Anda di halaman 1dari 37

timesleader.

com
WILKES-BARRE, PA ThuRSdAy, SEPTEmBER 12, 2013 50
6 09815 10011
NEWS
Local 3A
Nation &World 5A
Obituaries 10A
INSIDE
Editorials 11A
Weather 12A
SPORTS: 1B
BUSINESS: 8B
LIFE: 1C
Birthdays 3C
Television 4C
movies 4C
Puzzles 5C
CLASSIFIED: 1D
Comics 10d
NANTICOKE
Speaking before hundreds
of Greater Nanticoke Area
students in eighth through
12th grades, John Halligan
emotionally told the story
of his son, Ryan, who com-
mitted suicide in 2003 at the
age of 13.
He detailed the story of
physical and cyber-bullying
his son went through that
ultimately led to him taking
his own life.
I cant x everything with
a speech, said Halligan, a
nationally touring speaker.
But my hope is I can help
at least one of you.
Despite a few problems
with the sound system,
Halligans message seem-
ingly came through loud
and clear to the students.
Many asked questions after
the presentation and sev-
eral remained to have one-
on-one teary conversations
with him.
Halligan and his wife,
Kelly, have a website
ryansstory.org and
they personally respond to
emails to try to help wher-
ever they can.
This community, this
school, has lost a few kids in
recent years, Halligan said
after his presentation. A lot
of the students are having a
difcult time nding their
way through the experi-
ence of losing a friend. They
asked me for advice on how
to move on after the loss of
somebody.
Halligan will be in
Luzerne County for three
weeks speaking to students
in all its school districts and
to parents groups. The for-
mer IBM worker from New
York has dedicated his life
to trying to eradicate bully-
ing and to prevent suicide,
especially among young
people.
Personal story shared
Standing alone on stage,
Halligan relates Ryans story
as pictures of his son and
family ash on a screen
behind him. Halligan then
tells the story of his sons
tragic journey that began in
the fth grade and ended at
the start of eighth grade.
Halligan talks about the
his sons innocence his
UNITED NATIONS Key international
players were moving on two diplomatic fronts
Wednesday to try to put Syrias chemical weap-
ons under international control, and a fresh
effort appeared to be underway to get the gov-
ernment and opposition to peace talks.
The ve veto-wielding
members of the Security
Council, who have been deeply
divided over Syria, met late
Wednesday to discuss what
to include in a new resolution
requiring that Syrias chemical
weapons stockpile be secured
and dismantled. They later left
Russias U.N. mission without
commenting.
At the same time, U.S. Secretary of State John
Kerry and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey
Lavrov were heading to Geneva with teams of
experts for broader-ranging talks today about
the nuts and bolts of putting Syrias chemi-
cal weapons under international control and
Diplomats
hold fate
of Syria
Talks continue in attempt
to get regime to give up
chemical weapons
EDITH M. LEDERER
Associated Press
Fred Adams | For The Times Leader
John Halligan tells
Greater Nanticoke
Area High School
students about
the harmful
consequences of
bullying during a
presentation he
intends to offer
throughout the
county this month
aimed at prevent-
ing youth sui-
cides. Halligans
son Ryan, seen
pictured on the
screen behind
him, took his own
life in 2003 at
age 13.
Father tells of bullyings deadly toll
GNAstudents hear about
tragic consequences of
physical, online taunting
BILL OBOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
AP photo
Geraldine Davie of Pelham, N.Y., cries Wednesday after viewing the name of her 23-year-old daughter, Amy ODoherty, on the wall at the
Sept. 11 memorial in New York City.
REMEMBERING SEPT. 11, 2001
Our hearts still ache for the futures snatched away, the lives that might have been.
A major ood can wreak
havoc in a town in a matter
of hours, but West Pittston is
learning that getting a levee
built will take years if it
ever happens.
Borough residents have
been aching for a levee since
record Susquehanna River
ooding damaged more than
800 structures two years ago,
and the U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers may soon begin
the process required to make
it happen.
The rst step to obtain
a levee is an initial assess-
ment, which takes nine to
12 months, Army Corps
Baltimore District spokes-
woman Ashley W. Roberts
said Wednesday.
Borough ofcials formally
requested an assessment in
June, and the Army Corps
will include the $100,000 cost
of this study in its 2014 fed-
eral budget request, Roberts
said.
The assessment will look at
water patterns and past ood-
ing to help the Army Corps
decide whether a feasibility
study is warranted, Roberts
said.
It looks at the whole com-
munity and how ooding
impacts the community, she
said.
If the assessment convinces
the Army Corps to proceed,
a feasibility study would be
completed to identify the
appropriate ood control
system and project if the
potential cost of damages in
future oods would surpass
construction costs, which
is known as a benet cost
ratio, Roberts said.
A feasibility study takes
18 months to two years to
complete, and the federal
government equally splits the
cost with the sponsor, which
would be the borough, she
said.
If that study results in a
recommended levee, the fed-
eral government would cover
65 percent of the design and
construction, while the spon-
sor must come up with the
remaining 35 percent, she
said.
Will cost millions
Cost estimates for a West
Borough
pushing
for levee
of its own
West Pittston faces long
haul in food-control quest
JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES
jandes@timesleader.com
Hearing echoes
of loved ones lost
NEW YORK Life in lower
Manhattan resembled any ordinary
day on Wednesday as workers rushed
to their jobs in the muggy heat, but
time stood still at the World Trade
Center site while families wept for
loved ones who perished in the terror
attacks 12 years ago.
For the families, the memories of
that day are still vivid, the pain still
acute. Some who read the names of
a beloved big brother or a cherished
daughter could hardly speak through
their tears.
Has it really been 12 years? Or 12
days? Sometimes it feels the same,
said Michael Fox, speaking aloud to
his brother, Jeffrey, who perished in
the south tower. Sometimes I reach
for the phone so I can call you, and we
can talk about our kids like we used to
do every day.
On the memorial plaza overlooking
two reecting pools in the imprint of
the twin towers, relatives recited the
names of the nearly 3,000 people who
died when hijacked jets crashed into
the towers, the Pentagon and in a eld
near Shanksville, Pa. They also recog-
nized the victims of the 1993 trade
center bombing.
Bells tolled to mark the planes hit-
ting the towers and the moments
when the skyscrapers fell.
In Washington, President Barack
Obama, rst lady Michelle Obama,
Vice President Joe Biden and wife
Jill Biden walked out to the White
Houses South Lawn for a moment of
silence at 8:46 a.m. the time the
rst plane struck the south tower in
New York. Another jetliner struck the
Pentagon at 9:37 a.m.
Our hearts still ache for the futures
snatched away, the lives that might
have been, Obama said.
A moment of silence was also held
at the U.S. Capitol.
