws drop. Then they laugh: That was supposed to protect you from nuclear bombs? I smile too. Now I can see that the whole exercise wasnt designed to save lives. It was to let kids know we were at war. The stakes in the Cold War were enormous. Americas adversary, the Soviet Union (1922-1991), was organized to promote an ideology based on the premise that history obeys certain predictable laws. A small group of men who met in the Kremlin in Moscow believed they could sway events in the direction they wanted. To serve their vision of a state-run economy, Soviet rulers had a multi-million-man army at their disposal, along with tens of thousands of nuclear missiles and a vast propaganda bureaucracy that pushed MarxistLeninist values from the local level to the global. The whole construct was held together by bluff and fear. Every person was subject to total control thoughts as well as actions; hence the term totalitarian. Notoriously, the government banned religion while pushing a cult-like worship of its leaders. The secret police hunted down anyone who wouldnt conform. Over the decades, the Soviets murdered tens of millions of people. Their goal was to impose this system on the whole world. Thats why Soviets ended up in such unlikely places as Cuba, Angola, Vietnam and the Manhattan Atom Bomb Project at Los Alamos, N.M. Led by the United States, a coalition of nations styling itself the free world deployed vast fleets of bombers, surface ships, submarines, tanks and nuclear-tipped missiles to face down the Soviet Union. Moscow matched them tank for tank, plane for plane, rocket for rocket. We called it the Cold War. Given the significance of this struggle and the magnitude of the U.S. victory, its strange that so little has been done to commemorate it. Rep. Joel Helfley is trying to remedy that. He authored a bill directing the Interior Department to identify sites and resources in the United States that were significant to the Cold War. In December, the bill passed the House and now awaits Senate approval. The Colorado district Mr. Helfley represents includes airbases, the U.S. Air Force Academy and the North American Aerospace Defense Command. Obviously, many servicemen and women who played a key role in the Cold War lived in his area and hed like to honor them. Which is what they richly deserve. Stopping the Soviets militarily allowed the force of ideas and democratic values to ultimately overwhelm their society. When that happened, the Evil Empire fractured along its natural ethnic lines. Thats where the Taras Shevchenko Monument in Washington comes in. Located just a short walk from Du Pont Circle, it should certainly be included in any Interior Department list of significant Cold War sites. For Ukrainians, poet Taras Shevchenko is a national icon who combines elements of Washington, Lincoln, Shakespeare, Dante and Martin Luther King. Born a slave in the Russian Empire in 1814, he became an orphan shortly thereafter. Because of his talent as a painter, Shevchenko miraculously won his freedom at age 24 and found welcome in the highest levels of St. Petersburg society. Instead of celebrating his own good fortune, he elevated a personal fairy tale to historical significance when he started tapping into Ukraines past to write eloquent poetry about freedom, human rights and independence. He took special aim at serfdom, autocracy and Ukrainian servility. Two years after Shevchenkos death in 1861, the tsar banned the use of the Ukrainian language, but it was too late. People had memorized Shevchenkos poetry and recited it at every occasion. When the Bolsheviks took power in Ukraine, Shevchenko was far too big to ignore, so they made him one of their own, casting him as a proto-Communist. Whatever didnt fit into their construct, they downplayed or rewrote, or censored altogether. Understandably, Ukrainians in the West who had fled Soviet terror, resented the way Shevchenko had been co-opted and distorted. Thats why the Shevchenko Memorial Committee of America, organized by leading Ukrainian American organizations, launched a campaign to construct a monument to Shevchenko in Washington. In 1960, Congress gave its official approval. The Soviets, who had named thousands of towns, streets, schools, post offices, etc. after Shevchenko, were livid. The sponsors of the Washington statue, they said, were bourgeois speculators and blasphemers, whose monstrous, disgusting and provocative purpose was to slander the homeland of Shevchenko. And so on... I was one of 100,000 people who came to Washington on a hot day in June 1964 to see former President Dwight D. Eisenhower unveil the statue. Those were unsettled times. President John F. Kennedy had been assassinated just a few months before. The 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis was still fresh in everybodys mind and Southeast Asia was starting to simmer. Those who gathered in Washington that day were deeply engaged in the Cold War. They were there to thumb their noses at the Soviets and reclaim Shevchenkos legacy. Not everyone in America was in favor of the statue. The Washington Post called it a monument to ignorance, and a blunt weapon in a fierce Cold War propaganda campaign against the Soviet Union. Its writers were puzzled by the tug of war over Shevchenko and disapproved of the monuments inherent message heralding the implausible goal of Ukrainian nationhood. They called it a peculiar notion of how to fight communism. As it turned out, of course, a healthy form of nationalism is precisely what ended up defeating communism. Obviously, the Shevchenko monument alone did not do that its just a symbol, a very powerful symbol. It cost $275,000, all raised by the private sector. I cant think of a better bargain. When the Cold War ended, it did so with a whimper, not a bang. On December 1, 1991, Ukrainians overwhelmingly approved a referendum on independence. A week later, the presidents of Russia, Belarus and Ukraine quietly dissolved the Soviet Union. Now, 10 years later, its time to start identifying symbols that can teach our children just how big an effort the Cold War was. Please contact your senators and urge them to support passage of H.R. 107.

A simple request to our performers


Dear Editor: For many a year now, I have been keeping up to date in reading the column Preview of Events. My patience is drained when I read announcements of performances by Ukrainian well-known violinists, pianists or other instrumental players who continuously perform the music of Haydn, Schubert and other composers, but rarely render Leontovych, Lysenko and other Ukrainian composers who have written Ukrainian music to which the listening public has rarely been introduced. I could listen to Haydn, Schubert and others at any time, either on records or cassettes. The concert neednt be entirely Ukrainian but to insert a theme of Ukrainian music would open the door to Ukrainian music. Do I dare bring this up to our Ukrainian musicians? Or is this an illustration of the old saying the foreign is better than our own. I prefer to recall the words of Taras Shevchenko: Learn what others have to offer, but do not forsake your own. Wasyll Gina New Haven, Conn.

Cornell club shares Ukrainian events with university community


10 THE UKRAINIAN WEEKL Y SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2002 by Julia Tretiak In light of recent concerns about the apparent lack of student interest in Ukrainian activities on college campuses, Id like to describe the efforts of the Cornell University Ukrainian Club in sharing Ukrainian culture with university students and our community. While taking the bus back to Cornell University after last years Labor Day Julia Tretiak, a junior at Cornell University says she is thoroughly enjoying her semester in Lviv. Besides intensively studying Ukrainian, she travels most weekends to towns and villages, meeting scores of relatives and new acquaintances. Just recently she was informed by Cornell that she has been awarded the Frederic Conger Wood Fellowship for Research in Europe by the Institute for European Studies. She plans to do research/field work regarding children of Chornobyl in various locations in Ukraine this summer. festivities at Soyuzivka, my friend Kristy Pocious and I became inspired to start a Ukrainian Club at our university. Earlier that summer, while working together on campus, Kristy and I were thrilled to discover that we are both of Ukrainian descent. We went to the Labor Day weekend at Soyuzivka because I was performing there with the Ukrainian dance group, Syzokryli. Roma Pryma Bohachevsky generously welcomes former group members to return to dance at various performances. Many are eager to come back, rehearse and dance with old friends. We had a great weekend, enjoying Ukrainian food and music, and meeting many new and old acquaintances. By the end of the weekend we decided that we wanted to do something to bring Ukrainian students together at Cornell. Kristy and I founded a Ukrainian Club. Our club started with two people: I became president and Kristy the treasurer. Our Ukrainian language professor, E. Wayles Browne, offered to be our advisor. We registered with the university, applied for funding, sent out e-mails, and made sidewalk chalkings announcing our club all over campus. Within a few weeks, we had about 25 students on our mailing list. A diverse group of Ukrainians and non-Ukrainians joined the club. Some of the students had been involved in Ukrainian activities all of their lives. Others were simply interested in learning more about the culture. We began to hold biweekly meetings where we planned the logistics of our first event. Our club wanted to sponsor an event of utmost importance. So we decided to invite Alex Kuzma and Joseph Sywenkyj of the Children of Chornobyl Relief Fund to come to Cornell in order to spread awareness about the Chornobyl disaster and its tragic aftermath. Mr. Sywenkyj displayed his photographs of Ukrainian children affected by the disaster. Throughout the day, Cornell students, professors and people from the Ithaca

No. 2

community were clearly moved as they viewed his photographs and asked him questions about his experiences in Ukraine. In the evening, Mr. Kuzma gave two informative, very interesting lectures about the causes of the Chornobyl disaster, its effects on children in Ukraine, long-term effects on the environment and about what we could do to help. The event was a tremendous success. We were very fortunate to have Messrs. Kuzma and Sywenkyj come to share their experiences and knowledge with the Cornell and Ithaca community. During the spring semester, the Cornell University Ukrainian Club invited Yaroslava Surmach Mills to teach us the art of making pysanky. She talked about the history of the pysanka, and what the different designs and colors represent, and she demonstrated the process step by step. Each person who attended the workshop was able to create his/her own pysanka, which proved to be very (Continued on page 17)

Guest speaker Yaroslava Surmach Mills is flanked by Cornell University Ukrainian Club founders and officers Kristy Pocious (left) and Julia Tretiak.

The Ukrainian Weekly Press Fund: November 2001


$15.00 Markian Pawluk Iwan Sierant Stefan Zwarycz Olha Balaban Walter Dziwak Roman Golash Taras Rebet Stephen Sokolyk Walter Swyrydenko Barbara Bachynsky Peter Bencak Nicholas Bobeczko Michael Bogira Maria Chraplyvy Tillie Decyk Michael Dutko Helen Filenko Myron Koblansky Halyna Koval Daniel Kozak Slavko Mendeluk O. Ohryn Leonid Petrenko Elias Petryk Walter Pytlowany Roman Semczuk Bohdan Sklierenko Marynell K. Lygizos Ihor Ambroziak Petro Bajko Zinowij Balaban Roman Bihun Lansdale, Pa. New York, N.Y. Deltona, Fla. Worthington, Ohio Lake Hiawatha, N.J. Palatine, Ill. Minneapolis, Minn. New Braunfels, Tex. Cleveland, Ohio New York, N.Y. Chicago, Ill. Cleveland, Ohio Denver, Colo. Matawan, N.J. Sun City, Ariz. Hicksville, N.Y. Houston, Tex. Charlotte, N.C. Easthampton, Mass. Greenville, N.C. Parma Heights, Ohio Warren, Mich. Sun City West, Ariz. Perkasie, Pa. Port Richey, Fla. Amsterdam, N.Y. Mississauga, Ontario Grosse Pointe, Mich. Bainbridge Island, Wa. Parma, Ohio Fairfield, Conn. Rolling Hills, Calif. Walter Bilyk Olga Blethen Mary Cherneskey Wolodymyr Dyhdalo Eugene Hanysz Dora Hrycelak Merle and Bonnie Jurkiewicz Anna Kokolski Walter Koshuba Harry Kowalcheck John Kytastyj Mark Levytsky Myron Lucyshyn Mary Maciach Olya Krutyholov Paul Pleczen A. Rakowsky Arkadi Salamacha Michael Senkiw Nazar Shcheglov Olga Siegelski Phylis Zien

The Cornell University Ukrainian Club at a recent event with Alex Kuzma (standing, left) and Joseph Sywenkyj (right) of the Children of Chornobyl Relief Fund.

Amount Name City $100.00 Daria Bekersky Tuxedo, N.Y. Eugene Shklar Redwood City, Calif. $75.00 Murray Gruza Saskatoon, Sask. $65.00 Sputnik Global Telecom Corp Des Plaines, Ill. $55.00 Serge Polishchuk Jersey City, N.J. Wasyl Sosiak Forest Hills, N.Y. Boris Wirstiuk Hackettstown, N.J. George Wyhinny S. Barrington, Ill. $50.00 Stefan Hawrysz Erdenheim, Pa. Wolodymyr Klokiw Rye, N.Y. Anthony Koltuniuk Hofman Estates, Ill. $45.00 Peter D. and Levka J. PankowPark Ridge, Ill. Boris Schulha Trabuco Canyon, Calif. Kathryn Sos-Hayda San Antonio, Tex. $35.00 Michael McGrath Franklin Square, N.Y. $30.00 Nadia Haftkowycz Wethersfield, Conn. Michael Prychodczenko Salem, Ohio John Smarsh Mississauga, Ontario $26.00 T. Motorney Washington, D.C. $25.00 Ursula Balaban Dobbs Ferry, N.Y. Bohdan Burachinsky Florham Park, N.J. Iyvan Chuchman Winnipeg, Manitoba Paul Shott Plymouth, N.H. Orest and Judy Tataryn San Jose, Calif. Ivan Franko Society, UNA Branch 83 Philadelphia, Pa. Michael Vennett Wellington, Fla. $20.00 John Carbon Baltimore, Md. William Chirash New Providence, N.J. Walter Kushner Warren, Mich. Olga Manasterski Aliquippa, Pa.

