Anda di halaman 1dari 16
The Warren County Cultural and Heritage Commission is pleased to announce the winners of the
The Warren County Cultural and Heritage Commission is pleased to announce the winners of the

The Warren County

Cultural and Heritage Commission is pleased

to announce the winners

of the 2013 Senior

Citizen Art Show at the Wayne Dumont, Jr. Administration Build-

ing. The works will be

shown through Thurs- day, June 27th. This show is co-sponsored by

the Warren County Divi- sion of Aging and Disability Services and the Warren County Cultural and Heritage Commission. Professional division winners are: Oil Paint- ing: First Place Duane Alpaugh, Second Place Pat Olds, and Caroline Goldsmith with Third Place. Watercolor category winner is Ruth

E. Grabner in First

Place. Acrylic Painting First Place went to Jack Stephens and in the

Painting First Place went to Jack Stephens and in the Mixed Media category First Place was
Painting First Place went to Jack Stephens and in the Mixed Media category First Place was
Painting First Place went to Jack Stephens and in the Mixed Media category First Place was
Painting First Place went to Jack Stephens and in the Mixed Media category First Place was
Painting First Place went to Jack Stephens and in the Mixed Media category First Place was
Painting First Place went to Jack Stephens and in the Mixed Media category First Place was
Painting First Place went to Jack Stephens and in the Mixed Media category First Place was

Mixed Media category First Place was won by Jacqueline Korosec. The Photography category winners are: First Place Don Myles, Second Place Peggy Niece, and Third Place Carol Southerland. The non-professional division winners are:

Acrylic painting; First Place Karen J. Hoffman,

Second Place Rebecca Tonjes, and Lynne Newton in Third Place. Watercolor winners include: Bill Gunders- dorf in First Place, Mau- reen Heritage in Second Place, Susan Goran in Third Place, Dolores Federico and Marcia Haag tied for Fourth Place, while Peggy Richards took Honor-

able Mention. In the Drawing category; Dorothy Teel First Place, and Joan Richie Second Place. Photogra- phy: First Place William McMyne for the second year in a row, Patti Tivnan Second Place, Cathy Ulrichny Third Place, Beverly Lalley Fourth Place, and Ray Lalley Honorable Men-

tion. In the Oil category:

First Place Susan Reyn- olds, Second Place John Wolverton, Third Place Shirley Spangler, Kath- leen Jusko and Wendy Waterman tied for Fourth Place, and Hon- orable Mention went to Elaine Eramo. Warren County's Blue Ribbon winning art works will be entered in

the 46th New Jersey State Senior Citizens Annual Juried Art Contest and Exhibition, at Meadow Lakes, 300 Meadow Lakes, East Windsor, NJ, from September 23rd to Octo- ber 31st. For further informa- tion, please call 908- 453-4381 or visit the website at wcchc.org

please call 908- 453-4381 or visit the website at wcchc.org Blairstown, New Jersey. The Blairstown Dog
please call 908- 453-4381 or visit the website at wcchc.org Blairstown, New Jersey. The Blairstown Dog

Blairstown, New Jersey. The Blairstown Dog Park located on Lambert Road in Blair- stown plans to have a Grand Opening Celebration on June 22nd from 10am until 12pm. Rain date is June

23rd.

The Grand Opening

Celebration will feature

a dog costume contest,

giveaways, food, fun and instant membership with completed form and proof of vaccines. What began as a small idea in November 2010

has finally turned into a reality. With a land donation from the township, the Blairstown Dog Park is

a large, 1-acre fenced in

area where people can bring their dogs to socialize and run off leash. It was completely funded and run by volunteers and generous donations. Open to anyone, mem- bers must first complete a membership form and show proof of license

and vaccines. A mem- bership fee also applies. The Blairstown Dog Park is a 501(c)3 non- profit organization. For more information and forms, visit www.blairstowndogpar k.com. Membership forms are also available at the Blairstown Library and

Municipal building.

available at the Blairstown Library and Municipal building. By Bob Halberstadt Becoming an Eagle Scout is

By Bob Halberstadt

Becoming an Eagle Scout is no easy achievement. But for Rob Mohr, a junior firefighter with the Hope Volunteer Fire Department, it is the final step to that honor. Rob, a senior at the North Warren Regional High School, headed a group of 15 volunteers that worked over 550 hours to build turnout gear racks for his depart- ments' Fire House on Route 521 in Hope Township. Working from plans provided by an Ohio fire department, the group bent pipe, welded and painted heavy duty rolling racks, where the fire department will store their helmets, boots and uniforms at the ready for emergency calls.

boots and uniforms at the ready for emergency calls. According to scout- stown, Rob has been
According to scout- stown, Rob has been a scout for seven years. Rob will begin
According
to
scout-
stown, Rob has been a
scout for seven years.
Rob will begin Fire
Academy
training
in
master Ralf Irizarry, of
July
to
further
his
Troop
140
in
Blair-
firefighting education.
Academy training in master Ralf Irizarry, of July to further his Troop 140 in Blair- firefighting
The 2013 Patriots Football Speed and Conditioning Clinic will be held July 8th through 11th
The 2013 Patriots Football Speed and Conditioning Clinic will be held July 8th through 11th
The 2013 Patriots Football Speed and Conditioning Clinic will be held July 8th through 11th
The 2013 Patriots Football Speed and Conditioning Clinic will be held July 8th through 11th
The 2013 Patriots Football Speed and Conditioning Clinic will be held July 8th through 11th

The 2013 Patriots Football Speed and Conditioning Clinic will be held July 8th through 11th for children five through 14. All children who register by June 20th will receive a free Patri- ots Football shirt. No football equipment is required. Register online at www.nwmfl.org. The Blairstown Aux- iliary of the Newton Medical Center is looking for new mem-

bers. The auxiliary meets the first Tuesday of every month at the First United Methodist

