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Vol. VIII October, 19 3 5 No. 2
A Quarterly. Magazine Annual Subscripti0~, $1.00 (England 5 / - I n d i a Rs. 31-) Single Copy 25c Founded by DR. M. M. SADIQ. Published b y SUFI M. R. BENGALEE 56 E. Congress St., Suite 1307. Chicago, I!1., U. S. Amer.

The Ahmadiyya Movement


The Ahnmdiyy a Movement ~vas fgunded by Hazrat Ahmad, the Promised Messiah and Mahdi and t h e expected Messenger of all nations, Irt the spirit mid power of all the earlier prophets, he came to serve and re-interpret the final and eternal teaching laid down by God in the Holy Quran. The Movement-therefore represents the T r u e and. Real I s l a m - a n d geeks to uplift humanity a n d to establish peace throughout the w o r l d . Hazrat Ahmad died'"in 1908, and the present Head of the.Movement ishis second successor, Hazrat Mirza Bashirttd-l)in Mahmud Ahmad Under whose directions the Movement Ires established Missions in many parts of the world, t h e following heing the addresses of some of them: THE I:ONDON MOSQUE, 63 M/dr0se Road. Southfields, kondon..S: \V.!8, : England. ) THE AHMADIYYA/ " MOVEMENT IN ISLAM Sufi M.R:. Bengalee, M . A . , 56 E. Congress St:, ' Suite 1 3 0 7 , Chicago, 'Illiflois, U. S., America. MOSLEM MISSION, THE AHMADIYYA 14!9 Roosevelt Ave., Indianapolis, Ind., U. S., America. T H E A H M A I JIYYA MOSLEM M1SSION. 913 Woodland Avenue, :Kansas City. M i s s o u r i . U . S. America THE-AHMADIYYA MOSLEM MISSION. 537 H e n d f i e Street. Detr9it, Michigan. - U . ' S .... ~nlerica THE AHMADIYYA MOSLEM MISSION. 2008 \Vvlle Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa.. U. S.. America
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"rite AHMADI~'YAMOSLEM .MISSION, 928 \V. 7 t h S t r e e t , Cincinnati. O., " : U.. S,, America. T H E AHMADIYYA MOSLEM MISSION, 216 S. Euclid Ave., D a y t o n , Ohio. U. S , America THE AHMADIYYA: MOSLEM MISSION. - 5311 .~Voo(lland Ave.. iCleveland. Ohio. U . S., America :THE AHMADIYYA MOVEMENT. Gold Coast. West Africa. Commercial Road. Salt Pond. THE AHMADIYYA .MOVEMENT. R 0 s e Hill._ Mauritius. TIIE AHMADIYYA MOVEMENT. Box No. 305. G. P. O.. Perth. W: A u s t r a l i a . MALANA ABUL-ATA - [ULLUNDARI, . :Mt. Karmad. Haifa. Palestine. MAULVI RAHMAT ALI, ' " C a r e o f I~eved Kampoeng. Djawa. Padang. S. Vg. C.
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CHICAGO, ILL., U. S. A. 1935 No. 2

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Qadian Center of the Ahmadiyya Movement,in Islam

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Transliteration

.AllahU No0rus-Samawati wal "Ardh. (XXIV-34.) : : L :. -, .innalladlieetia Q a l o 0 Rabi,una-llahU t l i u i h m a s t a q a m o . i a t a f i a z zalualaihumulMaiaikatu a l l a . t a k h a f o o X~ala TahZano~y:wa' absiair6o bil J a n n a t i l l a t e e Ktiiiltum t o o - a d o o n N a l m u .Awiiau ~Kum fil h a y a t i d duniy a w a f i l A k h i r a h . ( X L I - 3 0 ) i. ' " ~ .: . " - X V a n l i n a n n a s i m a n - y a s h r i nafsalau. i b t i g h a - a n m a r a d h a t i l l a l i Whllahu Ra-ufum-l)il Ibad. ( I I - 2 0 3 ) " " - . M a n a m i l a . ~ a l i h a n m i n Z a k a r i n a w u n t h a w a h u a m u m i n u m fala m i h i v a y a n n a l m hav-atafi .t~tyvebatan w a l a n a j z i y a w n a - h u m ajl~ahum bi . ahsalii n m k n o o vamhl0on.. (X.\:.[~97) ~ " ' ~: " -i :i : " Translation '";-.i.:i':

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. God is**.tl~ light of t h e l~ea~-ens a n d the em e -i . i Tllose ~:h6 sa~; " G o d - i s o t t r ; L o t ' d " a n d a de~,Cend ui)bnl t h e t n ' a n d . s a v , "Fcmr ve not, liei :'beiofg0"0d c h e e r tlmt x:oU~will lye m a d e heirs heen pronrised, t o y o u ; : \ V e Willl lye G u a r d i a n s o v e r . y o u in this. world and in the next. ( X L I - 3 0 1 ) ". : " """ - . A i l d of.:mankind is h e Who SellS (SacrifiCes) l a i n i s e l f s e e k i n g . t h e pleasuri~ 0 f God.alid God i:s merciful u n t 0 H i s serVanfs. (I~-203) : -. W h o S O e v e r does good,' m a l e or fen~ale;-iS t h e f t r u e lJelievet-. \rer~ ih--fiim shall- we gi~e :h,'ipp~; and p u r e life. -~ ~Nnd verily we sliali give tliem r e w a r d for t h e : b e s t 0f w h a t - t h e ~ did: (XV.I-97) ": ~

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The Sayings of the Master Prophet Muhammad


Abdullah Ibn U m a r relates.how once the Hol3,Prophet told this little s t o r y : T h r e e persons, ~long ago, were j o u r n e y i n g thr0ttgh the land. These three staved for the night in a niountain ravine: In thernight a huge st~me rolled over the mouth 0f the r~tvine and imprisoned t'iae three. The u n f o r t u n a t e men conferred on w h a t w a s t o be done, until theylagreed that if the5' prayed to God, reminding I-Iim of thqir past g o 0 d d e e d s , H e might release them. Then th'e first m a n hegan thus: "O God, r my father and " " nay mother are very aged, and I love them so much that I feed them before I feed my children. Once, coming home With my flock after a johrney, I .fotmd m y father a n d :mother asleeI). I milked nay animals, and with the milk by nay side I kept vigil by nay parents' hedside till dawn. Then my parents woke up and drank gi-atefully.. Even as I waited for their waking nay children clamoured r0und,.crying f o r food, so hu.ngrv were the)-. O God, if I d i d t h i s to Win T h y pleasure, s u r e l y Thou wilt help us i n our distress." ~ Lo! the stone slid back a fraction, not leaving.enough space, however, through which tO pass. Then the second man.prayed- thus :- O God,.I h a d a cousin " . and she was very dear to me. O God, m y passion ruled me, and I wanted to sleep with h e r . She hecame m o s t indignant and did not consent. A famine Came Up6n Our ~:ountr3~. and my cousin came t o m e f o r hell), as she starved. I reminded her of my desire, and told her that I would give her a sum of money if she would agree to sleep with me. The ?unfortunate lady agreed, H o w e v e r ; just as yve :made ready'~ she said. 'O cousin, fear God and d o not commit the unlawfiflact.' ~Vith t h a t . I set her free and left her. O God, if I have done

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Call to Truth
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Hazrat Mirza Ghulam Ahmad -The P r o m i s e d Messiah a n d M a h d i , 1836-1908 ....

"Thc only religion Which can now redeem .mankind and lead .thenl to salvation is. Islam, and the last divine Word by which man can find God is contained in the H01y Quran, and the last- D i v i n e L a w - g i v c y is M u h a m m a d (peace :and the blessings of God b e upon: him !.~. "The. Lord o f H e a v e n and Earth. h a s s e n t m e t o bring i tilt: world back to G o d a n d His-wo. rd and H i s P r 0 p h e t , whom. they had forsaken, and to preach His w o r d to the nations and t. lead them back i n t o H i s ldngdom a n d tO bring those that had became separated f r o m I I i n a : and to give faith to the faith, less, e y e s to the blind and ears 1~o the d e a f ; and tO heal those whose b0dies, had been corrupted by-leprosy; and to raise tl{e dead ; and to awaken those that slmnber ; and to conciliate those that are disaffected: and.to reform those that are corrupted; and to r~ise those that a r e fallen ;. and to look after those, that are helpless: and tO open the gates of the k i n g d o m .of heaven unto tfiose t h a t are rejected. "Ye men, whatever vonr religion, t h e gates 0 f God's this to seek Thy pleasure, wiit Thdu not help us in Our dis, tress ?" LO! the stone g a v e w a y a little more, yet t h e r e was n o t .enough room through which to pass to the opefi air. ~. Then the third m a n : p r a y e d t h u s : " O God, I had a laboUrer and I paid h i m : Once, however, he went way, withOUt wages. "In t h e meanwhile I invested his w a g e s in many ways. Soon I got m u c h wealth, and became exceeding!yprosperous. : Then the labourer returned and asked for his wages. I gave him it, and with it all the w e a l t h I had accumulated honi it. I - t e thought ! jested, but .became assured of my seriousness and took it all'gratefullvi 0 God, i:f I have done this to secure Thv pleasu.re, wilt. ;I'hou n o t help us in our .hstress. . -" L o t the stone rumbled, and rolled back, and t h e three men stepped out and went on their way. ( B u k h a r i )

