Anda di halaman 1dari 27

15 MAY 2007[Energy Efficiency Technology] | 421‐629 

 
ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY IN 
  MALAYSIA:  THE IMPACT ON FUTURE ENERGY 
DEMAND IN INDUSTRIAL SECTOR 
 
   
 

 
 

[Vigneswaran KUMARAN] | 277492

Digitally signed by V Kumaran


Coordinator: Dr. Lu Aye  V DN: cn=V Kumaran, c=MY
Reason: I am the author of
Department of Civil and Environmental   Kumaran
this document
Date: 2009.06.18 12:08:40
+07'00'
ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY IN MALAYSIA: THE IMPACT ON FUTURE ENERGY DEMAND IN THE INDUSTRIAL SECTOR 

Abstract 
 

This report attempts to delineate the impact of Energy Efficiency Technologies (EET) in the 
Industrial  Sector  in  Malaysia  vis‐à‐vis  the  future  energy  demand.  A  holistic  approach  was 
envisaged to demonstrate the paramount importance of evolving Malaysian energy policies 
inter  alia  the  energy  production,  consumption  and  management,  and  thus  in  the 
culmination  of  energy  efficiency  technology  policies.  In  order  to  generate  an  exclusive 
analysis of future energy demand and quantify this in respect to implementation of EET in 
the  industry,  a  statistical  assumption  was  made  to  apply  the  Pareto rule  and  Simple  Ratio 
method.  Additionally,  case  studies  modeled  by  the  Malaysian  government  for 
implementation of EET in industry were used to complement the available fiscal and energy 
data for quantitative impact analysis.  

Keywords:  Energy  efficiency  technologies,  industrial  sector,  future  energy  demand,  case 
studies, quantitative impact analysis 

 
 

2 | P a g e    

 
ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY IN MALAYSIA: THE IMPACT ON FUTURE ENERGY DEMAND IN THE INDUSTRIAL SECTOR 

Aim 

The  method  and  approach  integrated  in  generating  this  report  is  designed  to  meet  the 
following objectives: 

• Outline  the  National  Energy  Policy  development  vis‐à‐vis  Energy  Efficiency 


Technology (EET) 

• Provide a distilled Energy Supply and Demand analysis for Industrial Sector 

• Describe the present Energy Efficiency Technology in Industry 

• Quantify the future Energy Demand due to the impact of EET 

3 | P a g e    

 
ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY IN MALAYSIA: THE IMPACT ON FUTURE ENERGY DEMAND IN THE INDUSTRIAL SECTOR 

Contents 
 

  Abstract                    2 

Aim                                  3 

1.0  Introduction                 7 

2.0  Energy Policy Development                                 10 

3.0  Energy Demand and Supply            12 

4.0  Energy Efficiency Technology (EET) in Malaysian Industry    14 

5.0  Case Study of EET Model in Industry          16 

6.0  Future Energy Demand:  Quantitative Analysis      17 

7.0  Conclusion                                           20


   

References and Notes                                              21 

Appendix 
A1  Examples of Energy Efficiency Technology            22 

A2  Energy Demand Curve Estimates without EET Impact        23 

A3  Energy Demand Curve Estimates with EET Impact        24 

A4  Energy Savings and Quantitative Analysis Calculations        25 

A5  Energy Generation Mix and Power Producers’ Capacity        26 

A6  Generation Mix and Power Producers’ Generation         27 

A7  Sales of Electricity and Electricity Consumers          28 

Figures 
Figure 1  Industrial Fuel Intensity in Selected ASEAN Countries 1980‐2000    13 
Figure 2  Energy Demand  Curve (without EET) from 1990 to 2000       23 

4 | P a g e    

 
ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY IN MALAYSIA: THE IMPACT ON FUTURE ENERGY DEMAND IN THE INDUSTRIAL SECTOR 

Figure 3  Energy Demand Estimates (without EET) from 2010 to 2020      23 
Figure 4  Energy Demand Estimates with EET Impact from 2010 to 2020     24 

Tables 
Table 1 Final Commercial Energy Demand by Source           8 
Table 2 Final Commercial Energy Demand by Sector           9 
Table 3 Primary Commercial Energy Supply by Source           12 
Table 4 Applicable Energy Efficient Technology for Malaysian Industry (MIEEIP Model)   14 
Table 5 Energy Efficient Application in MIEEIP Industry Model (Case Studies)     16 
Table 6 Potential Energy and Cost Saving             22 
Table 7 List of EE Project for Second Phase of MIEEIP’s Demonstration Project             22 

Glossary 
 

CHP: Combined Heat and Power 

EET:  Energy Efficiency Technology 

EPU: Economic Planning Unit 

EIB:  Energy Information Bureau 

GDP:  Gross Domestic Product 

MIEEIP:  Malaysian Industrial Energy Efficiency Improvement Project 

OECD:  Organisation of Economic Cooperation and Development 

PTM:  Malaysian Energy Centre 

5 | P a g e    

 
ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY IN MALAYSIA: THE IMPACT ON FUTURE ENERGY DEMAND IN THE INDUSTRIAL SECTOR 