Jersey City, N.J. Sterling, Va. Saskatoon, Sask. Troy, Mich. Grayling Twp, Mich. Nokomis, Fla. Toledo, Ohio Cumberland, R.I. Lakeland, Fla. West Newton, Pa. Livonia, Mich. Huntingdon Vy., Pa. Phoenix, Ariz. Jersey City, N.J. Ternopilska Oblast, Ukraine Miami Shores, Fla. Wading River, N.Y. Newark, N.J. Inverness, Fla. Jackson Heights, N.Y. Jackson, N.J. Cameron, W.Va.

$10.00

$9.00 $5.00

TOTAL: $1,621.00 Sincere thanks to all contributors to The Ukrainian Weekly Press Fund. The Ukrainian Weekly Press Fund is the sole fund dedicated exclusively to supporting the work of this publication.

No. 2

THE UKRAINIAN WEEKL Y

SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2002

11

The Ukrainian American Youth Assn

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2002 CROWNE PLAZA HOTEL, WHITE PLAINS, NY Featuring ZOLOTA BULAVA (Montreal, Canada)

Debutante Ball

invites you to the annual

COCKTAILS AT 6:00 PM DEBUTANTE PRESENTATION AT 7:00 PM DINNER AT 8:00 PM DANCE AT 9:30 PM


Dinner and Dance $90.00 per person Dance only (for guests over 21) $45.00 per person Dance only (for guests 16-20 years old) $30.00 per person

For hotel reservations call: (914) 682-0050 Evening attire required Masters of Ceremony: Lydia Mykytyn, Jaroslaw Palylyk Reservation coordinator: Lesia Palylyk, (203) 792-2798, or fax (203) 743-3972 (Mastercard, Visa, Discover accepted) Debutante Ball Committee: Lesia Palylyk, Lyalya Yurcheniuk, Marta Matseliuch, Adia Rudyk, Michi Wyrsta

, ,

, ,

, ,

, ,

, ,

, ,

, ,

, ,

, ,

, ,

, ,

, ,

* This announcement was paid for by SUMA Yonkers Federal Credit Union
Main Office: 301 Palisade Ave., Yonkers, NY 10703; Tel.: 914-965-8560 Branch Offices: Spring Valley, NY; Tel.: 914-425-2749 Stamford, CT; Tel.: 203-969-0498

12

THE UKRAINIAN WEEKL Y

SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2002

No. 2

Annual Yalynka held in New York City Saskatchewan government report lauds Prairie Centers role as community link
SASKATOON The government of Saskatchewan on November 14 released A Progress Report on University Revitalization. This document is an interim report card on the governments attempt to revitalize the provinces universities with an eye to the current and future needs of the province. The report is a summary that is based on a comprehensive review of the universities achievements with respect to public priorities. Under the heading Meeting the Learning Needs of Society the report lauds the initiative of St. Thomas More College through the creation of the Prairie Center for the Study of Ukrainian Heritage (PCUH) as a link between this provinces Ukrainian community and academia by focusing on academic research, document collection and oral history. This important affirmation of the work of the PCUH by the provincial government demonstrates that, although only three years old, the Prairie Heritage Center has already made its mark on higher education in Saskatchewan. Among its current programs is the annual Mohyla Lecture series and, commencing in the fall of 2001, the publication of those annual talks. Important upcoming projects of the center are the publication with Novalis Press of Windows to the East: A Dialogue of Charity, and in the spring of 2002 an exhibition and symposium on the work of Saskatchewan artist Dmytro Stryjek in association with the MacKenzie Art Gallery (Regina) and the Kenderdine Art Gallery (University of Saskatchewan). Thus, the Prairie Center is quickly contributing to raising the profile of Ukrainian studies both within and beyond the borders of Saskatchewan.

Saskatoon UCC reps meet with minister


Tad Sendzimir

Officers of the UESA, UMANA and UIA during the annual Yalynka in New York. by Marco Shmerykowsky NEW YORK Continuing an annual tradition, the New York City Chapter of the Ukrainian Engineers Society of America (UESA), the Ukrainian Medical Association of North America (New York Metro Chapter), and the Ukrainian Institute of America held a traditional Yalynka on Saturday, December 15, 2001, at the Ukrainian Institute of America in New York City. Over 160 people were in attendance for an evening of holiday cheer. The evening began with a traditional Christmas Nativity play prepared under the direction of Dr. Ihor Magun with assistance from Dr. Lesia Baranetsky. The narrator for the play was Larissa Huryn, and the vocalist was Mrs. Magun-Huryn. Upon conclusion of the program brief remarks were given by Marco Shmerykowsky, president of the New York Chapter of the UESA, and by Andrij Wowk, the new national president of the UESA. After the program, the guests were invited to enjoy a hot buffet and refreshments. Members and friends celebrated the holiday cheer into the early hours of the next morning. The annual Yalynka is an excellent example of how three Ukrainian organizations are working together to provide an excellent source of professional and social contact for students, practicing professionals, newly arrived immigrants and experienced professionals within the Ukrainian American community. For more information about the organizations and how to become a member, please visit their sites on the World Wide Web: Ukrainian Engineers Society of America, www.uesa.org, Ukrainian Medical Association of North America, www.umana.org, Ukrainian Institute of America, www.ukrainianinstitute.org.

SHORT HILLS, N.J. Continuing his work in support of the Ukrainian American community and the Children of Chornobyl Relief Fund, U.S. Sen. Robert G. Torricelli (D-N.J.) attended the annual Christmas party of the Ukrainian American Professionals and Businesspersons Association of New York and New Jersey on December 15, 2001. In his address to the 150 attendees, Sen. Torricelli acknowledged the generosity of the Ukrainian American community in humanitarian efforts specifically the work of the Children of Chornobyl Relief Fund (CCRF) over the past 10 years. There can be no more worthy cause than helping the Children of Chornobyl Relief Fund achieve its ultimate goal of saving the lives of children, said Sen. Torricelli. Initiatives like this, and the dedicated souls behind them, must be supported. Held at the home of Zenon and Nadia Matkiwsky, founders of CCRF, the event raised more than $15,000 for the international charity dedicated to protecting and saving the lives of children confronting the worlds worst environmental disaster. Sen. Torricellis close relationship with CCRF over the past six years, has reflected his humanitarian spirit and his concern for the Ukrainian American community. For additional information about the Children of Chornobyl Relief Fund, please contact the CCRF national office, (973) 376-5140, or visit the website www.childrenofchornobyl.org.

Sen. Torricelli attends New York/New Jersey professionals Christmas gathering

SASKATOON The Ukrainian Canadian Congress Saskatchewan Provincial Council, the representative body for the Ukrainian community of Saskatchewan, on December 20 met with the Ralph Goodale, federal minister of natural resources, at his Regina office. The UCC-SPC, represented by President Eugene Krenosky, Treasurer Edward Lysyk and Executive Director Ostap Skrypnyk, had frank and open discussions on many topics with the minister ranging from multicultural programming in Heritage Canada, and immigration and visa questions to the current policy of deportation and denaturalization of suspected war criminals as well as the unjust internment of Ukrainians during World War I. The state of CanadaUkraine relations was also discussed. The minister expressed interest in the provincial activities of the UCC-SPC and in Ukrainian studies at the provinces universities. Minister Goodale appeared well acquainted with the topics under discussion. The UCC-SPC presentation gave

him a clear understanding of where the community stands on these issues. UCC-SPC presented the minister with a brief that outlined the UCCs position on the topics listed above. Meetings of this type serve to keep key ministers informed about community concerns and issues, noted Mr. Krenosky, president of the UCC-SPC. Maintaining an open dialogue with the Government on outstanding issues is an important function of the UCC at all levels, he added.

Correction
In last weeks report (January 6) on new projects of the Encyclopedia of Ukraine, a technical error cut short the ordering information in the last paragraph of the story. Orders for the Encyclopedia of Ukraine: Index and Errata may be sent to: CIUS Press, 450 Athabasca Hall, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2E8, Canada; telephone, (780) 492-2972; fax, (780) 492-4967; e-mail, cius@ualberta.ca.

Seen at the UAPBA Christmas party (from left) are: the Rev. Bohdan Lukie of St. John the Baptist Ukrainian Catholic Church in Newark, Leonard Mazur, president of the Ukrainian American Professionals and Buisnesspersons Association of New York and New Jersey and of Genesis Pharmaceutical Co.; Sen. Robert Torricelli with Maria Kavatsiuk, a leukemia survivor who was brought to the United States for treatment by the Children of Chornobyl Relief Fund; and Dr. Zenon Matkiwsky, founder of Children of Chornobyl Relief Fund and chief of surgery at Union Hospital.

No. 2

THE UKRAINIAN WEEKL Y

SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2002

13

MN2 Productions presents dance-theater piece Shadows of Our Forgotten Ancestors


CLEVELAND Shadows of Our Forgotten Ancestors, a dance-theater piece based on the novel by Mykhailo Kotsiubynsky (1864-1913) which uses the theatrical conventions of dance, puppetry and music to tell the story of the star-crossed young lovers Ivan and Marichka, will premiere as a bilingual presentation by MN2 Productions at the Cleveland Public Theater on January 25. The tale is set in the Hutsul region of the Carpathian Mountains, in a world bound by ritual and custom, as well as fate and destiny. The text for the production, considered as a variation on the Romeo and Juliet theme, is by Nadia Tarnawsky. The piece is brought to life through the choreography of Sarah Morrison of Morrison Dance; Natalie Kapeluck of the Mary Miller Modern Dance Company and artistic director of the Kyiv Ukrainian Dance Ensemble; and Roman Lewkowicz, artistic director of the Obrij Folk Dance Ensemble and former dancer/choreographer with the Dukla Ukrainian Dance Company in Presov, Slovakia. The staging is by Michael D. Flohr. The soundtrack for the production features Ukrainian folk music from the Hutsul, Polissia and Volyn regions of Ukraine performed on folk instruments by master musicians: Vasyl Geker on violin and drymba; Alexander Fedoriouk on cimbalom and buben; Andrei Pidkivka on nai, sopilka, frilka, tylynka, koza, zozulka, and drymba; and Mykola Kuzyk on trembita; with Ms. Tarnawsky, vocals. The soundtrack from Shadows of Our Forgotten Ancestors is available on CD and cassette. MN2 Productions, with Ms. Tarnawsky and Mr. Flohr, as co-directors and Ms. Kapeluck, as collaborator, mounts theater productions, concerts and workshops based on Ukrainian themes featuring Ukrainian and non-Ukrainian performers. In the summer of 2000, Ms. Tarnawsky, a faculty member at the Cleveland Institute of Music, and her husband, musician and free-lance director Mr. Flohr, created the dance-theater piece Ancestral Voices, a collaborative venture based on Ukrainian folk songs and the poetry of Oleksander Oles, Lesia Ukrainka, Taras Shevchenko and Mykhailo Drai-Khmara in translations by Helen Turkewicz-Sanko. The work, which premiered at Clevelands Inside Gallery on June 29, received critical

Nadia Tarnawsky

Heather Baur as Palahna and Artour Bajanov as Ivan in the MN2 Production Shadow of Our Forgotten Ancestors, which premieres at the Cleveland Public Theater on January 25. acclaim from the Cleveland Plain Dealer in a review by dance critic Wilma Salisbury headlined A Magical Rendering of Ukrainian Folklore. MN2 Productions has received funding for its latest project from the Ohio Arts Council and the Ukrainain Museum and Archives of Cleveland, of which it has recently become a theater partner. Shadows of Our Forgotten Ancestors will run for three performances in the Gordon Square Theater at Cleveland Public Theater, 6415 Detroit Ave., on January 25 and 26 at 8 p.m., and January 27 at 3 p.m. Tickets are $15, general admission; $12 for seniors and students with a valid student ID. For ticket reservations call (216) 749-0060. Soundtrack CDs and cassettes are available for $15 and $12, respectively, plus $3 shipping; please make checks payable to Nadia Tarnawsky and send orders to her at P. O. Box 609067, Cleveland, OH 44109. For more information about MN 2 Productions, visit the website http://go.to/mn2productions; or e-mail mn2productions@yahoo.com.

The musical soundtrack by Alexander Fedoriouk and Vasyl Geker to the dance theater-piece Shadows of Our Forgotten Ancestors.