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mercy are open unto ;,ou" believe in the one God and ol)ev. Muhanunad (o11 whona be peace and the blessings of~God! i and the heaven shall shower its blessings upon you and the earth shall bring forth its abundance. "Ye who call vourselves Moslems, think not that ye shall please God by your name. God is not pleased b y w o r d s but bY the righteousness of your. hearts, and by vouractions. Purifxyour t h o u g h t s mad watch over.your actions, for these-are the things f o r w h i c h a - m a n is himoured by the-Lor:tk Say not unto yourselves: "~Ve are,the chosen of }he Lord, He will not punish us, b u t will destrqy our e n e m i e s . H e will destroy you before H e will de.str)y y o u r enemies anti condenin y0u before H e will condemn" them fro" ve knew His will and thev knew : not. and ye w e r e i n the Ligfit and knew t r u t h from darkness b u t the)" being i n t h e dark knew not. " Y e Moslefi~s and Sons of MoslemS!. remove the hardhess of your hearts and adopt humility for His s a k e a n d draw n o t y o u r s W o r d s for the faith: for thus are ye not the elect of tlae Lord lint are condenmed hr.Him, for-ve d i s h o n o u r God a n d His P r o p h e t and His Book a n d H i s F a i t h :to fulfil your own selfish desires and tO gain spoil f o r yourselves; ~ind to feed yourselves you cut the throats, of theirs: and ~ u disgrace t h e name i-ff the Lord and seek honour for. yourselves. "Tt/Tn:k-ye that the word of God Stands i n need o~ robbery and m u r d e r to be juStified and honoured? Does not even the w o r d ' o f man :extort deservi~d praise from the mouths of men? \Vhv t h e n must ye kill:and plmader to coral)el men to p r a i s e t h e 6"ord~0f God? ."Ye men, ye..cannot find happiness in goods and money; but he that: looks after the poor and the needy will find. hal)=piness, a n d h e that succours the helpless will be helped by the Lord; and he that protects the ;weak Will be g u a r d e d in heaven, so that ~vheia he sleeps God will keep awake for him, and when he is-ungamrded God. will watch over him: ~nd whenhe is not aw;ire of his enemy God will fight for him, for out of his l i m i t e d m e a n s .he helped God's poor .creatures and saved them from destruction. Shall the Lord, then, be miserly with .him and shall h e shut agailist him His .unlimited treasures ? ...... " A n d speak n o t that Which is not t r u e , f o r untruth i s a poison, a n d God accepts the righteou,s alone. Be honest andshun dishonesty. .

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Keys-to Moral. Evolution


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Hazrat Mirza Bashir-ud-Deen Mahrnud Abroad (Head of theAhmadiyya Movement, Qadian, India)
The function of religion is not merely to point out good and bad moi-a! quallties, b u t ,also: to pr0vid~-or:devise means by the aid t)f which men may be able to renounce evil and A~lopt g0od morals, f o r without t h i s all o u r efforts a r e vain and our research profitless. \~re give below some of the means as prescril~ed-byi-Islam f o r nloral improvement. The first m e a n s of m o r a l nnprovement furnished by Islam is through the manifestation of D i v i n e attributes, without which the: attainment of moral perfection is impossible. i n e v e r y t h i n g mari stands i n need of demonstration, and can easi-lv learn through demonstrations what he cannot :acquire thrc~t'l~h books. In the. absence o f demonstration allsciences and arts w o u l d be lost to the world. Can anyone, for instance,- l e a r n chemistry or .engineering without (he help of :experiments and demonst~rations? The same is t h e case with moral trainings M a n cannot a t t a i n t o moral perfection without the help of p e r f e c t models and demonstrations. I t is necessary, therefore, that perfect models should appear again and again in the world to demonstrate to mankind a life of-m0ral perfection. It is also necessary that these models should themselves be men, for a being that is n o t h m n a n Cannot Serve the purpose o~ a model for men- The conduct of such a being c a n n o t encourage mankind to imitation. So w e n m s t have perfect men to imitate and such men must appear frequently to enable . 0ther men ~t o mould their conduct i n imitation o f t h e m . I s l a m claims that such perfect men. a p p e a r f r e q u e n t l y . o n earth a n d t h e y are the Prophets and Messengers of God~ " . . . . i -This is the only:complete.perfect me,ms of attaining m0ral perfection, and all other means are only subsidiary tO it, for, the benefits w h i c h we c a n derlVe froth t h e f o r i n e r are certain, and those that can be derived from an): other means cannot be e n t i r e l y free f r o m the .possibility- of doubt and error. But as. this lneans cannot .be provided by man a t h i s own will and pleastire, Islam has. pointed o u t other means, by the aid of

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which a man might discard evil morals and.acquire good ones.The second means .provided by islam f.or the moral ilnprovement of man, is the lnethod adopted by it in classifying all moral qualities into different grades and. stages. : By indicating these different stag~/s of virtue and vice, Islam has rendered it easy .ior ever), p e r s o n to ascertain his true position in the lnoral scale, a n d t o take steps and.adopt measures or his moral improvement. :At every stage a man has a detin i t e Object p u t before, hin !, W h i c h does n o t appear to him to be impossible of attainment afld w h i q h , t h e r e f o r e , d0cs ilot-: discourage him. " F o r instance,-nothing would appear stranger or more hopeless to a m a n .who is so steepe d in vice that he does not retain the slightest conception o f v i r t u e and morality, than to be ~told that he must so r e f o r m himself as to 1hake virtue a part of his n a t u r e and to spend the rest of his life in the service of humanity. The~guli between his present position and. that. which he as asked, to. attam to, would. aP.t)ear insuper2 . able, and he would probably despair of e v e r beiilg a better lnan. But if we were to tell him that e v e r y s t e p taken towards virtue makes him more virtuous a n d t h a t iF he cannot alto-.: gether renounce vice he should a t least feel ashamed oF it, h e would eageHy follow our suggestions a s being practicable arid easily attainable. When. h e begins tO Feel. remorse and is a s h a m e d Of his Conduct, we c a n tell him t h a t h e lias achieved the: first step t o w a r d v i r t u e , i o r the renouncing o f the graver ' forms of vice is als6 a f o r m of virtue. T h e encouragement which he derives frOm this we can Use as an a i d towards his . further progress on the path of Virtue. "\-\re can next ask h i m t h a t i~I he is yet unable to do good, he s h o u l d . a t least avoid evil, a n d shoutd reFu.se to ~ ' t upon-the evil promptings and suggestions o f h i s mind;-aild slmuld try that no evil acts a r e done by him, so that he shonhl n o t l)yhis evil deeds cause pain or unpleasantness t o o t h e r s . . !-Ie w i l l find this easier than the first stage, and w h e n he has accoml)lished this he will be more than ever eager to a d v a n c e towards Virttle and to renounce hisl fol-meg .career o f vice. - H i s mind s~,ill, still be full o f evil thoughts,-/ but can anybody doub.t that "he will have at/ " " " tained a c e r t a i n stage of vil'tUd.-for he is constantly ad.vancing towards it a n d had refiounced tlm greater p o r t i o n o f his vices ? \~re shall then ask him t~?take the next step and t o cleanse . his mind of evil. thoughts mad to shtm all imlmrity a n d vice. This-will surely be touch,easier for h i m than the first two stages a n d w h e n / h e I{as accomplished this, his m i n d will be
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like that of a new-bol-n child a c l e a n plate on w h i c h no im. ,'. prcssion has ) r e t been inade. A f t e r he is saved f r o m the st.fi.te of moral degradation, we can next p u t h i n l to the f i r s t s t a g e ,,f ,,norality and lead him on and on to t h e highest pinnacle" ,,f m o r a l e v o l u t i o n . . The third means provided by Islam for this purpose is | h a t it has explained:the reasons w h y good moral qualities should be adopted a n d evil ones eschewed, so t h a t men, bec~min.~ axcare of the real i{ature of. these qualities should of lhemselves be pron{pted to acquire good m o r a l s a n d to eschew evil ones. -. . . . . ". . . . . . . - . The f o u r t h nleans provided bv Islam for. this purpose is I,~ alter the p o i n t 0 f view 0f man concerning s0me of the evil m o r a l s , and to substitute hope f o r despair in this conilection: ManVeviiS:are committed by men.because they believe that thev caml0t possibly avoid them. - T h e people who ..propagate such ideas .among their children, lav the foundatic,ns of the nloral depravity: Of f u t u r e g e n e r a t i o n s . A man wh~ does not believe that a certain object is attainable will uever strive after it. A nation that believes t h a t its ant ' t ' s l o r s had exhatlsted all possible discoveries and inventions is not likely;, to make a discovery o r i n v e n t i o n : a n d a nation thai: beliex;es t h a t it cannot possibly effect, a n improxTement in its condition is not likel.v.to attempt it. Similarly, people .who lielieve that evil is inhef'ent i n them a n d t h a t they cannot pos ~' siblx; resist it, a n d tlaat i t is impossible for. them t o a c h i e v e moral perfection, are t.hemselves providing the means of their Own destruction. The H o l y p r o p h e t (on whom.be peace and lhe blessinfs 0f G o d ) h a s laid ~reat stress~ on this point and has altogether forbidden despair: H e s a y s : "\,Vhen a man saysconcerning a people that t h e y have been destroyed, he is the person who d e s t r 0 y s t h e m . " T h a t is?to say, no material calamities and misfortunes dan b e so fatal t o a man as the impression on h l s . m i n d that the d o o r !of improvement, and p r o g r e s s h a s beei~ shut u p 0 n . h ! m . - Despair and disappointment prevent a l~aan from m a k i n g an eff0rt for success and lead to certain f a i l u r e a n d destruction. Islam does not cotmtenance the idea that ma'n Can ever be-debarred f r o m selfimprovement and progxess, and i t . h a s thfls opened the door to moral development. : . . . . . . . ' T h e r e can bel n o d o u b t t h a t man i s b o r n into this world with a pure and sinless nature, and:hOwever deep he m i c h t plunge into sin, his nature retains some Of its original purity,
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so that if at any time he turns towards virtue, he can discard all his vices, which are all acquired, and can?attain to the perfection of virtues, which is iiiherent in man. I s l a m has, by putting f o r w a r d this truth, completely a l t e r e d 1nan's point of view towards g o o d a n d e(,il, and given hini hope and courage. Religions o t h e r than I s l a m are either silent on this point, or represent man as entering this world under such burdens that they are enough to submerge him without the additional weight of his Own misdeeds,-

