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Alex Hauser I wanted to be a lawyer. As a rebellious seven year old, a
Alex Hauser
I wanted to be a lawyer.
As a rebellious seven year old,
a career where I could argue with
everyone and not get in trouble
was a dream come true. When I got rep-
rimanded for talking back to my parents, my
apology always consisted of “I’m sorry, but
I’m just practicing being a lawyer.”
But that dream quickly vanished the day
that I learned of that dreaded BAR exam. And
I quickly decided that career wasn’t for me.
Luckily, I soon found out that I loved to
write when my daily writing prompts in
third grade seemed to go on for pages, when
all the other kids could only muster a measly
half page. I wanted to be the next J.K. Rowl-
ing after reading my first Harry Potter book.
So I started writing. I took on the role of the
tortured writer, always carrying around my Lisa
Frank notebook and choosing to sit underneath
the jungle gym to write during recess.
I would write and write, positive that I had
the next best-seller in the making… for a
couple pages. Then I would think of another
plot. So I would scrap the old one and start
over.
But never finishing was frustrating, and
my third grade self decided to take a break
to meditate.
In fourth grade, I tried my luck at script
writing.
I wrote a play for my teacher, who was on
maternity leave at the time. Our substitute let
us take some time during each day to re-
hearse, and then when she returned,
we performed it at her welcome
back party.
But by the time middle school
rolled around, I decided I was
more mature and disciplined
and decided to try my luck at
novels again.
I
was having the same issue. I just
couldn’t stick to one plot line for that long.
The point is, my attention span isn’t some-
thing to be proud of. I’m passionate, but I get
distracted easily and change my mind.
And that’s where I found the beauty in
journalism.
I
can pour my heart and soul into each
article I write or design I create. And be-
fore I tire of it, it’s finished and I can start
with something new.
When my eighth grade teacher first hand-
ed me the application, I didn’t think it was
something I would like. Writing newspaper
articles seemed boring. I wanted to tell stories.
But over the years, I learned that I can tell the
most important stories. I can tell about the
student with down-syndrome who gradu-
ated with a regular diploma. Or how the
buses aren’t just a transportation system,
they’re the reason some students can grad-
uate and succeed.
These stories surpass the ones of the
Boy Who Lives and the Wallflower. They
tell the struggles and the joys of real people.
I
learned that everyone has a story; you just
had to dig deep enough and find the right angle.
Journalism was made for the hyperactive,
indecisive people like me.
I’ve stopped springing from hobby to
hobby trying to discover myself.
I’ve found it.
I
found my niche.
Conventions I’ve Attended
{
NSPA
SIPA
ASPA
}
Tuscaloosa, AL
Washington D.C
Minneapolis
San Antonio
Columbia, SC
2009
2010
2010
2012
2011
2012
W r i t i n g 50. 3 Feature Beat 8 “I ask God
W r i t i n g 50. 3 Feature Beat 8 “I ask God
W r i t i n g 50. 3 Feature Beat 8 “I ask God
W r i t i n g 50. 3 Feature Beat 8 “I ask God
W r i t i n g 50. 3 Feature Beat 8 “I ask God

Writing

50.

3

Feature

Beat

8

“I ask God to help us win all

Basketball

I

the games. That’s why we had a great season,” she said.

did.” Beth said she loved watching Allison play during the season. “She’s really enthused about

Allison has been playing bas- ketball since she was six and played on the school’s girls bas- ketaball team. “I’ve been playing for a long time, but I’m ten times better

playing. It’s her senior year and she’s excited to play. You can just see that she’s having fun,” she said. “I get so nervous [when I watch her play]. Whenever she gets the ball I get an adrenaline rush. I want her to score so badly.”

than when I first started playing,” she said. “It helps me make new

Friendships

friends, and I like having some-

 

Allison said she has a “really

thing to focus on.” Susan said Allison practices all the time when she is at home.

strong relationship” with her sis- ter, and they don’t fight, they just pick on each other.

 

“She has always liked playing.

“We don’t fight nearly as much

In

sixth grade she got a basketball

clipboard and was researching basketball plays,” Susan said. Allison is an encourager to her teammates and they encourage her in return. “I try to keep the team moti- vated when they feel down be- cause they do the same for me,” she said. “We all love each other like sisters, we’re a Northridge family.” Susan said she had the team be- hind her, and their support helped her score three goals during the season. “The whole team cheers her on. When she scored, they jumped up

as other sisters do. We get along really well,” Beth said. Allison and Beth encourage each other in everything they do. “I just feel that I’m glad to know that somebody’s always there to support me. I like know- ing she’s always there for me. She’s my biggest fan,” Beth said. Susan said that Allison has a “heart like Jesus” and is friends with everybody. “She’s very friendly. She loves being around people and knows everybody’s name,” Susan said. Beth said that Allison is a big role model because she is very

and high fived her. They encour- age her during practice, too,” she said. “She’s a good cheerleader.

forgiving and loves everybody. “Allison is that type of person that knows everyone, whether they know her or not. I tell every-

She has confidence in everyone.

one that you could go punch her

They can do anything. She gets

in

the face, and she will still love

discouraged because she can’t run as fast as anyone, but it’s just because she’s 4’ 10”.”

you. She never holds a grudge, even when she should,” Beth said.

 

During a game at Hillcrest, the

Allison said that she was meant

coach called her to go into the

to

be friends with everybody.

game, but she had to take off a bracelet she had on after a Chris-

“God told me to be friends with people, so I am,” she said.

tian conference.

 

Susan said that her philosophy

 

“I didn’t want to take it off be-

is

not to set limits, to try it and

cause I wanted to tell my friends

fail, instead of not trying at all.

about the next conference. It was

 

“When it comes back to it,

a

reminder,” Allison said. “My

we just used what was given to

mom yanked it off my arm. She

knew I was going to score. And

us. We would focus on what she needed to work with,” she said.

Alex’s story meant a lot to me because it really expressed Allison well. It showed her positives instead of her disability.

-Beth Gabriel

Allison’s sister, Beth, said that she was really excited when Allison passed the his- tory portion. “I know she’s a hard worker and all of her hard work paid off,” Beth said. “She has a really good memory. She remembers everything. I knew she could [pass] it.” Relationship with God Allison said she knew she would pass it because she had God on her side. “My mom told everyone to pray that I would pass the exit exams, and God an- swered our prayers,” she said. “I really wanted to graduate, so it was important that I passed. God helped me with that.” Beth said Allison prays for everything, “big or small.” “I pray because I feel like I’m talking to God about what is going on in my life. I know He cares. He always helps me with my struggles and gets me out of darkness,” Allison said. Allison even prays for her basketball team, who went 25 and 6 this season.

“I ask God to help us win all the games. That’s why we had a great season,” she said. Basketball Allison has been playing basketball since she was six, and is currently on the school’s team. “I’ve been playing for a long time, but I’m ten times better than when I first started playing,” she said. “It helps me make new friends, and I like having something to fo- cus on.” Susan said Allison practices all the time when she is at home. “She has always liked playing. In sixth grade she got a basketball clipboard and was researching basketball plays,” Susan said. “She would look up plays and draw them and go out and practice them on her basket- ball goal. She would be her own coach and make herself even better,” Beth said. Allison is an encourager to her team- mates and they encourage her in return. “I try to keep the team motivated when

The Northridge Reporter

March 8, 2012

Senior strives towards excellence despite limitations

Alex Hauser

exam was just another goal to ac-

Editor-in-Chief

complish, and they had God be- hind her.

Passing the exit exams

“That was just my goal for her,

Allison Gabriel, senior, never quits. She said she “tries to do every- thing a hundred and ten percent,” whether it is basketball or study- ing for classes. Allison’s mom, Susan Gabriel, said that passing the graduation

to graduate. I knew God was go- ing to let her. For her to get where she is, she works hard,” Susan said. Allison passed her last portion of the exit exams, the history por- tion, during the first semester of her senior year. “I felt absolutely amazing, and when I passed it, I thought I was smarter than anyone, which I am, because I’m a senior,” she said, laughing. Her mother said “she likes to study. She likes to write. She wrote facts over and over again. That’s how she passed the history part.” Allison’s sister, Beth, said that she was really ex- cited when Allison passed the history portion. “I know she’s a hard worker and all of her hard work paid off,” Beth said. “She has a really good memory. She remembers ev- erything. I knew she could [pass] it.”

She remembers ev- erything. I knew she could [pass] it.” Photo by: Beth Allaway Allison Gabriel,

Photo by: Beth Allaway

Allison Gabriel, senior, guides her team to victory against Hillcrest on Jan. 20. The team went on to beat Hillcrest 71-

Relationship with God

Allison said she knew she would pass it because she had God on her side. “My mom told everyone to pray that I would pass the exit exams, and God answered our prayers,” she said. “I really want- ed to graduate, so it was impor- tant that I passed. God helped me with that.” Beth said Allison prays for ev- erything, “big or small.” “I pray because I feel like I’m talking to God about what is going on in my life. I know He cares. He always helps me with my struggles and gets me out of darkness,” Allison said. Allison even prays for her bas-

ketball team, who went 25 and 6

this season.

Junior

Passing the Grad Exams Allison Gabriel, senior, never quits. “[She tries] to do everything a hundred and ten percent,” whether it is basketball or studying for classes. Allison’s mom, Susan Gabriel, said that passing the graduation exam was just an- other goal to accomplish, and they had God behind her. “That was just my goal for her, to gradu- ate. I knew God was going to let her. For her to get where she is, she works hard,” Susan said. Allison passed her last portion of the exit exams, the history portion, during the first semester of her senior year. “I felt absolutely amazing, and when I passed it, I thought I was smarter than any- one, which I am, because I’m a senior,” she said, laughing. Her mother said “she likes to study. She likes to write. She wrote facts over and over again. That’s how she passed the history part.”

4 Writing Feature I write to be influential Allison Gabriel made A’s and B’s in
4
Writing
Feature
I write to be influential
Allison Gabriel made A’s and B’s in Advanced classes. She passed all her
graduation exams. She played on the basketball team and was the tennis manager.
And now she’s in college managing that basketball team and studying to be an
office secretary.
She also has down-syndrome.
Her parents never gave her the opportunity to use it as an excuse. Allison thinks
she used to have down-syndrome but “grew-out of it” when she was little.
She has grown-up thinking she was normal. And that’s how she succeeded.
And I thought her story deserved to be heard.
It took me two weeks just to get her interview. Our local paper was doing a story
on her basketball achievements, and they kept scheduling interviews and then not
showing up. When I finally got the chance, her mom had reservations.
It turns out our local paper put in the lede the one thing her parents asked them
not to. They put that she has down-syndrome.
Allison wasn’t able to read her story. And it broke her heart.
I assured her mom that I would write a story Allison and her family could be
proud of.
In our critique, our judge counted us off because I didn’t mention it. He thought
people shouldn’t have to assume and the information should have been provided.
But the hugs and thanks I got from the family made it worth it.
This story was the defining moment in my choice to pursue a
career in journalism. I want to change lives with my words.
they feel down because they do the same
for me,” she said. “We all love each other
like sisters, we’re a Northridge family.”
Susan said that she has the team behind
her, and their support helped her score her
three goals.
“The whole team cheers her on. When
she scored, they jumped up and high fived
her. They encourage her during practice,
too,” she said. “She’s a good cheerleader.
She has confidence in everyone. They can
do anything. She gets discouraged because
she can’t run as fast as anyone, but it’s just
because she’s 4’ 10”.”
During a game at Hillcrest, the coach
called her to go into the game, but she had
to take off a bracelet she had on after a
Christian conference.
“I didn’t want to take it off because I
wanted to tell my friends about the next
conference. It was a reminder,” Allison
said. “My mom yanked it off my arm. She
knew I was going to score. And I did.”
Beth said she loved watching Allison
play during the season.
“She’s really enthused about playing. It’s
her senior year and she’s excited to play.
You can just see that she’s having fun,”
she said. “I get so nervous [when I watch
her play]. Whenever she gets the ball I get
an adrenaline rush. I want her to score so
badly.”
Relationships
Allison said she has a “really strong re-
lationship” with her sister, and they don’t
fight, they just pick on each other.
“We don’t fight nearly as much as other
sisters do. We get along really well,” Beth
said.
Allison and Beth encourage each other in
everything they do.
“I try to always be there for her. I cheer
her on in soccer and gymnastics. I get so
nervous for her,” Allison said.
“I just feel that I’m glad to know that
somebody’s always there to support me.
I like knowing she’s always there for me.
She’s my biggest fan,” Beth said.
Susan said that Allison has a “heart like
Jesus” and is friends with everybody.
“She’s very friendly. She loves being
around people and knows everybody’s
name,” Susan said.
Beth said that Allison is a big role model
because she is very forgiving and loves ev-
erybody.
“Allison is that type of person that knows
everyone, whether they know her or not. I
tell everyone that you could go punch her
in the face, and she will still love you.
She never holds a grudge, even when she
should,” Beth said.
Allison said that she was meant to be
friends with everybody.
“God told me to be friends with people,
so I am,” she said.
Susan said that her philosophy is not to
set limits, to try it and fail, instead of not
trying at all.
“When it comes back to it, we just used
what was given to us. We would focus on
what she needed to work with,” she said.

Writing

1
1

Feature

Freshman class has six sets of twins

With the school towering over them and students twice as big sharing the hassle, high school can be intimidat- ing for many freshman. Twelve stu- dents didn’t have to face their fears alone. They had their twin. Sawyer and Savannah Wilson, freshmen, are fraternal twins, and were glad to have their twin with them the first day. “It was easier [for me] because I had Sawyer, I wasn’t afraid to walk in,” Savannah said. Being in the same building is one thing, but the same room could be too much. Alex and Davis Jordon, freshmen, would rather not have their twin in their classes. “I see him at home all the time, so school is like a break for me,” Davis said. There are, in fact, some advantages in having a sibling in your classes. Natalie Patton, freshmen, said she loves having classes with Samantha Patton, freshman, because it is easier to keep up with homework. “We help each other with our class- es,” Samantha said. Sawyer likes having classes with Savannah because he gets to get notes from her that he missed in class. “Sawyer never writes anything down, always expecting me to have it,” Savannah said. Lauren and Hannah Johnson, fresh- men, are not partial to having classes with each other.