Bandura Magazine celebrates 20 years


CARMICHAEL, Calif. Bandura Magazine is a unique publication that appeared on the Ukrainian publishing scene 20 years ago with the aim of presenting articles on the history and development of the art of bandura playing. Mykola Czorny faithfully had served as the magazines editor-in-chief, promoter, financial supporter and telephone solicitor until his death in 1999. At the request of the family of the deceased, Olha Herasymenko accepted the post of editorin-chief. In previous years, she had actively helped with the typesetting, editing and printing of the magazine. Thanks to Lida Czorny-Matiaszek and other volunteers, the magazine is becoming ever more bilingual. Dr. Andrij Hornjatkevyc is invaluable as the Ukrainian-language editor. The materials come from all parts of the world. The format has been changed to a semi-annual publication with twice the original number of pages. Each issue contains such sections as: History of the Bandura, Bandura in the Diaspora, Bandura in Ukraine, New Bandura Recordings and Music for the Bandura. Issue No. 69-70 was devoted to the memory of Mr. Czorny. In this issue there was also a tribute written by Yuriy Borovyk, the producer of Kobzarsky Maydan, a Kyiv radio program devoted to bandura music and its performers. Other articles in this issue covered the activities of kobzar Terenity Parkhomenko and his daughter Evdokiya, as well as the contemporary bandurists Orest Baran, Ms. Herasymenko and Roman Hrynkiv. There was an announcement of an upcoming competition for bandura compositions sponsored by the Canadian Bandura Foundation. A series of installments about kobza and lira players, and psalm singers by Bohdan Zheplynsky appeared in the history section of recent issues. There were articles about the recordings of Zinoviy Shtokalko by Dr. Hornjatkevyc and Vasyl Yemets by Roman Sawycky. The latest issues also began a series of biographical sketches of the members of the editorial staff: Stephanie Czorny-Dosinchuk, Mr. Zheplynsky and Volodymyr Yesypok, president of the Bandurists League in Ukraine. The diaspora section reported on bandurists in Argentina, Brazil, Kuban, the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus based in Detroit, summer camps for bandurists in the United States and Canada, bandura schools in Cleveland, New York, Chicago and Toronto, and the Bandura 2000 Festival in Canada. The Bandura in Ukraine section contained materials about bandura schools in Stritivka, Ternopil, Lutsk, Chernihiv, Lviv, Kyiv and Mykolayiv (on the Dnipro) as well as festivals in Dubno, Kyiv and elsewhere. There were reviews of Shtokalkos A Kobzar Handbook, a brief history of the kobzar phenomenon by Mr. Zheplynsky, a collection of pieces for bandura by Halyna Menkush and others. The New Bandura Music section carried reviews of recordings by various artists, including Al di Meola with Roman Hrynkiv, who released Winter Nights. In the Music for the Bandura section there were scores of Ukrainian Christmas carols, the first bandura adaptation by Myroslav Skoryks Album Leaf, Hopak by Petro Hocharenko and Duma about Chornobyl by Halyna Toporovska. There were advertisements of the Trembita bandura factory in Lviv, bandura competitions for composers and performers, and other unique-materials. A years subscription to Bandura Magazine costs $25; the administration address is: The New York School of Bandura, 84-82 164th St., Jamaica, NY 11432-1735.

A SPECIAL CHRISTMAS OFFER: BOTH VOLUMES FOR ONLY $25

The Ukrainian Weekly 2000

To mark the end of this millennium and the beginning of a new one, the editors of The Ukrainian Weekly prepared The Ukrainian Weekly 2000, a two-volume collection of the best and most significant stories that have appeared in the newspaper since its founding through 1999. Volume I covers events from 1933 through the 1960s; Volume II the 1970s through the 1990s. To order copies of this two-volume chronicle of the 20th century, please use the clip-out form below. The Ukrainian Weekly 2000 is sure to become a resource for researchers, and a keepsake for readers. A great gift idea! THE UKRAINIAN WEEKLY 2000 TWO-VOLUME SET
l l

Number of two-volume sets $ Total cost of book sets at $25.00 each Also, I would like to donate to The Ukrainian Weekly Press Fund (check one): o $25.00 o $50.00 o $75.00 ( o $100.00 o Other $ ____________ I would like to subscribe to The Ukrainian Weekly (check one): o $45.00 (for UNA members) o $55.00

____________ $ ____________

l l l

$ ____________

l l

$ ____________ Total $ ____________

Please make check or money order payable to: The Ukrainian Weekly

Name Street Address

UNA Branch Number (if applicable) Apt. #

City

State/Province

Zip/Postal Code

Mail to: The Ukrainian Weekly, 2200 Route 10, P.O. Box 280, Parsippany, NJ 07054 To order by phone, call (973) 292-9800, ext. 3042.

New book focuses on Kozaks and religion in Ukraine


14 THE UKRAINIAN WEEKL Y SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2002 marked the completion of a major scholarly project of the Church Studies Program; its publication by a major academic press will undoubtedly help introduce Ukrainian history and religious tradition to broader circles of the English-reading public. The book, which discusses the role of religion in Cossack [Kozak] revolts of the late 16th and early 17th centuries, also examines the significance of the religious factor in the Khmelnytsky Uprising (1648-1654). The Ukrainian Kozaks, often compared in historical literature with the pirates of the Mediterranean and frontiersmen of the American West, constituted one of the largest Kozak Hosts in the Eurasian steppe borderland. They became known to the outside world for their wars with the Tatars, Turks, Poles and Russians. Following the successful revolt led by Bohdan Khmelnytsky in 1648, they created a polity known as the Hetmanate. Religion played a significant role in Kozak life, although it has been overlooked by modern historians. By and large the Kozaks were Orthodox Christians, and quite early in their history they adopted a religious ideology in their struggles against those of other faiths, initially the Muslim Turks and Crimean Tatars and later the Roman Catholic Poles and Lithuanians. Their acceptance of the Muscovite protectorate in 1654 was also influenced by their religious ideas. The Kozak revolts have traditionally been viewed in historiography as a species of peasant rebellion, with little ideological appeal beyond that social stratum. By examining the religious discourse of the period and the Kozak attitude toward religion, the book shows that the religious element was no less important in Kozak revolts than the social factor. Without the skillful use of religious ideas, the Kozak uprisings would never have attained their considerable proportions and attracted as many members of the nobility, clergy and townspeople into the rebel ranks as they actually did. The book breaks significant new ground in several respects. Reinterpreting Ukrainian, Polish and Russian historical sources, it shows how the confessionalization of religious life in the early modern period affected

No. 2

Cover of Dr. Serhii Plokhys new book.


Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies

EDMONTON In November 2001 Oxford University Press (United Kingdom) published a book by the director of the Church Studies Program at the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, Dr. Serhii Plokhy. Titled The Cossacks and Religion in Early Modern Ukraine, publication in North America was slated for December 2001. The release of the book

Kozak attitudes toward religion and how Kozak involvement in the religious struggle between Eastern Orthodoxy and Roman Catholicism contributed to the formation not only of Ukrainian, but also Polish and Russian cultural identity. The discussion of Kozak-Jewish antagonism reveals the fundamental significance of the previously overlooked religious dimension, showing how CounterReformation ideas shaped the opposing perspectives of Cossack officers and rank-and-file rebels. Thus, the book does not focus narrowly on matters of faith and Church history, but treats religion as a cultural system and uses the religious perspective to shed new light on broader social questions of mentality and identity formation. Since the Kozaks themselves left no political or religious writings discussing their attitudes to religion, this book reconstructs the attitudes and mentality of the Kozak officers and rank-and-file rebels on the basis of writings of the Orthodox clergy, Kozak correspondence of the period, and reports of Polish, Muscovite and Turkish envoys to the Kozaks. Apart from an extensive study of the published sources, the book makes use of a number of previously unpublished materials from the archival and manuscript collections of Kyiv, Lviv, Moscow and St. Petersburg. Myroslav Yurkevich of CIUS participated in the preparation of the manuscript for publication. He translated into English those parts of the book that were originally written in Ukrainian, edited the text, and helped Dr. Plokhy with bibliographic research. The Rev. Dr. Iurii Mytsyk, Drs. Paul Bushkovitch, Peter Rolland, Frank Sysyn, Zenon Kohut, John-Paul Himka and Mikhail Dmitriev read the manuscript and submitted their comments and suggestions to Dr. Plokhy. Orders for the book (ISBN 0-19-924739-0) should be sent to: CWO Department, Oxford University Press, FREEPOST NH 4051, Corby, Northlands NN 189ES, United Kingdom (hard cover, 48 pounds sterling); or in North America, to: Order Department, Oxford University Press, 2001 Evance Road, Cary, NC 27513 (hard cover, $74 U.S.).

The borders of the new Europe: a trilateral conference on Germany, Poland and Ukraine
by Iwanna I. Rebet MUNICH In collaboration with the Polish and Ukrainian consulates in Munich and the Academy for Political Education in Tutzing, Bavaria, the Ukrainian Free University organized a two-day conference dedicated to the question of the future of Polish-Ukrainian relations once Poland becomes a full-fledged member of the European Union. The conference began on November 22. Opening remarks setting a framework for the proceedings were delivered by: Jolanta Kozlowska, consul general of Poland in Munich; Heorhij Kosykh, consul general of Ukraine; Dr. Leonid Rudnytzky, rector of the Ukrainian Free University (UFU); and Prof. Heinrich Oberreuter, director of the Tutzing Academy. Following these, Miroslaw Czech, former member of the Polish Parliament, (Sejm) and Arnold Vaatz, member of the German Parliament (Bundestag), offered extensive introductory comments on the subject matter. The days program concluded with a concert by young Polish and Ukrainian musicians who are currently studying in Germany. The host for the opening day of the conference was the Munich Academy of Music and Theater. The second day of the conference, held in the Bavarian State Archives building, featured a keynote address delivered by Bohdan Osadczuk, a renowned political scientist, journalist and former vice-rector of the UFU, and three separate sessions on selected topics. The first session, devoted to politics and society in Poland and Ukraine, was chaired by Dr. Hermann Clement, associate director of the East European Institute in Munich; the panelists were: Marek Ziolkowski, ambassador of Poland to Ukraine; Dmytro Pavlychko, Ukraines ambassador in Warsaw, and Dr. Eberhard Heyken, the recently retired German ambassador to Ukraine. Members of the panel agreed that Poland and Ukraine currently enjoy an unprecedented friendly relationship marked by mutual respect and cooperation that contributes to the political stability of Central and Eastern Europe. Governments of Poland change, remarked Ambassador Pavlychko, but the Polish policy vis--vis Ukraine remains the same. Ukraine has made its choice to go with Europe, and Polands upcoming Polish membership in the European Union, despite the introduction of visa requirements between the countries, will not weaken Polish-Ukrainian relations, he stated. The second panel analyzed the current state of the economies of Ukraine and Poland, and the relations between these two countries within the European framework. The panel comprised Polish Senator Mieczyslaw Janowski; Andrej Perlix, an advisor to the Polish minister of foreign economic affairs; Prof. Peter Hampe of the Tutzing Academy and Dr. Karin Rau, the official representative of German business in Kyiv. During the discussion, presided over by Dr. Wolfgang Quaisser from the Munich-based Institute of Eastern Europe, the panelists discussed the current state of Ukraines economy and the countrys chances of eventually joining the European Union. Especially well received were Dr. Raus comments about Ukraines recent economic growth. The final session of the conference, dedicated to culture, science and religion, was chaired by Leonid Rudnytzky. It featured Msgr. Dr. Ivan Dacko, who is responsible for the external relations of the Ukrainian Greek-Catholic Church; Dr. Mykola Zhulynsky, former vice prime minister for cultural affairs of Ukraine; Prof. Stefan Kozak, chairman of the department of Ukrainian studies at Warsaw University; and Peter Hilkes of the Institute of Eastern Europe. The main topic of this session was the positive impact of the recent papal visit on Ukraines self-identity, and the ongoing rebirth and growth of Ukrainian culture. The final summation of the conference was offered by Prof. Ulrich Schweier of the University of Munich, who in evaluating the various presentations stressed the apparent need to hold such a conference on a yearly basis and to publish its proceedings. Over 100 people attended the two-day event, which was conducted in three languages German, Polish and Ukrainian. Simultaneous translations of the papers read and commentaries made were provided by two professional translators and Oksana Hnatiuk, a fourth year law student at the UFU. Following the official conclusion of the conference, all the participants and guests attended a gala reception in Munich City Hall hosted by the representative of the mayor, Elizabeth Schlosser. The conference received ample coverage in the international media, including Radio Liberty and the Voice of America.

SASKATOON Dr. Oleh Wolowyna of Chapel Hill, N.C., on November 16 delivered the 2001 Mohyla Lecture at St. Thomas More College in Saskatoon. A demographer and statistician by training, Dr. Wolowyna provided a historical overview as well as current information on the participation of ethnic Ukrainian Canadians in traditional and non-traditional churches. Dr. Wolowyna noted the important role that assimilation and mortality have played in declining rates of participation of ethnic Ukrainians in both the Ukrainian Catholic and Ukrainian Orthodox Churches. Utilizing recently released Canada Census data, he described regional variations but underscored that the overall rate of decline has accelerated in the last decade.