In New York, loved ones milled
around the memorial site, making
rubbings of names, putting owers
by the names of victims and weeping,
A nation pauses and refects
12 years afer terror struck
JIM FITZGERALD and MEGHAN BARR
Associated Press
Clark Van Orden | The Times Leader
Rebecca Green and Alyssa Lord, both
students in the Law Enforcement/Police
Science program at the West Side Career &
Technology Center in Pringle, raise the flag
at the start of a ceremony honoring the vic-
tims of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks in front
of the school Wednesday morning.
W-BArea pact
has costs, savings
WILKES-BARRE The new Wilkes-Barre
Area School District teacher union contract
will cost about $2.2 million in raises over its
four-year lifespan, but substantial increases in
deductibles and co-pays in health insurance
coverage should save at least $1 million a year,
Business Manager Leonard Przywara said.
The contract, approved in principle by the
union last June and formally approved by the
school board Monday, still awaited nal signa-
tures by both parties Wednesday and was thus
not publicly available, but Przywara offered key
changes in health insurance coverage that he
said create the savings.
Przywara stressed that those savings are for
all employees covered by insurance, not only
teachers, and that three other contracts one
MARK GUYDISH
mguydish@timesleader.com
Relax! They say
its good for you.
LIFE, 1C
Aholiday gift list BUSINESS, 8B
Where can you
get that gadget?
See LEVEE | 12A See REMEMBERING 9/11 | 12A
Kerry
See SYRIA | 9A
See BULLYING | 9A
Contract includes yearly raises, plus changes
to workers health insurance coverage
See CONTRACT | 12A
PAGE 2A Thursday, September 12, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
DETAILS
LOTTERY
MIDDAYDRAWING
DAILYNUMBER - 4-1-5
BIG4 - 3-8-5-4
QUINTO - 1-8-8-7-7
TREASURE HUNT
03-09-15-18-21
EVENING DRAWING
DAILYNUMBER - 0-8-6
BIG4 - 3-7-2-8
QUINTO - 0-8-5-9-1
CASH5
25-6-30-31-33
POWERBALL
11-19-33-42-52
POWER BALL - 33
HARRISBURG - No
player matched all five
numbers in Wednesdays
Cash 5 jackpot drawing.
Todays jackpot will be
worth $500,000.
Lottery officials report-
ed 74 players matched
four numbers, winning
$306 each; 2,940 players
matched three numbers,
winning $13 each; and
37,113 players matched
two numbers, winning $1
each.
OBITUARIES
Ambrose, Rev. Dr. W. Haydn
Antall, David Jr.
Basta, Jeanne
Boyd, Mary
Dunn, James
Flanagan, Patricia
Judge, Peter
Koonrad, Margaret
Krueger, Edythe Ann
Larock, Janice
Mihnovich, Daniel
Morgan, Dennis
Nicholson, John
Noakes, Nathaniel
Novak, Stephen
Savage, AndrewII
Shoop, Charlene
Slamas, Adam
Stempleski, Stephen
Sylakiewicz, Angeline
Zoltewicz, Helen
Pages 2A, 10A
WHO TO CONTACT
Missed Paper .................... 829-5000
Obituaries ........................... 970-7224
Advertising .......................... 970-7101
Advertising Billing ............. 970-7328
Classifed Ads ..................... 970-7130
Newsroom........................... 970-7242
City Editor
Daniel Burnett ................................ 970-7180
Sports Editor
John Medeiros ............................... 970-7143
Features Editor
Sandra Snyder ................................. 970-7383
Photo Editor
Clark Van Orden ............................. 970-7175
E-MAIL ......... tlnews@timesleader.com
BUILDING TRUST
The Times Leader strives to
correct errors, clarify stories
and update them promptly.
Corrections will appear in this
spot. If you have information to
help us correct an inaccuracy or
cover an issue more thoroughly,
call the newsroom at 829-7242.
THE TIMES LEADER ACIVITAS MEDIAcompany
2013-255
Wilkes-Barre Publishing, LLC
WALT LAFFERTY
Regional Business Development
Director &General Manager
(570) 970-7158
wlaferty@civitasmedia.com
DENISE SELLERS
VP/Chief Revenue Ofcer
(570) 970-7203
dsellers@civitasmedia.com
JIMMcCABE
Circulation Manager
(570) 970-7450
jmccabe@civitasmedia.com
JEFFTINNER
Production Director
(570) 829-7172
jtinner@civitasmedia.com
DAVID J. ANTALL JR.
Sept. 6, 2013
David J. Antall Jr., 67, of
Swoyersville, passed away
Friday afternoon, Sept. 6, 2013,
surrounded by his loving family
at Thomas Jefferson University
Hospital, Philadelphia.
Born May 29, 1946, in Nesbitt
Hospital, Kingston, he was a son
of the late David J. and Mary
Nanny Yosh Antall.
David was a graduate of
Larksville High School, class of
1964. He joined the U.S. Army
in January 1966 and served in
Vietnam, achieving the rank
of SP5 until his honorable dis-
charge in October 1968. He
was honored with the National
Defense Service Medal, Vietnam
Campaign Medal and Vietnam
Service Medal.
He began his career as an
electronics technician shortly
after his discharge at Owens-
Illinois/Techneglas in Jenkins
Township, retiring in 2004.
David continued his career at
Tobyhanna Army Depot until
his nal retirement in 2010.
He enjoyed his childhood,
growing up in Larksville with
his only brother, Stephen.
He married his grade school
sweetheart, the former Anna
Bromuko, on May 24, 1969.
They built a happy life together,
adding two sons, David J. Antall
III and Christopher S. Antall, to
complete their family.
Their family began to grow
when their son David married
his wife, Jennifer, and they
blessed them with their rst
two grandchildren, Patrick and
Carolyn, who reside in Kingston.
Chris continued to expand their
growing family when he married
his wife, Jill, and they added to
the next generation with James,
Julia, and Sarah, who reside in
Dallas Township. He cherished
all of his grandchildren, never
missing a chance to be their big-
gest fan at their various activi-
ties and sports.
Over 44 years of marriage
and his growing family left
David with an infectious smile
from ear to ear. The joy Anna
and his family gave him was evi-
dent every day.
He is also survived by a large
extended family, and will be
greatly missed by all who knew
and loved him.
As an avid Penn State fan,
you would nd him glued to the
television during every game.
He spent his boys childhood
coaching their Swoyersville
Little League teams.
David and Anna enjoyed
many visits to the casinos, rst
in Atlantic City and later closer
to home. He loved a good meal
out, especially when he could
share it with his many family
members. David always had a
comforting smile and kept up
lively conversation to make
those around him feel at ease.
He was also a faithful member
of St. John the Baptist Church in
Larksville, where he loved the
annual bazaar.