Church in Blairstown at 10am. For more infor- mation, call 908-902-

exhibit at the fundrais- ing event to be held at Warren County Techni- cal School in Washing- ton. Artists and crafters who are interested in applying for consider- ation to exhibit should email craftsinwarren tech@live.com to request an application and submit, with photos as soon as possible. For more details, contact exhibit coordinator Jennifer at craftsin warrentech@live.com or call 908-496-4100. On Wednesday, July 3rd, at 11:30am, come to the Warren County Library Headquarters for a special Picnic with the Librarian. Rain or shine, bring your lunch and a blanket to join Ms. Kelly for stories, songs, and a cool craft. Signups required. For ages 3 and up. Their new home is located on Route 519 South, between Village Drive and the Road Department. Bring the whole family to Family Fun Day at the Red Mill Museum Village on Saturday, June 29th from 11am to 3pm/ Filled with fun activities for tots through teens, the event will be an opportunity for families

to partake in activities led by local non-profits while learning about their missions, services and more. The Museum is located at 56 Main Street in Clinton NJ. The purpose of this event is to help the com- munity connect with non-profits through a fun, free weekend activ- ity for families. Activi- ties like sand drawing, trivia, and crafts will be interactive and engaging for a variety of ages and ability levels. The Warren County Community College Foundation is now seeking nominees for the 2013 Warren County Hall of Fame class. The public is invited to send their nominations to the WCCC Foundation. Nomination forms are available online at www.wcccfoundation.o rg or requested via email halloffame@wcccfound ation.org. For further information, call 908-

835-2325.

We love hearing from you! Send your birth- days, anniversaries, and other info to:

Here is a list of notable

Dog: 98 Essential Tips

3771.

books and other items that have been added to

the collection recently at the Warren County Library:

and Techniques, by Cesar Millan. Anyone Who Had a Heart: My Life and Music, by Burt Bacharach. Bloom:

The Warren County Technical School PTA is hosting its 4th annual Crafts in the Warren Tech on December 7th. Exhibi- tors who hand-craft their own items are invited to submit an application to

Adventures on the Alimentary Canal, by Mary Roach. The Drunken Botanist, by Amy Stewart. Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls, by David Sedaris. Cooked: A Natural History of Transforma- tion, by Michael Pollan. The Great Cholesterol Myth: Why Lowering Your Cholesterol Won't Prevent Heart Disease- and the Statin-Free Plan That Will, by Jonny Bowden. The Interest- ings: A Novel, by Meg Wolitzer. The Rising (Darkness Rising), by Kelley Armstrong. Bloodfire Quest: The Dark Legacy of Shan- nara (Electronic Format), by Terry Brooks. Middle School:

My Brother Is a Big, Fat Liar, by James Patter- son. NOS4A2: A Novel,

Finding Beauty in the Unexpected--A Memoir, by Kelle Hampton. Country Girl: A Memoir, by Edna O'Brien. Helga's Diary:

 

The PRESS PO Box 430 Blairstown, NJ 07825 thepressnews@enter.net

by

Joe Hill. The Sleep-

walkers: How Europe

 
by Joe Hill. The Sleep- walkers: How Europe   Went to War in 1914, by Christopher
by Joe Hill. The Sleep- walkers: How Europe   Went to War in 1914, by Christopher
by Joe Hill. The Sleep- walkers: How Europe   Went to War in 1914, by Christopher
by Joe Hill. The Sleep- walkers: How Europe   Went to War in 1914, by Christopher
by Joe Hill. The Sleep- walkers: How Europe   Went to War in 1914, by Christopher
by Joe Hill. The Sleep- walkers: How Europe   Went to War in 1914, by Christopher

Went to War in 1914, by Christopher Clark. Sand Castle Bay (Ocean Breeze), by Sherryl Woods. Bread & Wine:

A Love Letter to Life

Around the Table with Recipes, by Shauna Niequist. The Flame- throwers: A Novel, by Rachel Kushner. The Runaway King: Book 2 of the Ascendance Trilogy (The Ascen- dance Triology), by Jennifer A. Neilsen. How the Light Gets In:

A Chief Inspector Gam- ache Novel, by Louise Penny. Cesar Millan's Short Guide to a Happy

A Young Girl's Account of Life in a Concentra- tion Camp, by Helga Weiss. Hillbilly Heart, by Billy Ray Cyrus. Manifest Injustice: The True Story of a Convicted Murderer and the Lawyers Who Fought for His Freedom, by Barry Siegel. My Foreign Cities: A Memoir, by Elizabeth Scarboro. The Force of Things: A Marriage in War and Peace, by Alex- ander Stille. Waiting to be Hear: A Memoir, by Amanda Knox. FOR- TUNE The Greatest Business Decisions of All Time: How Apple, Ford, IBM, Zappos, and others made radical choices that changed the course of business, by Editors of Fortune Magazine. Trust Me, I'm Lying: Confessions of a Media Manipulator, by

Ryan Holiday. Explod- ing the Phone: The Untold Story of the Teenagers and Outlaws who Hacked Ma Bell, by Phil Lapsley. How to Create the Perfect Wife:

Britain's Most Ineligible Bachelor and his Enlightened Quest to Train the Ideal Mate, by Wendy Moore. The Wrath of Cochise: The Bascom Affair and the Origins of the Apache Wars, by Terry Mort.