Demographer Oleh Wolowyna delivers 2001 Mohyla Lecture

He noted in particular the trend whereby individuals of partial Ukrainian ancestry some 650,000 are members of neither the Ukrainian Catholic Church or the Orthodox Church, and that, combined with the process of continuing assimilation, will have serious future implications for both Churches. Dr. Wolowyna has taught at the University of Western Ontario and University of North Carolina. He is President of Informed Decisions Inc., The firm is currently designing and implementing health information systems in Ukraine and Jordan. The Mohyla Lecture Series, created in 1995 and supported by the Prairie Center for the Study of Ukrainian Heritage, is a program of annual lectures devoted to a discussion of Ukrainian heritage and current affairs.

Ukrainian Canadian writer tackles a difficult subject


No. 2 THE UKRAINIAN WEEKL Y SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2002 by Oksana Zakydalsky
Special to The Ukrainian Weekly

15

TORONTO A book of fiction for teenagers about an alleged Ukrainian war criminal? Writer Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch is no newcomer to difficult subjects. She is the author of a childrens book about the internment of Ukrainian Canadians during World War I (Silver Threads), a picture book about the 1932-1933 famine in Ukraine (Enough), and a story for young adults based on the Armenian massacre (The Hunger). Her latest book, Hopes War, tells the story of 15-year old Kat (Kataryna) Baliuk, a gifted fine arts student who hopes to have a fresh start at a new school for the arts after a less than successful year at a Catholic high school. The stresses of fitting into a new school, making new friends and finding the right outlet for her talent take second place when her family becomes the center of a media storm. Her grandfather, Danylo Baliuk, is accused by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) of being a policeman

OUN member offers stirring account of underground resistance movement


Cover of Hopes War by Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch. by Areta Pawlynsky EAST HANOVER, N.J. Maria Savchyn Pyskir held an audience captive on November 17, 2001, with her keen memories of participating in the Ukrainian underground resistance from 1939 until 1953. At the age of 14, Ms. Pyskir became involved in the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists (OUN) out of a desire to know more about Ukraine. Even at such a young age, she sensed Ukraines potential as an independent country and felt that through the OUN she could get a strong grasp of history, something essential to attain freedom. Her involvement grew to active participation in the Ukrainian Insurgent Armys (UPA) grueling struggle beginning in 1944, wherein she sacrificed contact with her family, her husband and two sons. She was captured for the second and final time in 1953, several months after Stalins death. A memoir of Ms. Pyskirs life was published in Ukrainian as part of the expansive, multi-volume Litopys UPA in 1995. This year, a condensed version was published in English under the title Thousands of Roads. Ms. Pyskir recorded seminal facts merely a few months after arriving in the United States in 1955 under political asylum, and then continued to work on it for years. Fear of the ramifications for family members in Ukraine delayed the memoirs release until several years after Ukraines independence was proclaimed in 1991. A heart-wrenching chapter from Thousands of Roads, describing the KGBs 1947 discovery of her hiding with an infant son at a Polish rectory, was read aloud at the beginning of the evening. This was followed by the author s description of the partisan spirit, and a lengthy question and answer period. Ms. Psykir articulated the importance of the partisan spirit and the influence of its struggle on Ukraines national consciousness. She pointed out the tremendously difficult role carved out for her generation a generation marked by growing up under three different political occupations and enduring two world wars. Contrary to being characterized as unrealistic, Ms. Pyskir believes that the resistance gradually realized that a military war could not be won against the Soviets but felt it could win Ukraines soul. The partisans felt compelled to make each day count, due to the uncertainty of the future. She believes that they put everything into their struggle, wanting desperately to create history, and described the movement as a cult of life, not death. This tremendous drive was recognized by the Soviets, who worked steadily to crush the resistance. Ms. Pyskir said she believes that the resistances influence has endured in Ukraines national consciousness and, thus, ultimately played a role in the creation of Ukraines sovereignty. For example, its visceral grip can still be felt in the popularity of that eras songs and the pride that many towns and villages have expressed post-1991 by erecting tall burial mounds to honor those in the UPA who fell in battle. She is critical, however, of todays Ukraine for not having enough feeling of a national soul. The psychological scars of a policy promoting Russian superiority for hundreds of years are still clearly visible, she noted. The evening was organized by the Ukrainian American Professionals and

for the Nazis in World War II Ukraine and is suspected of having participated in atrocities against civilians. All of Ms. Skrypuchs books have been well received and have enjoyed good sales. Hopes War, published in October by Dundurn Press, differs from her previous works in the fact that, this time, the historical context is not something that is done and over with, but one that continues to devastate some families and touches the whole Ukrainian community today. The background to the books story is the problem of finding Nazi criminals in Canada. The Dechenes Commission, convened to advise the government on how to deal with alleged war criminals in Canada, recommended in its 1985 report that such accused persons be given criminal trials in Canada. When the first three criminal cases were thrown out of court because of lack of evidence, the federal government lowered its standards and said it would institute deportation proceedings against suspected war criminals. Under federal law, people who lie about their wartime activities at the time of their immigration can be denaturalized and deported, even if there is no proof they actually committed any war crimes. Because the government destroyed old immigration records, the courts do not even have to prove someone lied, just that he probably lied. The case in the book against Kats grandfather is based on the cases of four real individuals in Canada. Three have been ordered deported: Helmut Oberlander of Waterloo, Ontario, Wasyl Odynsky of Toronto and Volodymyr Katriuk of Montreal. The fourth, Serge Kisluk of St. Catharines, Ontario, was also ordered deported, but died on May 21, 2001. In the Katriuk case, testimony was sought in Ukraine but once the trial was over and Mr. Katriuk was stripped of his citizenship, the people who testified against him admitted they had lied under oath. Their testimony had been taken under the threat of torture by the former KGB. Ms. Skrypuch said that every single thing that happens to Danylo Baliuk actually happened I just put it together. At her book launch, held on November 17, 2001, at the Ukrainian Canadian Art Foundation, Ms. Skrypuch explained how she came to write the book. She stressed the fact that the central focus of the book is not wartime Ukraine but the issue of justice in Canada today; that it concerns a human rights issue rather than an ethnic one. (The Ottawa Citizen misleadingly titled its review of the book Explores strained relations between Jews and Ukrainians.) Ms. Skrypuch said that she did a lot of research for the book she interviewed people who have been accused and

Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch autographs copies of her new book. talked to many people who are involved with deportation procedures. She noted that people are being targeted, but they are not given a criminal trial: such actions of the government have put the rights of all naturalized Canadians under threat. This is brought out in the book by the support the family receives from Kats Vietnamese friend whose grandparents came to Canada as boat people. The book is aimed at 12-to 16-year-olds junior high school age. It features a teens voice and perspective, and convincingly connects history and today. As Kat learns her grandfathers story, a chapter of Ukrainian history unfolds both for her and for the reader. Her grandfathers and the whole familys ordeal becomes the defining aspect of Kats year and solves some of the ambiguities with which she has to deal in her personal life. However, the wider issue of justice and fairness for all remains unresolved, as it is in real life. Hopes War is a book that confronts the young reader with a contemporary issue, engages him in the efforts of a young person to understand it, and shows him the effect an ill-guided government policy can have on a family and a whole community. It is both a good story and food for thought and discussion.

Businesspersons Association of New York and New Jersey (UAPBA). Efforts are being undertaken to reprint the Ukrainian-language version of Ms. Pyskirs memoirs to make the book available to young people and others in Ukraine who are wholly unfamiliar with what the UPA was and what it did. Anyone interested in supporting this project financially may contact the UAPBAs vice-president, Bohdan Vitvitsky, via email bvitvitsky@home.com

Andrew Nynka

Maria Pyskir autographs a copy of her book for the Rev. Bohdan Lukie.

16

THE UKRAINIAN WEEKL Y

SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2002

No. 2

CLA SSIFIEDS
TO PLACE YOUR ADVERTISEMENT CALL MARIA OSCISLAWSKI, ( 9 73 ) 2 9 2 - 9 8 0 0 x 3 0 4 0 SERVICES
,
, , , , , . . .:(718) 366-5025 (347) 693-4061 Ta

Lvivs Sheptytsky...
(Continued from page 8) ment in the near future. Some funds come from our patients as charitable donations, which cover about 40 percent of our current expenses. Nevertheless, with Ukraines poor economy we do not foresee any notable increase in these figures in the near future. Within the past year we have brought about a more effective and efficient management of the hospital by exploring new directions for medical help, so as to increase the quantity of donations to the Hospital. We are looking for sponsorship from pharmaceutical firms and Ukrainian sponsors. We renovated rooms and the heating system, the later being done in order to make heating more efficient and less costly. Furthermore, we are planning to establish a paid-services department at the hospital, which although small at first, will contribute positively to the hospitals budget. With this in mind, we would like to ask readers to examine the possibility of finding organizations and individual persons to assist in providing temporary financing for the Andrey Sheptytsky Hospital by the beginning of 2003. The hospital needs approximately $1,000 U.S. per month. We hope that you understand this situation and the needs of so many. May God bless you! *** Donations with the notation charitable donation may be sent to: Sheptytsky Hospital, Account No. 26008013202/840; beneficiary bank: West-Ukrainian Commercial Bank; SWIFT Code: WUCBUA2X. Our correspondent bank in the U.S.: Bank of New York, New York, Account No. 890-0057-211; SWIFT Code: IRVT US 3N. Our correspondent bank in Canada: Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, Toronto, Account No. 1883518 (for U.S. dollars); Account No. 1883410 (for Canadian dollars); SWIFT Code: CIBCCATT.

ATTORNEY

ECONOMY AIRFARES

JERRY KUZEMCZAK

accidents at work automobile accidents slip and fall medical malpractice

NYC/Kyiv/Odesa $510
+ tax (round trip)

MERCHANDISE
+ tax

$375 NYC/Lviv $648


one way
+ tax (round trip)

FIRST CONSULTATION IS FREE. Fees collected only after personal injury case is successful.

one way

$450

+ tax

YEVSHAN
Distributor of fine Ukrainian products - Cassettes, Compact discs - Videos - Language tapes & Dictionaries - Computer fonts for PC & MAC - Imported Icons - Ukrainian Stationery - Cookbooks - Food parcels to Ukraine

ALSO: DWI real estate criminal and civil cases traffic offenses matrimonial matters general consultation

WELT & DAVID


1373 Broad St, Clifton, N.J. 07013

Call for a free catalog

(973) 773-9800

1-800-265-9858

VISA - MASTERCARD - AMEX ACCEPTED FAX ORDERS ACCEPTED (514) 630-9960 BOX 325, BEACONSFIELD, QUEBEC CANADA - H9W 5T8

MISCELLANEOUS

LONGIN STARUCH
Licensed Agent

St. Vladimirs College Inc.


Grades 9-12 Ukrainian Catholic Private Boarding School P.O. Box 789, Roblin, Manitoba R0L 1P0 Tel.: (204) 937-2173 Fax: (204) 937-8265 Website: www.stvlads.net

Ukrainian National Assn, Inc.


312 Maple St., Kerhonkson, NY 12446
Tel.: (914) 626-2058 Fax: (914) 626-5831

WEST ARKA
2282 Bloor St. W., Toronto, Ont., Canada M6S 1N9

A ANDRE WOROBEC
Licensed Agent

Fine Gifts Authentic Ukrainian Handicrafts Art, Books, CDs, Ceramics Embroidered Goods and Supplies Gold Jewellery, Icons, Magazines Newspapers, Pysankas and Supplies All Services to Ukraine, Mail-orders
Tel.: (416) 762-8751
e-mail: andrew@westarka.com

Andrew R. CHORNY
Manager

Single ladies and gentlemen from Poland, Eastern Europe, USA and Canada are seeking their soul mates. All ages. Colored catalogue $5.

ANOTHER CHANCE INTERNATIONAL


Fax: (416) 767-6839
www.westarka.com

Ukrainian National Assn, Inc.


9 Bayard Pl., Newark, NJ 07106 Tel.: (973) 292-9800 ext. 3055 Fax: (973) 292-0900 e-mail: aworobec@hotmail.com

FIRST QUALITY
UKRAINIAN TRADITIONAL-STYLE

ADOPTION - THE BEST CHOICE


Happy family recently adopted healthy child from Ukraine. Follow our steps. It's easy and you should not spend your lifetime savings to be happy. Without any charge we will provide all the information needed and guide you to the happy end in your adoption endeavor. Just imagine, in six months you can enrich your life with another experience - PARENTHOOD. Call (860) 667-4884, this very well could be the phone call of your life.