Funeral will be at
10 a.m. Saturday at
the Yeosock Funeral
Home, 40 S. Main St.,
Plains Township, with a Mass
of Christian Burial at 10:30 a.m.
in St. John the Baptist Church,
Larksville. Interment with mili-
tary honors will be in St. John
the Baptist Cemetery, Pringle.
Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m.
Friday at the funeral home.
PATRICIA DALY FLANAGAN
Sept. 10, 2013
Patricia Daly Flanagan, 82, a
longtime resident of Penn Lake,
died Tuesday at her home.
Born Feb. 13, 1931, in Wilkes-
Barre Township, she was a
daughter of the late William and
Agnes Glennon Daly.
Pat was an administrative
assistant at White Haven Center
for more than 25 years before
retiring.
Mrs. Flanagan was a member
of the Parish of St. Patrick in
White Haven.
Pats greatest joy in life was
spending time with her grand-
children, who lovingly referred
to her as Nana.
Her husband, James A.
Flanagan, died Oct. 18, 1982.
She was also preceded in
death by her brothers, John C.,
William J. and James Daly.
She will be greatly missed
by her children, Patrick and his
wife, Kelly Flanagan, Dallas,
with whom she resided for the
past ve years; Kathleen and
her husband, Gustavo Estrella,
Uxbridge, Mass.; William
Flanagan, Bear Creek, and
James and his wife, Theresa
Flanagan, Springeld; grand-
children, Rachael, Christopher
and Patrick Flanagan; Antonio
and Patrick Estrella; Kaitlyn and
Krista Flanagan; Katherine and
Christina Flanagan; longtime
family friends, Alan and Julia
Mitchell, and their son, Aidan,
of Washington, D.C.; nieces,
nephews and other family and
friends.
Pats entire family is grate-
ful for the loving care given
by her care providers, Cathy
Tullo and Drs. John Brennan,
Gerald Maloney, Michael Rupp,
Aliasgar Chittalia, Philip Webb
and David Evans, as well as for
the compassionate care and
love shared by the entire staff
of Hospice of the Sacred Heart
through the past few days.
Celebration of Pats life will
be at 9:30 a.m. Saturday at
McLaughlins The Family
Funeral Service, 142 S.
Washington St., Wilkes-Barre,
with funeral Mass at 11 a.m.
in the Church of St. Patrick in
White Haven. Interment will be
in St. Patricks Cemetery, White
Haven. Visitation will be 5 to 8
p.m. Friday at McLaughlins.
Permanent messages and
memories can be shared with
Pats family at www.celebrate-
herlife.com.
NATHANIEL L. NOAKES
Sept. 11, 2013
Nathaniel L. Noakes, 90, for-
merly of Wilkes-Barre and West
Pittston, died Wednesday, Sept.
11, 2013, at Summit Golden
Living Center, Wilkes-Barre,
where he had been a guest for
some time.
Mr. Noakes was born in
Taylor, a son of the late Milton
H. and Harriet Dixson Noakes,
and attended Coughlin High
School, Wilkes-Barre. He joined
his father in the bakery business
as a young man and was later
employed as a route salesman
by Kutz Bakery, Wilkes-Barre;
Krispy Kreme Donuts, Kingston;
and Sonny Boy Bakery, Scranton.
Prior to retirement, he was a
school bus driver for some time.
Mr. Noakes had also been the
resident manager of maintenance
at the H. Merritt Hughes Funeral
Home Inc., West Pittston, for
many years.
Prior to entering Summit,
Mr. Noakes resided at the
Washington Square Apartments,
Wilkes-Barre.
Mr. Noakes had been a mem-
ber of the former Christ Lutheran
Church, Wilkes-Barre, where he
and his wife, Florence, had been
advisors to the Luther League.
He was currently a member
of Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church, Wilkes-Barre.
In addition to his parents, Mr.
Noakes was preceded in death by
an infant sister, Mary Noakes;
by his wife of 70 years, Florence
Diffenbacher Noakes, who
passed way earlier this year; and
by a daughter, Ruth Ann Roan.
Surviving are his daughter,
Mary Louise Gunshannon; sons-
in-law, Thomas Gunshannon
and Jarret Roan; grandchildren,
Thomas Gunshannon III, Natalie
and Amy Gunshannon, and Judy
Roan; great-granddaughter, Aine
Popish.
A memorial service will be at
noon Saturday at the H. Merritt
Hughes Funeral Home Inc., a
Golden Rule Funeral Home, 451
N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, with
the Rev. Peter D. Kuritz and the
Rev. Janell Wigen, co-pastors
of Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church, Wilkes-Barre, ofciating.
Friends may call 11 a.m. until the
time of service Saturday. Private
interment will be in Oak Lawn
Cemetery, Hanover Township, at
the convenience of the family.
The family requests that ow-
ers be omitted and that memo-
rial donations be made to Good
Shepherd Lutheran Church, 190
S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA
18701.
MARY ROSE BOYD
Sept. 9, 2013
Mary Rose Boyd, 77, of Park
Avenue, Wilkes-Barre, and a
resident of Little Flower Manor,
Wilkes-Barre, passedaway peace-
fully Monday.
Born in Glen Lyon on May 25,
1936, she was a daughter of the
late Metro and Anna Kozar.
She was a former member
of Holy Rosary Church, Park
Avenue, Wilkes-Barre.
Mary enjoyed many things
throughout her life. She had a
passion for reading and loved to
work on word puzzles. She also
enjoyed watching movies and
listening to polka music. She
was an avid bingo player. Her
greatest joys involved spending
time with her family and cooking
foods from her heritage: various
Russian foods and her husband
Richards favorite Italian foods.
Mary was preceded in death
by her brothers, Metro and
Daniel Kozar; stepbrothers, John
and Paul Petak; stepsister, Ann
Petak; and son-in-law, David
Zabofski.
Surviving are husband,
Richard Boyd; daughters, Janice
Pask and her husband, Charles;
Karen Boyd; Kathy Hickey;
Susan McDaniels and Maria
Zabofski; her grandchildren,
Shelly Reese, Jennifer and Nicole
Williams, Tania Shortz, Lauren
and Steven Pask, Marissa Lee
and Halle Yashkus; great-grand-
children, Michael and Braden
Shortz, Alexa Davidowski, Emily
Pask and Cole Olowiany; her
sister, Irene Terkowski; brothers,
Michael and George Kozar; and
several nieces and nephews.
Marys family acknowledges
and thanks Little Flower Manor
for the special care they gave
Mary while she was a resident
there. She was a special wife,
mom, grandma and GG Mary
(Great Grandma Mary). She will
be sadly missed by all who knew
her.
A memorial visitation will be
held 5 to 7 p.m. Monday at the
George A. Strish Inc. Funeral
Home, 105 N. Main St., Ashley.
