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How Lamborghini automobiles HR department working?

Automobili Lamborghini S.p.A., or simply Lamborghini, (Italian: [lamborini] ) designs, engineers, manufactures and distributes Italian luxury sports cars. Lamborghini's production facility and headquarters are located in Sant'Agata Bolognese, Italy. In 2011, Lamborghini's 831 employees produced 1,711 vehicles. Manufacturing magnate Ferruccio Lamborghini founded Automobili Ferruccio Lamborghini S.p.A. in 1963 with the objective of producing a refined grand touring car to compete with offerings from established marques such as Ferrari. The company's first models were released in the mid-1960s and were noted for their refinement, power and comfort. Lamborghini gained wide acclaim in 1966 for theMiura sports coup, which established rear mid-engine, rear wheel drive as the standard layout for high-performance cars of the era. Lamborghini grew rapidly during its first decade, but hard times befell the company when sales plunged in the wake of the 1973 worldwide financial downturn and the 1973 oil crisis. The firm's ownership changed three times after 1973, including a bankruptcy in 1978, before Chrysler Corporation took control in 1987. Unable to operate Lamborghini profitably, Chrysler sold Lamborghini to Malaysian investment group Mycom Setdco and Indonesian group V'Power Corporation in 1994. Lack of success continued through the 1990s, until Mycom Setdco and V'Power sold Lamborghini to the AUDI AG subsidiary of Volkswagen Group on 27 July 1998. Audi's ownership marked the beginning of a period of stability and increased productivity for Lamborghini. Sales increased nearly tenfold over the course of the 2000s, peaking with record sales in 2007 and 2008. The world financial crisis in the late 2000s negatively affected all luxury car makers worldwide, and caused Lamborghini's sales to drop nearly 50 percent. Lamborghini's Sant'Agata Bolognese production facility produces V12 engines and finished automobiles. Lamborghini's current production vehicles are the V10-powered Gallardo and the V12powered Aventador. Both production models are available in a variety of regular and limited-edition specifications.

Retaining the performance, reliability and appearance of your Lamborghini is essential to gaining maximum enjoyment from the experience. Regular maintenance and repairs from the best equipment and technicians is the best way to achieve this. The aftersales centres affiliated to Lamborghini London and Lamborghini Manchester provide the necessary technology and expertise to keep your car as close to its factory specifications as possible. From routine inspections to major repairs, our workshops in Acton and Stockport deliver a quick and reliable service. We have a selection of loan cars to choose from, minimising the inconvenience of longer-term repairs. Complimentary collection and delivery makes it even easier to get on with your day. Every car that we work on also receives a full professional complimentary clean for added customer satisfaction.

Hiring process information for an interview at Lamborghini

A car dealership industry business, Lamborghini interviews a massive assortment of customer service, management, technician, sales, and office prospects seeking a wide selection of available career opportunities. A Lamborghini job interview process might involve multiple rounds of phone, one-to-one, and group/panel interviews. To earn hiring consideration, Lamborghini interviewees may need to participate in behavior exams, drug tests, and background checks, depending on career goals. Lamborghini interview questions span a large collection of subject areas, such as education, schedule availability, work history, and customer service skills.

Appear at a Lamborghini job interview in professional dress in order to impress hiring managers. Make eye contact with each interviewer during the entire Lamborghini hiring process. Answer interview questions honestly and carefully throughout every round of the Lamborghini interview process. Do not expect Lamborghini interviewers to release hiring information during a job interview. To check potential job offers, contact a human resources representative a few days after the completion of the last Lamborghini interview.

Positions:
Lamborghini typically hires for the following positions: Business Analyst, Buyer, Car Detailer, Car Validation Specialist, Car Washer, Customer Service Representative, Finance Associate, Manager, Mechanic, Planner, Pricing Specialist, Sales Associate, Suspension Engineer Specialist.

Possible Lamborghini Interview Questions:


Prepare for your interview by reviewing the questions below. Think about how you would answer these types of questions.

