Anda di halaman 1dari 9

CONTENTS  

•  ANTERIOR KNEE PAIN  

•  INSTABILITY: DISLOCATION &  SUBLUXATlON
    

•  CLINICAL EVALUATION  

•  RADIOLOGICAL EVALUATION  

•  TREATMENT  

Anterior knee pain

1. patellofemoral overload

2. overuse in athletes

3. jump knee (patellar tendonitis)

4. patellofemoral subluxation

5. bipartite patella

6. patellar cysts or tumours

7. prepatellar bursitis

8. plica syndrome

9. osteochondritis disseccans

10. discoid meniscus

11. torn meniscus

Historical Perspective
Initially anterior knee pain was attributed to chondromalacia patellae (1960's).

Hughston: chondromalacia due to impingement of medial facet on lateral condyle during subluxation.

Merchant: separated chondromalacia into normal and abnormal patellar alignment types, treatment 
involved lat release.
Insall: excessive Q angle, patella alta. causes of dislocation and subluxation respectively, treatment by 
proximal realignmcnt.

Ficat: tight lat retinaculum producing patellar tilt

Maquet: lateral pressure synd

Larson: lat retinac release

Fulkerson: small nerve degen in tight lat retinac

Schutzer: CT studies of malalignment

Concepts: consider pain I instability dysplasia patella and patella femoral joint.

Classification of Instability
Pulkersolt & Hungerford:

1. articular lesion a) nil b) softening c) fibrillations d) OA

2. with a) subluxation h) subln & tilt c) tilt only d) no malalignment

Dislocation:

1. single

2. recurrent

3. congenital

4. habitual

Subluxation

Dislocation of the Patella

Dislocates laterally as the knee is flexed
Single dislocation due to in jury

Recurrent dislocation involves predisposing factors:

1. ligamentous laxity

2. lateral femoral condyle underdevelopment & flattening of the intercondylar groove

3. maldevelopment of the patella (too high or too small)

4. valgus knee deformity

5. primary muscle defect

During a dislocation medial capsule is torn

This may fail. to unite correctly resulting in lateral laxity

Repeated dislocation damages articular surfaces and may get flattening of condyle.

This will facilitate further dislocations.

Cogenital dislocations:

permanently dislocated

rare

Habitual dislocation:

dislocates every time the knee bends

reduction on extension

Subluxation:

more common than realised

abnormal patellar alignment

chondromalacia may result
Clinical Evaluation

Tilt

due to posterior' pull on lateral patella

lat facet almost parallel to posterior condylar line

Subluxation

Type I. Subluxation alone

complain of instability rather than pain

increased risk of dislocation

Type II. Tilt & subluxation

inc load on lateral facet

dec load on med facet

central patellar shear

instability

Type III. Tilt alone

increased risk of medial patellar OA/lateral facet OA

retinac adaptively shortens and may be painful in flexion

retinac thickening & shortening leads to lateral pressure synd (medial patellar excursion is normally 15 mm)

Type IV. No malalignment

Add A, B or C if:

A. No articular lesion

B. Minimal chondromaqlacia (Grade 1or 2)
C. OA (Grade 3 or 4)

Radiographic Evaluation
AP & Lat XR's: patellar sclerosis, patella alta (patella tendon>1.2x length of patella.

on lateral with line in 20­70 degrees flexion)

Sunrise XR trabec reorientation in the lateral facet in lat facet press synd angle of

congruence > 16 degrees to indicate subluxation on XR taken at 4S degrees of knee

flexion (Merchant)

ER view: (Malghem & Maldague)

lateral PF angle

CT: tilt normally 14 degrees at 10­20 degrees off flexion and >7 degrees in full extn

MRI

Treatment
consider alignment patterns & location of osteoarthrosis when planning treatment

acute repair of medial structures

Non operative

retinac, hamstring & IT hand stretching

quads strengthening (VM)

elastic knee support

patellar taping

NSAIDS
orthotics

activity modification (avoid high resistance 0­90 degrees)

LA injury to confirm diagnosis eg. in lat retinac

exclude other causes of knee pain

more stable with age

females>males

often bilateral esp. if malalignment is underlying cause

insidious on set is is more likely to he due to malalignment

dislocation when quads contracts with knee in flexion

knee stuck in flexion

prominent medial femoral condyle

local tenderness of muscle, tendon & retinac

apprehension test +ve between episodes

quads contracture

evaluation of malalignment (Q angle> 15 degrees & rotation of the lower extremity)

Q angle is between line from ASIS to mid­patella and line from mid­patella to mid

tibial tubercle

look for medial or lateral shift on flexion/exten (J sign)

normal patellae are firmly engaged in trochlea. at 30­AD degrees flexion

tilt (correctable or not) indicating lat. retinac tightness
glide or play

compression test (articular case)

alignment on standing

heel varus/inversion

pronation of foot or lower extremity and hyperlaxity

PF∙ instability classified by Dugdale & Renshaw in a review of 210 Down Syndrome

children:

Grade 1: stable

Grade 2: subluxation half of patella's width

Grade 3: dislocation

Grade 4: already dislocation but reducible

Grade 5: irreducible

Patterns of Malalignment
Operative

if non operative treatment fails (66% of paediatric cases)

arthroscopy to document degeneration, debride, treat other conditions

arthroscopic: shaving only if recurrent effusion due to cartilage flaps/fibrillation

must correct underlying cause

principle is to realign the extensor mechanism to a more favourable angle

relieve pressure on cartilage

1. suprapatellar
2. infrapatellar soft tissue

3. infrapatellar

4. patellectomy (reduces extension power 30­40%)

Fulkerson:

Type IA, IIB: lateral release ...but inconsistent results

VM advance may be required

Tib tubercule transfer medially esp if low troch and lat. rel does not produce PF

alignment

Type IIA & IIB: lateral release

medial imbrication or Trillat may also be required if severe subluxation

Possible complication of medial subluxation

Type IIC: anteromedial tibial tubercule transfer

Type IIIA & IIII3: non operative

lateral rel if this fails (good results)

Type IIIC: anteromedial transfer

Evaluate likelihood of success with distal tibial tubercle transfer. Extcrnally rotate

and extend knee (reproduces symptoms); internally rotate lessens symptoms

Anterior transfer should be l5mm

Complications of Maquet:

1. morbidity of bonc graft harvest
2. skin necrosis

3. non union

4. anterior compartment syndrome

Anteromedial transfer

does not requirc bone graft

max anterior transfer is l7mm

avoid lateral release & debridement if PF alignment is normal

Distal patella tendon hemitransfer

Medial semitendinosis tenodesis