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Nirvana (Jainism) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Nirva (Sanskrit: ; Prakrit: Nivva) in Jainism means final release from the karmic bondage. When an enlightened human, such as an Arihant or a Tirthankara extinguishes his remaining aghatiya karmas and thus ends his worldly existence, it is called nirva. Technically, the death of an Arihant is called nirva of the arihant, as he has ended his worldly existence and attained liberation. Moksa, that is to say, liberation follows nirva. An Arihant becomes a siddha, the liberated one, after attaining nirvana. However, the word nirva is often used to mean moksa, as well. Hence nirva means: 1. Death of an Arihant, who becomes liberated thereafter, and 2. Moksa

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Jain Prayers amkra mantra Micchami Dukkadam Philosophy Anekntavda Sydvda Nayavda Cosmology Ahimsa Karma Dharma Nirvana Kevala Jna Moka Dravya Navatattva Asteya Aparigraha Gunasthana Samsara Major figures The 24 Tirthankaras Rishabha Mahavira Acharya Ganadhara Siddhasena Divakara Haribhadra Sects Digambara vtmbara Texts

1 Description of Nirva of a Tirthankara in Jain Texts 2 Nirva as Moksa 3 See also 4 References

Kalpasutra gives an elaborate account of Mahaviras nirva. [1] The aghatiya Karmas of venerable Ascetic Mahavira got exhausted, when in this Avasarpini era the greater part of the Duhshamasushama period had elapsed and only three years and eight and a half months were left. Mahavira had recited the fifty-five lectures which detail the results of Karma, and the thirty-six unasked questions (the Uttaradhyana Sutra). The moon was in conjunction with the asterism Svati, at the time of early morning, in the town of Papa, and in king Hastipala's office of the writers, (Mahivira) single and alone, sitting in the Samparyahka posture, left his body and attained nirvana, freed from all pains. (147) In the fourth month of that rainy season, in the seventh fortnight, in the dark (fortnight) of Karttika, on its fifteenth day, in the last night, in the town of Papa, in king Hastipala's office of the

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Nirvana (Jainism) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

file:///C:/Users/akmoe/Documents/JAINISM/Nirvana_(Jainism).htm

writers, the Venerable Ascetic Mahavira died, went off, cut asunder the ties of birth, old age, and death; became a Siddha, a Buddha, a Mukta, a maker of the end (to all misery), finally liberated, freed from all pains. (123) That night in which the Venerable Ascetic Mahavira died, freed from all pains, was lighted up by many descending and ascending gods. (125) In that night in which the Venerable Ascetic Mahavira, died, freed from all pains, the eighteen confederate kings of Kasi and Kosala, the nine Mallakis and nine Licchavis, on the day of new moon, instituted an illuminations on the Poshadha, which was a fasting day; for they said: 'Since the light of intelligence is gone, let us make an illumination of material matter!'(128)

Image of a Siddha: the soul who attains Moksa; although they are formless, this is how the Jain temples often depict them.

The terms moksa and nirvana are often used interchangeably in the Jain texts.[2][3] Uttaradhyana Sutra provides an account of Gautama explaining the meaning of nirva to Kesi a disciple of Parsva. [4] There is a safe place in view of all, but difficult of approach, where there is no old age nor death, no pain nor disease. It is what is called Nirvna, or freedom from pain, or perfection, which is in view of all; it is the safe, happy, and quiet place which the great sages reach. That is the eternal place, in view of all, but difficult of approach. Those sages who reach it are free from sorrows, they have put an end to the stream of existence. (81-4)

Moksha Jainism

1. ^ Jacobi, Hermann; Ed. F. Max Mller (1884). Kalpa Sutra, Jain Sutras Part I, Sacred Books of the East, Vol. 22 (http://www.sacred-texts.com/jai/sbe22/index.htm) . Oxford: The Clarendon Press. http://www.sacredtexts.com/jai/sbe22/index.htm. 2. ^ Jaini, Padmanabh (2000). Collected Papers on Jaina Studies. Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass Publ.. ISBN 81-208-1691-9.: "Moksa and Nirvana are synonymous in Jainism". p.168 3. ^ Michael Carrithers, Caroline Humphrey (1991) The Assembly of listeners: Jains in society Cambridge University Press. ISBN-0521365058: "Nirvana: A synonym for liberation, release, moksa." p.297 4. ^ Jacobi, Hermann; Ed. F. Max Mller (1895). Uttaradhyayana Sutra, Jain Sutras Part II, Sacred Books of the East, Vol. 45 (http://www.sacred-texts.com/jai/sbe45/index.htm) . Oxford: The Clarendon Press. http://www.sacred-texts.com/jai/sbe45/index.htm.

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Nirvana (Jainism) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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