MONUMENTS
SERVING NY/NJ/CT REGION CEMETERIES

THE UKRAINIAN WEEKLY


Visit our archive on the Internet at: http://www.ukrweekly.com/

P.O. Box 20569 Columbus, OH 43220 1-614-457-3480

The Internet: Ukraines...


(Continued from page 2) tutes a national security threat was its November 26, 2001, house search of Oleh Yeltsov, editor of the Ukraina Kriminalnaya (www.cripo.com.ua) website. The court order that sanctioned the SBU action alleged that it was being undertaken in order to prevent the release of confidential information. After the search, Mr. Yeltsovs computer was disabled. The reason the SBU undertook this action is probably because Mr. Yeltsovs website had recently begun to include translations from the RFE/RL Crime, Corruption and Terrorism Watch. The SBU seems to be oblivious to the fact that the Internet does not respect state frontiers. If the Kriminalnaya Ukraina website is shut down, Ukrainian surfers can simply go to www.rferl.org to obtain the information. Various Western organizations, such as Freedom House and Reporters without Borders, have chronicled the deteriorating media situation in Ukraine since the late 1990s. In 1999 and 2001, the Committee to Protect Journalists placed President Kuchma among the worlds top 10 Enemies of the Press. As the authorities attempt to exert control over the Internet, Ukraines reputation as a country with a poor record on media freedom is now likely to further worsen.

OBLAST MEMORIALS
P.O. BOX 746 Chester, NY 10918

FOR RENT
VACATION CONDO - ST. THOMAS, USVI 2-BEDROOM, 2-BATH Beachfront Contact Julie or Wally at (763) 561-8965 E-mail: Pawlukmpls@cs.com

845-469-4247
BILINGUAL HOME APPOINTMENTS

UKRAINIAN SINGLES NEWSLETTER


Serving Ukrainian singles of all ages throughout the United States and Canada. For information send a self-addressed stamped envelope to: Single Ukrainians P.O. Box 24733, Phila., Pa. 19111

Room for rent in South Brunswick, NJ $500 per month Call Maria, Tel. (732) 821-7217

PROFESSIONALS
Michael P. Hrycak, Esq.
CRIMINAL AND CIVIL MATTERS TO TRIAL AND APPEAL, COMPUTER LAW 316 Lenox Avenue, Westfield, NJ 07090 Office: (908) 789-1870
Member of Bar: NJ, NY, CT, DC

HELP WANTED
Looking for a live-out Ukrainian lady to care for an infant and to perform housework in the Brooklyn, NY area. Tel. (718) 349 8804

Attorney at Law

GEORGE B. KORDUBA
Counsellor At Law Emphasis on real estate, wills, trusts, elder law and all aspects of civil litigation Ward Witty Drive, Montville, NJ 07045 Hours by appointment: 973-335-4555

Looking for live-in nanny for a newborn. Must speak English. Housekeeping and cooking involved. References required. Call (734) 397-8355 Canton Detroit, Mich.

No. 2

THE UKRAINIAN WEEKL Y collected clothes for the family. In my absence, while Im studying abroad this semester, the Ukrainian Club is continuing to bring students together. I am grateful to Andrew Demidowich and Adrian Korduba for directing club activities. They are planning several social gettogethers. I am currently studying Ukrainian language at Ivan Franko University in Lviv. Studying and living in Ukraine is making me realize how important it is for Ukrainian Americans to celebrate Ukrainian culture, pass it down to our youth and share it with our communities. Ukrainian Americans also need to be aware of the political, economic, social and environmental troubles facing Ukraine. I urge all university students to put their student activity fees to good use and to start Ukrainian clubs at their universities.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2002


, , 19 2001

17

Cornell club shares...


(Continued from page 10) rewarding for everyone. It was exciting to see students, professors and townspeople diligently producing his/her works of art, each person proud and delighted with their treasured egg. Also on display was the extensive collection of Valentyna Tretiaks wooden carved Easter eggs from various regions of Ukraine. The allday event attracted many people from the Cornell and Ithaca community. Aside from our two larger events, our club got together every other week to plan events, watch Ukrainian movies and cartoons, and talk about our personal connections with Ukraine. The Ukrainian Club also worked with the Red Cross as translators for a Ukrainian family whose apartment burned down in Ithaca. Members of the club raised money and

. .



. , 22 2001 ., . , , . : - - !

Newsbriefs
(Continued from page 2) tax base. The president also called on the Parliament to ensure that the budget is a realistic one. (RFE/RL Newsline) Adviser says 2002 budget unrealistic KYIV Presidential economic adviser Anatolii Halchynskyi told the Kyiv-based Fakty i Kommentari on January 5 that the 2002 budget signed by President Leonid Kuchma last week is completely unrealistic. Mr. Halchynskyi said President Leonid Kuchma signed the budget for political considerations. Had he not done that, the country would have been left without a budget for at least six months, which was unacceptable, he added. The budget law sets the 2002 deficit at 4.3 billion hrv ($810 million U.S.), or 1.7 percent of GDP. [The budget] does not include the money needed to reimburse VAT [value-added tax], which is almost 5 billion hrv. Additionally, we have no funds to finance many social benefits. The most conservative estimates suggest that this will add another 7 billion hrv to the hidden deficit, bringing the total figure to 16.3 billion hrv, or 4 percent of the GDP, Mr. Halchynskyi noted. (RFE/RL Newsline) IMF postpones meeting on loan to Kyiv KYIV Lorenzo Filiuoli, the International Monetary Funds senior permanent representative in Ukraine, said on January 4 that a meeting to determine whether a $370 million tranche should be disbursed to Ukraine has been postponed, Infobank reported. Mr. Filiuoli said the January 9 meeting of the IMFs board of governors was postponed to allow the IMF to clarify whether Ukraine is meeting its commitments, which include: enacting the government-submitted budget; completing an audit of Naftohaz Ukrainy; raising electricity tariffs; strengthening oversight of the banking industry; and refunding arrears on valueadded taxes. (RFE/RL Newsline) Ukraine drops visa requirements for CIS KYIV Nationals from throughout much of the former Soviet Union were allowed visa-free entry to Ukraine beginning on January 1, agencies reported the same day. The move implements a Cabinet decision from May to lift the requirements on citizens from Azerbaijan,

Armenia, Kazakstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan, according to Interfax. Citizens of Belarus, Russia, Georgia and Turkmenistan already could travel to Ukraine without a visa. Citizens of the Commonwealth of Independent States need only to present their passports to enter the country, ITAR-TASS added. The Associated Press reported that an agreement on visa-free travel also came into effect between Ukraine and Moldova on January 1, although ITAR-TASS cited a Ukrainian official as saying that talks are still under way on that issue. (RFE/RL Newsline) Decision delayed on Radio Kontinent KYIV A Ukrainian court on 28 December 28, 2001, postponed its decision on whether to allow independent Radio Kontinent to continue broadcasting in a case that the Council of Europe has called a test of media freedom, the Associated Press reported. The court was expected to issue its ruling some eight months after Ukraines National Television and Broadcast Council revoked Kontinents license, citing an outstanding debt. Others, including Council of Europe Secretary-General Walter Schwimmer, have suggested the move was politically motivated. Radio Kontinent challenged this decision in court almost a year ago, and no court action has been taken since then, Mr. Schwimmer said in a statement issued from Strasbourg and quoted by the Associated Press. He urged authorities to allow the station to broadcast until a decision is made, the agency added. (RFE/RL Newsline) Heavy snows hit western Ukraine KYIV Heavy snow left highways and minor roads impassable and left huge numbers of people in four regions of Ukraine without electricity, Interfax and other agencies reported on January 2. Interfax cited the Emergency Situations Ministry as saying that some 289 towns and villages in the western regions of the country were without electricity, while more than 400 settlements suffered power outages at some point. An international battalion made up of Ukrainian, Romanian, Hungarian and Slovak troops was helping clear roads in the aftermath, the Associated Press reported. (RFE/RL Newsline)

. , 2 2002

. .

, , . , , .

In Memoriam

Irena Wolosenko
The surviving family of our dear mother, grandmother and sister Irena Wolosenko, would like to announce that masses will be celebrated in remembrance of her passing one year ago. Masses will be said on January 31, 2002 at her original home parish, the Holy Cross Ukrainian Catholic Church in Astoria, New York and on February 10 at the Santa Clara Mission in Santa Clara, California. We ask all who knew Irena to join us in prayer for the repose of her soul. May she rest in peace.

The Wolosenko and Baziuk families: Jarko, Ihor, Roxana, Donnie, Vicki, Todd, Olesh, Mykolka, Anya, Vlodko and Joyce.

DEATH ANNOUNCEMENTS
to be published in The Ukrainian Weekly in the Ukrainian or English language are accepted by mail, courier, fax, phone or e-mail. Deadline: Tuesday noon before the newspapers date of issue. (The Weekly goes to press early Friday mornings.) Rate: $7.50 per column-inch. Information should be addressed to the attention of the Advertising Department and sent to: The Ukrainian Weekly, 2200 Route 10, P.O. Box 280 (NB: please do not include post office box if sending via courier), Parsippany, N.J. 07054; fax, (973) 644-9510; telephone, (973) 292-9800, ext. 3040; e-mail, staff@ukrweekly.com. Please include the daytime phone number of a contact person.

TO ALL MEMBERS OF UNA BRANCH 206


As of January 3, 2002, the secretarys duties of UNA Branch 206, were assumed by Mrs. Irene V. Sarachmon. We ask all members of this Branch to direct all correspondence regarding membership and insurance to the address listed below: Mrs. Irene V. Sarachmon P.O. Box 754 Woonsocket, RI 02895 (401) 766-3669

If youd like to obtain a back issue of The Ukrainian Weekly, send $2 per copy (first-class postage included) to: Administration, The Ukrainian Weekly, 2200 Route 10, P.O. Box 280, Parsippany, NJ 07054.

Need a back issue?

18

S P ORTS L I NE

THE UKRAINIAN WEEKL Y

SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2002 Germanys Andrea Niggemeier by 12 seconds. Niggemeier briefly overtook Plastinina in the last mile, but the Ukrainian regained the lead on a day ideal for running, reported The Associated Press.

No. 2 holds first place with 250 points and Andrea Henkel of German holds second with 188 points. On the mens side, Viacheslav Derkach of Ukraine took the bronze medal in the 15k with a time of 44:0.9 and one target missed while Vesa Hietalahti of Finland took the gold with a time of 42:50.6 and one target missed. Alexander Wolf of Germany took the silver medal with a time of 43:32.1 and two targets missed.

Boxing
German-based Ukrainian Volodymyr Klychko, known in boxing circles as Vladimir Klitshko, is looking into the possibility of a fight against WBC and IBF titleholder Lennox Lewis. The current heavyweight champion, Lewis, has set his sights on the eager and hungry Mike Tyson. However, in case the competing American television channels HBO and Showtime dont come to an agreement for a Lewis-Tyson showdown, Klitshko could be the next opponent of the three-time world champion from England. Oceans 11 just came out and I fought a guy named Vladimir Klitshko in the movie. That fight might really happen now, Universum Box-Promotion quoted Lewis as saying after knocking out Hasim Rahman in the fourth round of a recent fight. Before a Klitshko-Lewis or KlitshkoTyson fight can happen, the Ukrainian will have to face Nigerian David Izon.

That fight was originally scheduled for December 1, 2001, however, during a sparring session in November Klitshko, 37-1 (34 KOs), sustained trauma to muscles located in the shoulder area of his back and was indefinitely sidelined for his December 1 bout. After a detailed medical examination doctors declared that further trainings and the bout itself could rupture the muscle. The new date for this fight was set for sometime between late January and early February with the meeting between Lewis and Tyson unofficially looking like April 6. With a victory over Izon I want to show to the boxing world that Im ready to take on any opponent including Lennox, Klitshko was quoted by Universum Box-Promotion as saying.

Figure skating
Ukrainian Olena Liashenko took the bronze medal at the NHK Trophy in Kumamoto, Japan, on December 1, 2001, after Uzbekistans Tatyana Malinina won the gold medal and Japans Yoshie Onda took the silver.

World Cup cross-country


Irina Terelia took 11th place in the womens 5k freestyle with a time of 13 minutes, 32.3 seconds in Kuopio, Finland, on November 25, 2001. The Ukrainian finished 36.2 seconds behind gold medalist Katerina Neumannova of the Czech Republic. Yulia Tchepalova of Russia took the silver medal, while the bronze went to Kristina Smigun of Estonia.