1.0  INTRODUCTION 
 

“Energy can neither be created nor destroyed”. It is an accepted empirical principle referred 
to  as  First  Law  of  Thermodynamics.  Theoretically,  the  world  shall  never  run  out of  energy 
source.  However,  the  availability  of  energy  in  its  various  physical  forms,  which  have  been 
indiscriminately consumed by generations of civilization, can and will deplete. This applies 
in particular to the energy sources from exhaustible mass such as fossil fuel and minerals. 
Therefore, the scrupulous use of this energy sources instrumented by efficient technologies 
is  crucial  to  the  existence  and  sustainable  growth  of  any  nation,  and  more  so  for  a 
developing  country.  Importantly,  energy  efficiency  technology  offers  a  powerful  and  cost‐
effective tool for achieving a sustainable energy future [1]. 

A developing nation such as Malaysia, with strategic geographical location historically (Map 
1) and exemplary political stability, increases its vulnerability to energy supply and demand 
equilibrium in the absence of succinct energy policy.  

Map1: Peninsular Malaysia, Sabah and Sarawak 

 
Source: CIA World Factbook 

A  negative  imbalance  in  this  equilibrium,  can  adversely  impact  the  sustained  6.5  %  gross 
domestic  product  (GDP)  growth  achieved  by  Malaysia  over  the  past  50  years  of  post‐
independent [2].  

6 | P a g e    

 
ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY IN MALAYSIA: THE IMPACT ON FUTURE ENERGY DEMAND IN THE INDUSTRIAL SECTOR 

Malaysia is a country with diverse energy sources, both renewable and non‐renewable, such 
as petroleum, coal, coke, natural gas and hydroelectric. Its current population of 26.5 million 
[3] is estimated to reach 28.96 million in the year 2010, with an average growth projection 
of 1.6 % per year [4]. This expansion in population growth has strain on energy demand and 
energy  intensity.  Malaysian  statistic  reveals  that  per  capita  consumption  has  increased  to 
62.2GJA 1     (2005)  from  52.9GJA  (2000),  and  estimated  to  reach  76.5GJA  in  the  year  2010 
(refer Table1). 

Table 1: Final Commercial Energy Demand1 By Source

1990 1995 2000 2005 2010


PJ % PJ % PJ % PJ % PJ %
Source
Petroleum Products 414 74.9 676 72.8 820 65.9 1023.1 62.7 1372.9 61.9
Natural Gas2 45.7 8.3 81.1 8.7 161.8 13.0 246.6 15.1 350 15.8
Electricity 71.8 13.0 141.3 15.2 220.4 17.7 310 19.0 420 18.9
Coal & Coke 21.5 3.9 29.8 3.2 41.5 3.3 52 3.2 75 3.4
Total 553 100 928.2 100 1243.7 100 1631.7 100 2217.9 100
Per Capita Consumption (GJ) 29.9 44.3 52.9 62.2 76.5
Source of compilation: Malaysia Seventh (1996-2000), Eighth (2001-2005) and Ninth (2006-2010) Plan, Economic Planning Unit (EPU), Malaysia
1
Refers to the quantity of commercial energy delivered to final consumers but excludes gas, coal and fuel oil used in electricity generation
2
Includes natural gas used as fuel and feedstock consumed by the non-electricity sector
 

This increase in demand will deplete the countries non‐renewable resources by 2217PJA 2 , of 
which  45%  will  be  from  oil  and  petroleum  reserves,  while  another  42%  is  derived  from 
natural gas reserves. At present, the industrial sector is the second largest energy consumer 
(lagging the transport sector by mere 1.9%), at 38.6% of the total energy mix for the country 
(refer Table2).  

                                                            
1
 GJA as Gigajoules Per Annum 
2
 PJA as Petajoules Per Annum 

7 | P a g e    

 
ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY IN MALAYSIA: THE IMPACT ON FUTURE ENERGY DEMAND IN THE INDUSTRIAL SECTOR 

Table 2: Final Commercial Energy Demand by Sector

1990 1995 2000 2005 2010


PJ % PJ % PJ % PJ % PJ %
Sector
Industrial1 213.5 38.6 337.5 36.4 477.6 38.4 630.7 38.7 859.9 38.8
Transport 220.9 39.9 327.8 35.3 505.5 40.6 661.3 40.5 911.7 41.1
Residential & Commercial 67.3 12.2 118.8 12.8 162 13.0 213 13.1 284.9 12.8
Non-Energy2 18.5 3.3 125.4 13.5 94.2 7.6 118.7 7.3 144.7 6.5
Agriculture & Forestry 32.8 5.9 18.7 2.0 4.4 0.4 8 0.5 16.7 0.8
Total 553 100.0 928.2 100.0 1243.7 100 1631.7 100 2217.9 100
Source for compilation: Malaysia Seventh (1996-2000), Eighth (2001-2005) and Ninth (2006-2010) Plan, Economic Planning Unit (EPU), Malaysia
1
Includes manufacturing, construction and mining
2
Includes natural gas, bitumen, asphalt, lubricants, industrial feedstock and grease
 

Against  a  global  backdrop  with  an  average  world  economic  growth  of  3.8  percent  over  a 
projection  period  until  2030  [5],  Malaysia  with  sustained  average  GDP  of  6.5  percent  will 
potentially  outpace  the  global  energy  demand  growth  and  its  energy  supply  capacity  if 
stringent measures of energy management are not applied.  