The fifth means prescribed b y I s l a m for moral.reformat i o n appears at first sight to be inconsistent with the fourth. but in reality it is,merely sl{pplementary to it. This is the effo'rt, which Islam .nmkes to u p r o o t . t h e evil influences of, ! heredity. N o d o u b t m a n is.bona with a pure nature, but he also in]aerites from his parents o r - r e m o t e a n c e s t o r s certain inclinations towards vice. ' T h i s statement is not inconsistent. N a t u r e and inclination ar:e t w o different t h i n g s . . N a t u r e or conscience is ahvavs pure. E v e n the child o f a rohher or n m r d e r e r . i s . b o r n with a pure nature, lint if his.parents possessed an evil mind, he wilt be influenced by it, and will be easily led a w a y by such thoughts if he Subsequently encounters them. just a s theTchildren o f confirmed invalids a r e p r o n e to fall 'an easy prey. to diseases from w h i c h their parents suffered. Such inclinations and tendencies in the mind of a : c h i l d are the result of the ithought which fill t h e ,uinds of the parents at tl~e time o f Copulation, The effect of these thoughts on the min~l of the child is in most cases very slight an~l m a y x ery often be overcome b y environments and trainin,o', lint Islam .has prescribed a means of t u r n i n g even such influences into instruments of good. The husband and wife a r e taught to offer a lqrayer when: they meet each other. in private, w h i c h runs, "Secure us, . 0 Lord, and o u r children ;igainst evil promptings arfd evil i.coinpanions.'.' A p a r t f r o m its .effect:as a prayer,, this prayer starts.a current of p u r e ~ h o u g h t s in theminds of the parents, even in cases i n which they a r e notordinarily ~ v e n to such thoughts; f o r n o t o n l y : t h e mere act of prayer but also the w o r d s o f his particular prayer as well as tile concern which most people feel for the.welfare of their issue, and the natural desire of all parents that their children should lead pure.lives, produce this -effect. \ V h e n . . t h e r e : fore, parents offer p r a y e r for the p u r i t y of their children. ~ their own minds are -bound to be affected by it and to incline

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t6wards pnrity and virtue, and as the child is likely to inherit the thoughts entertained by his .parents at the moment, he will be saved frona inclinations which his parents might have entertahaed prior to this prayer. The Itoly Prophet ( o n whom be peace and the blqssings of God) says:--"Children whgse parents offer this prayer a t the time.of their conjugal relation are saved from the touch of Sat.an, ~ meaning that they are saved fronl t h e evil influences which they we.re, liable to iuherit~ from their parents. This would be so whether the prayer is accepted or not. If it is accepted it will also secure the child against other evil influences. The sixth means prescribed by Islam for the moral improvement of man is that if has opened ways by which s u c h ttioughts enter t h e m i n d of man as' may e x c i t e a n d q u i c k e n in him "lais natural instinct Of virtue. Some of these ways, e.g., prayer, worship, fasting, remembrance of God etc. W e will explain [a-eret h r e e of those ways :. (a). The first of these i s .mentioned in ~the following words of the Holy Quran: i.e., "O, Ye Muslitns, keep company with therighteous." (IX:119) I t cannot he denied that m a n is influenced.byhis environment, and a man who keeps company with the righteous is bound tO experience a rapid and wonderful-chan,,,e m .hmaself. ~hlch draws him towards virtue a n d helps him :to get rid of vices and evil thoughts. Islam .lays so nmch stress upon the effect.of a man s compa y. upon his. morals:, that the Moslems h a v e ever been fond of resorting to the company of the righteous men. They often undertakeilong and arduous journeys f o r this purpose and bear Separation f r o m their homes and dear:ones, and by. the help of. the magnetic influence o f such men they arrive at their goat w i t h i n a wonderfully short period of time.(b) :The second way for moral improvement is Contained in the-laws relating to l a w f u l and prohibited things, such as fo~d. \Ve are constantly surprised to find that the World has ncit vet realised the wonderful truth that a man's morals are deel;ly affected b y the fgod he takes. On t h e contrary, the laws 0f Islam"regulating food are. critiCised as entirely purposeless. The fact, however, that the-fo0d .one takes affects one's morals Can hardly be tleniedi The Holy Quran says: "0 Apostles,-eat those things that are pure;::and you will be enabled to act righteously." " . . . . . ( c ) . The third way of moral development devised byI s l a m is that a child s h o u l d b e subjected to .goodinfluences
. . . , , .-. . 1" " * " * i ' n

j
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Toward Islam
By
Sufi M. R. Bengalee Islam is .the most misrepresented and the least understood Of all religions. F o r centuries,, this noble faith has

from its infancy. - Islam-possesses the. unique disti'nctionof having appreciated this principle. In other religioias it isgenerally understood-that :religion ought t o regulate the conduct of a child only after it has attained to years of discretion. According t o Isl~tm, t h e injuctions of religion, no doubt, become binding on a child Only a f t e r - i t has attained discretion bu~: in matter of habit and r o u t i n e a child will not be able to conform to t h e comman~lments of his f a i t h unless he is trained from his very infancy to act in accordance with them. Accordingly, I s l a m enjoins upon parents the training of a child from the m o m e n t of. his birth. As soon as a child is ' i ~ horn 'to a Moslem,-the Azan; (i.e., t h e words used. for calling the faithful to prayer)..whicla c o n t a i n s a n abstract o f the essential .doctrines Of Islam, .is. recited into his"right a-nd left ear. The recitation:of the A z a n i m o the ears Of newly-born infant indicates thatthe .di.~retion. o f a ch.ild g r o w s steadily and graduall), f r o m the monient of his birth, and that he does not attain tofull discretion, at any given moment. The seventh means devised by /slam or~ the- moral iinprovement o f man is to Close t h e avenues tt:rough which sin finds an .entrance into the hun)an mind,. .. -. " EVil, according to Islam, is extraneous to man and enters from outs~ide. The,:nature of man is pure and loves virtue and abhors vicel Keeping this principle i n view Islam h a s laid down.instructions, whereby all.those avenues by w h i c h evil thoughts or vices c a n eliter the h u m a n m i n d - h a v e been closed. W e are surprised, however, t o find, that. this psychological truth :on which Islam h a s b a s e d these injunctiolis whereby it h a s - m a d e a material addition to the volume of moral and iniellectual debt w h i c h t h e world owes it, has provoked the fiercest opposition to, Islam and has ,failed to receive due appreciation .even a t the hands of those who value all things by the standard of intellect.
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bc~n mercilessly assailed by the Christian missionaries and the nfi,iiifonned and the preverted western writei-s as the most militant and spiritually and ethically .unedifying religion. The enemies of Islam have painted an extremely (lark and gloomy picture of the noble-faith with the avowed object of poisoning- the minds o the unenlightened: westernpublic. Consequently grossest ignorance about and a deep-seated and widespread antipathy against this holy-faith and its votaries are to be found among the: occidental people. It is highl)/gratifying to note that as a result of the rapid .,rowth of contact between the east a n d the west and through-.the noble.efforts of t h e Moslem missionaries of the :\lmmddiva m6vement, the light Of Islam-is.:.penetrating the .western world. Occidental people have begun to: have a better understanding.of the f a i t h of Islam and its lofty principles.' :\s the veil of misrepresentation, misunderstanding and ignorance ls being lifted,, people are g-radually becoming at~ tracted tmvard i t as t h o u g h b y the law .of gravitation. A n d the. west is consciously Or unconsciously adopting, the prin, -ciples of Islam.. Manifest signs.are visible: in. the .horizon, Which promise a magnificent future for .Islam in the west. The day is not far when the west .will find itssalvation at the -.feet of Islam. ' I n - t h i s article, we propose tO discuss briefly certain trends of the western world toward Islam. " :Divinil/y or-God-head o f Jesus, Trinity, vicarious atonement and.that man ~s born in Sin a n d shaped in ifiiquity are !he important Christian ' beliefs a n d doctrines upon w h i e h t h e Christianchurchis built. .. . . . : A careful study-of the radical c h a n g e s t h r o u g h which Christianity,. is passing for a long time, r e v e a l s t h a t a con.qderable portion of the Christians. have Summarily-repudiated the above mentioned: traditional and Orthodox Christian beliefs. Beginning with the Unitarian sect, innumerable Christian denominations have sprung up, which flinging Godhead. of Jesus and. Trinity to..the winds, have accepted the. purely Islamic truth of Monotheism--belief in one and the only C, od. Like the MOslems; they believe in Jesus as a man and a great prophet, nothing more than that. : ' Similarly many ChriStians have realized'the absurdity of the doctrine of the .vicarious atonement. T h e y have become -convinced that.salvation of man cannot depend Upon the blood
~r " " " " % *