Ideal Mate, b y Wendy Moore. The Wrath of Cochise: The Bascom Affair and the Origins
Ideal Mate, b y Wendy Moore. The Wrath of Cochise: The Bascom Affair and the Origins
Ideal Mate, b y Wendy Moore. The Wrath of Cochise: The Bascom Affair and the Origins
Gallery 23 watercolor artist Jan Swift will have her work featured at PNC Bank, located
Gallery 23 watercolor artist Jan Swift will have her work featured at PNC Bank, located
Gallery 23 watercolor artist Jan Swift will have her work featured at PNC Bank, located
Gallery 23 watercolor artist Jan Swift will have her work featured at PNC Bank, located
Gallery 23 watercolor artist Jan Swift will have her work featured at PNC Bank, located
Gallery 23 watercolor artist Jan Swift will have her work featured at PNC Bank, located
Gallery 23 watercolor artist Jan Swift will have her work featured at PNC Bank, located
Gallery 23 watercolor artist Jan Swift will have her work featured at PNC Bank, located
Gallery 23 watercolor
artist Jan Swift will have
her work featured at
PNC Bank, located at
136
Rt.
94
stown,

in Blair-

now through

June 28th. Jan Swift is known for

in Blair- now through June 28th. Jan Swift is known for her participation in numerous one-woman
in Blair- now through June 28th. Jan Swift is known for her participation in numerous one-woman

her participation in numerous one-woman shows and group shows in the tri-county area. Her award-winning watercolors include a variety of subject matter, including florals, archi- tectural settings, land- scapes, and still-life, as well as what she describes as “fun paint- ings” of chickens, roost- ers, and fish. Jan was an art teacher throughout most of her life. She taught in Freling- huysen and Fredon, and also served as Chairman

of Jr/Sr High Art Department in Bristol Township, and later as Elementary Art Coordi- nator for all 11 elemen- tary schools. She has won numerous awards for her work and is represented in several private and corporate collections. She consid- ers watercolor to be a particularly exciting medium, “especially when happenings occur.” She also has work on display at Gallery 23, located at 23 Main Street in Blairstown.

when happenings occur.” She also has work on display at Gallery 23, located at 23 Main
when happenings occur.” She also has work on display at Gallery 23, located at 23 Main
• Yard Sale to Support those Facing Alzheimer’s: June 21st, 9am to 6pm . Home

Yard Sale to Support those Facing Alzheimer’s: June 21st, 9am to 6pm. Home Instead Senior Care, 127 Belvidere

Ave., Washington. FMI, call Lucy at 908-399-

9604.

5K Fundraiser Walk to Benefit Todd Quinn:

June 22nd, 9am to noon. Sycamore Park, 10 Lambert Rd., Blair- stown. Walk to raise funds for Blairstown’s Todd Quinn who is battling ALS.

Blairstown Dog Park

Grand Opening Celebration: June 22nd, 10am to noon. Rain date: June 23rd. Snacks, giveaways, dog costume contest. FMI, visit www.blairstown dogpark.com.

•Smiles for Margaret Roxbury PBA 8th Annual Wiffle Ball Tournament: June 22nd. Horseshoe Lake, Succasunna. Teams of 3-4 players. Registra- tions due by June 17th. Rain date: June 23rd. FMI, contact Ptl. Brian Feeney at 973-448-2098 or bfeeney@roxbury

contact Ptl. Brian Feeney at 973-448-2098 or bfeeney@roxbury pd.com. • A l l - Yo u

pd.com.

A l l - Yo u - C a n - E a t Breakfast Buffet: June 23rd, 7am to 11am. Frankline Twp. VFD, 37 2nd St., New Village. FMI, call 908-319-0379.

Dickson Hofman Library meeting room, 4 Lambert Rd., Blair-

stown. FMI, call Fred or Carol Cook at 908-362-

6808.

Dig

Into

Reading

 

Magic

Show:

June

Comedy Murder

27th,

2pm.

CDH

Mystery Dinner

Library,

Blairstown.

Theater: June 23rd,

Magician

&

family

6pm. Marianna‘s, 224

entertainer

Steve

Stockton St., Phillips-

1896.

Woyce.

burg. Hosted by Phillipsburg Area Performing Arts. Doors open at 5:30pm. FMI & tickets, call 908-827-

The Retrocasters Gazebo Concert: June 28th, 7pm. Catherine Dickson Hofman Library, 4 Lambert Rd.,

Racin’ 4 Mason

Duct Tape Beach Bag Craft for Teens: June 26th, 3pm. Warren Co. Library Headquarters, 189 Rt. 519, Belvidere.

NW Democratic Club

Blairstown. Bring chairs or blankets. Rain or shine.

Cycling Fundraiser:

Make a waterproof beach bag out of color- ful duct tape. Grade 6 & up. Space is limited; sign up required.

Meeting: June 26th, 7:30pm. Catherine

June 29th, 8:30am. Starting & ending at YMCA Camp Ralph S. mason. Free lunch & swimming. All proceeds go to camper scholar- ships. Pre-registration required. FMI & sign- up, visit campmason.org /racin-for-mason.html.

& sign- up, visit campmason.org /racin-for-mason.html. • Picnic with the Librarian: July 3rd, 11:30am . Warren
& sign- up, visit campmason.org /racin-for-mason.html. • Picnic with the Librarian: July 3rd, 11:30am . Warren
& sign- up, visit campmason.org /racin-for-mason.html. • Picnic with the Librarian: July 3rd, 11:30am . Warren
& sign- up, visit campmason.org /racin-for-mason.html. • Picnic with the Librarian: July 3rd, 11:30am . Warren

Picnic with the Librarian: July 3rd, 11:30am. Warren Co. Library Headquarters, 189 Rt. 519, Belvidere. Rain or shine. Bring lunch & a blanket to join Ms. Kelly for stories, songs & a craft. Ages 3 & up. Sign up required.