Thus  it  is  imperative  that  improvement  in  the  efficient  use  of  energy  in  all  sectors  and 
particularly the industrial, (which contributes more than a third of the GDP) is achieved to 
lower  the  impact  on  costly  energy  demand.  As  such,  the  Government  of  Malaysia  has, 
throughout  the  years  been  actively  evolving  the  nation’s  energy  policy  to  meet  the 
increasing demand in general energy utilization.  

The  Government  of  Malaysia  had  introduced  policies  for  energy  efficiency  program 
implementation, apart from the use of alternative and renewable energy sources in the 7th 
Malaysia Plan, 1996‐2000 [6]. This has been a clear indication of the government’s stance in 
ensuring that the energy related industries and energy end‐users will enhance their efficient 
production and utilization of energy. 

8 | P a g e    

 
ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY IN MALAYSIA: THE IMPACT ON FUTURE ENERGY DEMAND IN THE INDUSTRIAL SECTOR 

2.0  ENERGY POLICIES DEVELOPMENT 
 

In  order  to  comprehend  the  present  situation  of  energy  efficiency  technology  practice  in 
Malaysia,  it  would  be  worthy  to  have  a  brief  understanding  of  how  the  overall  national 
energy policies evolved from the early 1970, as the nation began to experience the uprising 
tide of global economic expansion as well as the imminent international oil crisis. 

The following chronology highlights major energy policies development in Malaysia until the 
culmination of energy efficient sub‐policy [7]: 

• Petroleum  Development  Act  1974  –  The  establishment  of  Petronas  as  the  national 
oil  company  which  was  vested  with  the  sole  responsibility  for  exploration, 
development,  refining,  processing,  manufacturing,  marketing  and  distribution  of 
petroleum products. 

• National Energy Policy 1979 – Sets the overall energy policy with broad guidelines on 
long‐term  energy  objectives  and  strategies  to  ensure  efficient,  secure  and 
environmentally  sustainable  supplies  of  energy.  The  three  primary  objectives  of 
National  Energy  Policy  encircle  supply,  utilization  and  environmental  aspect  of 
energy. 
• National Depletion Policy 1980 – Introduced to safeguard the exploitation of natural 
oil  reserves  because  of  the  rapid  increase  in  the  production  of  crude  oil.  The 
production  of  oil  and  gas  was  reduced  significantly  to  cater  for  future  generations 
use. 
• Four Fuel Diversification Policy 1981 – Designed to prevent over‐dependence on oil 
as  the  main  energy  resource,  its  aim  was  to  ensure  reliability  and  security  of  the 
energy  supply  by  focusing  on  four  primary  energy  resources:  oil,  gas,  hydropower 
and coal. This policy was mooted by the international oil crisis in 1979 and the leap in 
oil prices subsequently. 

9 | P a g e    

 
ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY IN MALAYSIA: THE IMPACT ON FUTURE ENERGY DEMAND IN THE INDUSTRIAL SECTOR 

• Fifth  Fuel  Policy  (Eighth  Malaysia  Plan  2001‐2005)  –  In  the  Eighth  Malaysian  Plan, 
Renewable  Energy  was  announced  as  the  fifth  fuel  in  the  energy  supply  mix. 
Renewable Energy is being targeted to be a significant contributor to the country's 
total  electricity  supply.  With  this  objective  in  mind,  greater  efforts  are  being 
undertaken  to  encourage  the  utilization  of  renewable  resources,  such  as  biomass, 
biogas, solar and mini‐hydro, for energy generation. 
• Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Ninth Malaysia Plan 2006‐2010) ‐ The Ninth 
Plan strengthens the initiatives for energy efficiency and renewable energy put forth 
in the Seventh and Eighth Malaysia Plan that focused on better utilisation of energy 
resources. An emphasis to further reduce the dependency on petroleum provides for 
more efforts to integrate alternative fuels. 

The culmination of energy efficiency policy marks a new beginning in the Malaysian energy 
generation and consumerism. The policy sets forth to regulate and enhance the efficient use 
of energy in all aspects of industrial and commercial business via the promotion of energy 
efficiency technology. 

10 | P a g e    

 
ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY IN MALAYSIA: THE IMPACT ON FUTURE ENERGY DEMAND IN THE INDUSTRIAL SECTOR 

3.0  ENERGY DEMAND AND SUPPLY 
 

Energy demand and supply has increased by more than 60 % within the last 15 years (Table 
2  and  Table  3),  and  expected  to  increase  further  by  2010.  The  Industrial  Sector  (mining, 
manufacturing and electricity) has been the largest consumer until recently, been surpassed 
by the Transport Sector.  