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of Jesus. Man has to work out his mvn salvation bY submitting himself to the will of God and through his own good works. This is Islamic belief. Asid~ from t h e i g n o r a n t and the blind followers,_ the upper strata of. the Christian fiiith have recoglfized the hnmorality of the monstrous, docti'ine that man is b o r n in S i n and shaped in iniquity. T h e ; t r u t h h a s dawned upon them that. man is born p m ' e a n d Sinless. E v i l , i s n o t inborn, innate or natural with man. T h e sheet of h u m a n nature is perfectly: clean. T h i s means clearly a gr.eat triumph ~ f Islam. Monasticism--iS virttle,'in Christianity--. In sharp and vivid contrast i t istrice in Islam. The H o l y O u r a n proclaims; "There is. no inon~sticisnl in Islam." T h e Holy prophet Mutiammad says, " M a r r i a g e i s m y precept and example~ Those )vho do not follow my precept" and e x a m p l e are nor mY followers." T h u s Islam has emphasized and exalted t h e sanctity of t h e institution Of m a r r i a g e as the m a r r i a g e life is t h e moFt righteous life. W i t h the march of progress the .Christians had to s u b mit to this Moslem .princilfie w h i c h has g a i n e d ground in Christiandom with the result that Monasticism h a s been practically ~xting-uished. T h e r e is no ~Sanction of' divorce i n Christianity. TheI Christian Bible says~ , i \ \ 1"hosoever shall p.lt a w a v his wife, sav ~ ing for the cause of fornication, causeth her to commit adultery: a n d whosoever shall m a ( r y her that is diw.~;ced, committeth adultery." (Math. \"-32) : .... . In striking contrast, Islam allows divorce u n d e r certain circumstances when itbeComes an unavoidaNe necessity. At the same time, Islam takes e v e r y precaution and lmts stringent restrictions upon it so t h a t it may not become a menace to the sacred institution of m a r r i a g e m l d thus break the home l i f e . The saying o f : M t ! h a m m a d is deeply significant in t h i s regard. /The H o l y Prophet says. " O f all hra,fM things, di.vorce is the most al)omuaab e. So I s l a m allows diWwce but ImtS a great clleck upon it with its wise laws and teachings. The result is: that t h e r e :is no marriage and divorce problem i n t h e work] of Islam. For centuries,- the Christians hax;e brought accusation of b lasl~hemy against Islam on account of its sanction of divorce: It is not possible to oppose the law of nature which is t h e law of God forever. T h e Christians h a d to admit defeat at

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the hands of Islam in this particular. Most of the Christian gm'ernments were.forced t o annul the indisolubility of marriage and to adopt th e Islamic principle of divorce by laws, tlmugh without .the wise and effective restrictions of Islam. " The result is that the l)enduhml has swung to the other extreme . and divorce has bee{role so common that it has shaken the very foundations of the whole social s t r u c t u r e . . H e r e again, Islam secures another great victor),. The contribution of . Christianity .toward removing t h e great evil of drinking i s n e x t tonollhing. On the contrary, t h e . New.Testament furnishes abundant w a r r a n t ,for indulgence. Jesus' drinking:of w i n e gives.it the s t a m p . o f sanction . Islam has lint absolute veto on all into.kicants.; The success o f I s l a m in eradicating this evil is unparallelecL Since.its dawn. wherever Islam has.got!e, drinking.has vanished. The Christian w o r M h a s come to recog-nize that drinking is a g r e a t stumbllng block to the growth of civilization, There is a"tmiversal con'demnation, ot: this igiant evil. America adcipted the law of prohibition, Though it m e t w i t h c o m p l e t e and tragic failure it set a n o b l e precedent in impressing u p o n the wo.rld the supreme importance and utmost necessity of adopting the Islamic law of prohihition. This i s a flagranl: adniissi0n of the moral superiority of Islam and a great step forward toward the noble faith. T h e main l~roblem- -of o u r generation :is the economic " liaral)., which is deepl,~; rooted "in concentration of wealth. This is fast-ldriving the so-called .civilized world toward Islmn which alone holds the k e y fo the solution Of the vexedeconomic disorder. By its law of inheritance, by its.ban on interest and by-the.institution o f Z a k a t or poor rate. I s l a m removes the " evils of capitalism and effects an rapproachment between capital and labor. There has awakened a tremendous consciousness for wide and equitalJle distribution o f :,vealth all over the world. The recent :American: proposition 0f. share-the-~wealth -tax plan tellS the same story. This share-the-wealth proposition i s the nearest approach t o the l s l a m i c institution of ZaEat or poor rate, a c c o r d i n g to which two ancl. one-half percent of all k i n d s of surplus wealth of every.individual is t o be collected by t h e state and. spent: exclusively, for the wel.fare of the poor and needy. All the above mentioned examples are siareindications of the Swi~ft d r i f t of t h e world toward Islam.

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Mohammed, the. Desired of All Nations


By
Manly P. Hall
Mohalmned, the Prophet of Ishtn'm, ."tlie Desired of nil nations," was born in Mecca, A. 17). 570 and died in Medina. A. D.: 632, or in the eleventh y e a r after the Itef]h'a ( H i j r a h ) . In his youth ~Iohammed: tr,'iveled w i t h t h e ~ I 4 c c a n carat xian, on one occasion, acted as armour-bearer for: his uncle, and spent a considerable time amonff the Bedouins. \ V i t h the. Passing years Mc~hannued attained marked success in business antl when about twenty-five years ohl marriedone of hisenlplo3;ers, a wealthy X~q(10w nearlY' fifteen years his senior. The widow. Khadijah by name,, greatly fascinated by Mohammed, resolved to retain the young efficient manager for life. Khadijah was a w o m a n - o f exceptional mentality ai{d to her integrity and devotion must be ascribed the early success of the Islamic cause. B y his m a r r i a g e . M o h a m m e d was elevated from a position of comparative poverty to one of great wealth and power, and so exenlplary was his conduct that-he became known t h r o u g h o u t MeCca as "the faithful and true.": Mohammed Unhestitatingly sacrificed both his wealth and social position in the s e r v i c e o f th:e God whose voice he heard while meditating in the cavern on M o u n t H i r a in the month of Ramadan. Year after: 3'ear Mohammekt climbed the rocky and-desolate-slgpes of M o u n t Hira (since called Jebel-Nur, "The Mountain o f Light") and here in his loneliness cried-out to God to reveal anew the pure religion.of Adam, that spiritual doctrine lost to mankind through the dissensions o f religibus factions. Khadijah,.solicitous over her husband's ascetic practices which were impairing his physical health, sometinles acconlpanied him in his Weary v.igil, and with Womanly 'intuition sensed the travail of his soul. At last one night in his f.ortietti . year as he lay upon the floor- o f the cavern, .enveloped in his cloak, a great ligh t burst u p o n him. Overcome with a sense

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of perfect peace and understanding in the blessedness of the celestial presence, he lost consciousness. \Vhen he came to himself again the-Angel Gabriel stood before him, exhibiting a silken shawl with mysterious characters traced Upon i t . From these characters Mohammed gained the basic doctrines later embodied in the Koran: Then Gabriel spoke in a clear and w~mderful voice, declaring Mohammed to be the. Prophet of the. living God. " In awe and trembling, Mohammed hastened to Khadijah. fearing the vision to have been i n s p i r e d - b y the same evil .~liirits who Served the pagan inagicians so ,greatly despised by him. Khadijah assured him that his own virtuous life would lie his protection and that he need fear no evil. Thus reassure& the Priq~het awaited further visitations from Gabriel. When these did not . .come: however, such a despair filled his ... s~ul that .he attempted Self-destructic;n, only to be stopped in the very act of casting himself over a cliff by-the sudden reapl~eai-~nce .of flabriei, who again assured"the Prophet that the revelations needed by his people would be given to him as necessity arose, . Possibly as a result o f his lonely p e r i o d s o f meditation, .M~,hammed seemingly- was subject to ecstatic trances. On the occasions when the" xarious stira2ro)f the Koran.were dictated hc is said to have fallenunconscious, and; regardless of the chill:of the surrounding air, tO h a v e been coveredwith beads of perspiration. Often these attacks came. without warning; at other times he--W0uld sit wrapped in-ablanket to prevent a chill from the copious perspiration, and while apparently unconscious would dictare the various passageslwhich a small. circleof trusted frlends would either commit-to memory or re.duce to Writing. o n one occasion in later, life when Aim Bakr referred to the gray hairs in his beard, Mohamnaed, lifting the end of his-beard:and l o o k i n g a t it, declared its whiteness to be. due to the phvsicai agony attendant upon his .Periods o in~ spirati0n. If the writings attributed to Mohammed .bi~ considered as nierely the hallucinations of anepileptic----and for that:reas0n discounted his Christian detractors should beware lest with the doctrines of the ' Pr0phet -they also undermine the very -teachings which they themselves affirm, for many of the dis-_ ciples, apostles, and saints of. the early church are known to havebeen subject to nervous disorders.