“It’s fun having classes together,” Hannah said. “But we always sit in alphabetical order and that usually doesn’t turn out so well.” According to keepkidshealthy.com, only about 3.6% of the U.S popula- tion are twins. People are amazed when they find out a person has a double walking around. “It’s just funny, people’s reac- tions,” Natalie said. “People who see us together for the first time freak out,” Samantha said. Scott Johnson, math teacher, is of- ten confused, along with many oth- ers, in identifying twins with their correct names. “Mr. Johnson calls us Natantha and Samatalie,” Natalie said, “I guess just so he’ll never get our names wrong.” “Twin” is a common name for identical twins, to ensure they aren’t called the wrong name. “I’m called ‘twin’ everyday,” Sa- mantha said, “I hate it.” Fraternal twins get different reac- tions when their twin status is re- vealed. “They don’t believe me, I have to ask someone they trust to convince them, because we aren’t the least bit identical,” Hannah said. “They’re like, ‘Oh wow, I didn’t know that’ because usually twins look alike, and you know, we’re fra- ternal,” Sawyer said. Lauren said being a twin is just like having a sibling, that there isn’t really

a difference. “Everyone expects you to be the same, but we aren’t, we’re totally dif- ferent,” Lauren said. Jamel Smith, freshman, takes his status as a twin in stride. “I like being a twin because there aren’t a lot of them, so it’s cool,” Jamel said. “It gives me individuality,” Savan- nah said. Freshman Jori smith, Jamel’s twin sister, said she likes being a twin be- cause she likes having someone who always understands her. “The world may never know,” the famous question to the unsolv- able tootsie roll pop motto goes. “Do twins have telepathy powers?” “Sometimes, I’ll be listening to a song and as the same time Sawyer will too, and we won’t even know until we walk out of our rooms sing- ing the lyrics,” Savannah said. “It’s weird.” Jamel and Jori had a similar experi- ence. “I can be thinking something, and she’ll say it out loud; it happens all the time,” Jamel said. Lauren relates her twin status to an other sibling. “Being a twin is just like having a sibling,” Lauren said, “but you have to share a room.” “It’s not as different as some peo- ple think.” Sawyer said.

not as different as some peo- ple think.” Sawyer said. Where I started Our news editor

Where I started

Our news editor was working on a profile about a set of twins in our school. At the same time, our feature editor was struggling on finding an idea for her page. She wanted to use his twin story, but there was nothing else to fill the page. It got me thinking about all the twins in my grade, and I realized there were six sets. Usually the in-depth features are held for the upperclassmen and more experienced writers, so it was a big deal that I was allowed to write this as a freshman. Shortly after I was finished, the need for another people spread came up, and so I was asked to alter my story and create a spread for the yearbook.

the need for another people spread came up, and so I was asked to alter my
2
2

Writing

Feature

Freshman
Freshman
2 Writing Feature Freshman

Writing

5
5

News

Buses key to some

After seven and a half hours of school, several more hours of homework and hav- ing to wake up at the break of dawn to get to school by 8:00 a.m, students suffer from a lack of sleep. But students who ride buses, lose an- other hour, the bus often picks them up as early as 7:00 a.m. KeAmbria Washington, senior, said she is picked up around 6:52 a.m. and gets to school around 7:07 a.m. “We have to stay on the bus until 7:15,” she said. “We are always the first bus, and

it’s very empty in the lunchroom when we’re [allowed in],” she said. Jimmy Boone, the Director of Transpor- tation, said there is not a law on the time buses can drop off students. “We do have local policies,” he said. “As a rule we try not to drop off high school

students before 7:15 a.m. Since all students begin breakfast at 7:30 a.m. students only have up to 15 minutes to wait before they can go to breakfast.” Senior DeAnthony Mays, who rides bus 27, said his bus is overcrowded. “You have a

hard time try- ing to find a seat when there are so many people,” he said. “And then you have that

person that is saving a seat for someone or just wants to sit by themselves.” Mays said many people that ride his bus could drive and is part of the overcrowding problem. “If you are a licensed driver and have a car, please drive to school, it will open up seats for the people who don’t have that op- tion,” he said. The bus routes are created using a com- puter program called Edulog. During the summer a complete listing of the students are placed on a map, and the transportation department assigns each student a bus. “We try to make a distance of no more than four blocks to a stop for high school students. We examine how the students get to the stops for safety issues. For example, no crossing of four lane roads [or] railroad tracks,” Boone said.

northridgereporter.wordpress.com December 14, 2012 • Volume 10 • Issue 4 Northridge High School • 2901
northridgereporter.wordpress.com
December 14, 2012 • Volume 10 • Issue 4
Northridge High School • 2901 Northridge Road • Tuscaloosa, Al• 35406
Buses key to some students’ success
Alex Hauser
Editor-in-Chief
A fter seven and a half hours of school, several more hours of
homework and having to wake up at the break of dawn to get
to school by 8:00 a. m, students suffer from a lack of sleep.
But students who ride buses, lose another hour, the bus often
picks them up as early as 7:00 a.m.
KeAmbria Washington, senior, said she is picked up around
6:52 a.m. and gets to school around 7:07 a.m.
“We have to stay on the bus until 7:15,” she said. “We are al-
ways the first bus, and it’s very empty in the lunchroom when
we’re [allowed in],” she said.
Jimmy Boone, the Director of Transportation, said there is not a
law on the time buses can drop off students.
“We do have local policies,” he said. “As a rule we try not to
drop off high school students before 7:15 a.m. Since all students
begin breakfast at 7:30 a.m., students only have up to 15 minutes
to wait before they can go to breakfast.”
Senior DeAnthony Mays, who rides bus 27, said his bus is over-
crowded.
“You have a hard time trying to find a seat when there are so
many people,” he said. “And then you have that person that is sav-
ing a seat for someone or just wants to sit by themselves.”
Mays said many people that ride his bus could drive and that is
part of the overcrowding problem.
“If you are a licensed driver and have a car, please drive to
school, it will open up seats for the people who don’t have that
option,” he said.
The bus routes are created using a computer program called
Edulog. During the summer a complete listing of the students are
placed on a map, and the transportation department assigns each
student a bus.
“We try to make a distance of no more than four blocks to a stop
for high school students. We examine how the students get to the
stops for safety issues. For example, no crossing of four lane roads
[or] railroad tracks,” Boone said.
The process of creating bus routes is “very difficult” because
not every student rides a bus, but each one eligible is assigned.
“This year we hope to begin a process of including a request to
ride a bus as a part of spring registration. If we can only identify
students who want transportation, it will help us do a better job of
creating routes,” he said.
The transportation system transports over 5,000
students with 93 buses, 73 of them running
double routes.
Charles Anthony, assistant
principal, said, for the size, the
bus system is very effective.
“The drivers do a tremendous
job in transporting students to
and from school on a daily basis.
They communicate problems
they are experiencing on the bus
to me, and we work together to
try to correct the problem,” he
said. “Mr. Boone often sends
emails and will sometimes stop
by the school to see if there are
any problems with the buses and find out from us what they can do
to better serve our needs here at Northridge.”
Anthony said the only time the buses arrive late is when there
are a number of drivers out on a given day, and the transportation de-
partment always informs the school when they are going to be late.
“Some days, there are just not enough substitute drivers to cover
all of the routes where drivers are absent,” he said.
Boone said they are currently recruiting substitute drivers.
“On occasion we have to bring in other buses to assist with
routes because of a shortage of drivers. We regret having to do
this but strive to complete the routes,” he said.
Synteria Pearson, senior, said her bus driver really cares about
the students on his bus.
“He talks to you when you get on and off the bus, and he knows
all of his students by name. He’ll also wait a couple of minutes for
you when you’re late,” she said.
Boone said the transportation department is a “vital component
to education.”
“If students cannot get to school, they cannot get an education.
Without the bus, many students would not be able to get to school,”
he said. “A year ago I received a phone call from a young lady who
had been in a lot trouble in high school, and nearly
the
wheels
on the
bus
go
round
and
round
Is your bus overcrowded?
dropped out. After working on the problems with the
bus, she started attending school every day. She called
me to tell me she had just graduated from the Univer-
sity of Alabama, and told me she would not have been
there without the school bus,” he said.
Yes:38
No:14
Does you bus arrive before 7:15?
Yes:12
No:36
Art by: Kanjalla Dancer
Compiled by: Kelly Burnham
Tablets become option to replace textbooks next year
Rabisa Khan
tensive writing assignments, such as essays,
Copy Editor
The board is considering implementation
of tablets in place of textbooks next year.
Chris Jenks, Coordinator of Instruction -
al Technology, said the board is currently
evaluating various
options to transition
toward more digital
learning opportuni -
would not be suitable for such devices.
Elizabeth Tiley, guidance counselor, said
she is not aware of the tablet idea but thinks
it has many positive and negative effects.
“It might be beneficial for students in
this fast pace modern world and better
prepare them for
what’s coming up in
college,” she said.
Tiley said stu -
ties.
“At the direction
of Superintendent Dr.
Paul McKendrick, we
are investigating on
how to implement a
‘one-to-one’ initiative
I like to have something tangible in
my hands, something I can shove
papers into.
Photo by: Alex Hauser
Katherine McCray, sophomore
[which would give]
one device [to each] student,” Jenks said.
He said that the devices the board imple-
ments do not necessarily need to be tablets.
“The critical part to remember is that the
focus should not be on the device but on
the students’ needs,” Jenks said.
He said tablets will be most promising
for consuming reading content, notes and
enhancing an educational environment. In-
dents could down -
load many programs
and software for
learning purposes
but many students
will most likely
play games such as
solitaire instead of
working in class.
“Every student would most likely re -
ceive a tablet, but we could run into the
same problem as this year,” Tiley said.
“Many textbooks won’t be returned at
the end of the year, and we would run short
of devices,” she said.
Mary Margaret Murdock, sophomore,
was one of seven students selected from
the tenth grade to be part of a meeting with
the board members.
“[The board] talked about replacing text -
books with tablets, but I just don’t think
that’s a good idea at all.”
Murdock said she thinks it is stupid be -
cause the school is not even meeting AYP,
and people are more worried about getting
tablets.
Katherine McCray, sophomore, said she
also prefers textbooks.
“I like to have something tangible in my
hands, something I can shove papers into,”
McCray said.
McCray said she is also worried about
the financial aspect of this venture.
“If we can’t even afford textbooks for ev-
ery student, how are we supposed to fund
eBooks for every student?” McCray said.
Jenks said the school board has posi -
tioned the school system on sound finan-
cial footing.
“If the board decides this plan is the cor-
rect direction, local funds will be available
to make it a reality,” he said.
Additionally, McCray said she believes
there are too many complications and vari-
ables that would obstruct the success of
Plugged in:Tyesha Pinnock, sopho-
more, uses her iPad during class. “I
use it to research topics in class and
to help with school work or home-
work,” she said.
tablets in the classroom.
“Tablets could be lost or stolen, and they
require charging,” McCray said. “People
could easily get away with doing nothing.”
If done properly with focus on profes -
sional teacher development, network and
infrastructure preparation and curriculum,
Jenks said, “a device deployment like this
could be transformative.”
Kitty Craze
Swimming
Page 3
page 7
Traffic lady returns
Page 6
Senior

I

Designed

This

Page

be transformative.” Kitty Craze Swimming Page 3 page 7 Traffic lady returns Page 6 Senior I
6 Writing News students’ success The process of creating bus routes is “very difficult” because
6
Writing
News
students’
success
The process of creating bus routes is “very
difficult” because not every student rides a
bus, but each one eligible is assigned.
“This year we hope to begin a process of
including a request to ride a bus as a part of
spring registration. If we can only identify
students who want transportation, it will
help us do a better job of creating routes,”
he said.
The transportation system transports
over 5,000 students with 93 buses, 73 of
them running double routes.
Charles Anthony, assistant principal, said,
for the size, the bus system is very effective.
“The drivers do a tremendous job in
transporting students to and from school
on a daily basis. They communicate prob-
lems they are experiencing on the bus to
me, and we work together to try to correct
the problem,” he said. “Mr. Boone often
sends emails and will sometimes stop by
the school to see if there are any problems
with the buses and find out from us what
they can do to better serve our needs here
at Northridge.”
Anthony said the only time the buses ar-
rive late is when there are a number of driv-
ers out on a given day, and the transporta-
tion department always informs the school
when they are going to be late.
“Some days, there are just not enough
substitute drivers to cover all of the routes
where drivers are absent,” he said.
Boone said they are currently recruiting
substitute drivers.
“On occasion we have to bring in other
buses to assist with routes because of a
shortage of drivers. We regret having to do
this but strive to complete the routes,” he
said.
Synteria Pearson, senior, said her bus driv-
er really cares about the students on his bus.
“He talks to you when you get on and off
the bus, and he knows all of his students by
name. He’ll also wait a couple of minutes
for you when you’re late,” she said.
Boone said the transportation department
is a “vital component to education.”
“If students cannot get to school, they
cannot get an education. Without the bus,
many students would not be able to get to
school,” he said. “A year ago I received a
phone call from a young lady who had been
in a lot trouble in high school, and nearly
dropped out. After working on the problems
with the bus, she started attending school
every day. She called me to tell me she had
just graduated from the University of Ala-
bama, and told me she would not have been
there without the school bus,” Boone said.
No one every reports on the
bus. It was nice for people
to know how important the
buses are to some students.
-Synteria Pearson
I strive for diversity
Our school demographics define our school. We have the wealthiest part of Tuscaloosa combined
with the poorest. We are 30% white and 70% black. But we tend to focus more on the 30%. I
realized that we needed to report on the entire school, so I sought a story that would have a more
diverse demographic. I searched through our old papers trying to find a story, until I realized that
we have never had a story about the bus system, even though so many of our students ride a bus.
I went and talked to the administrator who mans the buses, and he gave me several angles to
pursue. I then talked to the transportation director and students to get my story.
Writing 7 News Board visits to assist in better learning atmosphere During the first week
Writing
7
News
Board visits to assist in better learning atmosphere
During the first week in October, board
members scoured the hallway, sat in on
classes and talked to students and faculty.
Isaac Espy, principal, said the purpose
of the visit was to evaluate the school’s in-
structional program and to help the school
do a better job of instruction based on spe-
cific recommendations resulting from the
audit.
“I contacted the superintendent last sum-
mer and requested that this audit take place
in the fall. It is a very healthy practice, and
our faculty and the central office are work-
ing together to improve the way we have
school,” he said.
Paul McKendrick, superintendent, said
the visit was not to evaluate people, but
processes within the school and that some-
one from the outside would have more of a
“critical eye.”
“You look at a process of how [you]
solve the problems, what are the ways that
the school addresses organizational issues
and then you try as much as possible to
see where the instructional program is,” he
said. “The idea is that you aren’t going into
an audit like that and saying we’re going
into Mrs. Jones’ class because we heard
she’s a wonderful teacher. But at the same
time, you don’t say you’re going into Mr.
Jones’ class because we heard he’s a hor-
rible teacher. Nor do you go back to the
principal saying they’re a horrible teacher
or perfect teacher because this is what we
saw.”
Espy said teachers knew there would be
walkthroughs.
“[The school board] has no bearing other
than the general snapshot of elements of
instruction that were observed at that par-
ticular time,” he said. “In a walkthrough,
the learning environment is assessed along
with the format for instructional practices,
strategies, teacher activities, grouping, stu-
dent engagement and the level of student
work required.”
McKendrick said the board came into the
audit without a prearranged idea of what
the school was going to look like.
They looked at data gathered through the
observations, the records review and the
conversations they had.
“[We] try to give a portrait of what the
school looks like,” e said. “If it’s something
that [we’re] happy with or we think is good
then we say ‘yes, this is what the school is
and this is what the school looks like and
these are the kinds of things that we want in
the school,’ [but] if the portrait shows you
some blemishes that you really don’t want,
then at that point, that becomes an issue.”
The board interviewed several students
about their view on the school, including
Natalie Patton, senior. Patton said they
asked her whether she thought the school
was safe, and how the school could be im-
proved.
“I was glad that they were asking the
questions, but I don’t think I gave them the
answers they were looking for. I think they
got mad when I spoke my mind about it,”
she said. “I said things like get new text-
books and better security cameras.”
Scott Johnson, math teacher, said the fac-
ulty was told that the purpose of the audit
was to assist us in better understanding of
our strengths and weaknesses, but the re-
sults were “disconcerting.”
“Pre-audit, I think we were all on board,
although no one really likes to be under a
magnifying glass. [But] post-audit, much
more was made of the school’s shortcom-
ings than its strengths,” he said.
Johnson said the people who had the
“largest hand” in the audit believe not
enough is being done for students who
struggle the most.
“In their view, the successful students
would probably be successful in spite of
the teachers and curriculum. They tend to
work hard regardless,” he said. “[The eval-
uators said] our primary concern and direc-
tion should be with the students who are
at risk of dropping out or graduation with
their ‘cohorts.’ While many of us disagree
with this point-of-view and believe instead
there needs to be a balance of both.
Johnson said that, while most of the au-
ditor’s behaviors were “unobtrusive and
professional,” there were some that I wit-
nessed that were invasive, disruptive and
very unprofessional.
“Let teachers evaluate teachers. Some of
these ‘experts’ wouldn’t last two days in a
classroom. Take the evaluator who pointed
out that six students were chewing gum.
So? Is that against some board policy?
Don’t think so,” he said.
Beth Allaway, science teacher, said the
examiners should have looked for “real
teaching” and not so much on paper work
like lesson plans and objectives on the
board.
“[They should have] stayed in the class-
rooms longer. That way they could get an
idea of how the class flows. There were
judgments made on our critiques that were
incorrect because they hadn’t stayed long
enough to know. Many of the people who
were observing had no knowledge or expe-
rience in the subjects they were observing,”
she said.
Mckendrick said he thought the audit did
what it was meant to do.
“I think it gave and will give Dr. Espy
what he needs to make some changes.
One of the incentives and reasons why we
went in is because the school did not make
AYP,” he said.
McKendrick said, although the AYP and
No Child Left Behind has some flaws, the
results that came from the test scores was
a good indicator to which students were
doing well, and which ones were doing
poorly, and that “everyone supported [it].”
McKendrick said that remembering fac-
tors that students should be dealing is a key
for educators.
“There are a lot of children that come [to
school] that we have to resolve some kind
of issues that are impacting their instruc-
tion,” he said. “And that’s a part of teach-
ing and being an educator because those
are issues we have to solve right when they
walk in their doors.”
8
8

Writing

News

8 Writing News I am careful with sensitive subjects Our board of education made many changes

I am careful with sensitive subjects

Our board of education made many changes over the years that the student body and teachers have not supported. At the beginning of my senior year, the board came and audited our school. Many rumors were spread, and I sat down with the superintendent to find our what was true and what was not. After my story was published, students and teachers became more informed on what the board thought. I got praise from both the city board and my school.