In lieu of owers, dona-
tions in her memory may be
made to the American Diabetes
Association, 63 N. Franklin
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701.
JAMES J. DuNN, D.D.S.
Aug. 26, 2013
James J. Dunn, D.D.S., 88,
a resident of Jupiter, Fla., and
formerly of Riverside Drive
in Wilkes-Barre, passed away
Monday, Aug. 26, 2013, at
Jupiter Medical Center.
Born April 13, 1925, in
Larksville, he was a son of
the late Thomas F. and Lillian
Dougherty Dunn of Larksville
and Pittsburgh.
A graduate of Larksville High
School, Jamesearnedhispre-den-
tal degree from the University of
Scranton. He advanced his edu-
cation by earning a Doctorate of
Dental Surgery from the Temple
University School of Dentistry.
Upon graduation, James was
commissioned as an ofcer of
the U.S. Navy and proudly served
in the dental corps during the
Korean War. Subsequent to his
service in the armed forces, Dr.
Dunn earned his certicate in the
specialty of orthodontics from
the University of Pennsylvania
Graduate School of Medicine.
Dr. Dunn prominently prac-
ticed the specialty of ortho-
dontics in Wilkes-Barre for
many years. He served as past
president of the Luzerne County
Dental Society and Third
District Dental Society. James
was afliated with many profes-
sional organizations, to include
being a lifetime member of the
American Dental Association,
the American Association of
Orthodontists, the Pennsylvania
Association of Orthodontists
and the Pennsylvania American
Dental Association, to which
he also served as a delegate for
many years.
A consummate civic leader,
Dr. Dunn was a member of
Our Lady of Victory Parish,
the Westmoreland Club, was a
former member of the Wilkes-
Barre Rotary and President
Emeritus of the Susquehannock
Club of Potter County. He was
also a member of the Harveys
Lake American Legion Post 967,
where he was honored for 50
years of continuous membership.
He was preceded in death
by his wife, Helen Claire Roan
Dunn; granddaughters, Megan
Brice and Kaitlin Claire Marie
Brice; and a brother, Thomas F.
Dunn.
He will be greatly missed
by his children, James D. and
his wife, Diane Duffy Dunn,
Riverview, Fla.; William J. and
his wife, Linda Kearn Dunn,
Shavertown; Mary Ellen and
her husband, Michael L. Brice,
Summerville, S.C.; Thomas W.
and his wife, Claudia Cardenes
Dunn, Brownsville, Texas; Lee
Ann and her husband, Timothy J.
ConnollyJr., Edwardsville; grand-
children, James D. Dunn; Erin
Claire Dunn and her husband,
James Liston; Patrick J. Dunn;
Michael L. Brice, CPT; William
J. DunnJr., Esq.; Jennifer Claudia
Bridgid Dunn; MatthewS. Dunn;
Timothy J. Connolly III, Esq.;
Meaghan Claire Connolly and
her husband, Steven Ubaldini
Jr.; Thomas W. Dunn Jr.; Sara
Marie Claire Dunn and Liam S.
Dunn; seven great-grandchildren;
nieces, nephews, and other fam-
ily and friends.
Celebration of
James life will be
Saturday with a funeral
Mass at 9:30 a.m. in the
Church of Our Lady of Victory on
Lakeside Drive at Harveys Lake.
Entombment will be in the Mary,
Mother of God Mausoleum at
St. Marys Cemetery in Hanover
Township. Visitation will be 5 to
8 p.m. Friday at McLaughlins
The Family Funeral Service, 142
S. Washington St., Wilkes-Barre.
Permanent messages and
memories can be shared with
James family at www.celebrate-
hislife.com.
STEPHEN S. NOVAK
Sept. 11, 2013
Stephen S. Novak, 62, of
South Street, Nanticoke, passed
away Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013,
in the Hospice Community Care
Unit at Geisinger South Wilkes-
Barre.
Steve was born in Nanticoke
on June 11, 1951, a son of Jane
Krasucki Novak and the late
Stanley Novak.
He was a member of the for-
mer St. Stanislaus Church, cur-
rently St. Faustina Parish.
Steve was self-employed as a
painter and wallpaperer.
Stephen was preceded in
death by his son, Stephen.
Surviving, in addition to
his mother, are daughters,
Gwynne Long, Swoyersville;
Jillian Novak, Wilkes-Barre;
and Jennifer Novak, Nanticoke;
grandchildren, Nathan and
Andrew Long; and sister,
Dolores Novak, Nanticoke.
Funeral services will be at
10 a.m. Saturday from the Earl
W. Lohman Funeral Home Inc.,
14 W. Green St., Nanticoke,
with the Rev. James Nash of-
ciating. Interment will be in St.
Stanislaus Cemetery, Nanticoke.
Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m.
Friday.
REV. DR. W. HAYDNAMBROSE
Sept. 6, 2013
Rev. Dr. W. Haydn Ambrose,
90, a longtime resident of
Kalamazoo, Mich., and former
vice president of Kalamazoo
College, died Friday, Sept. 6,
2013, in Kalamazoo.
He was born in Ammanford,
Wales, in 1922, and moved
to Lehman with his family as
a child. He graduated from
Lehman High School in 1940.
He received bachelors degrees
in history and theology from
Eastern College and Eastern
Baptist Seminary and was
ordained to the ministry in 1945.
He later studied at the Lancaster
Seminary, the University of
Illinois and Western Michigan
University, where he earned a
masters degree in educational
administration.
In 1963, he received an
honorary doctorate from the
American Baptist Seminary of
the West.
The Rev. Dr. Ambrose became
vice president for development
at Kalamazoo College in 1983,
where he oversaw fundraising,
alumni relations, public rela-
tions, publications and research
and launched a major capital
campaign.
He served the college since
1967 in numerous roles, includ-
ing assistant to the president for
church relations, dean of admis-
sions and nancial aid, and asso-
ciate director of development.
He retired in 1988.
Before joining Kalamazoo
College, he was the national
director of campus ministry for
the American Baptist Churches,
based in Valley Forge. He had
been the Baptist chaplain at the
University of Illinois and pastor
of the First Baptist Church in
Mankato, Minn.
In addition to numerous
church curriculum texts, he was
the author of The Church in the
University, published in 1969.
The work reects Ambroses
lifelong commitment to the role
of educational institutions in
helping individuals and groups
learn together in a context of
freedom and creativity.
It seems evident that the
church needs to begin by learn-
ing to accept the university as
it is, he wrote in that book.
The church must realize that
the truth uncovered by this free
community of learning is the
truth which God attempts to
reveal.
He was an avid reader of
history, theology, philosophy
and science, and was very
devoted to his Welsh heritage.
He was very active in church
and community groups and met
each week with other retired
faculty and staff members of
Kalamazoo College.