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Moha,mned's first convert was his own wife, Khadijah,. who was followed.by other nlembers of his immediate family; a circumstance which moved Sir William-Muir to note: "It is strongly corroborative of Mohmnmed' s sincerity that the earliest :converts to Islam were not only of uprigh't character, but his own bosom friends and people o f h i s household i who, intimately acquainted with his private life, could not fail otherwise to have detected those discrepancies whiEh ever more or less exist between the professions of the hypocritical dgceiver abroad and his actions at' h o m e . " ( S e e The Life of Mohamnaed.) Amol{g the f i r s t t o a c c e p t t h e faith of Islam was Abu Bakr. who becgme ;lohammed s. closest and mos.t faithful friend2 Abu'Bakr, a man of brilliant attainments, contributed materi/illv to the. success of t h e Prophet's enterwises , and in accord with the exWeSs wish of the Prophet became the leader of the faithful after Mohammed's death. A'isha, the daughter of Aim Bakr, later becaine the. wife of :Mohammed, thus still further cementing the bolad of fraternity between the two men. Quietly, but industriously, Mohammed l~ronmlgated his doctrines among a snmll Circle of. powerful, friends. When the enthusiams of h i s fisllowers finally forced his hand and he Imblicly announcedhis mission, he Was already the leader of a strong and v,~ell-organized faction. Fearing Mohammed's growing prestige; the pe0i~le,o f Mecca, waiving the-time-hon- i ored tradition that blood could not be spilt within the holy., city, decided to exterminate'Islam by assassinating.the.Prophet. All the differefit groups combined in this undertaking SO that the g-uilt fdr the crime might thereby h.c more evenly disrilmted. Discovering the danger in time, Mohammed left his friend Ali in his bed and fled.with Aim Bakr from the city, and after adroitly eluding the Meccans, joined the main' body of his foll~owers that had preceded hini t0 Yathrib (afterwards called Medina ). )L:'l~onthis incident-,-called the Hcqira ( H i j rah) or. "flight" is based t h e Islamic chronological system. Dating from the Hegira, (Itijrah) t h e p o w e r of the Prophet steadily gr~ew until in the eighth 3,ear Mohammed entered Mecca after practically abloodless victor), and estab- i lished it as the spiritual center Of his faith: Planting his stand ~ ard to the north Of Mecca, he.rode into the city, and after circling seven times the sacred Kaaba. ordered the 360 images within its precincts to be destroyed.: He then enl/ered the Kaaba
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itself, cleansed i t o f its idolatrous associationsl.and rededicated the s t r n c t u r e t o Allah. the monotheistic God. of Islam. Mo-hammed next granted amnesty to all his enemies for their attempts to destroy him. Under his prote'ction Mecca increased in power and-glory, becoming~the focal point of a great annual pil~r.image; which.even-tO this day winds.ac~)ss the desert in theTmonths of pilgrimage-and numbers over threescore thousand in its train. In'the tenth year after the Hegh'a ( H i j r a h ) , Mohammed led the valedictory pilgrimage and for the last timer0de at the .hea.d of the faithful along the sacred way l e a d i n g t o Mecca -an[ the BlackStone. As the premonition bf death was strong upon .him, he desired this pilgrimage: t o be the perfect model for all-the thousands that Would follow. Conscmus that life was waning away within him," wrote Washington Irving, "Mahomet, during this last sojourn in ihe sacred city o f his faith, sought to engrax~e h i s doctrines deeolv in the,minds and hearts of hisfollowers. For this purpose:'lae preached frequently in the Kaaba from the imlpit, or in the openair from the.back of his camel. 'Listen t o n i y words,' he would say, 'for ~[know not whether, afterthis year, we shall ever m e e t h e r e a g a i n . O h , m y hearers, I a m but a man like yourselves: the angel Of death may at. any. time appear, and I must obey his stnnmons'." Having completed the valedictory pilgrimage; Mohalmned returned to Medina. - " In the seventh year after the Hegii'a ( H i j r a h ) ( A - . H. 7 ) an attempt was made at Kheibar to poison the Prophet. As .XIohainmi~d took t h e first m o u t h f u l of the poisoned food, the evil design.was revealed to him by divine intercession. It is related that during his last sickness he rose one night and visited a burial ground on the outskirts Of Medina, evidently believing that he, .too, would soon be numbered with )he dead; A t this 'time he told a n attendant that the choice had been offered him of continuing his physical life or going to his Lord, and that he had chosen to. meet his Maker. Mohammed Suffered greatly with h i s head and side and also f r o m fever, but on june 8th. Seemed convalescent. He joined his followers in prayer and, seating himself in the courtyard, deli~-ered a lecture to-the faithful in a-clear and powerful voice. Apparently he-0vertaxed his strength, f o r it was necessary to assist him into the house of A'isha, which opened into the court of t h e mosque. Here upon a rough pallet, laid
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on the bare tloor the Propliet of Islam spent lris last hours ~m earth. \\;hen she saw t h a t her aged husband was sufferin.~ with intense pain, A'isha snl)l)orted him i n her arms until the end. Feeling that death was Ul)On him. Mohammed prayed: "O Lord, I beseech Thee, assist me in the agonies of death." Then ahnost in a whisper fie repeated three times: "Gabriel. come Close unto me." I n The H e r o as Prophet'. Thomas Carlyle writes thus of the dearth o f M o h a m m e d : :'His last Words were a prayer, broken ejaculations of a heart~ struggling-u 1) in trembling-hope towards its Maker."-Concerning' the character Of Moliammed there have been the grossest misconcel)tions. No, evidence exists t o sui)l)ort. the charges of extreme cruelty and licentious!li~ss laid.at his door. O n the contrary, the more closely the life o f M o h a m med is scrutinized by dispassionate investigators, the more al)l)drent become the finer qualities of his nature. In the words of Carlyle: " i lahomet hmlself, after all that can b e s a i d abotlt him. was not a sensual man. \ v e so err wi'dely if we consider this man as a c0mmon;voluputary, intent mainly cJn base enjoym e n t s ~ n a y , on enjoyments of any ikifid. H?is household _ivas one of the frugalest, his conamon ~liet barely bread and water. Sometimes for months there was not a fire once lighted On his hearth . A poor, hard-w0rking, ill-pr0vided man" careless of w h a t v u l g a r m a n toiled for -. The~; Called h i m a Prophet, yon say? \Vhy; he stood there face to face with t h e m ; there, not enshrined in any mystery, visibly clouting his. own cloak, cobbling his own shoes; fighting, counselling, ord ~ : ering in the midst o f them, they must have seen ~k;hat kind of a man he was, let him be called what you.like! NO emperor with his tiaras was obeyed as this man in.a_cloak:0f his own clouting?' i~onfused by the apparentl3,- Hopeless task o f feconciling the life of the Prophet. with the absurd statements long accepted,as-authentic, \V'ashington Irving weighs him m the scales of fairness. "His military triumphs awakened no pride nor vain glotw. as they. w o u l d have done had they been effeCted f o r Selfisfi i purposes In the time of his greatest power, h e m a ] n t a i n e d the same' simplicit3; of manners and appearan.ce as i n t h e days 9 f hig adversity. . . It is t!lis perfect abnegation, of seJf. connected with this apparent heart-felt piety, running through = . . .

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,ut the various phases of his fortune, which perplex one in forming a just estimate of Mahomet's character . . . . \Vhen he hung over the death-bed of his infant son Ibrahim, resig-na~i0n to the will o f God was exhibited in h i s conduct under this kecnest of afflictions; and the hope of soon rejoining his child inParadise ~was his Consolati6n." (See Mahomet and.His Successors.)
. . _ o -

" A'isha. questioned after the deal~h o f - t h e Prophet conceming, his habits, replied .that he mended his own. clothes, col)bled his own shoes, and helped hei--in the household. duties. [low f a r removed:from Western concepts of Mohanimed's !anguinary character is A'isha'S simple admission that he loved most of all to sew! H e a l s o accepted the invitations of slaves and sat at meals with servants, declaring himself to be ,~servant. O f all Vices he hated lying the most. Before his ,loath he freed a l l h i s slaves. He never permitted his family t0 tfse for personal ends any. of the alnls or the money given ILvhis people. H e was fond of sweetmeats a n d used rain water for drinking purposes. His time he divided into three )arts, ll~.lilely.: the first he gave to God, the second to his-family. and the t h i r d t o himself. T h e latter l;ortion however-, he later Sacrificed to the service of his people. He dressedchiefty in white but also wore. red, yellow, and green. Mohammed entered Mecca ~/earing a black turban and bearing a black standard. H e . w o r e o n l y t h e plainest of garments, declaring that. rich and conspicuous raiment did not become "the pious, and did not remoVe his .shoes at prayer. I-Ie was particularly concerned with the cleanliness of his teeth and.at t h e time of his death, when .too weak t o speak, indicated his desire for a toothpick. \Vhen fearful of forgetting something, (~he Prophet tied a thread t o h i s ring. He once had a very fine gold ring . t)ut, noting that his folloivers had taken.to-wearing similar rings i n emulation Of him, he removed his own. and. threw it awav l e s t h i s fNlowers form an evil habit. (See The Life of llol~ammad. ). The most 'frequent, a n d apparently the most damaging, accusation brought against Mohammed is that o f polygamy. who sincerely believe the. harem t o be irreconcilable ~tith.spirituaHty should with consistency move for the expurNtion, o f the Psalms 0f David and the Proverbs of Solomon from ihe list of inspired writings," for the harem of Islam's

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l'rophet was insignificant COmlmred with that Inaintained by Israel s wl. est king and the relmted favorite of the Most ~tigh'! The polmlar conception that Mohamnled t a u g h t that Wonmn had no soul and could attain h e a v e n only through marriage is not substantiated by the words and a t t i t u d e o f the Prophet during his lifetime. In a lmper entitled " T h e Influence Of Islam on Social Conditionsj' read at the \Vorld's.parliament 0f Religions held in Chicago. in lg93, Mohammed \Vebb states the charge and answe, rs it.thus: "It has been said that Mohammed a n d t h e K o r a n denied a soul to WOlnan and ranked her with the animals~ The Koran places h e r on a p.erfect and comlflete equality with man. and the Pgophet's tea6h!ngs oftela place her in a l~osition superior to the man in some re pects. Mr. \Vebhinstifies his stand by quoting from t h e thirty-third sltrtt o f the K o r a n : " \ ; e r i l y the Moslems of either sex: a n d the.true believers of either sex, and the dew'out men. affd the dewmt women, and the men of veracity, and the women of veracit)~ and the patient men, and the 1)atientwomen. and the h u m b l e men, ,.and the humble women, and the alms-givers o f either sex, and the men who fast, and the women who fast, and tile chaste men, and the chaste women, and t h o s e o f either sex Who remember Allah f r e q u e n t l y : for them hath Allah prepared forgiveness and a grea~ reward." Herd the a t t a i n m e n t o f heaven is clearly set forth as a problem iwhosc only solution-is that of individual merit. . On the day of his death Mohammed told Fatima~ his beloved daughter, and Safiya, his ~mnt: " \ V o r k ~,-eout that which shall g-ain acceptance for you with t h e . L o r d : ~f,,or I verilY have no power with Him. to save v0u i n any wise..' T h e l:~:ophet did not advise either w o m e n to rely upon-the w r t u e s of her hushand nor in any m a n n e r d i d he.indicate women'S Salvation to be dependent upon the lmman, f r a i l t y . o f h e r spouse. " T h e :uussunnans. writes Sir V~rflham Jones, "are already a s o r t o f heterodox Christians: they are Christians, i f Locke reasons justly, becatlse they firmly believe the immaculate conception and divine character: but thev are het~rod6x, in denying vehemently his character of Gon. and .his equality, as God, with the ]:ather, of-whose absolute:unity the 3, h a v e firm belief: while they consider our doctrines as perfect 151asphemy, a~ld insist that our copies of the Scriptures have been corrupted both by Jews and Christians."