I got praise from both the city board and my school. northridgereporter.wordpress.com and how the school
I got praise from both the city board and my school. northridgereporter.wordpress.com and how the school
northridgereporter.wordpress.com and how the school could be improved. “I was glad that they were asking
northridgereporter.wordpress.com
and how the school could be improved.
“I was glad that they were asking the questions,
but I don’t think I gave them the answers they were
looking for. I think they got mad when I spoke my
mind about it,” she said. “I said things like get new
textbooks and better security cameras.”
Scott Johnson, math teacher, said the faculty was
told that the purpose of the audit was to assist us
in better understanding of our strengths and weak-
nesses, but the results were “disconcerting.”
“Pre-audit, I think we were all on board, although

no one really likes to be under a magnifying glass. [But] post-audit, much more was made of the school’s shortcomings than its strengths,” he said. Johnson said the people who had the “largest hand” in the audit believe not enough is being done for students who struggle the most. “In their view, the successful students would probably be successful in spite of the teachers and curriculum. They tend to work hard regardless,” he said. “[The evaluators said] our primary concern and direction should be with the students who are at risk of dropping out or graduation with their ‘co- horts.’ While many of us disagree with this point-

of-view and believe instead there needs to be a bal -

ance of both. Johnson said that, while most of the auditor’s be- haviors were “unobtrusive and professional,” there were some that I witnessed that were invasive, dis - ruptive and very unprofessional. “Let teachers evaluate teachers. Some of these ‘experts’ wouldn’t last two days in a classroom. Take the evaluator who pointed out that six students were chewing gum. So? Is that against some board policy? Don’t think so,” he said. Beth Allaway, science teacher, said the examin- ers should have looked for “real teaching” and not so much for paper work like lesson plans and objec- tives on the board.

“[They should have] stayed in the classrooms

longer. That way they could get an idea of how the

class flows. There were judgments made on our critiques that were incorrect because they hadn’t stayed long enough to know. Many of the people who were observing had no knowledge or experience in the subjects they were observing,” she said.

McKendrick said he thought the audit did what it was meant to do. “I think it gave and will give Dr. Espy what he needs to make some changes. One of the incentives and reasons why we went in is because the school did not make AYP,” he said. McKendrick said, although the AYP and No Child Left

November 30 , 2012 • Volume 10 • Issue 3

Northridge High School • 2901 Northridge Road • Tuscaloosa, Al• 35406

Board visits to assist in better learning atmosphere

Alex Hauser

Editor-in-Chief

A

Behind

the Scenes

Look The Classroom of
Look
The Classroom of

Shane Ashcraft

During the audit, Dr. Paul McKendrick observed several classes, and said he wished he could have visited more. “Because you see some wonderful people that are teaching, and you see children engaged, and you see children enjoying the classes they’re in,” he said.

I was in [Shane Ashcraft’s] class, and I was

talking to a 9th grade English class. They

were discussing To Kill a Mockingbird.

I don’t think there was a student in there

that did not comment. And they hit on some

really tough questions. They had finished

reading the book, and they were discussing overall themes, and he had a set number of themes throughout that they were

discussing.

See the story on Ashcraft on pg. 8

During the first week in October, board members scoured the hallway, sat in on classes and talked to stu - dents and faculty. Isaac Espy, principal, said the purpose of the visit was to evaluate the school’s instructional program and to help the school do a better job of instruction based on specific recommendations resulting from the audit.

Behind has some flaws, the results that came from the test scores was a good indicator to which students were doing well, and which ones were doing poorly, and that “every - one supported [it].” McKendrick said that remembering factors that students should be dealing is a key for educators. “There are a lot of children that come [to school] that we have to resolve some kind of issues that are impacting their instruction,” he said. “And that’s a part of teaching and being an educator because those are issues we have to solve right when they walk in their doors.”

ed
ed

“I contacted the superintendent last summer and request-

that this audit take place in the fall. It is a very healthy

practice, and our faculty and the central office are working together to improve the way we have school,” he said. Paul McKendrick, superintendent, said the visit was not to

evaluate people, but processes within the school and that some- one from the outside would have more of a “critical eye.” “You look at a process of how [you] solve the problems, [and] the ways that the school addresses organizational is - sues,” he said. Afterwards, McKendrick said, they look at what in - structional program needs to be altered. “The idea is that you aren’t going into an audit saying

we’re going into Mrs. Jones’ class because we heard she’s

a wonderful teacher. But at the same time, you don’t say

you’re going into Mr. Jones’ class because we heard he’s a horrible teacher,” he said. “Nor do you go back to the principal saying they’re a horrible teacher or perfect teacher because this is what we saw,” McKendrick said. Espy said teachers knew there would be walkthroughs. “[The school board] has no bearing other than the gen- eral snapshot of elements of instruction that were ob- served at that particular time,” he said. “In a walkthrough, the learning environment is assessed along with the format for instructional practices, strategies, teacher activities, grouping, student engagement and the level of student work required.” McKendrick said the board came into the audit without

a prearranged idea of what the school was going to look

like. They looked at data gathered through the observations, the records review and the conversations they had. “[We] try to give a portrait of what the school looks

like,” he said. “If it’s something that [we’re] happy with or we think is good, then we say ‘yes, this is what the school

is, and this is what the school looks like, and these are the

kinds of things that we want in the school,’ [but] if the portrait shows you some blemishes that you really don’t want, then at that point, that becomes an issue.” The board interviewed several students about their view on the school, including Natalie Patton, senior. Patton said they asked her whether she thought the school was safe,

I also

designed

this

Page

Teachers receive monetary awards for test scores

Students

Raiha Bajwa

Managing Editor

who passed

AP Exams

T he AP grant that grants students a

hundred dollars per passing score

Marilyn

Scott

in any math, science or English class,

Stephens

Johnson

also gives the teachers in those subjects

AP Biology

22

Statistics

8

a

hundred dollars per student. Based

AP Chemistry

13

Patsy

Trina

on

previous years passing rates, bench -

Busby

marks are set for the teachers and if they

Lowery

English Language

21

surpass them one thousand dollar bonus

Calculus AB

29

English Literature

15

is

added.

Calculus BC

2

Mary Ruffin

Patsy Lowry, math teacher, had 29

Ria

Evans

Moore

English Language

27

of her 31 AP Calculus students pass the

exam, giving her a $3000 bonus, and a

Physics B

9

total of $5900.

Lowry said she cried when she got the scores because of how hard everyone worked. “I cried not just because of how many people passed, but passed with the high -

[the AP money].” Lowry said she is concerned about her current AP Calculus class on the new schedule. “This year I’m having to do it in half

est score they could make,” she said. “Everyone went in and did the best they

the time,” she said. “It’s been very chal - lenging for me and the students, but we’ll

could, no one drew pictures.”

see how it goes.”

Lowry said in her forty years of teach -

Trina Busby, English teacher, said she

ing that was about the best she’s ever

was happy about receiving the money,

gotten.

but does not fully support the idea.

She said she plans on using the money

“It’s a grey ethical issue for me; I

on a visit to England to see her daughter,

would do my job the same way regard -

son-in-law and two grandchildren.

less,” she said. “Yes it’s a nice incentive,

“I’m really excited,” she said. “I don’t

but at the same time it’s not why I want

know if I could afford to go without it

my students to pass.”

Page 3 Of Mice and Men
Page 3
Of Mice and Men
Fame Ashcraft Page 4-5 page 8
Fame
Ashcraft
Page 4-5
page 8