Table 3: Primary Commercial Energy Supply1 by Source

1990 1995 2000 2005 2010


PJ % PJ % PJ % PJ % PJ %
Source
Crude Oil & Petroleum Products 520.2 71.4 702.2 54.3 988.1 49.3 1181.2 46.8 1400 44.8
Natural Gas2 114.4 15.7 459.5 35.5 845.6 42.2 1043.9 41.3 1300 41.6
Hydro 38.3 5.3 64.5 5.0 104.1 5.2 230 9.1 350 11.2
Coal & Coke 55.5 7.6 67.5 5.2 65.3 3.3 71 2.8 77.7 2.5
Total 728.4 100 1293.7 100.0 2003.1 100.0 2526.1 100.0 3127.7 100.0
Source for compilation: Malaysia Seventh (1996-2000), Eighth (2001-2005) and Ninth (2006-2010) Plan, Economic Planning Unit (EPU), Malaysia
1
Refers to the supply of commercial energy that has not undergone a transformation process to produce energy.
Non-commercial energy such as biomass and solar have been excluded
2
Excludes flared gas, reinjected gas and exports of liquefied natural gas

However, the percentage of energy consumed by industry is approximately 62 % of the total 
energy used in Malaysia, since 50.6 % of electricity 3  is consumed by industrial sector (refer 
Chart  4  and  Chart  5)  in  addition  to  the  38.7  %  of  primary  energy.  Hence,  the  Industrial 
Sector is the largest energy consumer in Malaysia. 

Chart 6: Electricity Consumer of 

Chart 5: Sales of Electricity of  TNB, SESB and SESCO According to 
Sectors
0.4%
0.7%
0.1%
15.5%

TNB, SESB and SESCO According to  83.3%
Public Lighting
Mining
Domestic
Commercial

Sectors Source: Energy  Commission,  Government  of Malaysia  (www.st.gov.my)


Industrial

1.0%
0.1%
18.9%
Public Lighting

50.6% Mining
Domestic
Commercial

29.4% Industrial

Source: Energy Commission, Government of Malaysia (www.st.gov.my)
 

                                                            
3
 Power sector consumes 30 % of primary energy supply 

11 | P a g e    

 
ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY IN MALAYSIA: THE IMPACT ON FUTURE ENERGY DEMAND IN THE INDUSTRIAL SECTOR 

Subsequent  benchmarking  of  industrial  energy  consumption  against  developing  countries 


(Figure  1),  shows  Malaysian  industries’  energy  efficiency  and  energy  intensity  can  be 
improved further. 

Figure 1:  Industrial Fuel Intensity in Selected ASEAN 
Countries 1980‐2000
450
toe/GDP Industrial 1995 US Million

400
350
300
Phillipines
250
200 Thailand
150 Malaysia
100 Vietnam
50
Indonesia
0
1980 1985 1990 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000

Year
 
Source: MIEEIP, PTM 
 
A further analysis on the available non‐renewable sources reveals a non‐pleasant scenario in 
the coming decades, if Malaysia does not develop and implement succinct energy policies. 
The oil reserves are expected to exhaust in 19 years [2] at the current rate of 0.73 million 
bpd extraction. Conversely, natural gas reserve may indicate a more positive note, albeit still 
will  deplete  in  33  years  [2].  Coal  reserves  are  in  abundance,  however  the  local  coal 
production  is  limited  due  to  most  reserves  are  in  the  interiors  of  the  country  and  would 
incur large cost for extraction [8]. 

   

12 | P a g e    

 
ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY IN MALAYSIA: THE IMPACT ON FUTURE ENERGY DEMAND IN THE INDUSTRIAL SECTOR 

4.0  ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY (EET) IN MALAYSIAN INDUSTRY  

The  energy  efficiency  technology  (EET)  advancement  in  Malaysia  has  been  enhanced  and 
strengthened with the establishment of Malaysia Industrial Energy Efficiency Improvement 
Project (MIEEIP). The project is co‐funded by the Malaysian Government (under the Ministry 
of  Energy,  Water  and  Communications,  MEWC),  United  Nations  Development  Programme 
and the Malaysian private sector, and is executed by the Malaysia Energy Centre (PTM). This 
five‐year  national  initiative  (1999‐2004)  has  been  extended  to  June  2007  due  to 
overwhelming participation from the industry.  

Based  on  energy  audit  activities  carried  out  in  eight  energy  intensive  industrial  sectors,  it 
was reported that potential energy savings would amount to 7.1PJA. This is realised with an 
estimated capital expenditure of USD 26 million [9]. Apart from this, the Malaysian Energy 
Efficiency  Plan  (EEP)  foresees  a  potential  energy  saving  of  above  1400  GWh  over  the 
equipment life‐time, equivalent to USD 62.6 million.  

The type of energy efficiency technology applicable for the energy intensity enhancement of 
an industry is very specific to that industry. The type of application in some of the industry 
modelled by MIEEIP is shown in Table 4. 

