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Beyond Social Media:

from tools to trust


ERIC WEAVER
AD CLUB
NOVEMBER 2008
Since our last chat…
  On average, one in four of you has a new employer.
  Bloggers are regularly cited in the media.
  Facebook (124MM users) has surpassed MySpace
(114MM)
  Brands have taken to social sites
  Starbucks, Dove, AllState, Virgin America, Comcast, H&R
Block
  The Obama campaign has proven that social
networking has incredible power.

PAGE 2 
Forrester’s
Technographic
Model

PAGE 3 
IN THE LAST
YEAR: "
Fewer non-
participants,"
creators the
same, and "
far more
spectators

PAGE 4 
So what was initially a way to connect with
friends and others with shared interests...

PAGE 5 
…has become much more impactful.

PAGE 6 
LAST YEAR:"
seventh-
highest
Google
result for
“Comcast”
was a
sleeping
technician

PAGE 7 
THIS YEAR:
customer
service via
Twitter

PAGE 8 
LAST YEAR

PAGE 9 
THIS YEAR:"
soliciting
operational
ideas

PAGE 10 
THIS YEAR:"
online
community for
social good

PAGE 11 
So I should be advertising on social sites…?

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Let’s look at consumers.
  Attention-deficit
  Fragmented by niche
interests
  Feeling time-starved
  Girl Scouts merit badge
  Cell phone in the john
  Distrustful of advertising
  Spoiled by customization and
media options
  “Snack-media” consumers

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Power has shifted.
  SEARCH lets consumers
find people, products,
information and media of
interest & relevance
  EXPRESSION through blogs,
podcasts, opinion sites,
online communities
  SHARING items of value or
interest – globally

!
  Items they (we) love…. and
hate THE REALITY:
To get what they want, consumers
generally don’t need marketing,
advertising or PR.
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Working toward his goal, he was confronted by a
daunting array of skyscrapers, interstitials, video pre-rolls
and pop-unders.
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NEW
OLD SKOOL:
SKOOL: a Pyramid
the Sphere ofof
Cross-Talk
Influence

Opinion-Forming Elite

This means the


days of
“controlled voice”
are over.

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With so many voices, who do you believe?

People turn to peers for


recommendations
They also do this when:
  Risk is higher
  More choices to review and filter
  They have less time to research

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Social endorsement trumps marketing

60%
believe what “a
person like me”
says about an
organization (up LEAST CREDIBLE: corporate or
from 51% in 2007) product advertising (22% of ages
25-34)… hey, that’s us!
SOURCE: 2008 Edelman Trust Barometer

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Endorsement isn’t just influential. "
It’s widely shared.

56% of those aged 35-64 and 63% aged


25-34 were “likely to share their opinions and
experiences about companies they trust or distrust
on the web.”*

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*SOURCE: 2008 Edelman Trust Barometer 
Ultimately, social endorsement drives trust.
78% of those surveyed
aged 35-64 and 83% aged
25-34 were “likely to trust what
they have seen, read or heard
about a company if someone
they know has already
mentioned it to them.”*

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*SOURCE: 2008 Edelman Trust Barometer 
And trust drives preference.

88%
of opinion elites
choose to buy from
companies they trust.
85% refuse to buy The boFom line: 
from companies they
distrust.* Trust drives transac.ons. 
PAGE 24 
*SOURCE: 2008 Edelman Trust Barometer 
Build trust through Social Marketing.

The use of peer-to-peer engagement, dialogue


and connective tools to help your offering be
found, be relevant, be authentic and be
promoted.
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1. Be found.
 Optimize presence and content for search
 Place it in many relevant venues, fully tagged and
described (“social media breadcrumbs”)
  Podcasts on Utterz, videos on YouTube, bookmarks
on Delicious, valuable updates on Twitter
 Join multiple communities - wherever your brand
makes sense
 Be in the end zone

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2. Be relevant.
 Listen and engage
 Participate only in communities where your
offering would be of direct value
 Join as a person and member, not as an
advertiser
 Avoid the urge to push message

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3. Be authentic.
 Avoid glitz and high production values
 Demonstrate transparency and honesty
 Update frequently with less-than-perfect
content, rather than less frequently with highly
vetted material

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4. Be promoted.
 Make content easily shared
 Provide content or functionality with true value
rather than self-interest
 Don’t fight time starvation: keep content short
and sweet.

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Which tools to use?
BLOGGING AUDIO (podcasts)
  Product manager insights   Company storytelling
  CEO media/investor relations   Thought leadership
MICROBLOGGING (Twitter) WIKIS
  Special offers   Event planning
  Event buzz   Product development
VIDEO (one-off virals or recurring   Shared learnings
podcasts)   Distributed work-in-progress
  Product how-to’s SOCIAL & TOPICAL NETWORKS
  Personality pieces   Brand awareness
  Company storytelling   Community/CSR discussion
  Humor   Community building
WIDGETS   Feedback/testing/trials
  Content distribution/sharing

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And a final note: consider your “lens”
Boomers/Tweeners Gen X/Millenials
  Trained in formalities   Formalities ignored
  Don’t offend anyone   More interested in finding
  Be the most acceptable to those with like minds than
the largest number of worrying about turning off
people others
  Privacy highly valued   Less privacy means more
  Interested in tech ability to be found
functionality but often   Digital natives – tech is
overwhelmed by speed of ubiquitous and easy
change

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Power has shifted.
  EMPOWER CUSTOMERS TO BECOME ADVOCATES
  EXTEND YOUR BRAND WITHOUT HIGH COST
  YOUR CONTENT APPEARS IN MORE PLACES
  Lives on your sites, on enthusiasts’ sites, on cell phones,
PSPs
  INCREASE GOOGLE RANKINGS
  BE FOUND WHERE YOUR CUSTOMERS WANT TO
GO
  LEVERAGE THE EXISTING TRUST BETWEEN
PEOPLE rather than trying to buy it
PAGE 32 
THANK YOU.
facebook.ericweaver.com
branddialogue.com
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