He was preceded in death by
his rst wife, Jane, in 1969.
He is survived by his second
wife, Lone Bailey, whom he mar-
ried in 1971. Other survivors
include a sister, the Rev. Anita
Ambrose, Pittston; daughters,
Diana Ball and Nancy Gallagher;
sons, Brian and Ross Ambrose;
and three grandchildren.
A funeral service will be held
at the First Presbyterian Church,
Kalamazoo, at 1 p.m. Friday.
Visitation will begin at noon.
JANICE MARIE LAROCK
Sept. 11, 2013
Janice Marie Larock, 85,
of Sugarloaf, passed away
early Wednesday morning at
Berwick Retirement Village II.
Born in Lemoyne on March
31, 1928, she was a daughter
of the late Roland and Mary
(Hauze) Wright and spent
most of her life in Sugarloaf.
Together with her late hus-
band, Joe, she was the owner
of Valley Seeding Co. Inc.,
Sugarloaf.
Janice was a member of
Black Creek United Methodist
Church, Sugarloaf, and active-
ly served in many capacities
in the church, including presi-
dent of the United Methodist
Women and as a Sunday
school teacher and leader of
the youth group. She was also
a member of the Brainerd
Historical Church, Sugarloaf.
She enjoyed cooking, can-
ning, gardening and crafts.
She was preceded in death,
in addition to her parents, by
her husband, Joe, who passed
away Nov. 8, 2006; a brother,
R. James Wright; and a son-in-
law, Frank Danna.
Surviving are two daugh-
ters, Cinda Danna and Mary
Lou Burke, both of Sugarloaf;
two grandchildren, Shannon
Larock and his wife, Angela,
and Nicole Rabbitz and her
husband, John; three great-
grandchildren, Joseph and
Dante Larock, and Giavanna
Rabbitz; two step-grand-
daughters; three step-great-
grandchildren; sisters-in-law
and brothers-in-law, Nancy
Gabala, Shirley Larock,
Donald and Dorothy Larock,
and John and Shirley Larock,
all of Sugarloaf, and Barbara
Wright, Zion Grove; and many
nieces and nephews.
Her funeral will be held at
noon Saturday from Black
Creek United Methodist
Church, 158 Golf Course Road,
Sugarloaf, with her pastor, the
Rev. Gene Boyer, and her for-
mer pastor, Larry Mack, offi-
ciating. Burial will follow in
Black Creek United Methodist
Cemetery. Friends may call 10
a.m. until the time of service
at the church Saturday.
In lieu of flowers, memo-
rial donations can be made to
Black Creek United Methodist
Church, 158 Golf Course
Road, Sugarloaf, PA 18249; or
to the charity of the donors
choice.
Harman Funeral Homes &
Crematory Inc. (West), 1265
Rock Glen Road, is assisting
the family with arrangements.
Online condolences can be
entered and more information
is available at www.harmanfu-
neral.com.
More OBITUARIES | 10A
STEVE MOCARSKY
smocarsky@timesleader.com
LARKSVILLE An
Edwardsville teenager
who police say burglar-
ized a Pace Street home
Wednesday asked a judge
to release him on his own
recognizance so his nana,
whom he is caring for,
dont have to go to the
home.
District Judge Ronald
Swank denied Jesse
Rowles request at his
Wednesday night arraign-
ment, saying These are
very serious charges, and
youre already out on bail
on a previous
charge.
Larksville
p o l i c e
c h a r g e d
Rowles, 19,
with bur-
glary, crimi-
nal trespass/breaking into
a structure and resisting
arrest after he allegedly
broke into a home at 73
Pace St. shortly before
10:45 a.m. His bail was set
at $20,000.
Ofcers arrived after
a neighbor reported the
break-in and didnt know if
the suspect was still inside.
They saw a rear base-
ment window missing and
entered through an open
back door.
A Verizon technician
yelled that a male was
coming out the front door.
When ofcers went to the
front of the house, the sus-
pect ran out the back door.
Ofcers red Tasers at the
suspect but missed. After a
chase, they lost him.
Thursday afternoon,
while handling a call for
Edwardsville police about a
distraught male on a porch
, a Larksville ofcer noted
the male matched the
description of the suspect.
Under questioning,
police said Rowles admit-
ted to breaking in to the
Pace Street residence.
Police found a suitcase
belonging to the burglary
victim near the front door
of the home. Inside were
a large amount of cash,
jewelry, a backpack, a
32-inch TV, a box of cereal,
cologne, deodorant, shav-
ing razors and an Apple
iPod.
Rowleswas arrested on a
burglary charge in May and
was wanted on a warrant
from the Luzerne County
Sheriffs Department for
failure to appear. He was
jailed at the county prison.
Teen wanted release to care for nana
Rowles
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Thursday, September 12, 2013 PAGE 3A
WILKES-BARRE A
Luzerne County jury on
Wednesday found Juan Borbon
guilty of all four counts stem-
ming from a machete attack
outside the GAR High School
in February 2012.
Borbon, 21, was convicted of
two counts each of aggravated
assault and criminal conspira-
cy after a jury deliberated for
almost four hours Wednesday
afternoon.
Prosecutors say Borbon
wielded a several-inch-long
machete at GAR student
Marquis Allen, now 16, nearly
severing his left hand, in a ght
involving two groups outside
the school.
Im just so glad its nally
over, Allens mother, Darlene
Burt, said after hearing the ver-
dict.
Burt said her son recently
had some setbacks with his
physical therapy but has come
a long way since the attack.
When he saw the machete
(in the courtroom), he didnt
want to go back in, Burt said
of the three-day trial. It was
too much for him.
Deputy District Attorney
Alexis Falvello said the case
was difcult from the begin-
ning because a number of the
witnesses were young kids who
saw what Borbon did to Allen
and were afraid.
It was a long time coming,
fellow prosecutor Assistant
District Attorney Mamie
Phillips said. Were very
pleased there is justice for
Marquis.
Borbon testied Tuesday he
didnt participate in the ght
between those of Dominican
descent and African-Americans
outside the school, and that
he had been in Scranton that
morning applying for jobs
with his aunt. The defendant
is a native of the Dominican
Republican and had lived in
Paterson, N.J., before coming
to the Wyoming Valley.
Borbon maintained he
returned to Wilkes-Barre,
picked up sandwiches for him
and his girlfriend and then
returned to the Wilkes-Barre
house where he had been living
around 3:30 p.m.
The ght allegedly occurred
shortly after 2:30 p.m. when
school let out for the day.
Prosecutors say they were
able to identify Borbon as
the person who slashed Allen
because at the time he had his
hair dyed a red color and had
it pulled back in a ponytail
information corroborated by
Allen and other witnesses.