•Project Self-

Sufficiency will host the Girls for a Change

E m p o w e r m e n t

Program for teen girls:

Monday – Friday, July 22nd – 26th, 9am – 1pm. To register for the Girls for a Change Summer Camp, or to find out more about the programs and services available at Project Self-Sufficiency, call 973-940-3500 or visit www.projectselfsufficie ncy.org.

Celebrate Recovery

C h r i s t - C e n t e r e d

Program based on Beatitudes & 12 Steps:

Tuedays, 7pm-9pm. Walnut Valley UMC, Vail Rd., Rt. 94, Blair- stown. Free and open to the public. FMI, call

908-362-9713.

7pm-9pm. Walnut Valley UMC, Vail Rd., Rt. 94, Blair- stown. Free and open to the public.
7pm-9pm. Walnut Valley UMC, Vail Rd., Rt. 94, Blair- stown. Free and open to the public.
7pm-9pm. Walnut Valley UMC, Vail Rd., Rt. 94, Blair- stown. Free and open to the public.
(NAPSI)—Tubular skylights are a sleek new way to easily transfer the beauty of natural sunlight
(NAPSI)—Tubular skylights are a sleek new way to easily transfer the beauty of natural sunlight
(NAPSI)—Tubular skylights are a sleek new way to easily transfer the beauty of natural sunlight
(NAPSI)—Tubular skylights are a sleek new way to easily transfer the beauty of natural sunlight

(NAPSI)—Tubular skylights are a sleek new

way to easily transfer the beauty of natural sunlight into your home. These innovative light sources can brighten spaces that lack natural sunlight, beautifully illuminating closets, hallways, bathrooms and laundry rooms.

The natural light trans-

ferred through tubular skylights can reduce eyestrain and may even act as a mood elevator. What’s more, they may help with energy costs because they may reduce the number of fixtures needed in a room. Maxi- mizing daylight means you could go the whole

day without turning on a light.

10-inch ODL Tubular Skylight.

A three-button remote

control operates the dimmer’s shade from inside the house. At the touch of a

button, you can regulate

the amount of natural

light, making this a particularly good choice for a media room, nurs- ery, bedroom or any

place where light restric- tions are sometimes desired.

In addition, the dimmer

is the first of its kind that requires no hard wiring. Instead, it uses solar energy, which makes it easier and less expensive to install. As a bonus, the design integrates two LED lights, giving you the option for a soft glow into an otherwise dark room or hallway during the hours of darkness- handy for families with small children who wake up in the middle of the night. The ODL Tubular Skylight and Solar Pow- ered Dimmer are avail- able separately or as a package at major home retailers. For further facts, visit www.ODL.com, call (866) 635-4968 or view

a demonstration on YouTube.

call (866) 635-4968 or view a demonstration on YouTube. Hello fellow readers, The volunteer installation crew
call (866) 635-4968 or view a demonstration on YouTube. Hello fellow readers, The volunteer installation crew
call (866) 635-4968 or view a demonstration on YouTube. Hello fellow readers, The volunteer installation crew
call (866) 635-4968 or view a demonstration on YouTube. Hello fellow readers, The volunteer installation crew

Hello fellow readers, The volunteer installation crew of Yellow Frame Presbyterian Church in Fredon Township was over 25 strong! What a joy it was to witness the enthusiasm and hard work of the congregation. The landscape renovation involved bed preparations, 45 shrubs, 3 trees, 100 perennials and 10 or so flats of annuals. When I left after 6 hours they were down to the last bit of mulching. Impres-

sive! Are any of you for hire? Pastor Michael was given the task of watering the new plants and asked for tips. To irrigate thoroughly, the water must be absorbed by the soil slowly and they cleverly installed soaker hoses under the mulch to simplify the task. Typically for the first 2 to 3 weeks I suggest deep watering every other day if Mother Nature doesn’t provide. If we have a hot dry spell then daily is best. After 2 to 3 weeks cut back to twice a week unless a heat wave sets in. It takes judgment so check the soil under the mulch and if moist no need to water. Overwatering can be devastating and can cause root rot. When using a soaker hose system, water for about 30 minutes depend- ing on your type of soil and weather conditions. Without soaker hoses, its best to lay a hose with the nozzle turned down to a

its best to lay a hose with the nozzle turned down to a trickle next to
its best to lay a hose with the nozzle turned down to a trickle next to
its best to lay a hose with the nozzle turned down to a trickle next to

trickle next to each plant and run as follows: Large trees: 5-10 minutes or up to an hour if the root ball is very dry. Smaller trees and shrubs:

2-5 minutes or up to 30 minutes if very dry. Perennials and vines need about a minute. The best times to water is in the early morning to avoid the heat of the day, or late afternoon, as plants need to dry off before nightfall to avoid mildew and other problems.

Ralph and Phoebe of Green Township, 94 years young and married 72 years, were the self- proclaimed supervisors of the day. Phoebe was baptized at the Yellow Frame Church in 1919. What a delight to meet this spirited couple who, like their wonderful church, radiate in the history of love. Thanks to all! Garden dilemmas? askmarystone@gmail.com

love. Thanks to all! Garden dilemmas? askmarystone@gmail.com How It Works A tubular skylight system captures and
love. Thanks to all! Garden dilemmas? askmarystone@gmail.com How It Works A tubular skylight system captures and
love. Thanks to all! Garden dilemmas? askmarystone@gmail.com How It Works A tubular skylight system captures and
love. Thanks to all! Garden dilemmas? askmarystone@gmail.com How It Works A tubular skylight system captures and