Are you prepared to work a lot of hours? How much money do you want to make? How do you motivate yourself? Can you remember and follow instructions well? Are you a people person? How would you remain professional and composed if a prospective buyer was rude or abrasive? What do you know about Lamborghini? What sets Lamborghini apart from the competition?

SWOT Analysis Essays Organisations, Analysis and Policy REPORT To: Senior Management From: Group Accountant Date: 2nd May 2005 Subject: BMW Organizational Analysis and Human Resources Policies This report will provide a detailed analysis of BMW'scurrent corporate appraisal analysis. This will help to identify the company'scurrent strength, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. This will help the companies decision makers understand where the organization is now. The report will also critically evaluate BMW's human resources policy as a key area of theorganisation. We will highlight how BMW has strategically responded to the drivers for change in terms of its structure, conduct and performance. Finally, offer recommendations for the future development and improvements in human resource management, and how those will impact on its organizational structure, conduct and performance.

Company Background The BMW Group is the only manufacturer of automobiles and motorcycles worldwide that concentrates entirely on premium standards and outstanding quality for all its brands and across all relevant segments. With the brands BMW, MINI and Rolls-Royce Motor Cars, the BMW Group has been focusing on selected premium segments in the international automobile market since the year 2000. In the succeeding years, the launch of the BMW 1 Series meant an expansion of the model range in the premium segment of the lower middle class and the BMW 6Series did likewise in the segment of the large Coups and Convertibles. The MINI marque was launched and production began in the Oxford plant in 2001. In2003, the BMW Group assumed marque responsibility for RollsRoyce Motor Cars. At the same time, the Worldwide Head Office and Manufacturing Plant in Godwood, GB, was built. ( An Internal and corporate analysis in terms of strength, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) will assist in gaining an understanding of where BMW is currently in terms of strengths and where improvement is required within the business and what outside environmental threats it may face as well as what new opportunities are available to the company in the short and medium term.

BMW SWOT Analysis

Porter explains that there are five forces inherent in a market, which will jointly determine the intensity of competition and profitability of BMW and the automobile industry. The first is the threat posed by new entrants, the high capital expenditure and confidence of customers represent significant barriersto entry and the market is also sensitive to reputation. However, the emergent of low cost manufactures do pose a significant threat (as illustrated by figure2). There is an opportunity in the low price/ low economy (fast) sector. Maybe Hyundai or Daewoo could consider introducing a low cost sport saloon. The second is the threats from substitutes, as there are many make and model of other premium branded cars, hence, Jaguar, Mercedes Benz, and Audi etc. The third force is the threats from the bargaining power of buyers, is this strong for both BMW and the entire automobile industry with a large number of alternative suppliers, hence, the aggressive pricing strategy. This results in a very strong competitive rivalry in the industry. This is intensified as a result of little or no differentiation in the basic product offered. Finally the threats from the suppliers bargaining power, this is fairly low in the automobile industry, due to dual sourcing strategies, using arrange of alternative sources of supply for parts. The five forces analysis gives an improved understanding of the degree of competition within the business environment. The analysis shows that the automotive industry is highly competitive, with buyers possessing and exerting a very powerful influence to the large number of substitute brands available to them.

BMW Human Resources Policy


In response to a changing business environment BMW is being more business and service focus. In the past decade the organization has become much more proactive, dealing with new concepts to become more service and customer focus oriented. The structure of the organization has been redefined to deal with the new ways of operating. Organizational structure defines important relationship within the business for achieving business objectives. At the same time it helps to define the new business culture within BMW. Culture exists with the minds and hearts of BMW's employees and contributes to business strategies of the organization. Therefore, BMW's human resources policies are critical in the organizations structure, conduct and performance. Competitive pressures on BMW and national economies have increased markedly in recent decades. Therefore, organizations are constantly changing, as powerful entities have arisen at the international level, the European Union being a good example and multinational corporations increasingly dominate particular sectors such as cars. New competitions are emerging and forcing older companies to adopt or reform to survive. Different structures affect the way in which human resources are managed. BMW like all other businesses require the same basic human resources activities like recruitment, development and training, appraisal and reward systems, and control and feedback mechanisms. Organizational structures are influenced by culture. Employees have strong feelings towards the organizations they work for. German firms have inherently a flat, less rigid structures. The McKinsey 7 'S' model is often used to identify all the areas that make up an organisation.Structure, Style, Staff are three such areas. BMW has an equal opportunities none sexual discriminating culture within its organization. BMW actively supports young female executives and gives females insight into the field of technology. BMW also offers extensive training for all level of staffs; BMW Group's Trainee Promotion