Senior

Writing 9 Review The Northridge Reporter Entertainment 3 September 23, 2011 Knowing I would need
Writing
9
Review
The Northridge Reporter
Entertainment
3
September 23, 2011
Knowing I would need this review done the
day after the concert, I wrote it around 1 a.m.
New Planet of the Apes movie proves to be surprisingly good
James Rob-
erts
Beat Editor
This sum -
mer brought
us the latest
installment
of the Planet
of the Apes
franchise Rise
of the Planet
of the Apes.
Of all the
science
fiction
films
I’ve seen, I think that the Planet of the Apes franchise as a
whole has one of the better concepts.
It takes place in a future where we humans have become
animalistic and are no longer the most dominant of all of
God’s creations, and simians have assumed our former
role.
To me that is one of the most creative concepts for a film.
But it takes more than a great concept to make a spectacular
film. It has to be well-acted, well directed and produced,
well written, and have excellent special effects.
The original 1968 Planet of the Apes and this summer’s
installment in the franchise, Rise of the Planet of the Apes,
have this going for them, but the 2001 Tim Burton remake
(that you may have seen when you were a kid) pretty much
doesn’t. If you don’t believe me, let me compare these three
motion pictures.
The original’s make-up was quite convincing (even by
today’s standards.) The cast did a superb job of acting, al -
though Charlton Heston kind of overacted from time to time,
didn’t think that the special effects exactly worked with the
story and were sort of goofy.
Those few positive factors didn’t make up for the short -
comings in logic: The “animalistic humans” can talk, the
“superior” simians act more like simians than in the origi-
nal, and so on.
The Burton remake also had cardboard cut out human
during the three hours it took to drive home that
night. It was edited and placed the next day. I
received 2nd place review for this at the Alabama
Scholastic Press Association.
characters, bad writing, a weak climax, and a sloppy “twist”
ending that made no sense. If it weren’t for the stylish spe-
cial effects, it would probably be down there with Battle:
Los Angeles, a summer 2011 film built on special effects
that did poorly in theaters.
The recently made reboot of the Planet of the Apes fran -
chise, Rise of the Planet of the Apes, made up for the dam -
Matt Nathanson, Maroon
age of Burton’s remake.
I
will admit that at first, I thought it was going to be hor-
rible, and that I wasn’t too happy that the simians were now
CGI (Computer Generated Images,) as opposed to the con -
but it was still convincing. The characters were developed.
vincing make-up of the earlier films, but I was happily sur-
prised with it.
The writing was great, seeing as it came from a beloved
novella by Pierre Boulle.
The story was quite thought provoking and philosophical,
and the plot twist at the end was thrilling.
To sum it up, it’s about as near perfect as a film can get.
The ill-famed remake by Burton (that somehow grossed
$180,011,740, despite its problems) doesn’t exactly deserve
all of the infamy it received, but it’s beyond doubt not as
good as the original or Rise.
It
wasn’t as thought-provoking as the original and the
5 and Train perform and
seize fan’s heart
Art by Jane Yu
Some of the simian characters were actually pretty well
acted, and I kind of liked the stylish special effects, but I
pacing was a little faster than I would’ve liked, but the writ-
ing was better than expected, the characters were developed
and well-acted, the CGI simians looked somewhat realistic,
and the climax was splendid.
Overall, it was excellently made entertainment and pretty
much the second best film in the entire franchise.
Rise is rumored to be the first film of an entirely new
Planet of the Apes film series.
Will the new films be good? Let’s wait and see.
Matt Nathanson, Maroon 5 and Train perform and seize fan’s heart
Alex Hauser
dance and sing. He called them the “Trai -
Editor-in-Chief
It was that kind of show that keeps getting
better as it goes on. Three great performers
Matt Nathanson, Maroon 5 and Train ap -
peared on a Thursday night in September
in Atlanta.
It was a show that was worth the four hour
drive and the wait through Atlanta’s rush
hour. It was so good, I belted all the songs
the whole four hours it took to get back.
Matt Nathanson was the opening act.
And, like most opening acts, he isn’t nearly
as well known. He sings “Come On Get
Higher” for all of the Top 40 listeners.
Although he’s newer to fame, he had great
stage presence and entranced the audience.
Definitely on my list of artists to listen to.
His last song “Faster” was catchy and was
in my head until Maroon 5 started playing.
Adam Levine, lead singer of Maroon 5,
started off with his new hit “Moves Like
Photo by Robb D. Cohen
Pat Monahan, lead singer of Train, sings one of the crowd’s favorites at the September 1
concert in Atlanta.
nettes” and most of them got T-shirts say -
ing the name. One younger girl, a cancer
survivor, got to stand up on one of the
speakers and show off her dance moves,
and sing with him. It truly was an experi -
ence well-made for the girl, and it tugged
on all of our hearts.
Monahan interacted with the audience
tremendously, autographing beach balls
and throwing them out to the crowd, and
even meandered through the stands whilst
singing “Marry Me”.
The typically overplayed song “Hey,
Soul Sister” was brought back. Hearing
it live brought back the memories of first
hearing the catchy rhythm, completely
erasing my usual annoyance of it.
Train came back for an encore singing
their main hit “Drops of Jupiter.” The fa-
miliar piano was compelling, Monahan’s
voice is to die for. Not to mention Mona -
han’s ability to do acrobatics while sing -
Jagger.” I was hoping for Christina to show
up to sing it with him, but it was phenom -
enal nonetheless. It was an unexpected start
and got the audience pumped up for more.
He sang his classic hits such as “Misery,”
“This Love,” “If I Never See You Again,”
“Stutter” and “Sunday Morning.”
Maroon 5’s performing style focuses
more on the music. Besides the pretty lights,
there were few special effects, in contrast to
Train, effectively bringing all of the atten -
tion to the lyrics and rhythm of the songs.
They ended with “She Will Be Loved.”
Levine stopped in the middle of the song
to provide comic relief, asking his guitarist
if he had boogers in his nose, saying it was
bothering him and he felt self-conscious.
He ended the song by setting up a two-part
harmony in the audience.
After Maroon 5’s performance, I was
doubtful it could get better. I was wrong.
A train whistle announced Train’s en -
trance. The curtain rose, and they started
off with “Parachute” and “If It’s Love,” the
latter being one of my favorites.
They mostly sang songs from their newer
album Save Me San Francisco, but also
brought back some of the classics including
“Calling All Angels” and “She’s on Fire.”
During “She’s On Fire” Pat Monahan let
several girls come up on stage with him to
ing. It put the recording to shame, although
seemingly impossible.
They ended the concert singing “This
Ain’t Goodbye” and announced that they
were going to release a new album next
year, and will be back to Atlanta, a concert
I will not easily miss. I’ve been to several
concerts, and this was one of my favorite,
certainly one of the few I would go back and
see again. It was fabulously performed and
left me wanting more.
“Your Orthodontist On The Black
Warrior River”
752-4343
Kristi Jackson
Independent Director
Consultant #168431
Go Jaguars!
3523 18th Avenue NE
Tuscaloosa, AL 35406
Office: 205-349-4391
Fax: 205-366-0891
kj@kjcooks.com
kjcooks.com
P. MIKE UPTON, DMD, MS
TOP PERFORMANCE CLUSTER
Adam Levine,
lead singer of Ma-
roon 5, started off
with his new hit
“Moves Like Jag-
ger.” I was hop-
ing for Christina
to show up to sing
with him, but it
was phenomenal
nonetheless. It was
an unexpected start
and got the audi-
ence pumped up for
more.
He sang his clas-
sic hits such as
“Misery,” “This
They mostly sang songs from their new-
er album Save Me San Francisco, but also
brought back some of the classics including
“Calling All Angels” and “She’s on Fire.”
During “She’s on Fire” Pat Monahan
let several girls come up on stage with
him to dance and sing. He called them the
“Trainettes” and most of them got T-shirts
saying the name. One younger girl, a can-
cer survivor, got to stand up on one of the
speakers and show off her dance moves,
and sing with him. It truly was an experi-
ence well-made for the girl, and it tugged
on all of our hearts.
Monahan interacted with the audience
tremendously, autographing beach balls
and throwing them out to the crowd; he
Junior
It was that kind of show that keeps get-
ting better as it goes on. Three great per-
formers Matt Nathanson, Maroon 5 and
Train appeared on a Thursday night in Sep-
tember in Atlanta.
It was a show that was worth the four
hour drive and the wait through Atlanta’s
rush hour. It was so good, I belted all the
songs the whole four hours it took to get
back.
Matt Nathanson was the opening act.
And, like most opening acts, he isn’t nearly
as well known. He sings “Come On Get
Higher” for all of the Top 40 listeners.
Although he’s newer to fame, he had
great stage presence and entranced the au-
dience.
He is definitely added to my list of artists
to listen to.
His last song “Faster” was catchy and
was in my head until Maroon 5 started
playing.
Love,” “If I Never
See You Again,” Stutter” and “Sunday
Morning.”
Maroon 5’s performing style focuses
more on the music. Besides the pretty
lights, there were few special effects, in
contrast to Train, effectively bringing all of
the attention to the lyrics and rhythm of the
songs.
They ended with ”She Will Be Loved.”
Levine stopped in the middle of the song
to provide comic relief, asking his guitarist
if he had boogers in his nose, saying it was
bothering him and he felt self-conscious.
He ended the song by setting up a two-part
harmony in the audience.
After Maroon 5’s performance, I was
doubtful it could get better. I was wrong.
A train whistle announced Train’s en-
trance. The curtain rose, and they started
off with “Parachute” and “If It’s Love,” the
latter being one of my favorites.
even meandered through the stands whilst
singing “Marry Me.”
The typically overplayed song “Hey,
Soul Sister” was brought back. Hearing
it live brought back the memories of first
hearing the catchy rhythm, completely
erasing my usual annoyance of it.
Train came back for an encore singing
their main hit “Drops of Jupiter.” The fa-
miliar piano was compelling, Monahan’s
voice to die for. Not to mention his abil-
ity to do acrobatics while singing. It put the
recording to shame, although seemingly
impossible.
They ended the concert singing “This
Ain’t Goodbye” and announced that they
were going to release a new album next
year, and will be back to Atlanta, a concert
I will not easily miss. I’ve been to several
concerts, and this was by far my favorite,
certainly one of the few I would go back
and see again. It was fabulously performed
and left me wanting more.
10 Writing Sports Junior helps mom in bike race Their team name, “Life is Grand,
10
Writing
Sports
Junior helps mom in bike race
Their team name, “Life is Grand, Eh?” proudly “defined [their]
Canadian heritage” as they suited up for the big race.
Andrew Lattner, junior, and his mom, Patricia Tessner partici-
pated in the Pedal, Paddle, Pedal race on Sept. 18 at Lake Lurleen
State Park.
“It was a race done by the Druid City Bike Club that includ-
ed a 23 mile long bike race, 2.2 miles of paddling and a 23 mile
mountain bike loop,” Lattner said. “I did the paddling portion in
kayak.”
Lattner’s training for the race consisted of one practice lap a
week before the race, although he’s been kayaking for four years.
“We just did it for fun. We knew that some of the people doing
this would be serious athletes, and we probably couldn’t beat them
anyway. It was lots of fun doing it as a mother-son team,” he said.
Lattner first kayaked at a YMCA camp on Paradise Lake in St.
Jacobs, Canada, and continued participating in the sport because
he “thought it was really fun because [he] could go at [his] own
pace.”
“I just enjoy the feeling of freedom I get while kayaking, it’s just
a
me and the boat, there’s nothing to distract you. It’s just your own
thoughts. It’s calming,” Lattner said.
Lattner said he was pleased with his performance and his per-
her finish the race.
“Andrew was there supporting me, no matter how long it took,”
Tessner said. “And the fact that the mountain bike trail goes around
a lake so you have no choice but to finish; other than swimming
across the lake with a bike.”
Tessner’s favorite part of the race was tagging off between the
events.
“We spent the extra few seconds to give each other a hug and
wish each other luck,” she said.
Lattner and Tessner, although having a disadvantage of only
having two people, loved doing the race as a mother-son team.
“Andrew is so laid back. I could enjoy all of the race, without
any pressure to win. We cheered each other on just because we
support each other’s effort,” Tessner said.
Lattner said he worked hard, not wanting to disappoint his mom.
“I didn’t want to let her down, she was biking so far and long,
and I wanted to help her achieve her goals,” he said.
His mom said she “almost wishes he had gone a little slower so
[she could have had a little more rest between the road and moun-
tain bike rides.”
“If he decides to become a free agent for next year’s race, I’m
sure there will be teams interested in recruiting him,” Tessner said.
sonal time.
“I [think I] kayaked rather quickly; I had a pretty good time, and
the northridge reporter
october 22, 2010
sports 11
was able to make up two minutes of our time,” he said. “But I’m
not a professional, not even close, because I know there are people
I
Volleyball
season, in brief
Junior helps mom in bike race
wins
losses
alex hauser
brookwood
holy spirit
feature editor
a
lot better than me. I don’t know if there’s professional kayaking,
hillcrest
brookwood
bessemer
fayatte
bibb county
but if there were, I couldn’t do that.”
Lattner said being able to see his competition gave him motiva-
tion.
“It gives me the goal to beat [my competition], but when I’m
alone, or I’m on a river that has a lot of bends, I can’t see [my
competition]. It’s hard to find motivation when you don’t have a
goal,” he said.
Lattner and Tessner were the only two-person team, Tessner
competing in both the cycling and mountain bike loop.
“She’s a really good athlete,” Lattner said. “[I’m proud of her]
because I know I can’t do it, and the fact that she’s more than twice
my age, that’s a big accomplishment.”
Knowing she could check off doing both a road and mountain
bike ride in one day from her lifetime list was one thing that helped
bryant
county high
sipsey valley
-The girls volleyball team ended their season
with a 26-4 record.
-The team won the Stillman Challenge, the
Brookwood Brawl, and the Area Tournament.
-Ashlyn Sunseri was named MVP at the
Brookwood Brawl and the Area Tournament.
-Carly Cignetti, Kenyatta Moffett, and Lizzi
McElwain were on the All-Tournament Team at the
Area Tournament. McElwain and Cignetti were also on
the All-Tournament Team at the Brookwood Brawl.
central
Their team name, “Life is Grand, Eh?”
proudly “defined [their Canadian heritage”
as they suited up for the big race.
Andrew Lattner, junior, and his mom,
Patricia Tessner participated in the Pedal,
Paddle, Pedal race on Sept. 18 at Lake
one day from her lifetime list was one
thing that helped her finish the race.
“Andrew was there supporting me, no
matter how long it took,” Tessner said.
“And the fact that the mountain bike trail
goes around a lake so you have no choice
but to finish; other than swimming across
the lake with a bike.”
compiled by ellie cauthen
Volleyball team continues to win
craig first
infographics editor
The girls volleyball team won the area
tournament for the first time since 2005
during fourth period on Oct. 12.
Hosted and sponsored by Northridge, the
team played Bessemer City and Hillcrest.
The first round of games in the tournament
were played against Bessemer City.
“Before the [first] game, I was in my
normal routine trying to set up and get my
girls ready for the game. I didn’t allow time
for myself to get nervous, but I was excited,”
Coach Sherri Shuttlesworth said.
The whistle blew and the game started at
2:02 p.m. and within the next ten minutes
the score was 16 to 5, Northridge. Then, five
minutes later the score was 24 to 9, only
one point away from Northridge winning.
And, in the blink of an eye 30 seconds later
the first game was won, Northridge 25 and
Bessemer City 10.
“Normally, I’m not into sports, but during
the first game it got pretty intense. I really
enjoyed it, and I can’t wait to see the next
one,” Lane Russell, spectator, said.
In the first few minutes of the second
game, Northridge started the game leading
with a score of 7 to 0, but then a series
of blunders led Bessemer City to gain 5
points. For the rest of the game, the scoring
fluttered back and forth between the teams
with scores such as: 15 to 9, then 16 to 11
and 18 to 15. With less ease than the first
game, Northridge still managed to come out
on top with a final score of 25 to 17.
As for the third game, the score was neck
and neck. Then, for the first time in the
championship, Bessemer City got a lead
on Northridge by three points. After that,
it was fairly close. But again, Northridge
beat Bessemer City, but the score was even
closer than before with Northridge scoring
25 points and Bessemer scoring 20 points.
Later after the school bell rang and
students went home, Northridge went on to
beat Hillcrest three games out of three and
won the tournament.
“During the Hillcrest game our team
really came together and played as one. We
beat Hillcrest in three games straight and
won the whole area tournament. [This was]
one of our biggest goals from the beginning
of this season,” Natalie Cignetti, freshman,
said.
Tessner’s favorite part of the race was
tagging off between the events.
“We spent the extra few seconds to give
each other a hug and wish each other luck,”
she said.
Lattner and Tessner, although having a
disadvantage of only having two people,
loved doing the race as a mother-son team.
“Andrew is so laid back. I could enjoy
all of the race, without any pressure to win.
We cheered each other on just because we
support each other’s effort,” Tessner said.
Lattner said he worked hard, not wanting
to disappoint his mom.
“I didn’t want to let her down, she was
biking so far and long, and I wanted to help
her achieve her goals,” he said.
His mom said she “almost wishes he had
gone a little slower so [she] could have
had a little more rest between the road and
mountain bike rides.”
“If he decides to become a free agent for
next year’s race, I’m sure there will be teams
interested in recruiting him,” Tessner said.
Ingle Demolition
and Salvage
My sophomore year, we didn’t have a very reliable
sports editor. Every story that ended up on the page
was a last-minute football or basketball season update,
and we knew we needed something better. So I searched
for someone who did an extracurricular sport and found
a student that participated in a road bike, kayak and
mountain bike race with his mom that weekend and
wrote a story.
Lurleen State Park.
“It was a race done by the Druid City
Bike Club that included a 23 mile long
bike race, 2.2 miles of paddling and a 23
mile mountain bike loop,” Lattner said. “I
did the paddling portion in a kayak.”
Lattner’s training for the race consisted
of one practice lap a week before the race,
although he’s been kayaking for four
years.
“We just did it for fun. We knew that
some of the people doing this would be
serious athletes, and we probably couldn’t
beat them anyway. It was lots of fun doing
it as a mother-son team,” he said.
Lattner first kayaked at a YMCA camp
on Paradise Lake in St. Jacobs, Canada,
and continued participating in the sport
because he “thought it was really fun
because [he] could go at [his] own pace.”
“I just enjoy the feeling of freedom I get
while kayaking, it’s just me and the boat,
there’s nothing to distract you. It’s just
your own thoughts. It’s calming,” Lattner
said.
Lattner said he was pleased with his
performance and his personal time.
“I [think I] kayaked rather quickly; I
had a pretty good time, and I was able to
make up two minutes of our time,” he said.
“[But] I’m not a professional, not even
close, because I know there are people a
lot better than me. I don’t know if there’s
professional kayaking, but if there were, I
couldn’t do that.” Lattner said being able to
see his competition gave him motivation.
“It gives me the goal to beat [my
competition], but when I’m alone, or I’m
on a river that has a lot of bends, I can’t
see [my competition]. It’s hard to find
motivation when you don’t have a goal,”
he said.
Lattner and Tessner were the only two-
person team, Tessner competing in both
the cycling and mountain bike loop.
“She’s a really good athlete,” Lattner
said. “[I’m proud of her] because I
know I can’t do it, and the fact that she’s
more than twice my age, that’s a big
accomplishment.”
Knowing she could check off doing
both a road and mountain bike ride in
photo by becci hauser
Lattner splashes through the shallows at
Lake Lurleen State Park. He participated
in a race with his mom on Sept. 18.
GUITAR LESSONS
with Jon Kilgore
Lessons are $70 a month
1042 Cherry Blossom Ln.
Mt. Olive, AL 35117
Phone: 205-799-3843
Email: legion1776@hotmail.com
“Your Orthodontist On The Black
Warrior River”
Phone: 205-602-8278
Fax: 205-285-9375
Email: denningle@charter.net
752-4343
Go Jaguars!
P. MIKE UPTON, DMD, MS
Sophomore

Design

11

Feature

D e s i g n 11 Feature Sophomore My first feature page This was my

Sophomore

My first feature page

D e s i g n 11 Feature Sophomore My first feature page This was my

This was my first spread I designed. Not only did I write the story on the left, I compiled the information for the timeline at the bottom, digitally color the illustrations in Photoshop and created the bar graph using Illustrator. I was only a sophomore at the time. This spread won first place newspaper design at the Alabama Scholastic Press Association spring convention.

12

Design

Feature

12 Design Feature This was my first time designing graphics in Photoshop. I created several photo

This was my first time designing graphics in Photoshop. I created several photo manipulations for my previous designs, but I never made anything from scratch. For this page, I created the notebook, the binder, the sheet of paper, the sticky note, the scraps of taped paper and even the background. I also created the graphs using illustrator.

Broadening

my

expertise

of taped paper and even the background. I also created the graphs using illustrator. Broadening my

Sophomore

Design 13 Front Page Summer snow helps out Page 8 Jaguars beat wildcats This page
Design
13
Front Page
Summer snow helps out
Page 8
Jaguars beat wildcats
This page was
Page 7
website: http://northridgereporter.wordpress.com
featured
September 2011 • Volume 9 • Issue 1
Northridge High School • 2901 Northridge Road • Tuscaloosa, Al• 35406
New schedule creates hassle for AP Students
in the
Do you like the
new schedule?
New Schedule
Alex Hauser
Several other options
were considered. The 5 x
Coates said that theA+ Col-
lege Ready Program Grant
Editor-in-chief
5
and a 7 or 8 period day
A new schedule was put
in effect this year after the
board of education received
information on the effec -
tiveness of the former 4 x 4
block schedule.
The Director of Second -
ary Programs, Robert Coates
said that the board requested
an evaluation of the effec -
tiveness of the Block Sched-
ule due to the number of
student dropouts, the high
school graduation rates and
the ability of our schools
to make AYP under the No
Child Left Behind Act of
2001. A committee was then
formed in 2009-2010 to dis -
cuss and recommend a more
effective schedule.
“[After the board received
the research data they] is -
sued a directive to change
the 4 X 4 Block Schedule,”
Coates said. “The Alternat-
ing A/B 4 X 4 Block Sched -
ule was the consensus of
the high school principals,
including TCT.”
were the two top alterna -
tives.
“The challenges [of the 7
or 8 period day] of sched -
uling Career and Technical
courses at TCT would have
been adversely affected by
55 or 50-minute classes.
[It’s] not enough transition
time for students taking
only one Career Technical
course,” Coates said.
The alternating A/B 4 X
for AP Classes did not affect
the decision on the schedule
choice and that “courses re-
quired as year-long would
have been included regard-
less of what schedule format
was selected.”
Cassel said that the sched-
ule affected AP students a
great deal. Cassel said she
could not fit all of the class -
es she wanted to take into
her schedule because “noth-
ing fit.”
Rationale
• The Core Curriculum is taught for the entire
school year (Half credits earned at end of Se-
mester 1).
Best of the
• Maintains the 4 x 4 Block Schedule resulting in
8 credits per academic year.
High School
• Provides opportunity for year-long courses in
Advanced Placement (AP) and
• International Baccalaureate (IB) in alignment
Press 17
4
Block Schedule offers
with the A+ Initiative.
flexibilities to add in extra
minutes for an advisory or
power period.
Although the alternating
schedule was considered the
best, students are frustrated
they can’t take all the class -
es they need to.
“I had my junior and se -
nior year all planned out,
but the schedule disrupted
it,” Sarah Cassel, junior,
said. “I have to take more
AP classes senior year, I was
hoping on having it all bal -
anced out.”
“I’m kind of mad at the
schedule because I was
planning on taking a lighter
AP load and get the harder
classes done, and I was
planning on taking more AP
classes as a whole, but I’ve
maxed out my senior year
just for the requirements,”
she said. “[The new sched -
ule has] messed up me tak -
ing AP and non-AP classes
together. It just doesn’t
work.”
• Provides opportunity for year-long courses in
mathematics and other areas of concern.
• There is no time required by counselors and
school staff at mid-year for planning and imple-
menting a new schedule for the spring.
after we won
• There is more flexibility within school calendar .
• Students will be attending Core classes during
the administration of the AHSGE/EOC Exams,
PLAN and ACT assessments.
first place
Yes
No
Continued on page 6
See schedule
• Teachers retain the same amount of planning
time.
Best-of Show
Compiled by Jah’meka Baxter
Designed by Alex Hauser
Information compiled by Alex Hauser
Large class sizes makes teaching difficult
Average class sizes
at the NSPA
Trent Clanton
News editor
“It’s harder to do group activi-
ties, and I feel the quality of in -
struction isn’t quite where I want
it to be. Also, [as with any large
class], with so many bodies it’s
hard to transition between activi -
ties without excessive talking,”
Humber said.
She said she was glad that she
had good classes, though.
“Even if my classes are large,
they’re a very well behaved group
fall convention
The student body count has in -
creased slightly over the years,
since the split of the three Tusca-
loosa City high schools. Over time
it has grown until now it is 447
students more than it was intended
to be.
Jackie Hudgins, guidance coun -
selor, said the actual student body
count has increased only slightly
this year.
“We have roughly 25 more stu -
dents than we did last year,” Hud -
gins said. “The total number of
students is up to 1247.”
However, that total number is
very large, compared to the other
city schools’ population.
Each high school in the Tus -
caloosa City School system was
built to house 800 students. Now
Northridge has the majority, with
Bryant’s population at 881 stu-
dents, and Central’s down to only
the school’s prestige.
“We have grown due to student
transfers from both the public and
private schools. Northridge has a
phenomenal academic and athletic
reputation and many students have
chosen our school to increase their
opportunities,” Hudgins said.
Mallie Humber, history teacher,
has 38 students in one of her class -
es.
“One of my AP U.S. History
in Minneapolis,
Minnesota
735.
Hudgins said one reason the at-
tendance is so high is because of
of students. It will be difficult,
but they’ll be prepared for the
AP Exam when the year is over,”
Humber said.
Beth Gabriel, junior, said her
classes are crowded.
“The hallways are a lot more
crowded and so is the lunchroom.
My classes have a lot more people
than last year,” Gabriel said. “I
personally like smaller classes be -
cause you have more individual at -
tention from your teacher.”
Average
Average
smallest
largest
class size
class size
Photo by Nick Motz
Class size has increased. Trina Busby’’s AP Language class (pictured)
has 27 students.
classes started out at 38 students,
and now it’s back down to 30. But
my other one started at 44 students
and is now at 38,” Humber said.
One of the most difficult things
with a large AP class, Humber
said, is grading.
“It’s hard to grade a large AP
class because little of the work is
multiple choice. It’s mostly writing
and short answer, which takes a lot
longer to grade,” Humber said.
She said with larger classes, she
isn’t able to assign as many activi-
ties and essays as she would like.
Continued on page 6
See Class size
Compiled by Jah’meka Baxter
Designed by Alex Hauser
Junior
This was the first front page I designed. It was a lot different from designing feature pages,
because you are allowed to break some rules for feature pages. I used grids instead of columns, which
was a new concept to our staff. I also made sure not to use useless color, something that our front page
designer did a lot the year before. The pink comes from the eraser on the graph, and the blue from
the graph was taken out of the picture. We try not to use jumps. This was the only page that had to be
jumped because of two huge stories that were deemed “front-page worthy.”
Number of Students
Number of students