Biathlon
The Ukrainian womens 4x7.5-kilometer relay team of Olena Zubrilova, Olena Petrova, Nina Lemesh and Tetyana Vodopyanova captured the bronze medal in a time of 1 hour 41 minutes 25.1 seconds in Pokljuka, Slovenia on December 14, 2001, while the German team of Katrin Apel, Andrea Henkel, Janet Klein and Kati Wilhelm took first place with a time of 1:40:21.2. The Norwegian team of Liv Grete Poiree, Gro Marit Kristiansen, Linda Tjorhom and Gunn Margit Andreassen took the silver medal with a time of 1:40:54.0. In World Cup competition, Olena Zubrilova took second place at the womens 15k in Brezno-Osrblie, Slovakia on December 20, 2001. The Ukrainian finished just two minutes, 53.7 seconds behind first place finisher Magdalena Forsberg of Sweden who won with a time of 49:46.9. and missed only one target. Katja Holanti of Finland took the bronze medal, missing three targets and finishing with a time of 52:49.9. Although the Ukrainian missed four targets in the event, the second-place finish put her into third place overall after five World Cup events with 174 total points. Forsberg of Sweden currently

Marathon
Ukraines Olena Plastinina won the womens division of the Philadelphia Marathon in 2 hours, 41 minutes and 5 seconds on November 17, 2001. She beat

Youth track and field


The Star-Ledger reported on December 12, 2001, that 9-year-old Andrew Bednarsky of New Jersey won the 3,000-meter event at the U.S. Association for Track and Field (USATF) N.J. Junior Olympic Championship at Warinanco Park in Elizabeth, N.J., on November 4 with a time of 11:11. Bednarsky went on to capture the USATF Region 2 Junior Olympic Championship at Holmdel Park, N.J., on November 18 with a time of 11:43. Bednarsky capped his performance by taking the USATF National Championship at Pioneer Park in Lincoln, Nebraska by six seconds in 11:29, and finishing fifth at the AAU National Championship in Orlando, Florida, on December 1, 2001, despite posting a 10:50 for the 3,000-meters. Compiled by Andrew J. Nynka

ROCHESTER UKRAINIAN FEDERAL CREDIT UNION


MAIN OFFICE

824 Ridge Road East, Rochester NY 14621


Tel. (585) 544-9518 Toll free (877) 968-7828 Fax: (585) 338-2980 www.rufcu.org Audio Response: (585) 544-4019

CAPITAL DISTRICT BRANCH


1828 Third Ave. Watervliet, NY 12189 TEL: (518) 266-0791 FAX: (585) 338-2980 www.rufcu.org AUDIO RESPONSE: (585) 544-4019 CREDIT UNION SERVICES CREDIT CARDS VEHICLE LOANS MORTGAGES SIGNATURE LOANS BUSINESS & COMMERCIAL LOANS SHARE DRAFTS & CHECKING CDS & IRAS INVESTMENTS YOUTH ACCOUNTS CONVENIENCE SERVICES AUDIO RESPONSE SYSTEM DIRECT DEPOSIT ELECTRONIC FUND TRANSFER NIGHT DEPOSIT BOX WIRE TRANSFERS: DOMESTIC, INTERNATIONAL UTILITY PAYMENTS NEWSLETTER, MAGAZINE NOTARY SERVICE, TRANSLATIONS SCHOLARSHIPS MEMBER EDUCATION SEMINARS LIBRARY AND MUCH MORE. e-mail: rufcu@frontier.net

Volume I and II
You can obtain both volumes for only $130.00
Including Postage

ORDER NOW
Fill out the order blank below and mail it with your check or money order
To: UKRAINIAN NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Inc. 2200 Route 10, P.O. Box 280, Parsippany, NJ 07054 I hereby order Ukraine: A Concise Encyclopaedia q Volume I $75.00
$130.00

q Volume II $75.00

q Volume I & II

NJ residents: add 6% sales tax

Enclosed is (a check/M.O.) for the amount $ _____________________________ Please send the book (s) to the following address:
Name No. Street

No. 2

THE UKRAINIAN WEEKL Y

SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2002

19

! . ,

. !

10-10-345

10-10-220*

_____________________________________________________

................ 10.9 . - .... 10.9 . ..................... 19.9 . ................. 23.9 . ...... 6.9 .
24 , 7 *

.-

10.9 . 10.9 . 19.9 . 23.9 .

25 . 25 . 25 . 28 .

29.9 . 29.9 . 29.9 . 29.9 .

* 10 . 15 2001.

........... 31.0 . ........... 39.0 . ............... 23.9 . ................... 21.9 .

...............31.0 . ...................12.9 . ..............9.9 .

!
: 10-10-719 + 011 + + + :10-10-719 + 1 + +

: 1-800-215-4943 : www.1010719.com
* ' 1.00 . . 30 . 15 . . . . 10-10-719 . , , . 10-10-719 , : 1800-215-4943 .

20

THE UKRAINIAN WEEKL Y

SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2002

No. 2

No. 2

NOTES ON PEOPLE

THE UKRAINIAN WEEKL Y

SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2002

21

Appointed to serve on draft board


WARREN, Mich. Roman J. Kuropas has been appointed in the name of President George W. Bush as a member of the Selective Service System local board in the state of Michigan. Mr. Kuropas completed his training in Selective Service policies and procedures in May 2001 in Lansing, Mich. His voluntary position is responsible for helping fill and maintain the ranks of the U.S. Armed Forces. Mr. Kuropas has been with the Michigan-based company General Dynamics for over 34 years, specifically with its Sterling Heights Complex, as a designer. He foresees his current stay with the Selective Service System to last approximately 20 years. With pride, honor and duty we must remain vigilant to have a Selective Service System second to none, said Mr. Kuropas. We have a continuous commitment to our past, present and future generations. Americas readiness

Honored by states League for Nursing


RIDGEWOOD, N.J. Zoryanna Kovbasniuk of Whippany, N.J., was recently honored by the New Jersey League for Nursing at the 2001 Autumn Gala. She was one of the recipients of the Nurse Recognition Award. As manager of the cardiac unit at The Valley Hospital in Ridgewood, Ms. Kovbasniuk is responsible for all clinical operations of the 33-bed, cardiac inpatient unit, as well as an additional ninebed outpatient service. She oversees a staff of 51 full-time employees. Her love of teaching also led her to become a nurse educator and the administrative director of infectious diseases during her career. Through her involvement with Humanitarian Medical Relief Fund/Emergency Medical Aid to Ukraine, Ms. Kovbasniuk became a charter board member and project director for Project Coronary, Project Babyface, and Project Ortho. These efforts have sent medical supplies, equipment and manpower to Ukraine since 1992. In addition, she has been instrumental in sending nursing professionals to Ukraine to teach the skills necessary to have Ukrainian medical professionals care for their own people. In 1991 Ms. Kovbasniuk joined the efforts of her brother, Roman Dashawetz, who serves as co-founder and executive director of the Emergency Medical Aid to Ukraine (EMAU). Together they mounted Project Ortho, sending supplies

and medical professionals to perform orthopedic surgeries. Ms. Kovbasniuk personally recruited the services of a podiatrist to broaden the services of the project. It should be noted that Mr. Dashawetz also was recently cited for his work with the EMAU; he was one of the recipients of the Firestone 100 Who Serve Awards. After meeting with a group of Ukrainian cardiologists in 1994, Ms. Kovbasniuk founded Project Coronary. After securing donated supplies for a catheterization laboratory, and coordinating the medical talent needed to run the service, Ms. Kovbasniuk and her group facilitated the first cardiac surgery and valvuloplasty in Lviv. While traveling with Project Coronary, Ms. Kovbasniuk met with the administrator of a regional pediatric hospital specializing in Chornobyl issues. The meeting identified many unmet pediatric birth medical needs, including children suffering from facial tumors, burns, congenital birth defects and cleft palates. Ms. Kovbasniuk founded Project Babyface, soon to be the subject of a documentary produced by The Visionaries and narrated by Sam Waterston. A biography of Ms. Kovbasniuk published in the program book for the New Jersey League for Nursing gala noted: Through her dedication to teaching and caring for others, whether her patients at The Valley Hospital, her patients in Ukraine, the members of her staff, or her peers, Ms. Kovbasniuk epitomizes all of the characteristics that best personify the profession of nursing. authority of the diocesan bishop. Bohdan is the son of Bohdan and Vanessa Horodecky and the grandson of Jaroslava and the late Hnat Horodecki of Sherman Oaks, Calif. and Karen and Douglas Turnbull of Mission Viejo, Calf. Andrew is the son of Eugene and Irene Kuchta and the grandson of the late Ihor and Josephine Kuchta of Hillside, N.J. and Maria and the late Petro Majnich of North Port, Fla. (formerly of Willimantic, Conn.). The Horodecky and Kuchta families are active in Houstons Ukrainian community. The Kuchtas are members of Ukrainian National Association Branch 368.

Roman J. Kuropas must never be questioned. Mr. Kuropas is a member of Ukrainian National Association Branch 20 and is a former UNA advisor.

YURI INTERNATIONAL
13 Royal Palm Dr., Cheektowaga, NY 14225

PARCELS, AIRLINE TICKETS, VISAS, MONEY TRANSFER, FOOD PARCELS FROM AMERICA AND CANADA TO UKRAINE, RUSSIA, BELARUS, MOLDOVA, BALTIC COUNTRIES, POLAND, CENTRAL ASIA AND CAUCASUS Invitation to America Visas to Ukraine Extension of U.S. visas DV Lottery Airport pick-up and assistance in Lviv, Kyiv, Moscow, New York and Toronto Assistance with immigration papers for Green Card Video Transfers PAL/SECAM - NTSC Calls to Ukraine 19 per minute Calls to Russia 19 per minute For further information call: Parcels picked-up from home

Tel.: (716) 685-1505 Fax: (716) 685-0987

TRADE, TRAVEL, PARCEL

Cub scouts earn unique honor


HOUSTON Bohdan Horodecky Jr. and Andrew D. Kuchta were recently presented the Light of Christ Religion Emblem at Protection of the Mother of God Ukrainian Catholic Church in conjunction with their participation in the Boy Scouts of America (BSA). The Light of Christ, the first of five religious emblems available to Catholic youth involved in BSA, is available to Tiger or Wolf cub scouts, and is presented by the

E-mail: Yintl@aol.com, Yuriinter@hotmail.com

(716) 685-1505

Cub Scouts Bohdan Horodecky Jr. (right) and Andrew D. Kuchta (left) are presented the Light of Christ Religion Emblem by the Rev. Andrij T. Dwulit during the conclusion of the divine liturgy at Protection of the Mother of God Ukrainian Catholic Church in Houston.

Notes on People is a feature geared toward reporting on the achievements of members of the Ukrainian National Association. All submissions should be concise due to space limitations and must include the persons UNA branch number. Items will be published as soon as possible after their receipt, when space permits.

22

THE UKRAINIAN WEEKL Y

SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2002

No. 2

No. 2

THE UKRAINIAN WEEKL Y The Central Asian states are in a class by themselves when it comes to top-down corruption. Can this be cleaned up? A reasonable proposition for the West to consider is that, in order to defend its own interests, it might have to undertake this enormous task by itself without substantial help from existing law-enforcement agencies in these countries. Past experience has shown that when the West is forceful in its demand that practices such as moneylaundering cease, then action is taken. Related laws were passed in Russia largely because the United States demanded that this be done or else sanctions would be applied. The same is true of laws aimed at defending intellectual property. And while the mere passage of laws in these countries is no guarantee that such illegal activities will end, it is an important beginning. The existing situation is such that internal affairs ministries (law-enforcement bodies) of the former Soviet republics are unreliable and highly corrupt. The intelligence services have been transformed into private investigative organizations for the leadership and their friends. Parliaments are too corrupt to pass necessary laws and provide oversight. Vote-buying remains a common practice in the Ukrainian, Latvian and other parliaments, while their members remain immune from prosecution. Western intervention in domestic legislation and law enforcement in the former USSR is an unavoidable consequence of the government/criminal alliance in those societies. It is no wonder that recently democratic opposition organizations have appealed to the FBI to help solve domestic crimes in their countries, while others have turned to the Council of Europe to create special investigative bodies to look into such cases as the murder of journalist Heorhii Gongadze in Ukraine. Does the democratic West have the wherewithal and the legal and moral right to police the former USSR? With no alternative in sight, this might be the only method left for establishing the rule of law in those countries. goals developed through the PFP Planning and Review Process. Ministers noted with appreciation the offer of the United States to host a meeting to follow up discussions on improving transparency and enhancing coordination of the more than 600 bilateral activities currently scheduled between Ukraine and Allied nations. Ministers noted the implementation of a PFP Trust Fund, supported by Canada, Hungary and Poland, aimed at the safe destruction of 400,000 anti-personnel land mines. Ministers noted with satisfaction the contribution of the two Ukrainian officers posted to SACLANT and AFSOUTH headquarters and the assignment of a Ukrainian officer to NATO HQ to work on defense and force planning issues. Ministers expressed their satisfaction with the important contribution of the NATO Liaison Office and the NATO Information and Documentation Center to the Distinctive Partnership and, in particular, the implementation of Joint Working Group activities aimed at supporting defense reform and the wider program of cooperation between NATO and Ukraine.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2002

23

The government-criminal...
(Continued from page 3) President Leonid Kuchma. Germany has put on trial Viktor Zherdytsky, a member of the Ukrainian Parliament, and Ihor Didenko, a former senior official of the Ukrainian state gas-trading company, Naftohas Ukrainy, on charges of stealing millions of dollars from a fund established to compensate former Ostarbeiters (workers from the East) who were in fact slave laborers for the Nazi regime. The Italian police in Turin arrested a group of Ukrainians for smuggling vast quantities of arms to Croatia at the time of the United Nations embargo in 1993. At the time of their arrest in 2001, one of the arrested suspects, Leonid Minin, had in his possession $500,000 worth of uncut diamonds and numerous forged end-user certificates for illegal arms sales to Liberia. An alleged co-conspirator, Oleksander Zhukov, was also arrested. He is the president of Syntez Holdings in Odesa, which controls the Marine Transport Bank which, in turn, holds on deposit most of the Odesa city budgets money. Yet Ukrainian law-enforcement agencies remain strangely paralyzed when it comes to bringing Ukrainian criminals to trial. The situation in Russia is better, but not by much. Pavel Borodin, the secretary of the Russia-Belarus Union, was arrested and held in jail in New York until his release on bail. He is also being investigated in Switzerland on charges of fraud and taking kickbacks. The Russian authorities issue periodic arrest warrants for Boris Berezovsky, yet are unable or unwilling to detain him. The Russian MVD seems to be hopelessly mired in endless corruption scandals; there are fears that its former minister and the current national security adviser, Vladimir Rushailo, is deeply involved in the corruption of his former subordinates. Georgia has been caught up in a neverending crisis of corruption and graft that has implicated the top leadership in that country and could point to the countrys president, Eduard Shevardnadze.