How It Works

A tubular skylight

system captures and sends natural light down through highly reflective tubing. The diffuser, which is ceiling mounted, then spreads the light evenly through the room. Now, the ODL ENERGY STAR−quali- fied Tubular Skylight system includes a Solar Powered Dimmer, which allows you to control the amount of natural light by simply installing it into a new or existing

Powered Dimmer, which allows you to control the amount of natural light by simply installing it
Powered Dimmer, which allows you to control the amount of natural light by simply installing it
Powered Dimmer, which allows you to control the amount of natural light by simply installing it
United Way of North- ern New Jersey invites area residents to join a national day
United Way of North- ern New Jersey invites area residents to join a national day
United Way of North- ern New Jersey invites area residents to join a national day
United Way of North- ern New Jersey invites area residents to join a national day

United Way of North- ern New Jersey invites area residents to join a national day of service on June 21st, to have the greatest impact on the longest day of the year. Each year on the Summer Solstice, United Way Day of Action encourages residents to make the most of extra daylight hours by lending a hand in the local community. Residents are encour- aged to help stock shelves by holding a healthy food drive, sharing homegrown vegetables and encour- aging family members and friends to do the same.

In Warren County, residents can donate to the United Way/St. James’ Episcopal Church Summer Back- pack Program. Through a joint partnership, food is provided to Hackett- stown - area children who qualify for the free- or reduced-lunch program during the school year. The absence of the school program creates a finan- cial hardship for the families of these children. United Way is working to provide healthy meals to the families of 300 Hackettstown - area children beginning the

families of 300 Hackettstown - area children beginning the last week of June and through Labor
families of 300 Hackettstown - area children beginning the last week of June and through Labor
families of 300 Hackettstown - area children beginning the last week of June and through Labor
families of 300 Hackettstown - area children beginning the last week of June and through Labor

last week of June and through Labor Day. In addition to dona- tions of low-sodium canned soups, low- sugar cereals and canned tuna or chicken in water, monetary donations are also needed. Checks can be made out to United Way of Northern New Jersey and sent to United Way’s office in Warren County, 37 Belvidere Ave Suite 1C, Washing- ton, NJ 07882. Please write “Summer Backpack Program” in the memo line. To sign up to help the Summer Backpack

Program or to find other volunteer opportunities in the local community, visit United Way Volun-

teer

www.UnitedWayNNJ.o

rg/BecomeAVolunteer.

Link,

at

Volun- teer www.UnitedWayNNJ.o rg/BecomeAVolunteer. Link, at Are you a homeowner looking professional, exp- erienced

Are you a homeowner

looking

professional, exp- erienced painter who has a variety of skills in addition to painting? Look no further----Ken Pandorf of Liberty Painting and Decorating LLC is ready to accommodate your needs! With thirty years experience, he and his staff do the highest quality work in painting, Restoration, wall coverings and more. He does restoration of Colonial and Victorian homes in the Warren County area. “We do removal of wall coverings as well as all types of specialty spraying and plaster finishes.” They also have full service wall covering experts. Ken prides himself in that he works with homeowners to choose

for

a

himself in that he works with homeowners to choose for a color palates suitable for their
himself in that he works with homeowners to choose for a color palates suitable for their

color palates suitable for their lifestyle. Ken gives free estimates and of course, is fully insured. He said “No job is too small.” He has restored murals, gold leafed statues at 30 Rockefeller Center as well as worked in the office for MTV. His retail clients have also included Old

Navy,

Prada,

Blockbuster, The Gap and more.

“We will do power washing ---chemical and non-chemical-on all types of exterior finishes such as sidings, decking, concrete, driveways and in-ground pools using bio-friendly products.” Another service provided is concrete floor grinding which could lead to an array of custom Epoxy floor coatings. Ken can be reached by calling 862-881-0002.

floor grinding which could lead to an array of custom Epoxy floor coatings. Ken can be
floor grinding which could lead to an array of custom Epoxy floor coatings. Ken can be
floor grinding which could lead to an array of custom Epoxy floor coatings. Ken can be
floor grinding which could lead to an array of custom Epoxy floor coatings. Ken can be
was especially excep- tional as Tracy was also awarded the 2012 Region CAREGiver of the
was especially excep-
tional as Tracy was also
awarded the 2012
Region CAREGiver of
the year owner of the
Northeast Region. Her
team member Deborah
Shanley had the honor
of becoming the North-
east Regional CARE-
Giver of the year.
Deborah was one of
eight CAREGivers who
were honored across the
United States and
Canada for their dedica-
tion and compassionate
for caregiving.
Deborah worked for
three years in the activi-
ties department and six
years as a rehab assistant
at a nursing home before
caring for her mother at
home, a period she calls
“the best four years of
my life.”
After her mother’s
passing, Deborah
wanted to return to the
workforce and she knew
seniors would be her
focus. Deborah learned
about Home Instead
from a church friend.
When I went to the inter-
view, it was just a beau-
tiful setting,” she said.
“Tracy is inspiring. It’s
a beautiful family we’re
all allowed to be in as
CAREGivers.”
“Women like Deborah
become points of light,”
Tracy said.
“They shine without
ever knowing how their
bright light energizes
and inspires those
around them.”
“The light that a senior
can bask in, feeling the
“The light that a senior can bask in, feeling the Tracy Fazzolari was honored for outstanding
“The light that a senior can bask in, feeling the Tracy Fazzolari was honored for outstanding
“The light that a senior can bask in, feeling the Tracy Fazzolari was honored for outstanding