Programme (TPP) provides the perfect combination of theoretical studies and practical work. BMW Group trainees receive many benefits in addition to their pay, other social payments such as holiday and Christmas bonuses, meal and travelling expenses subsidies, health programmer and PC training. BMW claims that it does not see its staff as a cost factor but as an essential performance factor. Also the employees are referred to as associates' rather that works. BMW in its human resources policy states that any policy that is not oriented towards its associates will lead to negative cost effects in the long-run. As a future-oriented company, we seek to pursue an exemplary, creative and associate-oriented human resources policy, making significant contributions to business success through our human resources activities. The human resources policy of the BMW Group is an integral feature of our overall corporate policy in both strategic and operative decisions. (Corporate appraisal (or SWOT analysis) consists of the internal appraisal of the organizations strength and weaknesses and an external appraisal of the opportunities and threats open to organizations in competition within industry.

The Five Forces Model

Porter explains that there are five forces inherent in a market, which will jointly determine the intensity of competition and profitability of BMW and the automobile industry. The first is the threat posed by new entrants, the high capital expenditure and confidence of customers represent significant barriersto entry and the market is also sensitive to reputation. However, the emergent of low cost manufactures do pose a significant threat (as illustrated by figure2). There is an opportunity in the low price/ low economy (fast) sector. Maybe Hyundai or Daewoo could consider introducing a low cost sport saloon. The second is the threats from substitutes, as there are many make and model of other premium branded cars, hence, Jaguar, Mercedes Benz, Audi etc. The third force is the threats from the bargaining

power of buyers, is this strong for both BMW and the entire automobile industry with a large number of alternative suppliers, hence, the aggressive pricing strategy. This results in a very strong competitive rivalry in the industry. This is intensified as a result of little or no differentiation in the basic product offered. Finally the threats from the suppliers bargaining power, this is fairly low in the automobile industry, due to dual sourcing strategies, using arrange of alternative sources of supply for parts. The five forces analysis gives an improved understanding of the degree of competition within the business environment. The analysis shows that the automotive industry is highly competitive, with buyers possessing and exerting a very powerful influence to the large number of substitute brands available to them.

BMW Human Resources Policy


In response to a changing business environment BMW is being more business and service focus. In the past decade the organization has become much more proactive, dealing with new concepts to become more service and customer focus oriented. The structure of the organization has been redefined to deal with the new ways of operating. Organizational structure defines important relationship within the business for achieving business objectives. At the same time it helps to define the new business culture withinBMW. Culture exists with the minds and hearts of BMW's employees and contributes to business strategies of the organization. Therefore, BMW's human resources policies are critical in the organizations structure, conduct and performance. Competitive pressures on BMW and national economies have increased markedly in recent decades. Therefore, organizations are constantly changing, as powerful entities have arisen at the international level, the European Union being a good example and multinational corporations increasingly dominate particular sectors such as cars. New competitions are emerging and forcing older companies to adopt or reform to survive. Different structures affect the way in which human resources are managed. BMW like all other businesses require the same basic human resources activities like recruitment, development and training, appraisal and reward systems, and control and feedback mechanisms. Organizational structures are influenced by culture. Employees have strong feelings towards the organizations they work for. German firms have inherently a flat, less rigid structures. The McKinsey 7 'S' model is often used to identify all the areas that make up an organisation.Structure, Style, Staff are three such areas. BMW has an equal opportunities none sexual discriminating culture within its organization. BMW actively supports young female executives and gives females insight into the field of technology. BMW also offers extensive training for all level of staffs; BMW Group's Trainee PromotionProgramme (TPP) provides the perfect combination of theoretical studies and practical work. BMW Group trainees receive many benefits in addition to their pay, other social payments such as holiday and Christmas bonuses, meal and travelling expenses subsidies, health programmer and PC training. BMW claims that it does not see its staff as a cost factor but as an essential performance factor. Also the employees are referred to as associates' rather that works. BMW in its human resources policy states that any policy that is not oriented towards its associates will lead to negative cost effects in the longrun. As a future-oriented company, we seek to pursue an exemplary, creative and associate-oriented human resources policy, making significant contributions to business success through our human resources