14

Design

Front Page

14 Design Front Page This was the April issue of our paper my junior year. April

This was the April issue of our paper my junior year. April 27 was the one year anniversary of the devastating tornado that swept through Tuscaloosa and our centerspread topic was about where we were now in recovery. We aimed on having a light story on the front page. Skipping school for lunch was a fun story, and I loved designing the page around it. I blackened the student and highlighted the “M” on the bag because it told the story of why the student was sneaking into the school in the middle of the day. I designed the grunge headline to show the rebellious nature of the student and the colors show the humor in the problem. At first, someone found me a picture of a Manga character on MCT Campus, but right before we sent the page off, I switched it out with a photo story of the talent show with the winner featured on the front. That student loved being on the front, and would come in our class everyday for 2 weeks to pick up more copies for his family. I was so glad I spent the time to design it just to see that smile on that guy’s face.

to design it just to see that smile on that guy’s face. Beth Gabriel Page 7
Beth Gabriel Page 7 BCN Problems Page 6 http://northridgereporter.wordpress.com April 12, 2012 • Volume 9
Beth Gabriel
Page 7
BCN Problems
Page 6
http://northridgereporter.wordpress.com
April 12, 2012 • Volume 9 • Issue 7
Northridge High School • 2901 Northridge Road • Tuscaloosa, Al• 35406
Leaving school for lunch forbidden; students ski p anyway
Trent Clanton
News Editor
W hen the bell rings to dismiss for lunch,
most students head to the lunchroom. But
some head to the parking lot, leave campus and
buy their lunch at a fast food restaurant. The only
problem is: leaving campus, even for lunch, is
against the rules.
Isaac Espy, principal, said it is board policy that
students can’t leave campus without checking out.
“The punishment for skipping lunch is in-school
suspension with a parent conference. The only stu-
dents permitted to leave campus during lunch are
the ones in programs like Co-Op or SGA, and stu-
dents with a class at TCT that period,” Espy said.
An anonymous senior said that he skips lunch
frequently and has been caught before.
“I typically go to McDonald’s, Taco Casa or
Taco Bell. I always make it back to school in time
for my classes, though. I get my own lunch be-
cause I don’t like the taste or portion size of the
cafeteria food, and it’s nice to get away from the
school for a little while,” he said.
James Donahoe, senior, said he used to go off-
campus for lunch until he got caught.
“I think some students just don’t want to go to
school lunch and so are willing to pay a little extra
to eat something like Taco Casa,” he said.
Donahoe said he didn’t think he did anything
wrong when he went off-campus for lunch because
of the fact that he got back to school before his
lunch period even ended.
However, the policy is for more than just trying
to keep students in school.
Mike Morgan, zoology teacher, said the rules are
in place to protect students.
“I think the biggest reason students can’t skip
lunch is obviously the safety factor. Having teens
out driving unsupervised presents the possibility of
them getting in a wreck and getting hurt, not com-
ing back to school or even getting into some other
kind of trouble,” he said.
Morgan said he believed the punishment for
going off-campus without permission should be
changed slightly.
“The first couple of times, ISI is fine, but I think
after multiple offenses the student should have
their parking pass taken away for a week or two,”
he said.
Laine Elliott, junior, said she didn’t think it was
fair that students attending classes at TCT 3 rd pe-
riod were able to skip lunch and others aren’t.
“I think we should all be able to leave for lunch
and have longer lunch shifts. If they’re worried
about liabilities, I’ll sign a piece of paper or get
my parents to sign one that says I can leave,” El-
liott said.
On the other hand, the anonymous senior said he
somewhat agrees with not letting everyone leave for
lunch.
“I think the rule is appropriate; hundreds of cars
leaving the school in the middle of the day is im-
practical. As for TCT students, they should have
the privilege to go off-campus for lunch because
the school already entrusts them to drive to another
location,” he said.
(See editorial on page 2)

Photo illustration by Alex Hauser

Two books chosen

New book club interests Manga readers

Jah’’’meka Baxter

Infographics Editor

M anga Book Club met on March 27 in the library

to discuss their favorite Mangas and what they like best about the genre. Neilann Thomas, librarian and sponsor of the club, said that those who attended the meeting showcased their Manga themed artwork. Popular Mangas that were re- leased in the past will be ordered to place in the library, Thomas said. The club members chose two Manga books to read: Fullmetal Alchemist and Blue Exorcist.

Fullmetal Alchemist is writ- ten and illustrated by Hiromu Arakawa. The series is about two brothers who want to restore their bodies after a disastrous failed attempt to bring their mother back to life through alchemy. In the manga series, Blue Ex- orcist written and illustrated by Kazue Kato, humans live in the world of Assiah as demons reside in Gehenna. The two dimensions are not meant to interfere with each other, but demons still possess creatures in Assiah in spite of this. The hu- mans who can fight these demons are known as exorcists. Both Mangas are written by

women, and they have some reli- gious references. Manga Book Club members Kanjalla Dancer, sophomore, and Joshua Thomas, junior, are fans of the Manga series and have their own personal favorites. “I think that [Blue Exorcist] is a very interesting series, and I love the Anime,” Dancer said. “[Fullmetal Alchemist] is a popular series and one that I en- joy watching,” Thomas said. The Manga Book Club will meet on April 11 during advisory to begin reading one of the select- ed manga. (See the first story on the Man- ga Book Club on the web at www. northridgereporter.wordpress. com)

Meet the new Jaguar Star Photos by Beth Allaway (see talent show at www.northridgereporter )
Meet the new
Jaguar
Star
Photos by Beth Allaway
(see talent show at
www.northridgereporter )

This page

received

2nd place

front page

in the

Gold Circle

Awards

hosted by

CSPA

at www.northridgereporter ) This page received 2nd place front page in the Gold Circle Awards hosted

Junior

Design 15 Front Page 7 Period 20% northridgereporter.wordpress.com September 24, 2012 • Volume 10 •
Design
15
Front Page
7 Period
20%
northridgereporter.wordpress.com
September 24, 2012 • Volume 10 • Issue 1
Northridge High School • 2901 Northridge Road • Tuscaloosa, Al.• 35406
Do you like the seven
period schedule?
Rate
69
Yes
81
No
Which schedule do
you like the most?
of
Block
Change
57%
Photo by: Alex Hauser
150 students polled
Designed by: Alex Hauser
Information compiled by: Jakailah Cooper
Infographic
New schedule implemented, gets mixed reviews
Alex Hauser
Editor-in-Chief
For the second consecutive year, the school’s schedule
has changed.
After the disapproval of the A/B block schedule, the
school decided to implement a seven period schedule.
“The initial reason for changing the schedule had to do,
in high school. [And] thus far, the schedule has been well
received,” he said.
Espy said the new school year will be “re-energized”
with a faster paced schedule, although Kearston Wells, se-
nior, said the classes are “pressed for time.”
“I like that the classes are shorter, and you don’t lose
focus. But it’s too short because the teachers are stressed
and struggle trying to get everything done in that time pe-
in
very general terms, with overall student performance.
s
ree
e th
Story
We felt as if the block presented barriers to student learn-
ing that could be corrected with year-long classes,” Isaac
Espy, principal, said.
Espy said the block schedule had two main disadvantag-
es—consistency and the length of class.
“Many students found it difficult to concentrate for an
hour and forty minutes,” he said. “The pace, at times, tend-
ed to be slow.”
Espy said another benefit to the seven period schedule
was having class all year because it “eliminates semester
and year-long gaps in crucial areas of study.”
“The seven period day is a ‘normal’ school schedule.
George Washington had a seven period day when he was
riod,” she said.
Wells said another downfall is the inconsistency in class
times.
“It’s really unfair because first [period] is super short
with announcements and fire drills and second [period]
is really long if you keep your bonus period. So the only
class you really get the most time in is second,” she said.
“So teachers are like ‘Oh I have more time I can teach you
and do fun activities,’ but the other classes are so pressed
for time, they can’t get as much done and have to cut out
all the fun stuff and get straight to work.”
Nancy Reed, history teacher, said she prefers the seven
period schedule.
“I like the consistency that it provides, and I believe it
serves most students the best. It also helps alleviate disci-
pline issues in the classroom from my experience,” Reed
said. “For someone like me who loves to lecture [the seven
period schedule] just works best for me.”
Scott Johnson, math teacher, said he “think[s] [he] likes
the seven period day.”
“I think it’s better for the kids to have math and reading
[all year]; there’s not as many gaps,” Johnson said. “I’m
hoping [scores] will go up.”
Amanda Burns, senior, said she likes the seven period
schedule, although there are some flaws.
“I’ve only had seven periods my whole life, and when I
came to Northridge they were on the block, and I hated it,”
she said. “[With the new schedule] I don’t like the bonus,
and I don’t like how we lose a credit because we don’t
have eight periods like we used to.”
Burns said she likes the shorter classes, and it will just
take time to adjust.
“Teachers have to adjust to the time change, but I think
it will work out. Only time will tell,” she said.
Continued on page 6
See Schedule
our
Cash in your scores
AP passing rate beats area schools, AP students earn cash
de f
Renu Pandit
Espy said the money will be rewarded to
Feature Editor
e f
ves
ad
s
Sixty-two percent of the 231 students
that took AP exams passed.
Dr. Isaac Espy, principal, said that
Northridge surpassed other schools in
West Alabama like Bryant, Central, Hill-
crest and Tuscaloosa County High school,
whose passing rates were 21%, 2%, 46%
and 47% respectively.
“I am extremely proud of the great work
of our students taking AP courses, and the
teachers who worked with these students,”
Espy said. “I was honestly stunned at the
results.”
Espy said the passing rate two years ago
was 67%, but that only 173 students took
AP exams.
“We had a 26% increase of students pass-
ing tests,” Espy said. “We pushed far more
the appropriate students at an assembly the
last week of September.
Jane Yu, senior, took and passed the
AP Composition, Statistics, Calculus
BC, Physics and Chemistry exams in the
spring.
“The AP Grant has helped make AP
classes more appealing for students be-
cause of the incentive the money reward
gives,” Yu said.
However, Yu said she would have want -
ed to pass her exams even if there was no
monetary reward.
“AP courses are helpful when it comes
Hudgins said she feels students who do
well on the AP exams are properly recog-
nized.
“Especially those who are named AP
scholars,” Hudgins said. “I would love for
us to do more, but funding receptions is
nearly impossible.”
Zoe Bakker, senior, took and passed the
AP Calculus, Chemistry and Composition
exams in the spring.
“The money reward didn’t have a huge
affect on me, but it was a nice bonus,”
Bakker said. “I would have wanted to pass
even without it.”
However, Bakker said she believed the
Site helps students
contribute to yearbook
Julia Hocutt
Staff Writer
to
getting ready for colleges. I’ve already
figured out what I like to do because of
them,” Yu said. “Also, I think it’s a once in
money reward is what “caused a rise in
students joining AP classes, many of which
didn’t even pass.”
a
life time opportunity to explore as many
“When you have a class of 35 people, and
subjects as you want without the huge cost
at least five don’t even want to be there, it
ReplayIt is an interactive, community
wide picture sharing website. Students can
upload personal pictures from their phones,
computers and other devices to the Replay-
of
tuition.”
students out of their comfort zone and into
Jacqueline Hudgins, guidance counselor,
a
major challenge.”
said it’s too early to tell if the money had
makes it hard to learn,” Bakker said.
Upon hearing that the school’s passing
rate was 62%, Bakker said the school needs
It
“time capsule,” so the school yearbook
The AP Grant that was initiated last year
promises a $100 reward to students who
pass an AP English, math or science exam.
a
serious effect on increase in AP students
to put more focus on people who do well.
and AP passing rates.
“We always have students who
“The school system puts so much focus
on people who fail the graduation exams.
staff members have more picture options to
put in the school’s yearbook.
With the program, student body mem-
bers who aren’t apart of the yearbook com-
mittee now have the opportunity to help
work hard because they
have a determined
Rather than changing our
out their staff and participate themselves.
schedule to help a
“I really like how the whole school
d
work ethic, and
few people with
can get connected and involved,” year-
Pictures
Infographic
they understand
the value of AP in
preparing for college,”
Hudgins said. “However,
who wouldn’t want $100 for
passing a test?”
ho m
their graduation
exams, we should do
what’s best for the whole
school,” Bakker said.
ma
book editor Katherine Duckworth, ju-
nior, said.
“ReplayIt is a great way for students to
share their pictures with other classmates.
Being a member of the yearbook staff,
Designed by: Alex Hauser
Information compiled by: Jakailah
Cooper
would love students to upload their fun
pictures,” Hallie Young, junior, said.
I
Hillcrest game
Zoology
Page 7
Page 8
AYP
Page 6
Senior
A/B
This was my first design of my senior year. I wrote the main story,
took the picture at the top (see page 29), created the infographics
at the top and bottom, and took all the pictures to fill the inside
boxes on the bottom. I also spent time teaching the new students
and mentoring the old.
who
o ma
ts w
uden
wh
23%
nts
den
St
de
ts
Stu
Stu
16 Design Front Page I did something different for this page, I only used one
16
Design
Front Page
I did something different for this page, I only used one story. When I wrote this story at first, it was a lot
shorter. My advisor told me not to worry about length because I had a lot of good information and nothing
could be cut out. This page design was difficult because I had to figure out how to break up all the text. I used
subheads for the story, and I asked our artist to draw me a white board. Even with the white board, there
was still too much text. I used Photoshop to extract the eraser and expo marker to make the page look more
appealing.
northridgereporter.wordpress.com
October 29, 2012 • Volume 10 • Issue 2
Northridge High School • 2901 Northridge Road • Tuscaloosa, Al• 35406
College
Prep
Mock
As school year goes by, students start preparing for college
Alex Hauser
Editor-in-Chief
Election
or
Whether it’s taking standardized tests
visiting
schools,college
year school, or for academic reasons didn’t
meet the criteria to get into a four year
school,” Hudgins said. “And it’s also for
the advanced academic, honors or AP stu -
dent that
just wanted
“The deadlines are expected to be met. If
they say the deadline is Dec. 1, they don’t
want your stuff on Dec. 2,” she said.
For any college, there’s a process; first,
the application must be sent, then the tran-
script, and sometimes, a separate scholar-
Results
preparation can
start as early as
to
start in a
“I definitely think it’s wise
freshmen year.
to apply for college ear -
Jackie Hud-
ly
don’t make applying
gins,
senior
counselor, said
Breakdown of grades
students have
to
find the
for college stressful. It’s
an exciting time.”
smaller set -
ting that’s a
lot less ex-
pensive.”
The local
communi -
ty college,
ship application.
“Once you do those three things for the
university, you’re pretty much done until
you make a housing department and en -
rollment deposit, and they will talk to you
more specifically about that later,” Hud -
gins said.
Early deadlines for the University of Al -
“right fit” for
t h e m s e l v e s
S
Hannah Johnson, senior
when it comes
to
preparing
h e l t o n
State, of-
fers a sum-
mer schol -
abama are Dec. 1, and applying early can
take away tension from senior year.
“It helps to know that this is an option,
or this is not an option, so students can go
for
college.
a
r s
h i p
ahead to Plan B. Procrastinating brings on
See page
Some people
take a year off
or a gap year,
stress,” Hudgins said.
College Visits
go to a two year school or a four year uni -
9th
10th
11th
12th
ver -
Obama
=10%
sity.
“Finding the right fit for you…
is what we want to help you with,”
called S 2 .
The schol -
arship al -
lows students not eligible for Pell grants
to take 12 hours of academic study free of
charge the summer between graduation and
the start of their freshman year in college.
24 for more
Romney
she said.
Paying for College
Breakdown of ages
Gap Years
Students can receive money through fi-
nancial aid, standardized tests scores and
14
Hudgins said gap years have
been a rising trend and help students
take time to figure out what to do and to
decompress from high school.
scholarships.
Financial aid is available to every stu-
dent, but has levels that only certain stu-
15
Romney
information
about the
Special Education teacher Beth Hol -
liman’s daughter Maury took a gap year
to save up for a study abroad program
dents qualify for. Low-income students can
receive Pell grants, and any student is eli -
gible for student loans and work study.
Obama
16
before starting college.
“Maury was a junior in high school
when she started making college visits.
“Fill out FAFSA (Free Application for
Federal Student Aid). It doesn’t cost you
anything to do. You never know what cir-
When picking colleges, she said campus
visits are one of the most important things
to do.
“You can feel very comfortable in a place
or feel very out of your element. A college
campus visit is where you can determine
that,” Hudgins said.
LaJessica Duncan, senior, visited UAB
(University of Alabama in Birmingham)
because she was interested in the medical
program.
“It’s not too far, but not too close either.
Some of my family members go there. But
I wanted to make sure it’s like people say it
is, and that I like it and can imagine myself
living there.
Hannah Johnson, senior, visited Cove-
She was very unsure of what she wanted
cumstances could change. Something hap-
17
to do and where she wanted to go. She
thought she might want to go into culi -
nary arts,” she said. “I knew she would
pens, and someone could suffer a job loss,”
Hudgins said. “[Also,] work study is a great
way to get your foot in the door.”
18
Mock Election
Breakdown of ethnicity
eventually go to college, so I encour-
aged her to take a break and just work
for a while… [During her senior year],
she pretty much decided she wanted to
take a year off, work and save all of her
money and use it to go on a big trip.”
Holliman said taking a gap year has “tre-
mendous benefits.”
“It gives [students] a year to take
a break from academics, experience
having a job, and, in my daugh -
ter’s case, a chance of a lifetime
trip. She earned enough money to
travel to Europe [and visit] eight differ-
ent countries. She was over there for 35
days and paid for every bit of it her-
self, [and] even had money left over
to decorate her dorm room at UA,”
she said.
Hudgins said students need to find a
balance between having fun and remain -
ing focused.
“[Students] really need to focus on pre -
paring for what they are going to do the
next level,” she said.
r
Many organizations award scholarships
based on interest, test scores or essays.
Some colleges accept your college appli -
cation as the scholarship application, but
some places, like the University of Ala-
bama, require students to fill that out sepa-
rately.
“A scholarship is that investment of a
college or organization in you. And so,
if they thought everybody was qualified,
they would give everybody money. They
are looking for an investment to
represent their
organization,”
nant College in Georgia. She said the cam -
pus visit was what made her sure about her
college choice, and that it’s a necessary trip
any senior should take.
“It’s important to find a college you can
imagine yourself living in. Covenant Col -
lege was that for me. I liked that it was
small and a Presbyterian college. To me,
when you visit a college that you really
like, you find little things that stand out to
you,” Johnson said. “I wanted a school that
had a pretty campus. Covenant looked like
Hogwarts. And that’s definitely a plus.”
Johnson said it was important to fill out
the application when you have time to
think about each
answer.
“Just elabo-
Hudgins said.
“They want
more than just
the very, very
smart student.
They want
someone that
will be in -
volved in their
campuses.”
s.
rating on a
M
certain volun-
udgin
1.
Search out
and test scores
teer event you
admissions
requirements
4.
Fill out
scholarship
attended could
impress the
st
2.
Send in
applications
admissionsof-
applications
5.
Wait
for
answers
fice. Don’t be
3.
Send in transcripts
6.
Make a decision
eps
s’ 6
to
ap
H
The Common App
ply
Community Colleges
Obama
Romney
f
white
black
other
1 person=10%
le
And the winner is
Barack Obama
ge
r col
Romney
69%
31%
639 students polled
information compiled by: Alex Hauser
Designed by: Alex Hauser
Photos by: MCT Campus
Community colleges are resources for
anyone in the community and helpful for
all students, according to Hudgins.
“It’s for the student that maybe dropped
out of high school and got their GED. It’s
for the student that received special edu -
cation services, and they exit high school
with a different type of certificate. It’s for
the standard diploma student who, maybe
for financial reasons, couldn’t afford a four
The Common Application is a resource
available to students planning to apply to
several schools.
“We’ve had students in the past that have
applied to 10 different schools, and nor-
mally that would mean filling out 10 differ-
ent forms and writing 10 different essays.
Now with the Common App, they just have
to do it once,” she said.
When turning in any application, Hud-
gins said to remember deadlines.
modest. This
is your time to
brag about your
years in school,” she said.
She said she’s glad she started applying
early because now she can enjoy her senior
year.
“It takes so much stress away, knowing
what my options are. And I loved Cov -
enant so much, I’ll probably go there,”
Johnson said. “I definitely think it’s wise
to apply for college early. You never know
what could happen, and how busy you will
get later. Don’t make applying for college
stressful. It’s an exciting time.”
o
In-school conditioning
Exemption policy
Page 7
Page 6
Color Run
Page 8
Senior
Design 17 Newsmagazine Cover December 16, 2011 Volume 9 Issue 4 See the back
Design
17
Newsmagazine Cover
December 16, 2011
Volume 9 Issue 4
See the back
http://northridgereporter.wordpress.com/
of my
http://northridgereporter.wordpress.com
Portfolio
to see how our
newspaper
utilizes both
traditional
front page
and a
newsmagazine
cover
Pg. 4-5
Junior
Honorable Mention
at
CSPA’s
Gold Circle Awards
This is one of my favorite magazine pages I designed.
I created the background, napkin, and coffee cup from
scratch in Photoshop. I then created a coffee stain brush
in Photoshop and used it to make the letters to spell
“caffeine.” Our paper is limited to black and white, so
I try to add as much dimension to my pages to distract
from the lack of color.