Tracy Fazzolari was honored for outstanding business performance and client relationship at Home Instead Senior Care network’s annual International Conven- tion 2013 held in Omaha, Nebraska. Fazzolari was awarded the Presidential I and Presidential II awards for superior sales and service satisfaction. Tracy started her Home Instead Senior Care journey in 2003. Thirty two years’ expe-

rience in client assur- ance, customer relations, and business management led to the role of General Manager for the Home Instead office serving the Hunt- erdon & Warren County communities. New Year’s Eve 2007, marked the beginning of a new vocation as the owner of a life changing organization dedicated to providing compre- hensive CAREGiver training and support, client-CAREGiver compatibility and Qual- ity Assurance. Tracy has become a passionate advocate for seniors’ CHOICE to “Age in Place” where their lives are enriched by personal relation- ships with Home Instead CAREGivers! “Living the Years, not Counting Them” is her mantra! This year’s convention

Counting Them” is her mantra! This year’s convention warmth of dedicated compassion so unself- ishly given
Counting Them” is her mantra! This year’s convention warmth of dedicated compassion so unself- ishly given

warmth of dedicated compassion so unself- ishly given over and over again. To a senior, this light is fife, worth,

validation and purpose. Deborah gives these gifts daily, without hesitation. She gives the gift of home.”

fife, worth, validation and purpose. Deborah gives these gifts daily, without hesitation. She gives the gift
fife, worth, validation and purpose. Deborah gives these gifts daily, without hesitation. She gives the gift
fife, worth, validation and purpose. Deborah gives these gifts daily, without hesitation. She gives the gift
fife, worth, validation and purpose. Deborah gives these gifts daily, without hesitation. She gives the gift
Department Of Economic Develop- ment, Training and Employment in hosting a five-hour event that The
Department Of Economic Develop- ment, Training and Employment in hosting a five-hour event that The
Department Of Economic Develop- ment, Training and Employment in hosting a five-hour event that The
Department Of Economic Develop- ment, Training and Employment in hosting a five-hour event that
Department Of
Economic Develop-
ment, Training and
Employment in hosting
a five-hour event that

The Christie Adminis- tration joined Essex County officials today in linking job-seekers with employers at the annual Essex County Services Employment Expo, held at the Robe- son Campus Center at Rutgers University.

Commissioner Harold J. Wirths of the state Department of Labor and Workforce Devel- opment, along with members of his depart- ment and staff, joined Essex County Executive Joseph N. DiVincenzo, Jr. and the county’s

also introduced job- seekers and business owners to the many state and county services available to both. “This annual coopera- tive effort underscores the importance of estab- lishing partnerships in New Jersey to get people employed and to

insure the industries that are leading the state’s economic growth have the wealth of talent and support necessary for that growth,” said Com- missioner Wirths, who greeted participants as they entered the expo. More than 1,000 people pre-registered to attend the expo, which was free to job-seekers and vendors alike, and many others were able

to register on-site to take

advantage of the fair. “Essex County is com- mitted to providing our residents with employ- ment opportunities and access to services, while assisting businesses with recruiting skilled and qualified applicants.” To date, Essex has been able to put 119 people to work with the funding.

skilled an d qualified applicants.” To date, Essex has been able to put 119 people to
skilled an d qualified applicants.” To date, Essex has been able to put 119 people to
skilled an d qualified applicants.” To date, Essex has been able to put 119 people to
skilled an d qualified applicants.” To date, Essex has been able to put 119 people to
skilled an d qualified applicants.” To date, Essex has been able to put 119 people to
Governor Chris Christie’s $26 million Hire New Jersey pack- age was highlighted today as Commissioner

Governor Chris Christie’s $26 million Hire New Jersey pack- age was highlighted today as Commissioner

Harold J. Wirths of the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development (LWD) toured Vantage Apparel,

a Middlesex County

manufacturer that received a $24,000 state grant. Under Hire New Jersey, three grant programs were launched in the wake of Superstorm Sandy to insure the state is well- positioned for future growth and economic expansion. Vantage Apparel was awarded its grant through the Recovery4Jersey pro- gram, which is making

funds available to assist New Jersey employers in providing classroom and/or on-the-job train- ing for workers to specifically address the extra demands created by the recovery and rebuilding efforts forced by Sandy. “This Recovery4Jersey grant is just part of the three-prong Hire New Jersey package launched by Governor Christie shortly after Sandy hit. Each program under Hire New Jersey focuses on helping New Jersey businesses to overcome the economic challenges posed by the storm and to maintain the momentum of the state’s overall recov- ery,” said Commis- sioner Wirths. Vantage Apparel employs 370 people at

its corporate headquar-

ters in the Avenel section of Woodbridge Township, and has addi- tional locations in California and Missouri. Specializing in logo

apparel design and manufacturing, embroi- dery, screen printing, laser etching and appli- que embellishment, Vantage’s New Jersey operation was shut down for three days due to Sandy. Vantage Apparel will

match the state training grant with $52,721 in company funds and train employees in courses such as crisis manage- ment and emergency response, disaster recov- ery, contingency plan- ning and data recovery. The manufacturer also will try to bring on as many as 22 new hires within the next 12 months. “Nothing is more para- mount than the welfare of our employees and, to that end, we recognize the importance of preparing ourselves for natural disasters, work- place challenges, supply-chain disruptions and more,” said Ira Neaman, president of Vantage Apparel. “By partnering with the state and receiving crisis man-

agement training

through

Recovery4Jersey grant program, we can struc- ture a course of action that ensures the protec- tion of our employees as well as preservation of business operations no matter what event or circumstance we are forced to confront. The value of this program and the results that will follow cannot be under- stated.” The Hire New Jersey package was developed by the Christie Adminis- tration in direct response to Sandy through a re- branding of the LWD’s traditional training grant programs. Not only are the funds being directed to employers impacted by the storm and compa- nies that have assisted New Jersey in recover- ing from the storm, but they also are being focused on improving the workforce skills of businesses in key indus- try clusters identified by LWD as driving the future economy of the state.