activities. The human resources policy of the BMW Group is an integral feature of our overall corporate policy in both strategic and operative decisions. (Corporate appraisal (or SWOT analysis) consists of the internal appraisal of the organizations strength and weaknesses and an external appraisal of the opportunities and threats open to organizations in competition within industry.

Organizational background
The Munich-based BMW Group manufactures automobiles and motorcycles, with its emphasis on premium standards for all of its brands across all relevant segments of the group. The company currently has 16 production facilities in Germany, Austria, the UK, South Africa, the US, Brazil and China. In 2005, the group manufactured over 1.3 million automobiles and just under 100,000 motorcycles. The BMW, Mini and Rolls-Royce Motor Cars brands all belong to the BMW Group. In addition, the group is also active in the financial services industry. With a turnover of more than 46 billion in 2005, the company ranks among the top 10 automobile manufacturers in the world.

At the end of 2005, the BMW Group had a total workforce of around 106,000 employees worldwide, 75% of whom were employed in Germany. As is the case in the automobile industry in general, the companys demand for university graduates has greatly increased. Between 1999 and 2005, there was a 60% rise in the number of academically educated employees. Towards the end of 2005, the proportion of employees above the age of 50 years totaled about 15%, and the number of employees in this age group is expected to increase in the future. According to estimates, every third employee within the BMW Group will be over 50 years of age by 2015.

The group has a differentiated and long-term oriented human resources (HR) policy, which provides for different employee groups and supports and encourages them in their career advancement. The Human Resources and Industrial Relations department at the companys headquarters in Munich is responsible for the general alignment of the HR policy worldwide. At its headquarters, the company also launched the project Today for tomorrow, which monitors the expected demographic developments and the resulting consequences for the groups HR policy in Germany, finally translating the insights gained into suitable measures.

As in the German automotive industry in general, the BMW Group also bears the stamp of strong codetermination. Social dialogue within the company is characterized by close cooperation between the social partners.

Good practice today


The groups Human Resources and Industrial Relations department in Munich has been monitoring demographic changes since 2003. This was prompted by a workshop on demography held within the scope of the so-called goal management process. As part of this process, staff managers of the companys various plants and the HR management identified issues of strategic importance for the BMW Group. Following the workshop, the project Today for tomorrow was launched. This project runs from 2004 until 2007 and, to begin with, is only geared towards the German plants, since the majority of the workforce is employed in the country and also because demographic change in Germany is particularly dramatic.

In order to help anticipate demographic change processes at the organizational level, the company conducted age structure analyses at plant as well as department level and made corresponding forecasts. During this process, it could often be determined from the workforce age structure when the respective plant was established, as it used to be common practice to recruit mainly young employees who are now ageing together for new plants. The following two problems arise from having a homogeneous age structure: For a long time, there will be hardly any old age-related fluctuation and thus little new expertise will enter the company. At a later stage, a relatively large number of employees may retire from the company more or less at the same time, which might lead to problems regarding the recruitment of new staff members in the future. Moreover, the retirement of many experienced employees leads to a brain drain of important know-how, which cannot simply be replaced by the recruitment of younger workers.