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-Why I A m a. Moslem
' By

Omar Cleveland
I w a s brought Up in the teachings o Christianity f r o m m y earliest c h i l d h o o d . I studied the Bible, read chuI:ch magazines, and attended the Methodist EpisCopal Church a n d Sunday Schools regularly until I attained nay majority. I felt assured that-I could subscribe to all of its fundamental principles its trappings o f ritualisnl and superstitions in its entirety. ... About this time~, I came across an 01d copy of " T h e A b dlemy of Happiness,"by. Ghazzali. an early Moslem writer. It was a.treatise on the teachings of Islam. T h e r e is nothing to compare t h e book iEo, for in:all the world there have lived few h u m a n beings who so found their manifest destiny, so completely fulfilled it, and were so spiritually enriched and humbled by that fulfilhnent. Yet h e w a s able to paint in words t h a t i)hfsical, mental ahnost psychic unfol~Iment. It seems to stand as a masterpiece of life that transscerids literature i~-. thoughts w r a p p e d in incomparable, clearnessl that h a d j o u r n e y e d d 0 w n the long reaches of the centuries to me. I w a s thirsty and it g a v e m e drink; I was h u n g r y and it gave me food. . .. L a t e r I c a m e in contact with Sufi M.-R. Bengalee, the H e a d Df the A h m a d i y y a M o v e m e n t in I s l a m in A m e r i c a . H e b r o u g h t t o me a wealth of inf0rniation a n d placed at my disposal ninny splendid books and magazines, for which. I am very grateful to him. - . . . . The simp!ici.ty of Islam,. the powerful appeal a n d compelling atmosphere o f .its Mosques - the five. dailY, calls to prayer ~ the earnestness of its adherents, and the:mellow concept of life ~0uched the a~espons!ve Chord of my heart and .won my unclualified approbation. .... ~ N o other religion can be coral)areal with :Islam, dictated as it was by t h e A n g e l Gabriel, to M o h a m m e d in a cave in Mount i H i r a , not fai- from. Mecca, ' whence he h a d . g o n e to lose himself.in meditation and solitudei This message which is c a l l e d t h e H o l y Q u r a n , contains. . what every soul craves for its Spiritual elevation--it is truly the gift of Alla h, the Book E t e r n a l .

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"Western Writers and Islam"


~
' ~ Y o n g e

I1a Spain music was greatly, cultivated, aud there was very extensive musical litei-ature. Poetry flourished with music. E v e r y o n e was :a poet. Th6 extraordinary richness of the languag"e, which is So fllll that the dictionary is in sixty volmnes, and the n a t u r a l cadences lend themsel('es,,to verse: and the tone of mind of the nation was poetical, and tleli,qhted in figurative i n i a g e r v a n d in descriptive or romantic pieces. P r o f e s s e d poet, s were Sure of renown and wealth, and even princes.sent letters and chal5 lengds in poetry to one another. ~to!iv-tellers,,-ere also in h i g h honour, and tfiei-e were an immense'nmnl~er of ~ romances, of which w e m a y g u e s s t h e s t y l e b y lheir Eastern.kindred. History, ~geneal0gy, g r a m n m r , - r h e t o r i c , and philosophy were greatly Cultivated, and m a n y treatises on them were written. " ' Mathematics w e r e studied earnestly, a n d t h e : s u b s t i t u t i 0 n of the nifle A r a b i c figures:f0r ihe c u n ~ b r o u s R o m a n method. enabled the operations to be carried much f a r t h e r than befor.e. Gebr, the A r a b term for ari~;hmetic, is t h e source of our term algebra..* " " their " The sages of Cordova 'icarmed " " calculatmns into astronomy, a n t i ' i m p r o v e d on the systems of- l?tolemy. A1 ;Batany, who was b0rn.in ~77; was!the first to measure the~ obliquity Of the ecliptic, and made other great discoveries Of pract!cal value. T h e n a m e s of most of the individual, stars remain a s monuments of our debts to these Arabs, from whom we learnt to talked of the Zenith and nadir, Geography was also studied. The A r a b descriptions o f Spain are still valuable; and-travellers were sent out t o bring home accounts of the scenery, inhabitants, productions, and naturai h i s t o r y of different countries. Treatises on all the. branches of nat'ural history abounded, and a few of theni still remain, including one on all the methods o the chase with dogs, horses, falcons, etc. Agriculture was especially studied. Great :treatises on !r.rigationand crops, cattle, grafting~ and g a r d e n i n g still eMst, ~. , , for~the motto of the .~ rab - |andoxxner x~as :. ,, H e who planteth and soweth, and maketh the earth bring forth fruit for man and beasL hath done ahns t h a t shall be reckoned t o him in heaven." Even the Khalifs w o r k e d i n their gardens with their own hands, and Andalusia was like one v a s t highly-cultivated farm.

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Many plants were introducedby the t(ha.lifs, which Spain lost and neg'lected after the discovery of America" saffron and mulbcr~2wtrees, ginger, myrrh, bananas, and dates: The Spanish names of many plants show their origin, and some have traveled e~,en to us. s u c h a s the ap/-icot, from A L B A R I C A Q U E : -the artichoke, from A L C A C H O F A " cotton, from A L G()DON; Medicinal plants were greatly:stUdied, and the :\tab physicians; Working on from the d!scoveries of Celsus and Galen, divided w i t h the Jews all there was of healing skill or knmvledge; and though anatomicalstudies were impossible to a devout believe, their surgeons made some progress in discoverv. Cheniistry:and alchemy alike a r e derived from their Wo]-ds A L KYMIA, alteredfrom the Greek. The terms aleiubic, alcohol, and alkali mark their progreSS in discover~:: and t h e signs of ap0thecaries"weight; only n o w f a l l i n g in{o disuse, a r e a remnant of the days. when tiae leech was either a Moor or a Jew. Nor were Women excluded from all these Studies. They sludied enough tO be. companions to their husbands, and a lady nmned .Maryam had a school :for young maidens at Seville, where thevcould acquire science, matheinatics, and history, as well as lighter arts. They went about veiled up to the eyes, and nevm: a t e w i t h . m e n ; b u t t h e y .were allOWed to associate willi, them-in.thecourts and gardens of their beautiful houses, and join in their~c0nversations, music, and poetry. Cordova; the .seat of a great.literary society; where the ,descendants of Arab Sheiks by turns opened their gorgeous pal:tees in the evenings to poets, phi!osophers,.and men of science, iwli~, debated mad recited.as in the golden days 0f Pericles or Maecenas. jew alld ChriStian ~0uld be freely admitted, and travelers and. discoverers related their adventures, showed the curiosities they had brought home, and.descriSed the:places flmv had seen. Or anecdotes-were related, when story-tellers vied with each Other i n relating instances of~courage, gener~,sit.v,adroitness, or the-like; poems were recited, .or ar~lments heldon abstr~mt subjects or mystic, explanations of' the. Koran, .~tretching-its meaning as Mohammed never intended. The imliulse he had given h a d carried these .Arabs to the highest lJoint, and their progress was.stiown in t h e exquisite taste of all their productt0ns, fr0nl their bu!ldings down t o the lovely ilhmfinations which enriched the beautifnl Arabiclwriting .Of their manuscripts. - - T h e Augustan Age of COrdova.

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Islam on. Marriage


. B y .

James Williams (Muhammad Ahmad)


America has a difficult i)roblenl to meet, a prohlena which has sounded from the very heart of its society and re-echoed t h r o u g h o u t the len,~h and breadth -of its 'cities a n d states: T h a t is the prohlem of marriage . . . . . In t h e - U n i t e d States. F e d e r a l L a w s d o n.o'tgovern the contracts of marriage. Each state, being soverigm, constructs the laws o f marriage to suit itself. : In t'0rty-eight states, there are forty-eight distinct and separate codes, in Which this most important phase of life is clealt with. The Laws of. Some states are protective; in others, perilously insecure. In most cases, the), are inconapetent and. ill: constructed. D i v 0 r c e i s rampant. F.asv marriage and equall.v easy divorce leave in theft wake. sufferil~g Won{en and children. whose-onl~:ecourse is to t h r o w themselves Ul)On the mercy of the state for charitable maintenance, in case the father doesnot or 'cannot contribnte to their support. I n an)" case, the situation is la,nentahle. I S L A M offers a direct ~antl comprehensible answer to this situation. I t s code of.ethics, in .regard to marriage, was set forth in t h e I-tolv Ouran t h i r t e e n h u n d r e d a n d fifty years ago and h a s , unto, tfiis'-daY, acted as a working principle for a l l mankind. It h a s n o loop-holes. It is unique, in that it, is complete within itself. First:: I s l a m unreservedly protects the rights of w o m e n . Second: Islam protects the rights o f children through marriage. " Third: Istam enjoins the economic security 0f both. In the first instance/, Islam says that "Not italy should the parties Of a contemplated ma.rriage satisfy, each Other as to their respective merits., hut the relatives Of the bride should also satisfy themselve s that t h e i)roposed bridegroom is a person Who .x~,ould be a suitable husband f o r the bride and a desirahle father of h e r c h i h l r e n . " (Ah|nadivvat-.|)ae-e ~81-289 ) ] That as to Say, among other things; he has the visible means to ] take care of a family, once he has entered into the. marriage ,]