Table 4: Applicable Energy Efficient Technology for Malaysian Industry (MIEEIP Model)

No. Sector Energy Saving Application


1 Cement High insulating bricks in rotary kiln burning zone; and/or
Rotary kiln combustion control and management system
2 Ceramic Ceramic recuperator in sanitary ware muffle kiln
3 Food Compact immersion tube juice pasteurisation; and/or
Mechanical vapour recompression evaporator
Energy efficient food blanching through steam recirculation
4 Glass Electric heating or glass furnace forehearth; and/or
External sprayed-applied insulating fibers for furnace refrigerator
5 Iron & Use of low excess air recuperative burners; and/or
Steel Improved ladle drying and preheating in small foundaries
6 Pulp & Radio frequency drying
Paper Improved paper drying system
7 Rubber Drying air recirculation; and/or
Insulation jackets for rubber injection press mold
8 Wood Flash steam and condensate recovery; and/or
Automatic solid fuel feeding and combustion system
Wood dust burning system
Source: MIEEIP, PTM

13 | P a g e    

 
ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY IN MALAYSIA: THE IMPACT ON FUTURE ENERGY DEMAND IN THE INDUSTRIAL SECTOR 

The above table provides a small fraction of the technologies available in the market to be 
utilised  by  the  industry.  There  are  number  of  Combined  Heat  and  Power  (CHP)  efficient 
technology  being  promoted  in  Malaysia  to  proliferate  the  efficient  use  of  primary  energy 
such as natural gas [10]. The various EETs, but not exhaustive, have been listed in Appendix 
1 for a quick perception of the progress of EET in Malaysia.  

14 | P a g e    

 
ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY IN MALAYSIA: THE IMPACT ON FUTURE ENERGY DEMAND IN THE INDUSTRIAL SECTOR 

5.0  CASE STUDY OF EET MODEL IN INDUSTRY 
 

This part of the report attempts to provide a brief overview of some of the Energy Efficiency 
Technology  application  being  modelled  by  MIEEIP  in  the  industry.  Four  case  studies  have 
been  reviewed  in  this  section  and  the  potential  energy  and  cost  savings,  along  with  the 
technology applied have been summarised in the following matrix. 

Table 5: Energy Efficient Application in MIEEIP Industry Model (Case Studies)

Plant 1: Cargill Palm Products Sdn Bhd Plant 3: Pan-Century Edible Oils
Product: Refined palm oil Product: Refined Palm Oil
Capacity: 450 kMTA Capacity: 1000 kMTA
Sub-sector: Food Sub-sector: Food
Energy Efficient Application: Heat Recovery System Energy Efficient Application: Steam system optimization (using vacuum pump,
Process control of Stearin Hold-up Tank heating pressure regulating valves, etc.)
Boiler fuel switching to Natural Gas High efficiency motors
Other maintenance activities (non-related) Cooling tower modifications for thermal efficiency
Total Energy Saving 24,522 GJ/annum Total Energy Saving 35,000 GJ/annum
Total Cost Saving USD 0.546 million/annum Total Cost Saving USD 0.285 million/annum

Plant 2: JG Container Sdn Bhd Plant 4: Malayawata Sdn Bhd


Product: Glass container Product: Steel
Capacity: 120 MTD Capacity: 700 kMTA
Sub-sector Glass Sub-sector Iron & Steel
Energy Efficient Application: Replacement of 1970's with new glass furnace Energy Efficient Application: Two stage recuperator installation
Annealing lehrs replaced with energy efficient VSD for process cooling water pump
LPG/NG fired lehr Reheating furnace burner fuel atomisation
Recycle of cullet washing water Fuel pre-hetaing using flue gas
Total Energy Saving 60,100 GJ/annum Total Energy Saving 19,724 GJ/annum
Water Saving 8,250 m3/annum Fuel Saving 2,210 T/annum
Total Cost Saving USD 0.514 milliom/annum Total Cost Saving USD 0.572 million/annum
Source: MIEEIP, PTM

The  above  case  studies  represent  some  of  the  typical  energy  inefficiencies  in  Malaysian 
industry that has the potential for large degree of improvement. These plants are among 6.7 
million  (refer  Chart  6)  industrial  energy  consumers  that  potentially  require  some  form  of 
energy efficiency tool to improve their energy intensity. 

 
15 | P a g e    

 
ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY IN MALAYSIA: THE IMPACT ON FUTURE ENERGY DEMAND IN THE INDUSTRIAL SECTOR 

6.0  FUTURE ENERGY DEMAND:  QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS 
 

In order to undertake the task of quantifying the impact of EET on future energy demand in 
the industrial sector, plausible assumptions are essential due to the dynamics of economy, 
social and political force that influence the energy demand in a country. The following are 
the assumptions expressed in deriving the quantitative impact of EET: 

• Although  the  economic growth  and  energy  demand  are  linked,  the  strength  of  the 
link  varies  among  regions  over  time.  Specifically,  for  the  non‐OECD  countries 
(excluding  non‐OECD  Europe  and  Eurasia),  energy  demand  and  economic  growth 
have been closely correlated for much of the past two decades [5] 

• The population projection [4] for Malaysia had been taken at 1.6 % per annum over 
the  period  of  analysis,  which  is  from  the  year  2005  to  2020,  hence  the  energy  per 
capita rises in tandem 