When establishing new plants in the future, the BMW Group wants to avoid this by establishing a more heterogeneous workforce structure from the outset. Therefore, the group has developed pertinent principles which in addition to other criteria have to be taken into consideration when recruiting employees. Thus, the new BMW plant in Leipzig hired both older and younger employees: the proportion of employees aged 40 to 50 years currently stands at around 25%, while 5% of workers are older than 50 years of age. The project Today for tomorrow comprises a total of five fields of action: health management; qualifications; work environment; retirement models; as well as communications and change management. A steering committee was set up for the project, on which the HR management, some individual plant personnel managers, as well as department heads from the central Human Resources and Industrial Relations department are represented. In the steering committee, regular accounts on the development and the current state of the project are given and decisions are made on further courses of action. Furthermore, all five fields of action have been assigned a project leader and an extended implementation team, in which the contact persons for the Today for tomorrow project of the respective plants are represented. The works council is informed about all of the projects important measures and is involved in the issues that are subject to codetermination

Health management
Health management is traditionally directed at the employees and has been cultivated by the BMW Group. In May 2006, the company won an award for its exemplary health management practices from the Bavarian State Ministry for Environment, Health and Consumer Protection. Under current policies, employees at BMW are offered many opportunities to promote and improve their health. The work environment and employees behaviour define the starting point of the measures outlined in the various fields of action. The measures are directed at the entire workforce or at individual target groups. Examples of the relative fields of action and related measures include the following:

Ergonomics and exercise the ABAtech and ABAmed methods of assessment place particular emphasis on the adaptation of the workplace to the individual employee. Following the assessment of the workplace requirements in terms of working profiles and risk exposures (ABAtech method), employees can be deployed on the basis of a profile of their physical limitations, which is determined by the workers capabilities and risk exposures (ABAmed method), as assessed by the company medical officer. In addition, a company-wide exercise programme called MoveUp was developed to preserve, improve and rejuvenate the workers musculoskeletal system. Almost all company sites have fitness centres and offer physiotherapy treatments. Cancer prevention in addition to measures for early detection of breast cancer, BMW has, in cooperation with the German Federal Association of Company Health Insurance Funds (BKK), repeatedly carried out campaigns for colorectal cancer screening. So far, around 20,000 BMW employees have availed of this service. In March 2004, the BMW Group received the Felix Burda Award for its exemplary colorectal cancer screening programme. Diet and obesity the company-wide labelling of food in its restaurants according to healthrelated criteria aims to provide guidance to employees when choosing their lunch. In 2006, the employees of the Regensburg plant in southeast Germany lost more than 2,300 kilos in total as part of a slimming campaign slim for summer. Disability management optimised rehabilitation processes (such as Network rehab) and vocational integration measures are designed to facilitate an employees reintegration into the company and to reduce or prevent possible secondary complications. Information and communication the lecture series Health talks is addressed to all interested staff members of the BMW Group who want to gather information from experts about specific health aspects. The BMW health training seminar, a target-group oriented seminar organised as part of the in-house further education programme, gives staff members and executives an insight into the foundations of a healthy lifestyle. Forum health initiative this scheme offers employees informative health checks, and was newly conceived within the framework of the project Today for tomorrow to ensure the sustainability of endeavours in this field. The initiative in its new form was first implemented at the Munich plant at the beginning of 2006. Approximately 6,400 of the more than 10,000 employees participated in the project. The comprehensive health check was followed up by an interview with the company medical officer, after which the employees were sent a detailed report on diagnostic findings.

Qualifications
The BMW Group currently invests more than 200 million a year in training and further education a budget corresponding to that of a medium-sized university.

New technologies and processes constantly entail changing quality standards. Therefore, within the scope of the Qualitative Human Resources Planning, the company has for some time been looking at how skills will develop among workers within the company. In this regard, the company has organised training measures or recruited younger employees in good time that is, before the need actually arises; this enables the company to safeguard the knowledge transfer from older to younger employees and thus the retention of skills and knowledge among the workforce.