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st;ire. The wife will not then l~e pernfitted to take unto herself a husband Who would be a burden, and that She might even have to support herself. In addition to this, the presiding magistrate or jtidge must satisfy h i m s e l f ' t h a t no fraud Or deception .is being practiced -flpon the bride. At the time Of marriage, I s l a m requires a marriage settlem~'nt to b e m a d e upon the wife. The nmtter o f "dowry", is one of the most flmdamental laws of Islam. I t s object is to provide the wife w i t h an independent proprietary position, and shoukl be free to spend as her discretion allows. T h e instituti~in is a practical acknowledganent by the husband of the independent proprietary position of t h e v)ife a n d h e r r i g h t to nminrain and acquire separate property, w h i c h t h e husband cannot use to his own purpose. Divorce is practically unheard Of in Moslem countries. It is allowed, but only under extreme circmnstances. The obtaining o f divorce on trunlped-up charges, such as mental cruelty, etc., would be laughed at and derided. For every one hmldred divorces in America, there is hardly one in Islamic cotmtries. : . . \Vith regard to children: Upon the father devolves the .full repsonsibility of ~the maintenance of his children. ~Strict laws :govern their support. ] f a wonmn marries, she is relieved o f all anxiety with rcsi~ect to the maintena.nce o f h e r s e l f a n d her.children, and if she does not. marry, which Islam does not approve o f , s h e has 0nh'.hersel to m~iintain out Of her property.- I f a man marries, and Islam bicls him so, he will beresponsible for the maintenance of his wife andqhildren. K e e p i n g this in view, Islam has fixed the s h a r e of-the :hnsband as d o u b l e t h a t of the wife. This is a g o 0 d d e a l differeut in America, .where today, numbers and numbers of women work, s o that their children may be aml)ly provided for. It is, in truth, a jig-sawed system. \ V h a t A m e r i c a needs is universal laws, of Islamic origin, that will satisfactorily m e e t . t h e crying need o f - t h e situation at hand. Iristead of being choliped u l ; i n t o f0rtv-eight different kinds of law, it needs O N E governing principle~ which will eliminate past mistakes and s~flidifv into O N E golden standard. America has a c r y i n g n e e d for the ethics-of Islam. H o w soon she-will adopt them, time will ouly tell.

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A Persian Ode
By
:The D e r v i s h - p o e t , Baba Kuhi of Shiraz

" I n the market, in the cloister--=only God I saw. In the valley and on the m o u n t a i n n o n l y God I s a w H i m I have seen beside me oft in trilmlation : 'In favour and in fortune_-:-only God I saw. In prayer and fasting, in praise and contemplation, In the religion of the P r o p h e t - - o n l y God I s a w . Neither soul nor body, accident nor substance, Qualities n o r causes---only God I saw. " " I opened mine eyes and-b3, t h e light of His f a c e around me In all the eye discovered only God I saw. Like a c a n d l e I Was melting in His fire: A m i d s t the flames outflashing'--only God I saw. Myself w i t h m i n e own eyes I saw m o s t c l e a r l y , " " But when I looked w i t h God's eyes only God I saw. ' . (Translated)
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T h o s e w h o a r e l n a r r e a r s a r e r e q u e s t e d : t o s e n d i n their r e m i t t a n c e i m m e d i a t e l y a n d h e l p u s i n this g r e a t w o r k .

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A Meeting in the Ahmadiyya Mosque in Chicago


'By Dr. Harlan Tarbell M e t a p h y s i c i a n and' P s y c h o l o g i s t "

E v e r since I have been a youngster I have been interested in t r u t h . I realized at an early age that we were living in a world of illusion due tO greed and the selfishness of man, and that greed and selfishness were not interested in humanity as whole but i n : s e l f , i " : GreatTeachers and Masters c a m e t o the world at times when they e r e . most needed and brought U s greater underW standing of life, accenting ithings most needed during their respective periods on earth. Muhammad, Jesus, Moses, Conlucius, Buddha, Zoroaster and all the other founders of religion t a u g h t t h e science Of life with great strength and vividl l e S S . _

I first became actively interested in Muhammad through :Carlyle's excellent e s s a y o n this great prophet and teacher. Hisgreat and unique sei-vlce to humanity is but little realized by.tl~e Western wOrld. Sufi Bengalee has been my neighbor for about seven years and-we have become intimal~ely acquainted-with one another. We have worked side by s i d e as .brothers.. I . h a v e learned many things o f Islam:from him : and whereas :Islam had been held u p t o m e as a religion of. the Sword I found .it was a religion of peace. The remarkable contributions o f Islam toward thesolution of human problems were start.ling revelations to me. : - " It .was with ardent interest that I v i s i t e d the Ahmadiyya Mosque in Chicago., O n t h e eighth ofSeptember I was fortunate to attend a special meeting t h e r e . . T h e _ d e l e g a t e s from i'ari0us American cities came to attend the meeting which was represented by six races of people~ All were working .in the interest of God through the teachings of ~Iuhammad and had -forgotten w h e t h e r they were brown, .yellow, black or white. The meeting was opened with a melodious chant from the OUran by a n e w American MoSleln,'Abdur Rahman. Sister Fatima was then introduced and she spoke in behalf of the Society of the Maids of God. She greeted ttie audi-

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ence,Sand told of the wonderful progress the Mosqt.ie has made and expressed great sincerity and g r i m determination to go forward to estahlish Islam peace upon earth. Then .qufi Bengalee made the Opening speech saying," "A ,~ few years ago a . m e e t i n g was held under .the auspices of the \Vorld Fellowship of FaithS a n d the subject o f discussion was ' H o w Can W e Overcome Color and Race .Prejudice?' " T h e r e were some important Chi'istian ministers includ~ ing the Dean of the University of Chicago. I had the pleasure of representing I s l a m . ClarfenCe D a r r o w : w a s on e t~f. the Speakers. H e made t h e statement that religion w a s n0t:going to overcome color and race prejudice. The Christian ministers instead of refuting this statement .admitted the failure of ChriStianity in overcoming color and r a c e prejudice. " A t that tiifie I met the {:hallenge and stated, "$~11 through the ages wherever I s l a m has gone, 1.41am has exterminated color and race prejudice. Now that we are in America 3re Will solve this problem in this country also. , " I do not say t h a t xve have solved the i~rol)lem but we have certainly laid a solid foun~lati0n toward the solution. As a humble proof o f this I present to-night two Moslems, one white and one colored." . Omffr Khan, a colored Moslem, Was t h e n introduced and h e spoke very convincingly . . . . BrsJther O m a r K h a n was followed bv a white Moslem, 3itihammad: Ahmad, who told of the great henefit t h a t Isiani had heel] to him and his wife, and that it had opened such a beautiful viewpoint of life which he had never had before embracing the faith of Islam. Now he saw all men as brothers, all things a s G o d ' s , had a perfect Code Of ethics and he was so much .farther, m ttme with the mfimte. Sufi then introduced Mr. Charles F. \Veller, head of the \Vorld Fellowshil~ of Faiths. Mr. \Velk,il-said that wli{le he had been raised a Christian, vet he could call himself a 310slem, for Muhan.unad's teachings were so much in tune with his own ideas and ideals o f 1i%, and it was with l)leasure that he called himself a Mo.slem. l-te gave tribute to the Prophet Muhammad, his helief in God and in prayer, lJrotherhood, prohibition and in raising the status Of women. Next Sufi called, me to say a few words. I. was happy tO respond to the call and speak on. the truth. "\Ve-are of God
'. r# t. .. ~ o .,

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and created by God, we should live for God, follow the laws of God: And we nmst n o t b e sidetracked from the main purpose Of life by i l l u s i o n s . W e are not children of the m o m e n t but children of eternity and we nmst live so as to:root ourselves int- eternity in tune with the Divine p l a n . I s l a m is d o i n g a stupendous work, if it only worked for the brotherhood of man. B u t it deals with li{e as a whole .and in complete--the life of happiness and progress, the.natural automatic result of being submissive to the will of God. "God desigxled the workl f o r t h e happiness of man. Man himself has br6ught f o r t h all the troubles and hardships through selfishness, Man nmst return to A l l a h to find true happiness. T h i s i s w h a t - M u h a m m a d and other great prophets triefJ to make man understand. The), came to teach L i f e abundant f o r all men; for all nien were created in the image of God. - . . . . " Sufi Berigaiee closed the meeting with a.brief but inspiring address. H e said in part, " A n old Greek legend tells the story of a demon, who after he waylaid his intended victims, asked them various questions.: I f his prey was so u n f o r t u n a t e as to give the w r o n g answer, he was-immediately.devoured by this monster. A n d so does each age have,its questions Which each faith a n d religion nmst answe.r correctly Or perish. "This age.is also a demon a n d p u t s q u e s t i o n s to the different religions. T h e religion w h i c h will a n s w e r the questions correctly will b e saved. :Islam answers the questions !~' Staff Bengalee discussed briefly how Islam .leads men to the realization of God, makes p e a c e a m o n g al.l religions, estabfishes brotherhood and solves economic problems and answers all:the questions of the day. H e told how the work of Islam is spreading like a Wild conflagration in A m e r i c a and showed thai the salvation of the world lies at the feet of Islam. A n A m e r i c a n observer noticed that t h e r e was no clapping of hands but overflowing enthnsiasna was expressed by Arabic : prayers,Allah-0-Akbar, A1-Hamdu-l.illah" ( G 0 d i s most great, All praise belongs I~o God). At the conclusion o f . t h e meeting, the faithflfl retired upstairs when the Moslem call to prayer Was given, a n d prayer was performed i n congregation. I t was. -an impressive spectacle to see the Moslems standing side by side, s h o u l d e r to shoulder, f o r m i n g s t r a i g h t lines in-prayers and kneeling a n d bowing down symbolizing obedience to God.