the

“Our focus is to train our workforce with the skills needed to move forward in Garden State industries that hold the most promise for our economic future. In turn, the industries become more competi- tive and prosperous, and will expand their payrolls,” Commis- sioner Wirths explained. Through its Talent Networks, LWD is focusing on seven of the state’s key industry clusters to connect employers, job-seekers, the state’s One-Stop Career Centers, and educational institutions to achieve the common goal of helping people develop relevant skills that lead to job opportu- nities. The seven industry clusters included:

Transportation, Logis- tics and Distribution; Life Sciences (Pharmaceuticals, Bio- technology, Medical Devices); Advanced Manufacturing; Finan- cial Services; Health

Care; Technology/ Entrepreneurship; and Retail, Hospitality and Tourism. Commissioner Wirths was joined in touring Vantage by John Kennedy, the chief oper- ating officer of New Jersey Manufacturers Extension Program, a not-for-profit company that works with small to mid-sized manufactur- ers to help them become more efficient, profit- able, and globally com- petitive. NJMEP will conduct the training authorized under the grant. “When our state Department of Labor announced the Recovery4Jersey grant program, NJMEP knew it was a great fit for us,” said Kennedy. “We believe that this is a perfect blend of NJMEP’s mission of supporting New Jersey manufacturers of all sizes, and the LWD’s objective to champion the development of our workforce throughout the state.”

of all sizes, and the LWD’s objective to champion the development of our workforce throughout the
of all sizes, and the LWD’s objective to champion the development of our workforce throughout the
of all sizes, and the LWD’s objective to champion the development of our workforce throughout the
of all sizes, and the LWD’s objective to champion the development of our workforce throughout the
of all sizes, and the LWD’s objective to champion the development of our workforce throughout the
The Public Safety Training Academy, the home for Emergency Services training in Sussex County, will
The Public Safety Training Academy, the home for Emergency Services training in Sussex County, will
The Public Safety Training Academy, the home for Emergency Services training in Sussex County, will
The Public Safety Training Academy, the home for Emergency Services training in Sussex County, will
The Public Safety Training Academy, the home for Emergency Services training in Sussex County, will
The Public Safety Training Academy, the home for Emergency Services training in Sussex County, will

The Public Safety Training Academy, the home for Emergency Services training in Sussex County, will be conducting a Summer Fire Academy from Monday July 8 through Friday July 12. The Academy is open to students who have com- pleted 8th grade as well as grades students in grades 9-12. The Summer Fire Academy is a mix of learning and fun to achieve the goals of introducing students to the many facets of the fire service. Through classroom training, field trips, guest speakers and fire ground activities,

students are exposed first hand to possible career choices as well as volunteer options. It is anticipated that students will visit a 9-1-1 dispatch center, the New Jersey Forest Fire ground headquar- ters in Andover Borough and the New Jersey Forest Fire Aerial Operations in Andover Township as well as a Forest Fire observation tower. Guest speakers are invited from the New Jersey Division of Fire Safety to discuss Arson and demonstrate detec- tion with an Arson dog. The Sussex County

Haz-Mat team and the County Sheriff Incident Command Unit are also invited to participate. The registration fee for the program is $40.00 and includes two t-shirts and a Bar-B-Q lunch on the last day. The Acad- emy provides all the gear and safety equip- ment needed, students only need to provide sturdy shoes and rugged clothing. A “gradua- tion” ceremony is held during the week after the course and all are invited. For further information contact the Public Safety Training Academy at

973-948-7897.

the course and all are invited. For further information contact the Public Safety Training Academy a
the course and all are invited. For further information contact the Public Safety Training Academy a
the course and all are invited. For further information contact the Public Safety Training Academy a
JB's Landscaping is back with their 2nd Annual Charitable Food Drive. We will again be
JB's Landscaping is
back with their 2nd
Annual Charitable Food
Drive. We will again be
collecting food dona-
tions on June 29th at the
A&P Supermarket in
Blairstown, NJ from
9am to 5pm.
These donations will
be distributed to food
pantries in Blairstown,
Newton, Sparta, and
Hackettstown.
“We really enjoyed this
aspect of last years event
because it was great to
see that contributions
would directly impact
people in our own com-
munity.”
We wanted to make a
difference on a national
level as well. This is
where Feeding America
comes into play. They
are a nation-wide orga-
nization fighting food
insecurity, which means
a person doesn't know
Everyone is invited to
a
5K Fundraising walk
to
benfit Todd Quinn on
where their next meal is
coming from. Right now
1 in 6 people in America
are food insecure so we
realized that we needed
to help on a national
scale as well. For every
dollar donated, Feeding
America can provide 8
meals to people in need,
which is a huge return
for each donation.”
An online fundraiser
was launched late last
week using the GoGet-
Funding platform
(gogetfunding.com/proj
ect/jb-s-landscaping--
2nd-annual--
charitable-food-drive) to
help raise money. They
teamed up with a few
other local businesses to
offer rewards for various
levels of donations
towards our goal of
raising $10,000 for
Feeding America.
For more information,
visit www.jbslands
cape.com and click on
the events tab or call
Saturday, June 22nd,
9am to noon, at Syca-
more Park, 10 Blair-
stown Rd., Blairstown,
Accept the intivation to
Fight ALS by participat-
ing in the fundraising
walk for Todd Quinn, a
long-time resident of
Blairstown, who is
battling Lou Gehrig’s
Disease (ALS). Todd
was born and raised in
Blairstown, attending
Blairstown Elementary
and North Warren
Regional, actively
aprticipating in the
basketball, soccer and
baseball programs.
After residing in Colo-
rado and Alaska, Todd
returned to Blairstown
with his family in 2008
where he worked as an
independant building
contractor within the
community.
In 2011, Todd was
diagnosed with ALS, a
progressive neurode-
generative disease that
affects about 20,000
people in the US, with
5,000 new diagnoses
each year.
The burdens of this
disease are many for the
individual as well as the
family that supports
him.
They are
in
need of
walkers, volunteers,
sponsors and donors at
the event.
For more information
about the event, call
Tanya Quinn at 973-
600-8598 or Terri Quinn
at 908-752-8143.
To learn more about
Todd’s story, visit
www.mighty-quinn.org.
For more information
about Lou Gehrig’s
Disease, visit
www.als.net.
(908)-496-4755.
Gehrig’s Disease, visit www.als.net. (908)-496-4755. With the launch of the new MyTown feature, Jersey Central
Gehrig’s Disease, visit www.als.net. (908)-496-4755. With the launch of the new MyTown feature, Jersey Central