The company acts on the assumption that the biographical age of an employee has little influence on the development of their ability to learn. It is regarded as being far more important to maintain the employees willingness to adapt to constant change. Intergenerational learning is considered as having the best potential outcomes. The company takes into account the fact that older staff members learn best if they are able to bring their experience into the learning situation; this can be achieved if the learning arrangement is designed in a practical and work-oriented manner. For this reason, the company aims to combine working and learning processes to a greater extent, a move which will benefit both younger and older workers.

This approach was implemented in the information technology (IT) field, in which project leadership and project management tasks predominate. As part of the project, employees of the IT sector were divided into age-heterogeneous groups with a maximum of 10 workers. In addition to the prescribed learning contents, the group could also define its own learning objectives. During this process, the experienced staff members passed on their wealth of knowledge to the younger employees and, conversely, the experienced employees could obtain new technological and methodological know-how from their younger colleagues. At present, it is being determined how the elements of this project can also be transferred to other business areas.

The so-called age management seminars for executive staff constitute a further module of the project Today for tomorrow in the field of qualifications. The seminars focus on communicating information on ageing and work.

Work environment
This field of action focuses on organising working conditions particularly with regard to workplaces, working time and working structures in an age-friendly manner. The objective in this context is to maintain and to prolong the employability of workers in the long term, as well as to adequately deploy employees with performance limitations.

The issue of ergonomics plays an important role for the BMW Group. Thus, for instance, for the start-up of the new BMW 3 series, more than 25 million was invested into the design of ergonomically optimised workplaces in the Munich plant, in order to reduce the physical strain on workers. These measures are designed, in particular, to prevent bending, stooping and stretching movements on the one hand, and also to reduce the lifting and carrying of loads.

A further example of planning working conditions is in the area of pre-assembly, such as in the cockpit area of the vehicle, whereby some activities are separated from the machine-paced assembly operation. At these workplaces, employees showing various levels of performance can be effectively deployed. In this case, employees can within certain limits set their own pace of work and decide how to carry out the work while also working productively for the company once again.

Another important issue with respect to this field of action is the organisation of working time. Since 1994, the BMW Group has been offering employees the opportunity to take sabbatical leave of between one and six months. So far, around 6,500 employees have availed of this option. Workers often use their sabbatical to attend a school for master craftspeople or for other further education activities. As a rule, the sabbatical is financed by a corresponding cut in company bonus payments, such as holiday and Christmas bonuses.

Yet another working time issue is the organisation of the shift schedule. In this respect, the BMW Group aims to take the latest findings of related studies into account more fully when organising the shift schedules.

As regards working structures, concepts concerning the systematic creation of mixed age groups, rotation within and beyond the foremans area and other issues are being discussed. The company is also examining how the various workplaces can be made more conducive to learning.

Retirement models
The Today for tomorrow project is primarily aimed at improving the performance and employability of the workforce, thus enabling the employees to continue to work for a longer period of time, as is evident in the rising retirement age. Nonetheless, the BMW Group acts on the assumption that not all of its employees will want to or will be able to work to full capacity until their retirement age. For these employees, the company requires employee-oriented retirement models when the statutory early retirement options start to wane. Thus, the BMW Group is, in cooperation with the works council, saving a part of the companys profit-sharing scheme for the future by regrouping funds. The details are stipulated under the companys Contract for the future of the youth.

Communications and change management


This fifth field of action accompanies and supports the abovementioned fields and measures. It aims at developing an awareness among executive staff and employees of the imminent social and company changes. All employees should be aware that demographic change affects them personally and that they have to assume responsibility for themselves; they have to take action not only with respect to financial matters, but also in relation to the maintenance of their health and their skills.

Under the My provision for the future initiative, an electronic provision portal was set up on the BMW Groups intranet. All company measures in the fields of action relating to further education, health, work environment and private financial planning are grouped together under the heading provision for the future. The personal responsibility of the employees for their performance ability and their employability is directly addressed.

The Today for tomorrow project is set to run until the end of the year and aims to standardise and establish the processes, thus ensuring the sustainability of the abovementioned initiatives and measures.