Investigators say Yansy
Abreu, 18, supplied Borbon
with the machete. Prosecutors
have said Abreu was charged
in juvenile court with unknown
related offenses and is current-
ly under supervision.
Were disappointed, obvi-
ously, Borbons attorney, Paul
Galante, said after the verdict.
But, we respect the jurys ver-
dict.
Galante said he tried to
present evidence to show
Borbon was not the attacker,
and that Borbons family was
condent he was going home
Wednesday.
During their deliberations,
jurors asked if they found
Borbon not guilty of two of the
charges, could they nd him
guilty of the remaining two.
Galante said that question
left him hopeful of a not-guilty
verdict, but you never know
what a jury is going to do.
County Judge Joseph
Sklarosky, Jr. said Borbon will
be sentenced on Oct. 21, when
he faces a maximum of 20
years in prison on one of the
aggravated assault charges.
Prosecutors said they will
be seeking a stiffer sentence
for Borbon because he used a
deadly weapon in the assault.
Prosecutors also asked that
Borbons bail be revoked, a
request that Sklarosky granted.
Borbon has been lodged at the
Luzerne County Correctional
Facility for being unable to
post $150,000 bail.
PITTSTON
WVIA director
earns an Emmy
Ben Payavis II, vice president of WVIA
Production &VIAStudios Global, a
division of WVIAPublic Media, won an
Emmy Award during
the 31st annual Mid-
Atlantic Emmy Awards in
Philadelphia on Saturday.
He won in the Best
Director Live or Live-
To-Tape category for the
WVIA original presenta-
tion Cherish the Ladies:
An Irish Homecoming, which premiered
Jan. 26 on WVIA-TV.
WVIAwas also nominated in the Human
Interest Program/Special category for an
episode of its long-running program State
of Pennsylvania titled Armed Guards In
NEPAs Schools?
WILKES-BARRE
Wilkes recognized
for vet support
For the fourth con-
secutive year, Wilkes
University has been
designated a Military
Friendly School by G.I.
Jobs magazine and its
parent company, Victory Media.
The list honors the top 20 percent of col-
leges, universities and trade schools in the
country that are doing the most to support
Americas military service members, veter-
ans and spouses as students and ensure their
success on campus.
Wilkes has worked to ensure a smooth
transition to academic life for veterans
through a number of initiatives, including
havinga dedicatedveterans affairs counselor,
retired U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Mark Kaster,
to work with veterans coming to the univer-
sity.
The Military Friendly Schools website
www.militaryfriendlyschools.com fea-
tures the list, interactive tools and search
functionality to help military students nd
the best school tosuit their unique needs and
preferences.
NEWYORK
Nanticoke native
assaulted in NYC
Brian Carey, 52, a radio anchor for CBS
1010WINSinNewYorkCity, was assaulted
in his apartment building Monday night,
according to several New York City online
newspapers.
Carey, a graduate of Kings
College who keeps a home
in Nanticoke, suffered a bro-
ken jaw and facial injuries in
the lobby of his apartment
building on East 61st Street
in the Upper East Side of
Manhattan. Carey told authorities his wal-
let and cellphone were stolen, according to
online reports.
According to his biography on the radios
website, Carey was a part-time reporter
at WBRE-TV and news director at WILK
Radio. He alsoworkedat WARMRadioand
was a morning anchor on MAGIC93 FM.
In 2005, Carey won the Achievement
in Radio Award for Best News Anchor in
New York City and a rst place Associated
Press Award for Best Regularly Scheduled
Newscast.
Kings College awarded Carey with
the Award for Outstanding Professional
Achievement in 2006.
HAZLETON
CAN DO chooses
fund drive chair
Earl C. Berger, well recognized in the
region in business as well as for his civic
and philanthropic accomplishments,
has accepted the chairmanship of the
2013 annual fund drive for the CAN DO
Community Foundation, Gary F. Lamont,
foundation president, announced.
Berger will be assisted
by the following commit-
tee members: Matthew B.
Bayzick, Joseph M. DeBias,
Eugene M. Dougherty, Dr.
Terrance M. Eyerly, Dr.
Anthony Falvello, George R.
Hludzik, Jennifer Hopkins,
Elaine Judd, Gary F. Lamont, Robert J.
Moisey, E. Richard Moore, John Patton, W.
Kevin ODonnell, Donald M. Pachence, E.
Thomas Sandrock, Krista Schneider, John
J. Spevak, Chris Stamatopoulos and Nancy
Stasko.
Sinceit was establishedin1992, thefoun-
dation has supported projects that improve
the quality of life in Greater Hazleton
involving Conservation, Preservation and
Reclamation, or CPR breathing new
life into the community. It was recently
involved in restorations at Hazleton
Elementary/Middle School and Ferrwood
Music Camp and assisted Leadership
Hazleton with a grant to assist in develop-
ment of an environmental educational area
for Rails to Trails.
Clark Van Orden | The Times Leader
Juan Borbon was found guilty Wednesday of using a machete during an attack last year outside GAR High School
that nearly severed the hand of a teen.
Borbon guilty in machete attack
The 21-year-old faces up to 20
years in prison for the 2012 attack
outside of GAR High School
SHEENA DELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
Fugitive caught
while allegedly
peeking in cars
WILKES-BARRE A man
who pleaded guilty to steal-
ing thousands of dollars from
his mother and then failed to
appear in court
for sentencing
was captured by
city police inves-
tigating a sus-
picious person
peeking into cars
on Kado Street
early Wednesday
morning.
M i c h a e l
Muchler, 46, of Wilkes-Barre, was
jailed at the county prison on an
arrest warrant issued by Luzerne
County Judge Joseph Sklarosky
Jr. when he failed to appear for
a sentencing hearing on Monday
on the theft charges as well as
on charges to which he pleaded
guilty in other cases.
Police said they picked up
Muchler while investigating a
suspicious person walking onto
driveways and looking in cars at
about 12:40 a.m.
A records check showed
Muchler had an active warrant for
his capture.
Court records state Muchler
appeared in county court on May
13 for a guilty plea hearing on
several cases, including:
Hanover Township police
charged Muchler with forgery
after he cashed a stolen check for
$2,800 at M&T Bank on July 22,
2011. He pleaded guilty to forg-
ery; prosecutors withdrew charg-
es of theft and receiving stolen
property.
Larksville police charged
Muchler with selling his mothers
2004 Jeep Grand Cherokee with-
out her knowledge in February
2012. His mother was in a nurs-
ing home at the time. He pleaded
guilty to theft.
City police charged Muchler
for his role in stealing items
from Boscovs Department Store,
South Main Street, Wilkes-Barre
on Aug. 9, 2012. He pleaded
guilty to criminal conspiracy;
prosecutors withdrew a charge of
receiving stolen property.