Ukrainian Historical Association re-elects Wynar as president


KENT, Ohio In a general election conducted during October through November of 2001, full-fledged members of the Ukrainian Historical Association re-elected Dr. Lubomyr Wynar to a new four-year term as president. Balloting was conducted via mail, with the candidates for office selected by the Nominating Committee, which included Dr. Olexander Dombrowsky, Dr. Yaroslav Rakovskyi and Dr. Natalia Pazuniak. Members also elected Prof. Alexander Baran, first vice-president; Prof. Mykola Kovalskyi, second vice-president; Dr. Olexander Dombrovsky, general secretary-treasurer; Anna Wynar, assistant secretary-treasurer, Prof. Alexander Sydorenko, secretary of international affairs; and Prof. Arkadii Zhukovskyi, executive presidium member. Prof. Assya Humetsky, Dr. Bohdan Klid, Dr. Andrew Sorokowski and Dr. Osyp Danko were elected board members. Also elected to serve as members of the auditing board were Prof. Rakovskyi, Prof. Oleh Gerus and Yuri Olinyk. The Ukrainian Historical Association was established in 1965 as a professional organization for Ukrainian historians in the diaspora as well as for enthusiasts of Ukrainian history. It is the publisher of The Ukrainian Historian, a scholarly journal devoted to all aspects of Ukrainian history and historiography, which was founded in 1963 by Prof. Wynar, who has served as its chief editor since its inception. During its 36 years of existence, the UHA has organized numerous regional, national and international conferences, which provide a forum for Ukrainian historical thought to both Ukrainian and non-Ukrainian historians. The association also sponsors a number of important historical serial publications such as Historical Monograph Series, Historical Studies, Hrushevskyiana, Ohloblyniana, Memoirs, Epistoliary Sources to Hrushevskyi Studies, to name just a few. In addition, the UHA continues to publish separate historical monographs in the English and Ukrainian languages. During the past five years the UHA has made significant strides in establishing and developing its organizational and publishing activities within Ukraine. Presently there are 15 active UHA centers in various regions of Ukraine, most affiliated directly with major Ukrainian universities. During the summer of 2000, the UHA was instrumental in organizing at Chernivtsi National University The First International Congress of Ukrainian Historians, which was devoted to all aspects of Ukrainian history and was attended by over 400 scholars from the United States, Canada, France, Germany, Hungary, Poland, Russia, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Latvia and Ukraine. The UHA is now laying the groundwork for the second International Congress of Ukrainian Historians, scheduled for the summer of 2003 in Ukraine. It is important to note that UHA has been a major sponsor of the Hrushevskyi museums in Kyiv and Lviv and continues to be instrumental in assisting these unique institutions with their collection development. Specialized UHA library collections have been established at the National University of Ostroh Academy and at the Chernivtsi National University. Each year the association donates 500 copies of its journal and all other publications to universities, libraries and other scholarly institutions throughout Ukraine. During the next four years, the newly elected presidium will continue to develop the content of The Ukrainian Historian, expand its readership base and publish new monographs, including works by Hrushevsky, Braichevsky, Ohloblyn and other eminent Ukrainian historians. Additionally, the association plans to increase its organizational activities, primarily in Ukraine, by sponsoring conferences, assisting in the growth of cultural scholarly institutions and strengthening its cooperative relationship with major academic institutions. The UHA is a non-profit organization with tax-exempt status. Individuals wishing to financially support UHAs organizational and publishing activities may send their tax-exempt donations to: Ukrainian Historical Association, P.O. Box 312, Kent, OH. Persons may also support the UHA by becoming members; the membership fee is $60 per year and incudes a subscription to The Ukrainian Historian.

Statement...
(Continued from page 3) senior level in supporting Ukraines efforts to take forward defense and security sector reform and noted that the next JWG meeting at the senior level would be hosted by Ukraine in autumn 2002. Ministers also noted plans for a high-level NATO-Ukraine conference in Berlin on March 3-4, 2002. The commission approved the Report on the National Defense Reform Objectives. Ministers underlined the importance of the PFP [Partnership for Peace] Planning and Review Process and the development of the National Defense Reform Objectives as a means to support Ukraines State Plan for the Reform and Development of the Armed Forces. The commission noted with satisfaction the decision to carry forward the establishment of a Joint Staff Working Group to support armaments-related cooperation and the efforts of NATO and Ukraines military authorities to better focus military cooperation on the implementation of defense reform and the interoperability

If youd like to obtain a back issue of The Ukrainian Weekly, send $2 per copy (first-class postage included) to: Administration, The Ukrainian Weekly, 2200 Route 10, P.O. Box 280, Parsippany, NJ 07054.

Need a back issue?

The Ukrainian Institute of America


will present a concert by

LEONTOVYCH STRING QUARTET


in celebration of the quartets 30th Anniversary.
Featuring the works: Dvorak: String Quartet No. 12 in F Major Silvestrov: String Quartet No. 1 Tchaikovsky: String Quartet No. 2 in F Major

Turning the pages back...


(Continued from page 8) comprises a large percentage of Ukraines voters. The upcoming elections also forced national democrats to look for supporters in eastern Ukraine, where relations with Russia were a trump card routinely used by Communists. The ratification of the Treaty on Friendship, Cooperation and Partnership with Russia was seen as only the first step in normalizing relations between the two most powerful republics of the former Soviet Union. Source: Verkhovna Rada ratifies treaty with Russia, setting the stage for a new relationship by Pavlo Politiuk, The Ukrainian Weekly, January 18, 1998. Vol. LXVI, No. 3.

The concert will be held Sunday, January 27, 2002 at 3 p.m. Weill Recital Hall of Carnegie Hall 57th Street, New York City. For further information contact Ukrainian Institute of America Tel. (212) 288-8660

24

THE UKRAINIAN WEEKL Y

SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2002

No. 2

No. 2

THE UKRAINIAN WEEKL Y Mr. Zhdanov said that while he could not exclude the possibility that the illegal arms sales investigation also could have put Mr. Potebenko on more political blacklists, he predicted that prior to the March elections there could be much additional mudslinging and negative public relations, and from that vantage point this would be seen as merely one more example of it. Mr. Potebenko has been under fire off and on for years, most recently since the beginning of last year, when the case of missing journalist Heorhii Gongadze exploded into a full-blown scandal and Mr. Potebenko found himself at the center of it. The procurator general was forced to defend his agency against accusations of ineptness. He was also extensively ridiculed for not being able to come to terms publicly, at least with the fact that a headless body found outside of Kyiv in the town of Tarascha was that of Mr. Gongadze, even when DNA testing showed the probability of it being so was 99.6 percent. Lately he had been criticized for being unable to solve a single major crime that the Procurator Generals Office had investigated in the last several years: the Gongadze case, the murder of journalist Ihor Alexandrov and the murder of banker and politician Vadym Hetman. Among those who criticized the chief prosecutors performance was Volodymyr Yatsenko, national deputy and fellow Communist Party member, who did so at the January 5 party congress. Mr. Potebenko rejected the negative assessment of his work during a January 9 press conference during which he stated that the murderers of Messrs. Hetman and Alexandrov have been found and will go to trial shortly. He did not mention that the person charged with assassinating Mr. Hetman has never been publicly identified and that many politicians have rejected the officially presented scenario for Mr. Alexandrovs murder as comical at best.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2002

Controversial procurator....
(Continued from page 1) ing former and current government officials. Mr. Potebenkos aide, Deputy Procurator General Oleksander Otamaniuk, head of the agencys military investigations department, explained that he would proceed based on a report submitted by National Deputy Hryhorii Omelchenko. Mr. Omelchenko and National Deputy Anatolii Yermak have alleged that the Secretary of National Security and Defense, Yevhen Marchuk, and Leonid Derkach, both directors of the State Security Service of Ukraine at one time, are involved in illegal weapons trade. While both these issues were sufficiently explosive to have President Kuchma seek his chief prosecutors dismissal, Ihor Zhdanov, political analyst at the Razumkov Center for Economic and Political Studies, said he believes the erroneous report of Mr. Potebenkos dismissal was simply a political trial balloon floated by officials to determine the extent to which politicians and voters want him removed. He did not exclude that the rumors could portend a future sacking, such as happened with Minister of Internal Affairs Yurii Kravchenko, who was dismissed by Mr. Kuchma after a week of rumors, which in that instance the president had denied until the final moment. Mr. Zhdanov explained that the Kuchma administration understands that in the current situation it would be very difficult to find a replacement for Mr. Potebenko until after the elections and would be willing to wait until after March 31. There has been a low level of confidence in the procurator general for a long time now anyway, so if he stays on the job that situation would not change, explained Mr. Zhdanov, adding that Razumkov Center surveys have given Mr. Potebenko not much more than 10 percent popular support for several months now.

MALANKA
Featuring
From Montreal

25

Zolota Bulava

&

Vorony
From Syracuse

Saturday, January 26, 2002, at 9 p.m.


St. Georges Hall 301 West Main Street, New Britain, CT

Friday, January 25, 2002, at 8 p.m.


Ukrainian National Home 961 Wethersfield Avenue, Hartford, CT

PUB NIGHT

Free Admission
For tickets, table reservations, directions, or more information,
Christopher Iwanik (860) 379-5541

please contact:

Bohdan Platosz bplatosz@home.com.

MAY WE HELP YOU?


The Ukrainian Weekly To reach call (973) 292-9800, and dial the (as listed below).

appropriate extension Editorial 3049, 3063, 3069 Administration 3041 Subscriptions 3042 Production 3052 Advertising 3040

26

UKE LODEON
THE UKRAINIAN WEEKL Y SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2002

No. 2

FOR THE NEXT GENERATION

Young artists from Kyiv depict attacks on World Trade Center


KYIV In the blue collar Troyeschyna district of Kyiv, a group of young children gather each Saturday morning to experiment with new colors and traditional art forms as they pursue their dreams of becoming professional painters and graphic designers. Their meeting space is the Troyeshky Childrens Art Studio, a refurbished community center in a ramshackle concrete multistory building overlooking a small tributary of the Dnipro River. Following the September 11 terrorist attack on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, many of the young Ukrainian artists began using their art work as a means to express their sympathy for their American counterparts who were orphaned or otherwise affected by the disaster. Among the most poignant renditions was a pair of oil paintings by 8-year-old Vladyk Dolhopolov titled The Weeping Towers one portraying the moment when the hijacked planes approached the World Trade Center and the other showing the burning towers shortly before their collapse. Many of the young artists painted icons of the Mother of God as a Protectress watching over the world and the people of the United States. The children were encouraged to give expression to their feelings by their headmaster, Volodymyr Titulenko, a nationally acclaimed painter who returned to Ukraine after taking part in last summers Great Lakes Expedition of the Ukrainian tall ship Batkivschyna.

Eight-year-old Vladyk Dolhopolovs painting titled The Weeping Towers depicts New York Citys World Trade Center after the terrorist attack of September 11.