’’’’’’’’’

18 Design Newsmagazine Cover March 8, 2012 Volume 9 Issue 6 http://northridgereporter.wordpress.com/ Junior During
18
Design
Newsmagazine Cover
March 8, 2012
Volume 9 Issue 6
http://northridgereporter.wordpress.com/
Junior
During this month,our feature page missed the deadline,
and I was forced to design this without any knowledge of
what the page looked like. I had the idea to have the names
of the politicians balancing on top of each other as if one of
them could fall at any moment. Then on top the “bigger
battle” of the two parties battling it out. Little did I know,
the feature editor’s page looked very similar to this.

Design

19

Newsmagazine Cover

November 30, 2012 Volume 10 Issue 3 northridgereporter.wordpress.com
November 30, 2012
Volume 10 Issue 3
northridgereporter.wordpress.com

Senior

Volume 10 Issue 3 northridgereporter.wordpress.com Senior I designed this my senior year. The centerspread was about
Volume 10 Issue 3 northridgereporter.wordpress.com Senior I designed this my senior year. The centerspread was about

I designed this my senior year. The centerspread was about alumni who went on to become famous musicians, football players, or comedic superstars. The feature editor did hand drawings, and spotlights were thematic in her design. I created this and loved the dark contrast it gave.

20

Design

Yearbook Page

20 Design Yearbook Page I stopped playing basketball a few weeks into my freshman year, meaning
20 Design Yearbook Page I stopped playing basketball a few weeks into my freshman year, meaning

I stopped playing basketball a few weeks into my freshman year, meaning I had to find a class to have my last period. Yearbook was the only class I was allowed to join because of the lateness in the year. I had journalism the period before, and so I just continued into the next period, instead of doing yearbook as well. I did independent study learning InDesign and Photoshop. Soon enough though, I started editing the other freshmen’s stories. The freshman editor was struggling, so I sat next to her and helped her with coming up with ideas. She had to leave for two weeks for a funeral across the country, and I had to take over. There was a blank spread, and the yearbook editor decided to do it on the six pairs of twins we had. I already wrote the story, so I just modified and shortened it for the yearbook. I set up and took every picture for this spread, as well as design the page from scratch. This was my very first published design in my journalism career. It received 2nd place People Page at the Alabama Scholastic Press Association.

Freshman
Freshman

Design

21

Infographics

Affected areas of the tornado design by: alex hauser Sophomore
Affected areas of the tornado
design by: alex hauser
Sophomore
areas of the tornado design by: alex hauser Sophomore After our April Tornado, we decided to

After our April Tornado, we decided to do a spread on how it affected students in our school. I designed the page as well as the map infographic. I showed the path of the tornado throughourtown.Iincluded recognizable features and key areas hit. I gave it a minimalistic design to give the reader ease and be able to read the information without much hindrance.

hit. I gave it a minimalistic design to give the reader ease and be able to

22

Design

Infographics

lengthy classes, and a seven month gap in math instruction.” “Everyone will have to learn
lengthy classes, and a seven month gap in
math instruction.”
“Everyone will have to learn to adjust,”
“I
think
that
it’s
C
A
E
b
T
i
b
c
s
u
Information supplied by: Lesley Bruinton
Designed by: Alex Hauser
Information compiled by: Jah ' meka Baxter
p
t
AP f
i
l
hi d
d
b
ll-
l
f
Cinnamon Challenge page 8 http://northridgereporter.wordpress.com May 10, 2012 • Volume 9 • Issue 8
Cinnamon Challenge
page 8
http://northridgereporter.wordpress.com
May 10, 2012 • Volume 9 • Issue 8
Tennis page 11
Tennis
page 11

Northridge High School • 2901 Northridge Road • Tuscaloosa, Al• 35406

school schedule changes again

Seven period schedule provides shorter classes for shorter attention spans

Raiha Bajwa

Espy said the seven period day is a tra -

she said. “Students will have to learn to ad-

Opinion Editor

ditional schedule, and one that is used in most high schools.

just their schedule to their workload, just like teachers will have to change teaching

The Tuscaloosa City School Board an-

“It is not innovative, exploratory or a

styles.”

nounced a new schedule for the 2012-2013

novel idea,” he said. “It is a common sched-

The new schedule will make it harder for

better because my attention span is defi- nitely not an hour and thirty minutes long,” Goodall said.

 

Goodall said even though he’ll have to

sign up for more classes, he does not ex -

school year consisting of seven periods, as well as a thirty-six minute skinny block. Beth Allaway, biology teacher, was on the committee to discuss a schedule for the next school year. “In our committee everyone was with the four block,” Allaway said. “But the big problem with the four block is that the board wanted students to be in math and English classes all year instead of just a semester.” Isaac Espy, principal, said there were flaws in the previous four block schedule. “There has been a level of dissatisfaction with the block schedule for years,” he said. “Some of the common complaints include lengthy classes, and a seven month gap in math instruction.”

ule among many if not most high schools in Alabama, and I am optimistic that it will be progressive and a positive component of our instructional program.” Allaway said she hopes the change will not be too stressful. “I imagine that there will be some rough patches that we will have to work through,” she said. “I don’t think that anything can be worse than the schedule this year. The grades are horrible compared to what they have been.” Elizabeth Tiley, guidance counselor, said she does not think the changes will be that bad. “Everyone will have to learn to adjust,”

students to retake classes they have failed. “Failures will be harder to deal with,” Tiley said. “You won’t be able to make up classes the way you used to be able to.” But Espy said available credit recovery courses should solve the problem. “Credit recovery resources will make repeating entire classes almost obsolete,” he said. Allaway said there should be some pros to the new schedule. “The people who like the seven period schedule like it because kids don’t pay at - tention for that long anyway,” she said. Taylor Goodall, junior, said he likes the schedule for that reason. “I think that it’s

pect it to be too stressful. “It’s not like I’m going to be taking seven academic courses,” he said. “There should be at least three classes that are electives that I don’t have to stress about.” The incoming freshman class will only need 24 credits and will need to have taken Algebra II as a math to graduate. Graduation exams will become obsolete and all juniors will take the ACT. “The state of Alabama is going to have end of course examinations,” Espy said. “The ACT test will help school officials monitor student achievement, as well as provide students with a free opportunity to take this important assessment.”

 

Class times affect HOSA

Alex Hauser

Editor-in-Chief

Information supplied by: Lesley Bruinton Designed by: Alex Hauser Information compiled by: Jah ' meka
Information supplied by: Lesley Bruinton
Designed by: Alex Hauser
Information compiled by: Jah ' meka Baxter
AP foreign languages hindered by all-year classes

Jane Yu

The foreign language department will be

knowledge together, comprehend Spanish

Entertainment Editor

The A/B block schedule affected foreign language honor societies because fewer students were able to finish the required courses by the end of their first semester. Barbara Beemer, French teacher, said French Honor Society had only a handful of students this year compared to almost

affected even more by the new seven pe - riod schedule. Unless students take foreign language classes in middle school, they will not be able to reach an AP foreign language. Julie Kim, senior, said she feels bad for those who cannot take AP foreign lan - guage. “In Spanish I, II, III and IV, you just do

thoroughly and get to be really immersed into Hispanic culture,” Kim said. Isaac Espy, principal, said the new sched - ule will affect foreign language classes and limit the number of double-ups. “The school system will plan to increase opportunities to earn foreign language credits for middle school students,” Espy said.

twenty students in previous years.

vocabulary, but in AP Spanish you put all

Even with the extended four period

block schedule, students taking classes at

Tuscaloosa Center for Technology (TCT) are rushed when traveling back and forth,

so they can have as much time in their

classes as possible.

The shortened class time that will be

in effect next year will hurt HOSA students because they won’t have enough time for class and clinicals. Sally Latham, HOSA teacher, said that she prefers the traditional 4x4 block sched - ule because it offers the best opportunity

for the health science class.

“[The 4x4 block schedule] allows maxi -

mum time for hands-on learning which is what health science is all about,” Latham

said. “[But] I always want to remain flex -

ible enough to have as many students tak-

ing health science classes as possible. If that means changing to a seven period schedule then we will certainly make the most of what we have to work with.” Juniors taking Foundations of Health Science will take the class in a two pe - riod, one semester course, meaning they will have to find two half-credit classes for the other semester. If they aren’t able to find classes, they will be unable to take HOSA. The senior level course will be a two period block class all year. There will be two classes: first and second, and third and fourth, using the bonus advisory period for extra time. This will give students enough time to complete their clinicals as well as other in-classroom activities. Elise Tucker, junior, is currently taking the junior level Foundations of Health Sci - ence so she can participate in HOSA next year. “I’ve been waiting to take HOSA since freshman year,” she said. “With the new schedule, I’m not sure how it’s going to work out. My schedule is really full, and it’s going to be difficult scheduling around

HOSA.”

Junior

going to be difficult scheduling around HOSA.” Junior The last paper of my junior year, the
going to be difficult scheduling around HOSA.” Junior The last paper of my junior year, the

The last paper of my junior year, the front page featured three different stories on the effects of the new schedule that would be implemented the next year. Instead of trying to have three different graphics, I decided to turn my page into a package and tie them together. I created the paperclip graph in Photoshop so I could link the paperclips. The line graph was created in illustrator and the graph paper I made in Photoshop. I used a sharpie to write on the legal pad and post-it notes and drew the drawings on a piece of copy paper. I arranged a blanked lined sheet of paper, the legal pad and the book on a desk and took a picture of the desk from a bird’s eye point-of-view. I took separate pictures of the post-it notes , drawings and pencil to transpose into my infographic. I combined all my elements to create this infographic.

Design

D e s i g n Population 313,101,231 Trent Clanton News Editor Information Now (also in
Population 313,101,231
Population
313,101,231
Population 313,101,231 Trent Clanton News Editor Information Now (also in called I-Now), a grading program

Trent Clanton

News Editor

Information Now (also

in

called I-Now), a grading program used across Ala- bama, underwent updates in February to include a new feature with which parents can view their children’s grades online. Jackie Hudgins, guid- ance counselor, said as long as they come to get their I-Now password, there is no reason why parents shouldn’t know how their

T

child is doing in school. “Some students don’t like to take progress reports and reports cards home, and

a

now we can ensure that par- ents will know what kind of grades their students are making,” she said.

at

kind of grades their students are making,” she said. at of Jane Yu all public schools

of

of grades their students are making,” she said. at of Jane Yu all public schools across

Jane Yu

all public schools across

the beginning

the year.