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Press Notices
which his discililes m o v e d . h i m at night, taking h i m to di3e 6f tlleir houses." ISLAM CURE FOR ECON.OMIC "Thei-e h e x~'~s tninisiered and broughtILLS, LEADER SAYS HERE hack to health. ~ I n d i s g u i s e , h e slipped. out of Palestine and v~'ent to uorthwest I00 S i o u x City Moslems Greei " ,MiSsionary H e r e . India. XVe h a v e found his tomb there at Sioux C i t y Syrians, of the Islam r e Srinlgar, C a s h m e r e ; L I n d i a . " ligion greeted Sufi',X[Utlur R a h m a n Ben2- " Jes/~sh to t h e : i s l a m . religion , was a galee, leader of ttie I s l a m missionary g r e a t teacher. However, m the light Of movement in the United States, when he the t i m e s , Sufi Bengalee's chief interest came to Sioux City from Chicago, Seemed to lie in tim. ecoilomy o f Iris reW i t h the visit of the Islam t e a c l i e r - !igin. - and h o w .the applicatlon of the and minister, Sioux City. h a s - b e c o m e three great laws. of lslam would b e a conscious t h e r e are nearly 1 0 0 Moslems panac~t to tlle economic ills of file nlod, nmnbered iu the. cosmopolitan g r o u p ern. westeruized world. which comprises the city: ., These. .are t b e " s a m e laws xvlfich were The youthful missionary, who w a s .in. effect d u r i n g the period in the Fourb o r n and educated in India, gravely exteenth and Fifteentli centuries when the plained the objectives . o f I s l a m as a reMoslenls were.at theheiglR, of their powligion, destined to obffterate sucli calami- " .er. V f i t h their retreat b e f o r e the westties as depresslolas . a n d r e s u l t i u g unbap-., ern World, t h e . l a w s were.sul,erseded by piness. ". . . . tile moderfi laws, wlligh pr6*~'ide a. capiThe title "Sufi," the minister Said, talistic world, l_le explained. ;'The result .tff. tile =application of these means spiritual l e a d e r a n d attainment of lmrity.. Sufi Bengalee Was educated in laws ~.woutd not.~be c o m m u n i s m , because the Utiiversities of Caldu[ta a n d P u n j a b ~ Islam belieces ill the possession of prop: in hidia. H e ~left India six years ago erLv.. Neither _would. i t .b e capitalism t o l e a d tim Ahmadivva tnovenlent iti tlie w h i c h . m e a n s the lahoritilz class is tile. '" Sufferer, the gradual e x t i n c t i o n of the Unitexl States. " . Of tile 35,000 Moslcnls h l l t h e United middle Class and tile assnnlptio,l of few States, tim majority a r e Syyians, Sul] - risks .by tl~e capitalists." " Bengalee said2 A m o n g these-35,000 are --The--thi'ee great laws o f Islanl are: about 10,000 cdnverts, he said.- prideful L ~: Law o f inheritance. " I s l a m law o f t h e acllievetnents (if" his movement:. p r o v i d e s tlfe..estates must be : divided There are 25 orga,lized mission groups ' e q u a l l y alnong all the relatives o tim in the U n i t e d S t a t e s and t h r e e m o s q u e s , deceased. Under this:law, all.great forat ,Michigan City, IIid.. Chicago a n d ?.tUnes are divkled and w i t h i n . t h r e e genBrooklyn. . . ." - " :. . " eratio,is cease to exi~ti T h i s prevents tile I SUfi Bengalee showed w h e r e really o 1 - acctufiulation 6 f . v a s t ~.'ealth and its-tilti-i the principles of ~ Christianity. and Isiam - m a t e usnrptiou of power. " coincide .lint p o i n t e d out One difference 2. Zakat. Tim lmrifying tax~ On which: he believes siguificant and i n t e r - ;all- wealth, including cash and ,all esting t o Christians. . properHes a n d possessions; lslani pro"~Are do not believe Jesus. d i e d on rim: . v i d e s a 2t/_, per cent tax p e r annum. cross," .said SUfi Benag!ee. ." " I t : i s our.i Tiffs revenue d0t's not go to the operabelief and supported by history, J e s u s " tion :of g a v e r m u e n t b n t is distributed .wasonly wounded on~thecross. H e was. a m o n g tile poor and the ileedy. t a k e n unconscious to tile sepulcllre, f l o r a . "Needy . is . not " synonynlous " with i
SIOUX CITY. TRIBUNE J a n u a r y I1~ 19J5

THE

MOSLEM

SUNRISE

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poor," Sufi Bengalee pointed out. " S h o u l d province of P u n j a b . H e speaks E n g l i s h fluently. l - l a c k funds, y e t really not be classed as poor, and I was seeking h i g h e r educa= Sufi Bengalee left two impressions in his r e m a r k s a b o u t religion a n d econom= tion, this fund would provide me the ics. n a m e l y : motley." . 3. U s u r y . T h e r e is no u s u r y in IsT h a t the United States, as well as other nations, m u s t change its economic syslain. ":Xll economists a g r e e t h e r e s h o u l d be t e m if d e p r e s s i o n s are to be prevente~, and no interest paid on loans to be used for c~nqtmption. T h e difference het~,een I s : T h a t A m e r i c a n s do not have the proplain and western ecouoiny lies--.in the er conception of true religion. 0pinio,ls cotlceruing luaus for profit a n d " T h e t r o u b l e w i t h y o u r country," Sufi pr.duction. .llengalee said, ':'is not l a c k 0 f food and "In capitalism the o w n e r . f the wealth cl,~thing a n d money. You have m o r e d.es n o t a s s u m e e n o u g h o f the risk a n d food t h a n Can be.eate,,, m o r e clothes t h a n labour nlust a s s u m e too g r e a t a percentc a l l be vorn, and m o r e m o n e y than you age. U n d e r the Islant law. capital would can spend. T h e difficulty is in coucenprolit if the investment is successful but t r a t i - n of wealth and lack of distribuit must bare as m o t h loss in case of fail. tion. ure," Sufi Bengalee said. " T h e Islamic "'In Islam, which i s the religion w r o n g economic s y s t e m gives wide aml e q u i t - . - l y called M o l m m m e d a n i s m , . a r e three ablc distributiou~of wealth. '~ taws set doxsal b y . t h e prophet M o h a m reed, w h i c h , if they were observed in SIOUX CITY JOURNAL your" nation, would fi~rever solve y o u r January" I I , 1 9 3 4 economic problems." MOSLEMMISSIONARY FROM O n e of the specific peculiarities of IsINDIA OFFERS CURE FOR l a m i s m is absolute prohibition of t h e use ECONOMIC ILLS OF of intoxicants. THE WORLD In explaining his s t a t e m e n t that A m e r ~ttfi .Xl, R. Bengalee l~xl)lains . icans do not h a w t h e p r o p e r conception Religion of I s l a m . of t r u e religion, the Sufi s u m m a r i z e d the By Merrill Burnette differences between Christianity and Islam, briefly, in the following line of lake a breath fr~m the far east. tinged t h o u g h t : I s l a m is uncoinpromisingly perhaps, with .the a t m o s p h e r e of the ocm-,mtheist~c, w h e r e a s Christians believe cident. Snli Mutinr- Rahmail Bengalee. in t h e Trinity, the d e i t y of Christ, vi,M.slem m i s s i n n a r y from India .to the carious a t o n e m e n t ' a n d other related d o c United States. visited T h e J o u r n a l editorial r o o m s T h u r s d a y , explained" the trifles. T h e M o s l e m worshipper :believes religion of I s l a m and presented his paua. i l l Christl only as a m a n a n d a proi~het tea for the world's ills. " of God, not the son of God except a s a l l Ills picturesque silken turban, f r a m prophets and followers are sons of God. ing a bearded countenance in which d a r k Islam places J e s u s in a classification ,,yes sparkled a n d white teeth flashed, l~e- with A b r a h a m . Moses. Krisbna. Buddha spoke the orient; s m a r t l y shined o x f o r d s a n d Confucious. and g r a y spats revealed the A m e r i c a n :,Xccordiug to I s l a m . l i f e - a f t e r death influence. " " is the continuation of life on earth. H e a v T h e missionary is b e i n g entertained in en is eternal and everlasting whereas Si.t,x City ill the h o m e of Mr. aud Mrs. hell is only temporary. Hell is as a hosD. Joseph, 1411 Virginilt Street. H e is pita~l xtreatmellt for the h u m a n soul. a g r a d u a t e of two universities, one i n . w h i c h , as sokm as it 'is cured, goes to ('ah'utta and the o t h e r in I.ahore in the heaven.

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SUF[ M. R. BENGALEE,
Edi'tor Moslem

: Books for Oriental Scholars


Interested:in " " :..... " :" ~

Islam,

Arabic

and

Persian

The Holy Quran, Part 1 . :$2.00 (English translation with commentary) : " The TeaChings of:Islam: English Cloth .............. 1.00 D0. P a p e : ; . . . . . . . ; ................. ... ...... .. .50 T h e I s l a m i c M o d e of. \,~io r s h i p ( i l l u s t r a t e d ~ . . . :..'. . . . . .50 ~The True Islam ......... ........................... 2.00 Ahmadiyya l~lovement ....................... ): .... 1.00 A P r e s e n t to the P r i n c e . o f VCales. 1 0 A Short Life of Ahmad: ..: ..... ....... . . . . L .00 0 E x t r a c t s f r o m the H01y Q u r a n a n d the. S a y i n g s o f the Holy Prophet Muhammad ........... . . . . i ' " "" " ' " 1~25 L i f e a n d T e a c h i n g s o f tlie H o l y P r o p h e t M u h a m m a d . . .25 \ r .. ,25 M u h a m m a d , tlae L i b e r a t o r o f "-\ o m e n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TO be had from-=-Ahmadiyya .
I

Movement'in Suite-1307 .

Islam. ". " . -

56 .East C o n g r e s s S t r e e t
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