With the launch of the new MyTown feature, Jersey Central Power & Light (JCP&L) now provides the state’s most comprehensive munici- pal web pages for outage and infrastructure infor- mation. In addition, the company has made other website enhance- ments that provide more detailed local informa- tion about power outages, including estimated restoration times. “The MyTown web pages join our portfolio of industry-leading communication tools – all introduced in the wake of Hurricane Sandy – that are designed to help JCP&L

customers access the important information they need during a power outage,” said James Fakult, president of JCP&L. By clicking the “MyTown” link on the JCP&L 24/7 Power Center outage maps page, customers, local

officials and media can view a summary of current outages affect-

ing their town, as well as

a snapshot of each

community’s electric infrastructure. The MyTown pages can also be accessed at www.firstenergycorp.co m/mytown. Information on the MyTown pages is updated approximately every 15 minutes.

The company has also enhanced its 24/7 Power Center outage maps, available on computers and mobile devices at www.firstenergycorp.co m/outages. Customers may now view individual outages, with best-available estimated restoration times, as well as the cause of the service disruption when available. Customers

can also toggle to the

conventional shaded map to see an overview of any power outages across the service territory. More information on the company’s technol- ogy tools can be found online, www.firstenergy corp.com/connect.

The 2013 Relay for Life of Greater Hackett- stown held May 31st – June 1st
The 2013 Relay for Life of Greater Hackett- stown held May 31st – June 1st
The 2013 Relay for Life of Greater Hackett- stown held May 31st – June 1st
The 2013 Relay for Life of Greater Hackett- stown held May 31st – June 1st
The 2013 Relay for Life of Greater Hackett- stown held May 31st – June 1st
The 2013 Relay for Life of Greater Hackett- stown held May 31st – June 1st
The 2013 Relay for Life of Greater Hackett- stown held May 31st – June 1st

The 2013 Relay for Life of Greater Hackett- stown held May 31st – June 1st a surprise visit from WNBC’s news-

caster Pat Battle. The American Cancer Soci- ety encourages everyone to Celebrate, Remember and Fight Back by

participating in Relay for Life events around the world. These events help raise funds to continue the great strides

These events help raise funds to continue the great strides Children ages 5 – 10 are

Children ages 5 – 10 are invited to participate in Project Self- Sufficiency’s annual Project Vacation program, offered July 15th – 19th, from 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. This year’s Project Vacation, “At the Fair”, will explore the tradition of the New Jersey State Fair through fun activi-

ties, crafts and special guest presentations. Children will learn about local agriculture and farm animals, while enjoying the sights, sounds and tastes of a carnival. The program is open to the public but space is limited and pre-registration is required. Camp fee is $10 per child. The

program will take place

at

Self-Sufficiency’s Com- munity Education Center, which is located at 127 Mill Street in Newton. To register, or to find out more infor- mation about the summer activities for children at Project Self- Sufficiency, call 973-

Project

940-3500.

at Project Self- Sufficiency, call 973- Project 940-3500. in cancer research in recent years. The Greater

in cancer research in recent years. The Greater Hackett- stown event has raised over $38,000 towards the effort. With Relay teams from surrounding areas including several school and community groups, the over 200 participants were surprised with guest speaker Pat Battle. At the Opening ceremonies several cancer survivors shared the stories of their struggle with cancer, including Ms. Battle who recounted her path to surviving breast cancer. Boosted by her speech and the supporters of local cancer survivor Margaret Walling, the Relay participants started their overnight journey, walking the candle-lit ‘track’ until 6:00 am. Why are Relay for Life events held overnight? Simply, because Cancer Never Sleeps. Through the evening event participants enjoyed a wide variety

of

music

and

games

keeping them engaged.

attend or donate prior to the event, donations are

The highlight of the being accepted until night was the events Tricky Tray, which August
The
highlight
of
the
being
accepted
until
night
was
the
events
Tricky
Tray,
which
August 30th!
http://www.relayforlife
included everything
.org/GreaterHackettstow
from
tickets
to
local
nNJ
theater,
signed
Jets
https://www.facebook.
helmet
and
Prime
com/pages/Relay-For--
Yankee Tickets.
Life-of-Greater--
For
more
information
Hackettstown.
on the Relay for Life of
Greater Hackettstown,
Questions?
Contact
Jennifer
Romer
at
the
you
can
visit
their
American Cancer Soci-
website
or
Facebook
ety
at
jennifer.romer
pages.
If you were unable to
@cancer.org
or
call
973.285.8019.
Soci- website or Facebook ety at jennifer.romer pages. If you were unable to @cancer.org or call
Soci- website or Facebook ety at jennifer.romer pages. If you were unable to @cancer.org or call