Yu all public schools across the beginning the year. 23 Infographics National Debt $15,410,000,000,000 page
Yu all public schools across the beginning the year. 23 Infographics National Debt $15,410,000,000,000 page
Yu all public schools across the beginning the year. 23 Infographics National Debt $15,410,000,000,000 page
Yu all public schools across the beginning the year. 23 Infographics National Debt $15,410,000,000,000 page
Yu all public schools across the beginning the year. 23 Infographics National Debt $15,410,000,000,000 page
Yu all public schools across the beginning the year. 23 Infographics National Debt $15,410,000,000,000 page
Yu all public schools across the beginning the year. 23 Infographics National Debt $15,410,000,000,000 page

23

Infographics

National Debt $15,410,000,000,000 page Black 6 history month Allison Gabriel Page 8 Northridge High School
National Debt
$15,410,000,000,000
page Black 6 history month
Allison Gabriel
Page 8
Northridge High School • 2901 Northridge Road • Tuscaloosa, Al• 35406
Population
Unemployed
by faking their socioeconomic status?”
Johnson said. “Our tax system is messed
up.”
Johnson said tax is the most direct and
effective way for government to get mon-
“However, the federal government has bor-
rowed money from that Trust Fund to pay
for other programs, and now there is not
enough money left in it to continue paying
what has been promised.”
She said that is why we have to borrow
huge sums of money from China to meet
the government our obligations to fund its
program.
She said she strongly believes that the
federal government has to cut spending
and eliminate waste and corruption.
“As painful as it may be, the govern-
ment may have to raise taxes,” Beemer
313,101,231
23,054,654
ey. However, he said only 50% of people
pay federal income tax, not including those
who are socioeconomically exempt, so less
money is available to the government, and
people who are taxed are overtaxed.
“We are definitely overtaxed, and gov-
ernment should stop spending,” Johnson
said.
He said he supports the idea of shrinking
the government.
“Small businessmen have to spend so
much to keep their businesses,” Johnson
said. “We have to reduce regulations on
business corporations.”
He also said
Debt Per Citizen
said. “Cutting spending is not easy because
the public expects a lot from the govern-
ment.”
She said her outlook for our future is grim
if the federal government continues to bor-
row more money, and
tax is not the way
to fix the debt but
spending is.
“One out of four
works for the gov-
ernment,” Johnson
said. “We have too
Poor government spending
causes the debt. As our debt
increases, our credit rating
goes down.
-Jared Lotfi, junior
many departments
for government,
and we spend too
much money supplying for military. [That
is a] bureaucracy.”
Barbara Beemer, French teacher, too,
said she thinks the national debt is caused
by the federal government spending more
money that the government receives in
taxes.
“The federal government has had to
borrow money to cover its expenses,” she
said.
She said, “If a family spends more mon-
ey than it has earned, the family has to
borrow money to live and to pay the bills.
If that practice continues, the family goes
bankrupt.”
She said one huge expense for the fed-
eral government is paying Social Security
to retirees.
“The workers have been putting mon-
ey into the Social Security Trust Fund
throughout their career,” Beemer said.
the debt continues to
be out of control.
“Our credit will be
downgraded, again,
and that will cause
the government to
owe more in interest
on all of those loans,”
Beemer said. “That
increases the debt
$49,215
further.”
She said the public will have to be bur-
dened with heavy taxes, and the federal
government could go bankrupt.
“If we want a preview of that possibil-
ity, we can watch what is happening in
Greece,” Beemer said.
Andrew Lattner, senior, said he does not
think there is that much of a debt problem.
“Something rarely known is that debt is
actually necessary for the government to
function properly,” Lattner said. “The gov-
ernment and the world economy are based
on the sale of treasury bonds, which are
forms of debt.”
He also said he thinks the Alabama State
debt could have much more of an impact
on students than the national debt.
“It will take dozens of years to get close
to Greece which had excessive debt and
major government cuts,” Lattner said.
What could be
bought with the
National Debt?
as it could.
“I think that they didn’t
it was just thrown on the
teachers without any prepa-
Teachers, do you like I-Now?
test it well enough before
ration,” Collins said.
it was mandated to be in all
Some students have fluc-
30
schools,” he said.
Quincy Collins, English
teacher, said he doesn’t
have any trouble with ev-
eryday use of I-Now, but
runs into problems some-
times with specific step-by-
step tasks.
“If I have issues with
it, I’ll usually ask another
teacher if they know how to
tuating or incorrect grades
because of the program,
like Sarah Cassel, junior.
“It has made some of my
grade averages higher and
lower than they should be,
and slows down the grad-
ing process because some
teachers have to do grades
by hand,” Cassel said.
Newman said the State
25
3,824,812,630
20
15
10
fix it, or I can Google it to
Department of Education
Super Bowl tickets
Richard see if I can find an answer,”
will likely continue to use
5
N o w e l l ,
he said.
I-Now.
ceramics Collins said he liked the
“As long as the state re-
t e a c h e r ,
idea of I-Now, but not its
quires its use, we don’t re-
said
the
implementation.
ally have a choice. They’ve
Yes
No
I - N o w
“The original intent was
put a lot into this program,
software for teachers to have access
and I think STI will be able
Infographic designed by:
d o e s n ’ t
to their grades from any-
to make it better in the fu-
Alex Hauser
work as well
where, but it seems like
Information compiled by:
ture,” she said.
Jah’meka Baxter
58,000,000
average houses
34,545,482,137
Lady Gaga tickets
Infographic designed and compiled by:
Alex Hauser
Information from usdebtclock.org and
abcnews.com
Junior
Number of Teachers
http://northridgereporter.wordpress.com March 8, 2012 • Volume 9 • Issue 6 Government spending, laziness blamed for
http://northridgereporter.wordpress.com
March 8, 2012 • Volume 9 • Issue 6
Government spending, laziness blamed for debt
National Debt
Entertainment Editor
$15,410,000,000,000
Unemployed
23,054,654
Debt Per Citizen
$49,215
What could be
bought with the
National Debt?
3,824,812,630
Super Bowl tickets
58,000,000
average houses
34,545,482,137
Lady Gaga tickets
Infographic designed and compiled by:
Alex Hauser
Information from usdebtclock.org and
abcnews.com
The United States has over $15 trillion of
national debt according to usdebtclock.org.
The United States started to accumulate
national debt for the Revolutionary War.
The debt for the war was $75 million, but
it was paid off quickly.
The amount of debt has increased a great
deal since then.
Jared Lotfi, junior, said he condemns the
government for causing this tremendous
debt.
“Poor government spending causes the
debt,” Lotfi said. “As our debt increases,
our credit rating goes down.”
He said bailouts and wars are the two big
obvious reasons that we have prodigious
amount of debt.
Scott Johnson, math teacher, said tre-
mendous amounts of debt started when we
started to borrow money for entitlement
social programs.
“Government should not spend money
on social programs,” Johnson said. “[We
need] self- reliance.”
He related debt problems with lazy peo-
ple who are reluctant to work.
“We have 40 million on food stamps,
and one fifth of the nation is unemployed,”
Johnson said.
He said the laziness passes to the current
students’ generation.
“This generation will be the first genera-
tion to be worse off than the generation be-
fore,” Johnson said.
He said former generations were taught
better work ethic, whereas students these
days play too much and are exposed too
much to social media.
Johnson said a link exists between in-
creasing college tuition and the United
States tax-system.
“Tuition doubles because so many get
free rides, not academically or athletically,
but socioeconomically,” Johnson said.
He said those exemptions decrease the
money colleges take in, thus tuition in-
creases.
“How many people are getting privilege
Parents can now view grades online with I-Now; program still has bugs
The I-Now program, cre-
ated by the STI company,
“We have also had many
reports of teachers not be-
was required to be placed
ing able to use the grading
function of the program.
the state by the Alabama
State Department of Edu-
cation before the end of the
2011-2012 school year and
cost $5.3 million dollars.
Though it offers useful
features, like online access
for parents, various teach-
ers have had issues with the
new grading program.
Pat Newman, Stu-
dent Database
There are sometimes bugs
in the system, too, but STI
usually fixes them,” she
said.
Though I-Now has its
issues, Newman said there
are advantages to the pro-
gram, such as the fact that
it is web-based and oper-
ates as one database
that is accessible
state-wide.
Manager at the
u s c a l o o s a
City Board
of Education,
said there were
lot of enroll-
ment problems
Graphic by: Alex Hauser
were lot of enroll- ment problems Graphic by: Alex Hauser The front page story assigned was

The front page story assigned was about the national debt. I tried to find a way to get a graphic with a student, but I kept running into the same problem: no one knew how much the debt actually was. Our students didn’t know much at all. I decided to make a comparison of the national debt to things students could understand, such as Superbowl tickets.

24

Design

Infographics

Mock As s Alex Ha Editor- Election Wheth or v schools,c Results Breakdown of grades
Mock
As s
Alex Ha
Editor-
Election
Wheth
or
v
schools,c
Results
Breakdown of grades
preparatio
start as ea
freshmen
Jackie
gins,
counselor
students
to
find
“right fit
t h e m s e
when it c
to
prep
for
co
p
take a ye
Some
or
a gap
9th
10th
11th
12th
go to a t
ver -
Obama
=10%
Romney
s
Breakdown of ages
G
14
15
Romney
Obama
16
17
18
Breakdown of ethnicity
been
take ti
decom
Spe
liman’
to sav
before
“Ma
when
She w
to do
thoug
nary
event
aged
for a
she p
take a ye
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mendous
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balance
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paring f
next lev
Comm
Obama
Romney
white
black
other
1 person=10%
And the winner is
Barack Obama
Romney
69%
31%
639 students polled
information compiled by: Alex Hauser
Designed by: Alex Hauser
Photos by: MCT Campus
Comm
anyone i
all studen
“It’s fo
out of hi
for the s
cation se
with a di
the stand
for financ
Senior
northridgereporter.wordpress.com October 29, 2012 • Volume 10 • Issue 2 Northridge High School • 2901
northridgereporter.wordpress.com
October 29, 2012 • Volume 10 • Issue 2
Northridge High School • 2901 Northridge Road • Tuscaloosa, Al• 35406
College
Prep
Mock
As school year goes by, students start preparing for college
Alex Hauser
Editor-in-Chief
Election
or
Whether it’s taking standardized tests
visiting
schools,college
year school, or for academic reasons didn’t
meet the criteria to get into a four year
school,” Hudgins said. “And it’s also for
the advanced academic, honors or AP stu -
dent that
“The deadlines are expected to be met. If
they say the deadline is Dec. 1, they don’t
want your stuff on Dec. 2,” she said.
For any college, there’s a process; first,
the application must be sent, then the tran-
just wanted
script, and sometimes, a separate scholar-
Results
preparation can
to
start in a
ship application.
start as early as
freshmen year.
Jackie Hud-
“I definitely think it’s wise
to apply for college ear -
smaller set -
“Once you do those three things for the
ting that’s a
university, you’re pretty much done until
lot
less ex -
you make a housing department and en -
ly
don’t make applying
gins,
senior
pensive.”
counselor, said
The local
rollment deposit, and they will talk to you
more specifically about that later,” Hud -
students have
for college stressful. It’s
an exciting time.”
communi -
gins said.
Breakdown of grades
to
find the
ty
college,
Early deadlines for the University of Al -
“right fit” for
S
h e l t o n
abama are Dec. 1, and applying early can
t h e m s e l v e s
when it comes
State, of -
take away tension from senior year.
Hannah Johnson, senior
fers a sum -
“It helps to know that this is an option,
to
preparing
mer schol -
or
this is not an option, so students can go
for
college.
a
r s h
i p
ahead to Plan B. Procrastinating brings on
Some people
take a year off
or a gap year,
go to a two year school or a four year uni -
sity.
“Finding the right fit for you…
is what we want to help you with,”
she said.
called S 2 .
The schol -
arship al -
lows students not eligible for Pell grants
to take 12 hours of academic study free of
charge the summer between graduation and
the start of their freshman year in college.
stress,” Hudgins said.
College Visits
When picking colleges, she said campus
visits are one of the most important things
11th
ver -
to
do.
9th
10th
12th
Obama
“You can feel very comfortable in a place
=10%
or
feel very out of your element. A college
Romney
Paying for College
Breakdown of ages
Gap Years
Students can receive money through fi-
campus visit is where you can determine
that,” Hudgins said.
Hudgins said gap years have
nancial aid, standardized tests scores and
LaJessica Duncan, senior, visited UAB
14
been a rising trend and help students
take time to figure out what to do and to
scholarships.
Financial aid is available to every stu-
(University of Alabama in Birmingham)
because she was interested in the medical
decompress from high school.
dent, but has levels that only certain stu-
program.
15
Romney
Special Education teacher Beth Hol -
liman’s daughter Maury took a gap year
to save up for a study abroad program
dents qualify for. Low-income students can
“It’s not too far, but not too close either.
receive Pell grants, and any student is eli -
gible for student loans and work study.
Some of my family members go there. But
I
wanted to make sure it’s like people say it
Obama
before starting college.
“Fill out FAFSA (Free Application for
is,
and that I like it and can imagine myself
16
“Maury was a junior in high school
when she started making college visits.
Federal Student Aid). It doesn’t cost you
anything to do. You never know what cir-
living there.
Hannah Johnson, senior, visited Cove -
r
She was very unsure of what she wanted
cumstances could change. Something hap-
nant College in Georgia. She said the cam -
17
to do and where she wanted to go. She
thought she might want to go into culi -
pens, and someone could suffer a job loss,”
Hudgins said. “[Also,] work study is a great
pus visit was what made her sure about her
college choice, and that it’s a necessary trip
nary arts,” she said. “I knew she would
way to get your foot in the door.”
any senior should take.
18
eventually go to college, so I encour-
Many organizations award scholarships
“It’s important to find a college you can
based on interest, test scores or essays.
Some colleges accept your college appli -
Breakdown of ethnicity
aged her to take a break and just work
for a while… [During her senior year],
she pretty much decided she wanted to
take a year off, work and save all of her
money and use it to go on a big trip.”
Holliman said taking a gap year has “tre-
mendous benefits.”
“It gives [students] a year to take
a break from academics, experience
having a job, and, in my daugh -
ter’s case, a chance of a lifetime
trip. She earned enough money to
travel to Europe [and visit] eight differ-
ent countries. She was over there for 35
days and paid for every bit of it her-
self, [and] even had money left over
to decorate her dorm room at UA,”
she said.
Hudgins said students need to find a
balance between having fun and remain -
ing focused.
“[Students] really need to focus on pre -
paring for what they are going to do the
next level,” she said.
s.
M
cation as the scholarship application, but
some places, like the University of Ala-
bama, require students to fill that out sepa-
rately.
“A scholarship is that investment of a
college or organization in you. And so,
if they thought everybody was qualified,
they would give everybody money. They
are looking for an investment to
represent their
organization,”
imagine yourself living in. Covenant Col -
lege was that for me. I liked that it was
small and a Presbyterian college. To me,
when you visit a college that you really
like, you find little things that stand out to
you,” Johnson said. “I wanted a school that
had a pretty campus. Covenant looked like
Hogwarts. And that’s definitely a plus.”
Johnson said it was important to fill out
the application when you have time to
think about each
answer.
“Just elabo-
udgin
Hudgins said.
“They want
more than just
the very, very
smart student.
They want
someone that
will be in -
volved in their
campuses.”
rating on a
certain volun-
teer event you
and test scores
attended could
1. Search out
st
admissions
4. Fill out
impress the
requirements
scholarship
admissionsof-
2. Send in
applications
fice. Don’t be
applications
eps
5. Wait for answers
3. Send
in transcripts
6. Make a decision
s’ 6
to
ap
The Common App
Community Colleges
The Common Application is a resource
modest. This
is your time to
brag about your
years in school,” she said.
She said she’s glad she started applying
Obama
Romney
H
available to students planning to apply to
ply
Community colleges are resources for
early because now she can enjoy her senior
white
black
other
1 person=10%
year.
“It takes so much stress away, knowing
And the winner is
f
Barack Obama
anyone in the community and helpful for
all students, according to Hudgins.
“It’s for the student that maybe dropped
out of high school and got their GED. It’s
for the student that received special edu -
cation services, and they exit high school
with a different type of certificate. It’s for
the standard diploma student who, maybe
for financial reasons, couldn’t afford a four
several schools.
“We’ve had students in the past that have
applied to 10 different schools, and nor-
mally that would mean filling out 10 differ-
ent forms and writing 10 different essays.
Now with the Common App, they just have
to do it once,” she said.
When turning in any application, Hud-
gins said to remember deadlines.
what my options are. And I loved Cov -
enant so much, I’ll probably go there,”
Johnson said. “I definitely think it’s wise
le
69%
to
apply for college early. You never know
Romney
31%
639 students polled
information compiled by: Alex Hauser
Designed by: Alex Hauser
Photos by: MCT Campus
what could happen, and how busy you will
get later. Don’t make applying for college
stressful. It’s an exciting time.”
ge
r col
In-school conditioning
Exemption policy
Page 7
Page 6
Color Run
Page 8
o
Exemption policy Page 7 Page 6 Color Run Page 8 o My senior year, we wanted

My senior year, we wanted to cover the election, but it was difficult getting interviews because there were so

few people who were eligible to vote. I had the idea to have

a school-wide mock election and post the results in our paper. I went and talked to SGA and they agreed to help me with the election. We set a date and they agreed to make posters, create announcements and supply students to help run the election. Two days before the election, I had not seen any posters, nor had any announcements been made. I made my own announcement and made all the ballots. I went up to talk to SGA and they decided they were too busy to help me. That night, I created my system for holding this election by myself. I delivered a set of ballots to each teacher with specific instructions on how and which period to let their students vote. After that period, I went to each teacher to pick up their ballots, and I spent free time in all my classes counting the ballots. Luckily I had help counting the ballots from my staff members. I created the infographic based on different demographics, which was interesting because we are one of the few areas in Alabama where the majority is democrat.