Kingston police charged
Muchler with stealing $15,000
from his mothers bank account
at M&T Bank while she was in a
nursing home in early 2012. He
pleaded guilty to theft, receiving
stolen property and forgery.
Michael Muchler, of Wilkes-Barre,
previously charged with
theft frommother, others
EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
Wyoming Area students contend college opportunities can be hurt when teachers walk
WEST PITTSTON A teacher
strikes impact can adversely affect
seniors by putting college acceptance
and funding at risk, two ofcers of
Wyoming Area Student Council said
Wednesday after joining the teacher
picket line on the seventh day of a
union strike.
We just want the strike to be
over, Student Council Vice President
Katherine Sokirka said as teach-
ers walked past with signs outside
Montgomery Avenue Elementary
School. Seniors want to be able to n-
ish their Advanced Placement courses
on time and get their letters of recom-
mendation for early acceptance in col-
lege.
The AP courses, designed to chal-
lenge students at a college level and
considered favorably in college appli-
cation screenings, have one immutable
test date, Sokirka said. If the strike
lasts the full month that it legally can,
students will be at a huge disadvan-
tage in trying to master the material
in time to score well, she said.
And the districts Secondary Center
is a hot spot for AP classes, Student
Council Secretary Emily Bellanco
added. She is taking four courses this
year, while Sokirka is taking three, and
some kids take six.
The most immediate impact is that
teachers cant write letters of recom-
mendation during the strike, Sokirka
said. And seniors have a better chance
of getting into their chosen college if
they apply for early acceptance. They
also have a better chance at getting
nancial aid.
The duo also noted the strike cur-
tails any participation in clubs and
most other extracurricular activities
another part of student portfolios
routinely scrutinized by college admis-
sions ofcers. Sokirka said she belongs
to, among others, the history club, and
that a month-long strike will hurt the
schools chances in the annual History
Bowl competition. If the strike lasts
long enough, the school might not be
compete at all.
Bellanco said it also hurts the stu-
dents who compete in the spring
Science Olympiad; shes been a par-
ticipant for years. Wed be putting
the team together right now, she
said. Usually were ready to go by
Christmas.
Sokirka plans to major in biology at
Bucknell University, while Bellanco is
heading to Wilkes Universitys phar-
macy program, and both said theres
one more thing the strike is stealing:
reunion with friends, including teach-
ers, showing up for support at sport
events, which are still being held.
Wyoming Area is like one big fam-
ily, Sokirka said.
Union President Melissa Dolman
said there have been no contract nego-
tiations, or even discussion of setting
up a session, since the strike began.
We are always ready to talk, she
added as the seniors joined the picket
march.
Clark Van Orden | The Times Leader
Several Wyoming Area students walk the picket line with striking teachers Wednesday morning at the Montgomery Avenue Elementary School in
West Pittston. Shown, left to right, are Melissa Dolman, president of the Wyoming Area Education Association; Emily Bellanco, senior class secre-
tary; Katherine Sokirka, senior class vice president, and Chris Hizynski, history teacher.
Seniors bemoan strikes impact
MARK GUYDISH
mguydish@timesleader.com
IN BRIEF
K
LOCAL
Muchler
We just want the strike to
be over. Seniors want to be
able to finish their Advanced
Placement courses on time and
get their letters of recommen-
dation for early acceptance in
college.
Katherine Sokirka,
Student Council vice president
Berger
Carey
Payavis
PAGE 4A Thursday, September 12, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Luzerne Merchants Association 18th Annual
Fall
FestivaL
pumpkin
September 14th
Main Street Luzerne
9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Join us for a great day of fun!
all day
food vendors
SCHeDuLe FOr SePteMBer 14
th
9:00am until 5:00pm
LiVe
eNtertaINmeNt
ChICKeN
DINNer
AT THE LUZERNE FIREHALL
CraFt & FOOD
VenDOrS
CiViL War
reeNaCtmeNt
Pumpkin
DerbY
Pumpkin
DeCOratinG
BALLOON
ARTIST
JuStin CreDiBLe
Bounce House
Horse & Wagon
Rides
CHILdRENS
GAmES
FaCe PaintinG
www.cornerpostfcu.org
World, Isnt It Nice To See
GOODOLD-FASHIONED
SERVICE?
GREAT LOW RATES
NewVehicles as low as 1.50%APR* (up to 24 months)
Used Vehicles as low as 3.00%APR* (up to 60 months)
SignatureLoans as low as 4.25%APR* (up to 60 months)
*APR = Annual Percentage Rate. Rates good through December 31, 2013
Equal
Opportunity
LENDER
NCUA
Federally Insured
by NCUA
566 South Main Street
Wilkes-Barre
(570) 823-6151
www.cornerpostfcu.org
www.cornerpostfcu.org
We can now serve anyone who lives, works, worships, or attends school in Luzerne County.
Pinnacle
Rehabilitation
Kevin M. Barno, MPT K. Bridget Barno, PT
Sharon Marranca, MPT Hal Glatz, MPT
Maria Hall, PTA William Montross, MPT
520 Third Ave.
Kingston 714-6460
Expert physical therapy close to home
www.pinnaclerehabilitation.net
201 S. Main St.
Pittston 602-1933
Feel Better, Hit It Further
and Win Your Match!
Treatment for all golf injuries or any
injury that is affecting your game
Golf specic exibility and
strengthening programs available
MOST INSURANCES DO NOT REQUIRE A REFERRAL FOR PHYSICAL THERAPY
We dont ofer gimmicks or gas
cards...just highest cash paid plain &
simple! We will give you more cash.
RECEIVE YOUR BEST OFFER
ANDCOME SEE US!!!
Scrap Your Unwanted Jewelry or
Coins For Cash!!
GUARANTEED!
Monday - Friday 10-6 Saturday 10-3
www.campasjewelers.com 80016197
476 Bennett St.
Luzerne
570-288-1966 80070869
80020845
Custom Homes
Additions Remodeling
Roofng Siding
Interior Damage
Fire, Water and Storm
Restoraton
We Will Work With Your
Insurance Company!
DOMBROSKI BUILDERS, LLC
Prompt Reliable Professional
570-406-5128 / 570-406-9682
Over 26 Years Experience
PA#088686 Fully Insured
80020122
GET YOUR ROOF ON BEFORE WINTER
BEFORE SHINGLE PRICES INCREASE
7
9
7
1
7
2
EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
SCRANTON A
Luzerne man charged by
Luzerne County detec-
tives with nearly 2,000
counts of child pornogra-
phy in June was indicted
by a federal grand jury in
Scranton.
Michael Shaw, 38,
of Bennett Street, was
indicted on a single
count of of child pornog-
raphy involving the use
of a minor engaged in
sexually explicit conduct.
The indictment was
unsealed on Wednesday.
