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Samvara - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Samvara (savara) is one of the tattva or the fundamental reality of the world as per the Jain philosophy. It means stoppagethe stoppage of the influx of the material karmas into the soul consciousness. The karmic process in Jainism is based on seven truths or fundamental principles (tattva) of Jainism which explain the human predicament.[1] Out that the seven, the fourinflux (srava), bondage (bandha), stoppage (savara) and release (nirjar )pertain to the karmic process.[1]

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1 Philosophical overview 2 Means of savara 3 See also 4 References

Concepts Anekntavda Sydvda Nayavda Jain Cosmology Ahimsa Karma Dharma Nirvana Kevala Jna Moka Dravya (Six substances) Navatattva (Nine or seven categories) Persons Ancient Kundakunda Samantabhadra Umsvti or Umsvmi Siddhasena Divkara Medieval Aklanka Haribhadra Hemacandra Mnikyanandi Vidynandi Prabhcandra Yaovijaya Modern Kanji Swami Pt. Sukhll Dr. Mahendrakumr Nyycrya

Savara is the first step in destruction of karmas. The world or the samsara is often described as an ocean and the soul as a boat trying to cross it and reach the shores of liberation. The boat is leaking i.e. the karmas are getting attached to the soul. Hence the first step is to stop the leak and prevent the new water from entering the boat. This is savara. Jains assert that emancipation is not possible as long as the soul is released from bondage of the karmas. This is possible by savara, that is, stoppage of inflow of new karmas, and nirjar, that is, shedding of existing karmas through conscious efforts.[2]

Samvara or stoppage of karmic influx is achieved through practice of: 1. Three guptis or three controls of mind, speech and body,[3] 2. Five samitis or observing carefulness in movement, speaking, eating, placing objects and disposing refuse.[4] 3. Ten dharmas or observation of good acts like forgiveness, humility, straightforwardness, contentment, truthfulness, self control, penance, renunciation, non-attachment and continence.[5] 4. Anuprekshas or meditation on the truths of this universe.[5] 5. Pariahajaya, that is, a man on moral path must develop a perfectly patient and unperturbed attitude in the midst of trying and difficult circumstances.[5] 6. Critra, that is, endeavour to remain in steady spiritual practices.[6]

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Samvara - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

file:///C:/Users/akmoe/Documents/JAINISM/Samvara.htm

Jainism Karma in Jainism Causes of Karma Tattvarthasutra

1. ^ a b Soni, Jayandra; E. Craig (Ed.) (1998). "Jain Philosophy" (http://www.rep.routledge.com/article /F005SECT1) . Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy (London: Routledge). http://www.rep.routledge.com /article/F005SECT1. Retrieved 2008-03-05. 2. ^ *Sanghvi, Sukhlal (1974) (in English trans. by K. K. Dixit). Commentary on Tattvrthastra of Vcaka Umsvti. Ahmedabad: L. D. Institute of Indology. p.320 3. ^ *Dr. Bhattacharya, H. S. (1976). Jain Moral Doctrine. Mumbai: Jain Sahitya Vikas Mandal. p. 45 4. ^ Dr. Bhattacharya, H. S. (1976) pp.4546 5. ^ a b c Dr. Bhattacharya, H. S. (1976) p. 46 6. ^ Dr. Bhattacharya, H. S. (1976) p. 47

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