Alex

Hauser

Alex Hauser I am a Writer Designer Photographer Editor Journalist
Alex Hauser I am a Writer Designer Photographer Editor Journalist

I am a

Writer

Designer

Photographer

Editor

Journalist

25
25

Photography

Enviromental Photo

Photo by - Alex Hauser
Photo by - Alex Hauser

I was also voted by the senior class most likely to become a writer!

voted by the senior class most likely to become a writer! During my senior year, I
voted by the senior class most likely to become a writer! During my senior year, I

During my senior year, I had my journalism teacher for 3 periods, one of them being yearbook. I usually worked on newspaper, but I would also assist the others when they needed help. It was mostly design purposes, but occasionally they needed someone to get a picture, and I would volunteer. This picture was tough to shoot. I had to come 2 hours before the game to help them paint up during tailgating. We brought several props to try out, and planned to take the picture after the first quarter. After trying several different poses, we decided we needed the student section in the background. It took a while to get enough of the students to participate or move out of the way, and we had to do it right before the half was over, so we had enough crowd in the background. We gave students bags of confetti, and placed them around the two senior favorites so it would look more filled. I opted out using the manual mode, and switched to sports mode, knowing I would need to get several shots, and we only had enough confetti for one shot. Afterwards, I added a lens blur to the background to make them stand out. Unfortunately, the guy was adamant to looking at the field, and the girl said she had to look in the camera. But they were extremely happy with the photo, and that’s what matters.

26
26

Photography

Enviromental Photo

Senior
Senior

I turned

26 Photography Enviromental Photo Senior I turned THIS into THAT

THIS

into

THAT

26 Photography Enviromental Photo Senior I turned THIS into THAT
26 Photography Enviromental Photo Senior I turned THIS into THAT
27
27

Photography

Sports Photo

27 P h o t o g r a p h y Sports Photo Junior Thomas

Junior

Thomas Arnold, senior, jumps up to hit the ball at sectionals against Thompson High School on April 18

28
28

Photography

Sports Photo

Junior
Junior

Kennedy Buettner, sophomore, hits a serve at sectionals against Hillcrest High School on April 18

at sectionals against Hillcrest High School on April 18 Boy’s Tennis Sectionals was hosted at our
at sectionals against Hillcrest High School on April 18 Boy’s Tennis Sectionals was hosted at our

Boy’s Tennis Sectionals was hosted at our school. I spent my journalism periods out on the courts shooting photos for newspaper and yearbook. I was not allowed on the courts to shoot and, as pictured on the left, the courts are surrounded by a chain linked fence, as well as a dark wind shield. To shoot I got down on my stomach behind the fence so I was below the windshield and set my lens as close to the fence as I could without scratching it. I used a large aperture so the fence would just blur and I could get the pictures I needed.

The Northridge Reporter Sports 11 May 10, 2012 Former student achieves success in Alabama Football
The Northridge Reporter
Sports
11
May 10, 2012
Former student achieves
success in Alabama Football
Ace
Tennis team performs well
Aasiyah Sullivan
Staff Reporter
vated while practicing and
playing is key if anyone
plays a sport like football.
“The thing that moti-
Vinnie Sunseri, 2011
alumni, has become a prime
vates me is the desire to be
the greatest ever. Being av-
younger.
“My dad always had
Vinnie involved in a foot-
ball team when he was lit-
tle. My dad always encour-
Tyesha Pinnock
Staff Writer
The girls tennis team won second place
out of 16 teams in the Austin High School
aged him to do the best he
candidate to play safety for
Tournament on March 30-31.
erage scares me, and I can’t
could,” Sunseri said.
the
University of Alabama
Becci Hauser, head girls tennis coach,
be satisfied with being av-
She said it will be dif-
Crimson Tide this upcom-
said she was very proud of the team.
erage,” Sunseri said.
ferent this season because
ing
football season.
“The team did very well for their number
Ashlyn Sunseri, senior,
Sunseri said working to
take Mark Barron’s spot as
said she can see why getting
this position and why play-
their dad is the defensive
coordinator at Tennessee,
of players,” she said.
Hauser said there were less experienced
and Vinnie still plays for
safety is challenging, and
girls filling in for injured players. She
ing football has became so
the U of A, so it will be
he
still has to work hard.
said she was impressed with the girls who
important
awkward when they [the U
Barron
played doubles together that had never
to her
of A] have to play Tennes-
was in-
played before.
brother.
see.
j u r e d
Maani Kamal, senior, had a hip injury
“Play-
“I think Vinnie misses
l
a
s
t
that occurred while doing a back swing in
ing foot-
our dad coaching him be-
season
December during practice.
ball is
cause he was always his
a
n
d
“It really hurt. I just pulled back, and the
important
support system when it
w
i
l
l
cartilage in my leg tore,” she said.
to Vinnie
came to playing football,
not re-
turn to
play.
“ A
because
football
has be-
come his
and now our dad will be on
the other side of the field,”
Sunseri said.
She said that since Vin-
Kamal said she hated not playing tennis
for so long.
Even though she was out most of the
season and couldn’t play, Kamal attended
lot of
every home game.
life, and
nie has started playing for
t
h
e
“I was very proud of my team; they’re
he has
the Crimson Tide, his foot-
o
t h e r
doing a very good job,” she said.
been sur-
ball skills have improved a
play -
According to Hauser, Kamal was able to
rounded by football since
lot.
ers
on the team are working
return on April 16 to play in sectionals. The
he was little, so he loves the
“The things that I have
towards having Barron’s
tennis team won first place. As a result of
sport,” Sunseri said.
Photo by: Alex Hauser
seen him improve on since
spot. It isn’t certain that
She said her father
Thomas Arnold, senior, jumps up to hit the
their placement, the girls went to play the
last year is that he can read
I
will get it, but I still can
ball at sectionals against Thompson High
School on April 18.
State competition in Mobile on April 26.
coached at the University
prove myself worthy to the
coaches,” Sunseri said.
He said that being moti-
They earned 5th place out of 16 teams.
of Alabama for three sea-
sons and has involved Vin-
nie in football since he was
any offense, and he can
also read the quarterback
extremely well,” Sunseri
said
We aren’t defined by what we don’t.
We are defined by what we do.
And what we do is
LIVE FREE!
Photo by: Alex Hauser
Kennedy Buettner, sophomore, hits a serve at sectionals against Hillcrest High School on
April 18.
Celebrate a safe and
drug-free lifestyle!
Open your heart
Open your home
PRIDE of
Be safe.
Be smart.
Make good decisions.
Tuscaloosa
To learn how you can become
a foster or adoptive family
Call 1-866-4AL-KIDS
or visit www.dhr.alabama.gov
29
29

Photography

Environmental Photo

Senior
Senior
wanted I
wanted
I
t o g r a p h y Environmental Photo Senior wanted I When I was

When I was planning my pages,

I couldn’t get this image out of my head. I

a student standing in a busy hallway

with students running around him to show that our new schedule clutters both the hallways and the classrooms. At first I was just going to shoot the blurred hallway and place a cut-out on it, but I decided that was just an easy way out. I got a student who wasn’t in an important class and we waited outside in the hallway before lunch let out. I set my camera up on a tripod to keep it steady. used a very low shutter speed and a long exposure to show motion. The student had to

stand completely still so he wouldn’t blur.

ree 7 Period 20% s s our ves e f e th de f northridgereporter.wordpress.com
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7 Period
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northridgereporter.wordpress.com
September 24, 2012 • Volume 10 • Issue 1
Northridge High School • 2901 Northridge Road • Tuscaloosa, Al.• 35406
Do you like the seven
period schedule?
Rate
69
Yes
81
No
ad
Which schedule do
you like the most?
of
Block
Change
57%
Photo by: Alex Hauser
150 students polled
Designed by: Alex Hauser
Information compiled by: Jakailah Cooper
New schedule implemented, gets mixed reviews
Alex Hauser
Editor-in-Chief
For the second consecutive year, the school’s schedule
has changed.
After the disapproval of the A/B block schedule, the
school decided to implement a seven period schedule.
in high school. [And] thus far, the schedule has been well
received,” he said.
Espy said the new school year will be “re-energized”
with a faster paced schedule, although Kearston Wells, se-
nior, said the classes are “pressed for time.”
“I like that the classes are shorter, and you don’t lose
focus. But it’s too short because the teachers are stressed
serves most students the best. It also helps alleviate disci-
pline issues in the classroom from my experience,” Reed
said. “For someone like me who loves to lecture [the seven
period schedule] just works best for me.”
Scott Johnson, math teacher, said he “think[s] [he] likes
the seven period day.”
“I think it’s better for the kids to have math and reading
“The initial reason for changing the schedule had to do,
and struggle trying to get everything done in that time pe-
[all year]; there’s not as many gaps,” Johnson said. “I’m
in
very general terms, with overall student performance.
riod,” she said.
hoping [scores] will go up.”
We felt as if the block presented barriers to student learn-
ing that could be corrected with year-long classes,” Isaac
Espy, principal, said.
Espy said the block schedule had two main disadvantag-
es—consistency and the length of class.
“Many students found it difficult to concentrate for an
Wells said another downfall is the inconsistency in class
times.
“It’s really unfair because first [period] is super short
with announcements and fire drills and second [period]
is really long if you keep your bonus period. So the only
class you really get the most time in is second,” she said.
Amanda Burns, senior, said she likes the seven period
schedule, although there are some flaws.
“I’ve only had seven periods my whole life, and when I
came to Northridge they were on the block, and I hated it,”
she said. “[With the new schedule] I don’t like the bonus,
and I don’t like how we lose a credit because we don’t
hour and forty minutes,” he said. “The pace, at times, tend-
“So teachers are like ‘Oh I have more time I can teach you
have eight periods like we used to.”
ed
to be slow.”
and do fun activities,’ but the other classes are so pressed
Burns said she likes the shorter classes, and it will just
Espy said another benefit to the seven period schedule
was having class all year because it “eliminates semester
and year-long gaps in crucial areas of study.”
“The seven period day is a ‘normal’ school schedule.
George Washington had a seven period day when he was
for time, they can’t get as much done and have to cut out
all the fun stuff and get straight to work.”
Nancy Reed, history teacher, said she prefers the seven
period schedule.
“I like the consistency that it provides, and I believe it
take time to adjust.
“Teachers have to adjust to the time change, but I think
it will work out. Only time will tell,” she said.
Continued on page 6
See Schedule
Cash in your scores
AP passing rate beats area schools, AP students earn cash
Renu Pandit
Espy said the money will be rewarded to
Hudgins said she feels students who do
Feature Editor
the
appropriate students at an assembly the
well on the AP exams are properly recog-
Sixty-two percent of the 231 students
that took AP exams passed.
Dr. Isaac Espy, principal, said that
Northridge surpassed other schools in
West Alabama like Bryant, Central, Hill-
last week of September.
Jane Yu, senior, took and passed the
AP Composition, Statistics, Calculus
BC, Physics and Chemistry exams in the
spring.
“The AP Grant has helped make AP
crest and Tuscaloosa County High school,
whose passing rates were 21%, 2%, 46%
and 47% respectively.
classes more appealing for students be-
cause of the incentive the money reward
gives,” Yu said.
nized.
“Especially those who are named AP
scholars,” Hudgins said. “I would love for
us to do more, but funding receptions is
nearly impossible.”
Zoe Bakker, senior, took and passed the
AP Calculus, Chemistry and Composition
exams in the spring.
“The money reward didn’t have a huge
Site helps students
“I am extremely proud of the great work
However, Yu said she would have want -
affect on me, but it was a nice bonus,”
contribute to yearbook
of
our students taking AP courses, and the
ed
to pass her exams even if there was no
Bakker said. “I would have wanted to pass
teachers who worked with these students,”
Espy said. “I was honestly stunned at the
monetary reward.
even without it.”
Julia Hocutt
“AP courses are helpful when it comes
However, Bakker said she believed the
Staff Writer
results.”
Espy said the passing rate two years ago
to
getting ready for colleges. I’ve already
money reward is what “caused a rise in
figured out what I like to do because of
students joining AP classes, many of which
ReplayIt is an interactive, community
them,” Yu said. “Also, I think it’s a once in
didn’t even pass.”
wide picture sharing website. Students can
was 67%, but that only 173 students took
a
life time opportunity to explore as many
“When you have a class of 35 people, and
upload personal pictures from their phones,
AP
exams.
“We had a 26% increase of students pass-
ing tests,” Espy said. “We pushed far more
subjects as you want without the huge cost
at least five don’t even want to be there, it
computers and other devices to the Replay-
of
tuition.”
makes it hard to learn,” Bakker said.
It “time capsule,” so the school yearbook
students out of their comfort zone and into
Jacqueline Hudgins, guidance counselor,
Upon hearing that the school’s passing
staff members have more picture options to
put in the school’s yearbook.
a
major challenge.”
said it’s too early to tell if the money had
rate was 62%, Bakker said the school needs
a
serious effect on increase in AP students
to put more focus on people who do well.
With the program, student body mem-
The AP Grant that was initiated last year
promises a $100 reward to students who
pass an AP English, math or science exam.
and AP passing rates.
“We always have students who
“The school system puts so much focus
on people who fail the graduation exams.
bers who aren’t apart of the yearbook com-
mittee now have the opportunity to help
work hard because they
have a determined
Rather than changing our
out their staff and participate themselves.
schedule to help a
“I really like how the whole school
work ethic, and
few people with
can get connected and involved,” year-
they understand
the value of AP in
preparing for college,”
Hudgins said. “However,
who wouldn’t want $100 for
passing a test?”
their graduation
exams, we should do
what’s best for the whole
school,” Bakker said.
d
book editor Katherine Duckworth, ju-
nior, said.
“ReplayIt is a great way for students to
share their pictures with other classmates.
Being a member of the yearbook staff,
Designed by: Alex Hauser
Information compiled by: Jakailah
Cooper
I
would love students to upload their fun
pictures,” Hallie Young, junior, said.
Hillcrest game
Zoology
ma
Page 7
Page 8
AYP
Page 6
ho m
o ma
who
wh
ts w
uden
nts
A/B
23%
den
de
St
ts
Stu
Stu
30
30

Photography

Sports Photo

I
I
the
the

most

football pictures my senior year for The Northridge Reporter as well as Blueprints Yearbook. I took this photo on my knees so I could frame the center with the two opponents. This same night, I also had to shoot the senior favorite picture (page s 25-26)

took

of

The Northridge Reporter September 24, 2012

Sports

7

 

Volleyball team

beats Hillcrest

Katie Poore

 

Staff Writer

Photo by: Alex Hauser
Photo by: Alex Hauser

The girls varsity volleyball team won their second game of the season, defeating Hillcrest High School within the first three matches on Sept. 6. The volleyball team won their matches with scores of 25-7, 25- 22 and 25-15. Kiana Johnson had two kills,

three digs, one ace, 15 assists and two blocks. Amanda Guarisco had five kills, four aces and one block. Anna Lee Petitt ende