• A  linear  correlation  had  been  assumed  between  consumption  per  capita  and  time 
function as indicated by the per capita against year plot 

• Political influence had been thought to remain stable and current policies pertaining 
to the use of fossil fuel and renewable will progressively improve 

• Pareto  principle  of  80:20  is  utilised  to  simplify  the  route  of  quantification,  which 
provides a rather low figure of energy saving, compared to actual potential 

• MIEEIP energy audit data is considered as a random study of the Malaysian industry, 
therefore  enabling  a  secondary  assumption  that  all  other  cases  in  the  sector  have 
same level of improvement potential 

• Alternatively, the Simple Ratio Method was used to provide a comparison study of 
the potential energy saving affected by the use of EET. In this method, the following 
secondary assumptions were made: 

16 | P a g e    

 
ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY IN MALAYSIA: THE IMPACT ON FUTURE ENERGY DEMAND IN THE INDUSTRIAL SECTOR 

o Total energy consumed is directly proportional to inefficient use of energy 

o Energy consumed includes both electrical and fuel energy 

o All  consumers  have  certain  degree  of  inefficiency  and  as  the  number  of 
consumers increase, the cumulative effect of inefficiency becomes averaged 
to  the  largest  consumer’s  inefficiency  and  therefore  creates  proportional 
energy saving relative to the smallest consumer group energy saving 

o Other  demand  factors  (such  as  maintenance,  turnaround  activity  etc)  are 
assumed constant and has insignificant cumulative effect.  

The  figures  in  Appendices  2  and  3  have  been  generated  using  some  of  the  above 
assumption. The curves obtained from the figures has regression (R square) factor between 
0.98‐0.99, which indicates a strong linear relationship of the plots. The estimates of energy 
demand for the year 2010 to 2020 has a marginal error of ± 5%, due to data disparity. Figure 
4  in  Appendix  3  provides  a  comparison  on  the  impact  of  EET  when  implemented  in  the 
industry,  with  the  assumption  that  the  implementation  has  been  carried  out  earlier  than 
2010 to produce the effect.  

The first curve shows the possible energy demand being 1138 PJA in 2020, without the EET 
impact. However, a reduction of 5 % energy demand is observed in the second curve (1081 
PJA).  This  reduction  is  observed  for  an  energy  saving  of  57.3  PJA  vis‐a‐vis  EET  application, 
and as calculated based on Pareto rule (Appendix 4). The third curve shows a reduction of 5 
%  in  energy  demand,  using  a  value  of  59.6  PJA  as  energy  saving  [9],  which  was  obtained 
from  a  literature  by  Malaysia  Energy  Centre  (PTM).  Alternatively,  via  the  Simple  Ratio 
method,  the  fourth  curve  shows  a  reduction  of  109PJA,  which  is  about  9.6  %  of  energy 
demand. 

Although the estimated values’ error margin and impact order is in the same magnitude, the 
overall  figure  indicates  a  potential  gain  in  energy  utilisation  with  the  application  of  EET. 
However, the error margin could be reduced with better set of data over a longer period of 

17 | P a g e    

 
ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY IN MALAYSIA: THE IMPACT ON FUTURE ENERGY DEMAND IN THE INDUSTRIAL SECTOR 

analysis  and  a  comprehensive  industrial  energy  consumption  data,  which  is  lacking  in  this 
analysis. 

18 | P a g e    

 
ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY IN MALAYSIA: THE IMPACT ON FUTURE ENERGY DEMAND IN THE INDUSTRIAL SECTOR 

7.0  CONCLUSION 
 

A  progressive  nation  such  as  Malaysia  stands  to  gain  more  with  better  technologies.  At 
present, Malaysia is a net exporter of energy, however, this advantage may not remain in 
decades  to  come,  as  its  natural  resources  deplete.  On  a  more  positive  note,  Malaysia  is 
evolving its energy policies effectively, albeit a little slower than many developing countries 
such as China and India. Subsequently, an effective implementation of the energy efficient 
policies and technologies will be the ultimate outcome anticipated to ensure future energy 
use optimisation.  

This  report  has  shown  the  progressive  policy  development,  the  industrial  energy  demand 
and  several  case  studies  of  Energy  Efficiency  Technology  implementation  in  Malaysia.  The 
attempt to quantify the impact of EET in the future energy demand for industry has been 
made with reasonable assumptions and limited available data. The impact of EET is seen to 
be assisting the country between five to ten percent of energy reduction between 2010 and 
2020. This impact could be lesser or more, depending on the extent of EET implementation. 
The effective implementation of EET in five to ten years from now will depend on how the 
policies are regulated, how the consumers’ awareness of economic loss (in the absence of 
EET)  is  projected  and  the  consumers’  capacity  to  embrace  higher  energy  efficiency 
technologies.  

Although  the  analysis  indicates  lower  energy  consumption  in  the  industry  as  an  impact  of 
EET implementation, this may not be the ultimate solution for future energy demand as the 
burgeoning economy and population will subsequently drive for higher energy requirement. 
A  multifaceted  synergized  approach  for  technology  and  renewable  energy  development 
would probably be a more pragmatic solution. 