Mr. Titulenko was granted a U.S. visa as an artist-in-residence aboard the schooner, documenting the ships journey and painting various landscapes against the backdrop of the ship and the skylines of Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit and other host cities. Prior to his departure from the United States,

Mr. Titulenko visited Liberty Park in Jersey City, N.J., which is located directly across from Lower Manhattan, and he could see the smoldering remains of the World Trade Center. When I told the students what I had seen and showed them photos of the site, it moved them deeply, said Mr. Titulenko. They already felt a special kinship with America as they had followed the course of the sailing ship. Then there were the terrible events unfolding in September and they wanted children in America to know how much they worried about them and prayed for their safety. So I urged them to put their feelings into their art, and promised to do what I could to pass some of these works on to the United States. The children took advantage of an early opportunity to present their work to representatives of the Children of Chornobyl Relief Fund during their recent visit to Kyiv. Under the direction of Olenka Bodnarskyj-Gunn, the CCRF chapter in Buffalo is staging a joint project that will enable the United States and Ukrainian children to exchange their art work and to place it on exhibit in hospitals, orphanages and public galleries. The children at the Troyeshky studio feel an instinctive solidarity with the children of New York and the U.S. in the wake of the September 11 tragedy, said Alexander Kuzma, CCRF executive director. The Troyeschyna district where they live was one of the areas of Kyiv that was most contaminated by Chornobyl, and they
(Continued on page 27)

Passaics littlest Plast members help needy in Ukraine

Dear Readers of UKELODEON:

PASSAIC, N.J. Novatstvo and ptashata the youngest members of Plast Ukrainian Scouting Organization did a good deed for Christmas when they collected mittens, hats and gloves to adorn two Christmas trees that decorate the auditorium at St. Nicholas Ukrainian Catholic Church. After the holidays these children of the Passaic Plast Branch will send the gifts along with holiday greetings to orphans in Ukraine.

Next month marks the third anniversary of UKELODEON, a special section of The Ukrainian Weekly that was created in February 1999 to serve as a forum for young readers and by young readers, where anyone from kindergartners to teens, could come to learn, to share information, to relate their experiences, and to keep in touch with each other. Though UKELODEON is prepared by the editorial staff of The Ukrainian Weekly working in conjunction with Lydia Smyk, an elementary school teacher at St. John the Baptist Ukrainian Catholic School in Newark, N.J., its main contributors are you, its readers. Thus, we repeat the invitation to our next generation: Dont be bashful! Send in your stories and your observations, share your experiences with fellow readers. And if you have any questions about sending materials, call us at The Weekly, (973) 292-9800, ext. 3049. Send in your articles, letters, photos, etc. to: The Ukrainian Weekly, UKELODEON, 2200 Route 10, P Box 280, Parsippany, N.J., .O. 07054. Or you can e-mail us: staff@ukrweekly.com. Our next issue will be dated February 10, so please send in materials by Feburary 1.

No. 2

THE UKRAINIAN WEEKL Y

SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2002

27

St. Nicholas students welcome metropolitan

Mykola Myshkas new favorite stamp

PASSAIC, N.J. Metropolitan-Archbishop Stefan Soroka visited St. Nicholas Ukrainian Catholic School on December 13, 2001. Above, the leader of the Ukrainian Catholic Church in the United States blesses the bread and salt presented as a greeting by Tania Zurawski in accordance with Ukrainian tradition.

Stamp collector Mykola Myshka is thrilled to have received a new stamp from Ukraine from his Uncle Ingert. He is particularly pleased as the stamp depicts a winter scene featuring characters from one of his favorite Ukrainian stories, Rukavychka The Mitten.

Kalyna dancers perform at Wisconsin fair


S F O U R T H L E A D E R I O M A Y R A U N A J R O D R O T E N E N Y K D Y R I C D W D I L I K I I T E N O E E A N P V S V S U V

Mishanyna
E N R T T A E R E H O K L P C F Y O R P S H S V F U E I U S N U A A S L I O T

MILWAUKEE The Kalyna Ukrainian Youth Dancers of Milwaukee, under the direction of Peter Jenkins, performed at the Wisconsin Holiday Folk Fair. Twelve children, ranging in age from 6 to 12, performed a lively dance. The three-day event, held November 16-18, 2001, at the Wisconsin State Fair Park, brings together the cultures from many ethnic groups. Among the features are an international bazaar, interactive exhibits, international kitchen and dance halls. The Holiday Folk Fair International is produced by the International Institute of Wisconsin, a not-for-profit social service organization dedicated to racial, cultural and ethnic understanding.

To solve this months Mishanyna, search for the words below all of which are connected to a significant January date in Ukraines history. Do you know what happened on this date? army autonomy Battle of Kruty Bolshevik Central Rada Council fourth freedom Hrushevsky independent January Kyiv land leader nation party people Petliura revolution Soviets state twenty second universal Vynnychenko

D U E N U G O E V E S R O

N L N E O I P L U O E E I

D O O C M L A O R B T L O

E V I O Y T R D H A S T N

N I T N E E T I T A D T A

T Y A D S P Y S Y M R A R

O K N E H C Y N N Y V B N

Young artists...
know what its like to live in the shadow of an event that takes years to overcome. We want our friends in America to know that we are grateful for their help to Ukraine, and we are thinking about them this
(Continued from page 26)

Christmas season, said 11-yearold Yana Bzenko. In a joint letter to their friends in North America that accompanied their artwork, the Troyeshky students wrote, We hope that our works will echo in your hearts. And in spite of the seas and oceans separating us, they will bind us together with a strong friendship.

Letter to UKELODEON
Dear UKELODEON:

CHECK IT OUT: On page 1 of this issue theres great news for fans of the young wizard Harry Potter. A renowned publisher in Ukraine has bought the rights to release Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone, the first book of the best-selling series, in the Ukrainian language. What do you think: Will Harry Potter be called Hryts Honchar?

In the Mishanyna for December you misspelled the word holy. It appeared in the grid as hloy.

Editors note: Thank you very much, Roma, for pointing out our error. Well try to do better!

Your friend, Roma Mirutenko Howthorn Woods, Ill.

28

THE UKRAINIAN WEEKL Y

SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 2002

No. 2

PREVIEW OF EVENTS
Sunday, January 20 NEW YORK: The Shevchenko Scientific Society is sponsoring a presentation by Andriy Saliuk, president, Fund for the Preservation of the Historical-Architectural Heritage of the City of Lviv, who will speak on the topic The Preservation of the Architectural Monuments of Lviv. The presentation will be held at the Shevchenko Scientific Society, 63 Fourth Ave. (between Ninth and 10th streets) at 5 p.m. For additional information call (212) 254-5130. NEW YORK: All are invited to the second annual Dyvo-Koliada Christmas pageant, to be presented by the Ukrainian National Home in Nnew York Branch 25 of the Ukrainian National Womens League of America, the New York School of Bandura and the Promin Vocal Ensemble. Come enjoy the manger scene, carolling, traditional New Years celebrations and games. Refreshments will be served. Admission: $10. For more information call (201) 4980863. Suitable for children. WASHINGTON: The Shevchenko Scientific Society, District of Columbia Branch, and the Ukrainian Academy of Arts and Sciences group present Judge Bohdan A. Futey, United States Court of Federal Claims, in a public lecture on Legal Reform and Judicial Independence in Ukraine. The lecture will be held at the Ukrainian Catholic National Shrine of the Holy Family, 4250 Harewood Road NE. Admission is free; contributions accepted. For further information call Andrew Sorokowski, (301) 933-8401. Friday-Sunday, January 25-27 CLEVELAND, Ohio: MN2 Productions presents Shadows of Our Forgotten Ancestors, a dance-theater piece based on the novel by Mykhailo Kotsiubynsky (Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors). Directed by Michael Flohr with choreography by Sarah Morrison, Natalie Kapeluck and Roman Lewkowicz, Shadows of Our Forgotten Ancestors tells the story of Ivan and Marichka by fusing modern and traditional dance, traditional Ukrainian folk music, puppetry and Saturday, February 9 PHILADELPHIA: The Philadelphia Branch of the Ukrainian Engineers Society of America will hold its annual Banquet and Ball in the Grand Ballroom of the Park Hyatt Hotel, Broad and Walnut streets. The banquet begins at 6 p.m., followed by the ball starting at 9 p.m. Music will be by Tempo. Tickets: $100, banquet and ball; $40, ball only; students, $25. For reservations and additional information call Dr. Larysa Zaika, (215) 635-7134. theater. Performances are on January 2526 at 8 p.m. and January 27 at 3 p.m. in the Gordon Square Theater, 6409 Detroit Ave. Tickets: $15, general admission; $12, seniors and students with a valid ID. For more information and ticket reservations, call Nadia, (216) 749-0060, or e-mail mn2productions@yahoo.com. Saturday, January 26 SOUTH BOUND BROOK, N.J.: The Central New Jersey Branch of the Committee for Aid to Ukraine invites everyone to a carnivale ball dinner/dance starting at 6:30 p.m. and featuring the music of Vidlunnia. Profits from ticket sales will benefit Ukraine. Tickets in advance for the dinner/dance: $50 per person; $35, students with identification. Tickets at the door: $60 per person, $45, students. Tickets may be ordered from: George Mischenko, (732) 671-1914; Damian Gecha, (908) 755- 8156; the Rev. Ivan Lyshyk, (908) 253-0401; Dr. Juri Wedmid, (732) 563-2690; Victor Babanskyj, (908) 754-0898; or Michael Shulha, (908) 534-6683. Sunday, January 27 OLD TOWN ALEXANDRIA, Va.: Louisiana Swamp Romp, presented by The Washington Group Cultural Fund, will perform music by such jazz greats as Louis Armstrong and Al Hirt, as well as Ukrainian folk music with a New Orleans twist at The Lyceum, 201 S. Washington St. Performance begins at 3 p.m. Suggested donation: $15; students, free. For more information contact Chrystia Sonevytsky, (703) 241-1817.

LAST CHANCE TO SAVE!


This Christmas, give the gift of a subscription to The Ukrainian Weekly

REMINDER REGARDING REQUIREMENTS:


There is a $10 charge per submission for listings in Preview of Events. The listing plus payment must be received no later than one week before the desired date of publication. There is also the option of prepayment for a series of listings. Listings of no more than 100 words (written in Preview format) plus payment should be sent to: Preview of Events, The Ukrainian Weekly, 2200 Route 10, P.O. Box 280, Parsippany, NJ 07054. Information sent by fax should include a copy of a check, in the amount of $10 per listing, made out to The Ukrainian Weekly. The Weeklys fax number is (973) 644-9510.

and get

$5 off with this coupon.

Please enter a gift subscription for:


Name.............................................................................................................. Address........................................................................................................... City............................................State.............Zip........................................... Phone number.................................................................................................

This gift is given by:


Name............................................................................................................. Address.......................................................................................................... City............................................State.............Zip.......................................... Phone number................................................................................................ UNA branch number, if applicable:............................................................... [ ] UNA member rate - $40/year [ ] Non-member rate - $50/year (Regular price: $45 for members, $55 for non-members.)

Columbia offers Ukrainian courses


NEW YORK Columbia University and The Harriman Institute will offer courses in elementary and intermediate Ukrainian in the spring semester. In addition to the Ukrainian language, students will have the opportunity to learn something about Ukrainian culture, folklore and tradition. The classes will meet twice a week on Mondays and Wednesdays elementary Ukrainian at 4:10 to 5:25 p.m. and Intermediate Ukrainian at 6:10 to 7:25 p.m. in Hamilton Hall. Students from universities which are a part of the Columbia University Consortium (e.g., New York University) pay no tuition and receive full credit. For further information call the Slavic Department, (212) 854-3941; or the Harriman Institute, (212) 854-4623; or send an e-mail to ab476@columbia.edu. The Harriman Institute at Columbia University will also offer the course Language Development in Post-

Please make checks payable to The Ukrainian Weekly, or charge to your credit card by entering the information below:
Credit card type (please circle one): Visa MasterCard American Express Card number.................................................................................................. Expiration date................ Signature:.............................................................

PLEASE NOTE: Offer available only with this coupon. All payments in U.S. dollars only. Special offer expires January 15, 2002. Please clip out and mail to: The Ukrainian Weekly, 2200 Route 10, P. O. Box 280, Parsippany, NJ 07054.

Totalitarian Space (call No.U6888), taught by Dr. Antonina Berezovenko. The course examines various dimensions of language development in the posttotalitarian space. While the main concentration of the course will be on current processes in language development, it will also consider problems from a diachronical perspective, extending to the Soviet and imperial period. The course will take as its focal point three major case studies: Ukraine, Belarus, and the Russian language within and outside Russia. The syllabus is available on the homepage of the Harriman Institute, and may be accessed at the following: http://sipa.columbia.edu/REGIONAL/III/ home.html. For further information call (212) 854-4623 or e-mail ab476@columbia.edu. The spring semester begins January 22, and registration must be completed between January 15 and 18.