19 | P a g e    

 
ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY IN MALAYSIA: THE IMPACT ON FUTURE ENERGY DEMAND IN THE INDUSTRIAL SECTOR 

REFERENCES 
 

[1]  International  Energy  Agency  (IEA),  www.iea.org.  Energy  Technology  Essentials 


(2007). 

[2]  United  Nations  Development  Programme  (UNDP),  www.undp.org.my.  Achieving 


Industry Energy Efficiency in Malaysia(2006). 

[3]  Economic  Planning  Unit  (EPU),  www.epu.gov.my.  The  Ninth  Malaysia  Plan  (RMK9), 
2006. 

[4]  The Star Online, www.thestar.com.my. Malaysia Ninth Plan, March 31, 2006. 

[5]  Energy  Information  Administration,  www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo.world.html  World 


Energy  and  Economic  Outlook,  International  Energy  Outlook  2006;  Report 
No.:DOE/EIA‐0484(2006). 

[6]  Economic Planning Unit (EPU), www.epu.gov.my. The Seventh Malaysia Plan (RMK7), 
1996. 

[7]  A.  Rahman  Mohamed,  K.T.  Lee.  Energy  for  sustainable  development  in  Malaysia: 
Energy policy and alternative energy. Energy Policy (2006); 34(15): 2388–2397 

[8]  Economic Planning Unit (EPU), www.epu.gov.my. The Eighth Malaysia Plan (RMK8), 
2001. 

[9]  R. Ponnudorai. Concept Paper on EE Business Opportunity in Malaysia (2005); PTM, 
www.ptm.org.my  

[10]  Phang  AC.  Potential  of  Gas  Fired  CHP  in  the  Manufacturing  Sector  in  Malaysia, 
Malaysian‐Danish Environmental Cooperation Programme (2005).  

20 | P a g e    

 
 
Table 6: Potential Energy and Cost Saving Identified from the Factories Audited Under the MIEEIP, Malaysia 2004

Sectors Food Wood Ceramic Cement Glass Rubber Pulp & Iron & Total

21 | P a g e    
Paper Steel
Annual Energy Consumption (GJ/annum) 1,835,430 1,031,528 774,061 21,556,595 4,000,370 611,307 5,080,208 4,223,247 39,112,746
1
Annual Energy Cost ('000 USD /annum) 12,067 3,861 6,875 58,328 27,951 4,831 24,057 45,752 183,721
Total Energy Savings (Total GJ/annum) 373,587 360,561 155,356 345,508 104,095 162,472 811,547 270,053 2,583,179
1
Total Cost Saving ('000 USD /annum) 2,433 1,486 1,712 9,643 710 1,232 5,648 1,499 24,363
Source of Data: PTM Findings of the Energy Audits
1
1USD = RM 3.5

 
Table 7: List of EE Project for Second Phase of MIEEIP's Demonstration Project

Project Sector Energy Saving (annual)


Energy GJ Energy Cost USD
Boiler economiser & waste heat recovery Food 167,087 620,000
Electrode Regulating System for EAF Iron & Steel 26,222 3,123,429
Energy Leakage Reduction Cement 9,180 257,143
Gob monitoring & fuel substitution Glass 1,780 400,571
Improve in fractionation plant cooling Food 1,900 111,429
Steam absorption chiller Pulp & Paper 13,116 213,143
Diesel generator flue gas drying Wood 39,955 284,571
Low thermal kiln Ceramic 16,107 137,143
Appendix 1:  Examples of Energy Efficiency Technology  

Total 275,347 5,147,429


Source: Reference (8)

 
ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY IN MALAYSIA: THE IMPACT ON FUTURE ENERGY DEMAND IN THE INDUSTRIAL SECTOR 

 
ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY IN MALAYSIA: THE IMPACT ON FUTURE ENERGY DEMAND IN THE INDUSTRIAL SECTOR 

Appendix 2:  Energy Demand Curve Estimates without EET Impact 
Figure 2: Energy Demand Curve (without EET) from 1990 to 2010
2500 90

80

2000
70

60
y = 2.222x ‐ 4390.
1500 R² = 0.990

y = 80.66x ‐ 160013 50
Energy, PJ

R² = 0.985
GJ
40
1000

30

20
500 y = 31.72x ‐ 62936
R² = 0.984

10

0 0
1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015

Year

Industry Energy Demand, PJ Energy Demand, PJ GJ/Capita


 

Figure 3: Energy Demand Estimates (without EET ) from 2010 to 2020
3500 120

3000
100

2500
80

2000 GJ
Energy, PJ

60

1500

40
1000

20
500

0 0
1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025

Year

Industry Energy Demand, PJ Energy Demand, PJ GJ/Capita


 
22 | P a g e    

 
 
Figure 4: Energy Demand Estimates with EET Impact from 2010 to 2020

1090

23 | P a g e    
990

890

790

690

Energy, PJ
590

490

390

290

190
Appendix 3:  Energy Demand Curve Estimates with EET Impact 

1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025

Year

Industry Energy Demand, PJ EE1 Impact on Industry (PA) EE2 Impact on Industry (Ref) EE3 Impact on Industry (SR)


ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY IN MALAYSIA: THE IMPACT ON FUTURE ENERGY DEMAND IN THE INDUSTRIAL SECTOR 

 
ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY IN MALAYSIA: THE IMPACT ON FUTURE ENERGY DEMAND IN THE INDUSTRIAL SECTOR 

Appendix 4:  Energy Savings and Quantitative Analysis Calculations 
 

Table 6: Potential Energy and Cost Saving Identified from the Factories Audited Under the MIEEIP, Malaysia 2004

Sectors Food Wood Ceramic Cement Glass Rubber Pulp & Iron & Total
Paper Steel
Annual Energy Consumption (GJ/annum) 1,835,430 1,031,528 774,061 21,556,595 4,000,370 611,307 5,080,208 4,223,247 39,112,746
1
Annual Energy Cost ('000 USD /annum) 12,067 3,861 6,875 58,328 27,951 4,831 24,057 45,752 183,721
Total Energy Savings (Total GJ/annum) 373,587 360,561 155,356 345,508 104,095 162,472 811,547 270,053 2,583,179
1
Total Cost Saving ('000 USD /annum) 2,433 1,486 1,712 9,643 710 1,232 5,648 1,499 24,363
Source of Data: PTM Findings of the Energy Audits
1
1USD = RM 3.5
 

Using Pareto Analysis


1
Total Consumer of Energy in Industry (Electrical
Cons.) 33740

Pareto Rule: 80% of inefficient use of energy in


industry is caused by 20% of the energy consumer

Number of consumers audited 43


2
Energy saving reported in the Audit (for electricity) 0.365 PJA
Percentage of this consumer 0.127 %
Saving from 20% of the Industry 57.28 PJA Electricity

Simple Ratio Method


Total Energy Consumed by 43 Consumers 39.11 PJA
Total Energy Demand by Industry 630 PJA
2
Energy Saving reported in the Audit (Total) 6.824 PJA
Total potential saving 109.92 PJA

PJA - Peta Joule per Annum


2
Based on reference (8)
1
0.5 % of Electricity Consumer - Refer Chart 5 & 6
 

 
24 | P a g e    

 
ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY IN MALAYSIA: THE IMPACT ON FUTURE ENERGY DEMAND IN THE INDUSTRIAL SECTOR 

Appendix 5:  Energy Generation Mix and Power Producers’ Capacity 

Chart 1: Generation Plan Mix 
10.3%
18.4%
Coal
Oil
2.5%
Distillate
0.3%
Diesel
7.5%
Biomass
1.9% Hydro
0.7% Gas
Others
58.4%

Source: Energy Commission, Government of Malaysia (www.st.gov.my)
 

Chart 2: Generation Capacity of 
Major Power Producers
0.5% 5.6%
3.5%
1.5% TNB
1.5% 27.3%
SESB
SESCO
IPP (Peninsular Malaysia)
IPP (Sabah)

2.3% IPP (Sarawak)

2.6% Co‐Gen (Peninsular Malaysia)
Co‐Gen (Sabah)
55.2%
Private Generation

Source: Energy Commission, Government of Malaysia (www.st.gov.my)
 

25 | P a g e    

 
ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY IN MALAYSIA: THE IMPACT ON FUTURE ENERGY DEMAND IN THE INDUSTRIAL SECTOR 

Appendix 6:  Generation Mix and Power Producers’ Generation 

Chart 3: Generation Mix in Malaysia
5.8% 0.6%
0.6%
2.8%
0.1% 23.5%
Coal
Gas
Distillate
Diesel
Biomass
Hydro
Others
66.6%

Chart 4: Generation by Major Power 
Producers in Malaysia
0.4%
3.4% 1.1%
1.9%
1.9% TNB
27.9%
SESB
SESCO
IPP (Peninsular Malaysia)
IPP (Sabah)

1.5% IPP (Sarawak)

2.1% Co‐Gen (Peninsular Malaysia)
Co‐Gen (Sabah)
59.8%
Private Generation

Source: Energy Commission, Government of Malaysia (www.st.gov.my)
 
26 | P a g e    

 
ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY IN MALAYSIA: THE IMPACT ON FUTURE ENERGY DEMAND IN THE INDUSTRIAL SECTOR 

Appendix 7:  Sales of Electricity and Consumers 

Chart 5: Sales of Electricity of 
TNB, SESB and SESCO According to 
Sectors
1.0%
0.1%

18.9%
Public Lighting

50.6% Mining
Domestic
Commercial
Industrial
29.4%

Source: Energy Commission, Government of Malaysia (www.st.gov.my)
 

Chart 6: Electricity Consumer of 
TNB, SESB and SESCO According to 
Sectors
0.7%
0.4% 0.1%
15.5%

Public Lighting
Mining
Domestic
83.3% Commercial
Industrial

Source: Energy Commission, Government of Malaysia (www.st.gov.my)
 
27 | P a g e