Shaw was initially
arrested on June 5 and
charged with five counts
of child pornography. At
his preliminary hearing
before District Judge
David Barilla on June
20, Luzerne County
Assistant District
Attorney Jenny Roberts
added 1,747 counts of
child pornography for
a total of 1,753 counts
against Shaw.
Roberts explained at
the time that 120 videos
and 1,633 pictures of
children engaged in sex
acts were allegedly dis-
covered on Shaws com-
puter between the time
of his arrest and the pre-
liminary hearing.
According to the crimi-
nal complaint filed in
June:
Authorities visited
Shaws residence based
on a tip that a computer
in his house was used in
a sexually explicit chat
with a young boy. From
there, authorities said
they learned about Shaw
kissing an 11-year-old
boy and finding a large
volume of images of
child pornography on his
computer and discs.
Shaw told authorities
he kissed the boys neck
up to five times a week.
Several pictures of the
unlawful contact were
found on his computer,
the complaint says.
When he was arrested
on June 5, Shaw told
authorities, I was acting
like a full-blooded pedo-
phile, according to the
complaint.
Shaw allegedly said
he emailed pictures of
him kissing the boy to
another man who is not
named in the complaint
in exchange for nude pic-
tures of boys.
Feds indict Luzerne man on child pornography charge
Michael Shawis shown being escorted to district court on June 20.
Ed Lewis | The Times Leader
PLYMOUTH Police
allege a highly intoxi-
cated Shawn Shoemaker
brandished a gun, caus-
ing customers at the
Sunoco service station on
East Main Street to flee
and take cover Tuesday
night.
The incident began
at about 8:40 p.m. as
Roberta Klecha and
her boyfriend, Geraldo
Langiois, argued outside
the station, according
to charges filed. Police
allege Shoemaker, 38, of
Elm Street in Plymouth,
left the Sunoco and said
something to Langiois,
who became hostile
and struck
Shoemaker in the
head.
S h o e m a k e r
allegedly pulled
a gun and aimed
it at Langiois.
Langiois ran and
was chased by
Shoemaker, who aimed
the gun at him, police
said.
Klecha told police she
tried to get Shoemaker
to calm down when he
aimed the gun at her,
according to charges
filed. Klecha is several
months pregnant and
complained she was hav-
ing problems with her
pregnancy due to the
incident, police said.
Customers inside the
Sunoco fled or took
cover behind the counter
and door that was locked,
police said.
The incident was
recorded on a surveil-
lance camera, police said.
S h o e m a k e r
told police he
was attacked by
Langiois and
defended him-
self with the gun
because he could
not fight.
He was
arraigned Wednesday
morning on three counts
of terroristic threats, two
counts each of simple
assault, reckless endan-
germent and disorderly
conduct and a single
count of public drunk-
enness. He was jailed
at the Luzerne County
Correctional Facility for
lack of $10,000 bail.
Shoemaker appeared
highly intoxicated and
registered an alcohol
level of .166 percent on
a breath test, police said.
A preliminary hearing
is scheduled on Sept.
18 before District Judge
Donald Whittaker in
Nanticoke.
Police: Drunken man threatens people with gun
EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
Shoemaker
Shawn Shoemaker allegedly pulled weapon
Tuesday outside Sunoco in Plymouth
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER NatioN & World Thursday, September 12, 2013 PAGE 5A
TRIPOLI, Libya A car
bomb tore through a Libyan
Foreign Ministry building in
the eastern city of Benghazi
on Wednesday, a powerful
reminder of lawlessness in
the North African nation on
the anniversary of a deadly
attack on the U.S. consul-
ate there as well as the 2001
terror attacks in the United
States.
The bombing came exactly
one year after al-Qaida-linked
militants stormed the U.S.
mission in Benghazi and a
nearby U.S. building, kill-
ing U.S. Ambassador Chris
Stevens and three other
Americans.
Prime Minister Ali Zidan
issued a stern warning to
militias blamed for much of
the violence that has plagued
Libya since the overthrow of
dictator Moammar Gadha
two years ago, proclaiming
that we will not bow to any-
one.
But the challenges are
mounting. The prime minis-
ter said that armed men had
just stormed a post ofce in
the capital, Tripoli, taking
employees hostage. A wit-
ness at the scene, speaking
on condition of anonymity
because of security concerns,
told The Associated Press
that the attackers were seek-
ing to cut off mail to the
southern city of Sabha in
retaliation for a rival tribe
from Sabha cutting off the
water supply to Tripoli for a
week, forcing hospitals and
homes to rely on wells and
large tanks.
Other groups have shut
down oil elds to protest cor-
ruption or demand regional
autonomy, causing the coun-
try to lose out on millions
of dollars a day in potential
revenue.
The Benghazi blast caused
no deaths or serious injuries,
but destroyed the Foreign
Ministry branch building in
an attack rich in symbolism.
The building once housed the
U.S. Consulate under the rule
of King Idris, who was over-
thrown in 1969 in a bloodless
coup led by Gadha.
The bombing took place
about 6 a.m., well before any-
body was due to arrive at the
Foreign Ministry for work
and at a time when the near-
by streets were nearly empty.
The explosion blew out a
side wall of the building, leav-
ing desks, ling cabinets and
computers strewn across the
concrete rubble. It also dam-
aged the Benghazi branch of
the Libyan Central Bank.
Pictures circulated on
Facebook showed men car-
rying dead doves, with one
person commenting that the
dog who did this will be pun-
ished for the guilt of killing
doves. Another photo shows
black smoke smoldering
out of the charred Foreign
Ministry building, along with
wrecked cars and burned
palm trees. A green tarp was
later placed over part of the
building.
The blast also rocked
Benghazis main boulevard,
Gamal Abdel-Nasser, which
runs through the city from
north to south. Several pedes-
trians were slightly wounded.
BAGHDAD
Blasts at Shiite
mosque kill 35
A suicide attacker staged a double
bombing near a Shiite mosque in
northern Baghdad as worshippers
were leaving after evening prayers on
Wednesday, killing at least 35 in the
latest deadly episode of violence to
rock the country, according to Iraqi
authorities.
The blasts follow months of
heightened sectarian violence in
Iraq, intensifying fears the country is
slipping back toward the widespread
bloodshed in the years that followed
the 2003 U.S.-led invasion. The past
several months have been the deadli-
est since 2008, when Iraq was pulling
back from the brink of sectarian civil
war.
TORONTO
Oil in train
disaster mislabeled
The oil carried by a freight train
that derailed and exploded in Quebec
this year had been misclassied
as a less dangerous type of crude,
Canadian ofcials said Wednesday,
and they urged U.S. and Canadian
regulators to ensure dangerous goods
are accurately labeled.
Forty-seven people were killed in
the July disaster when the unattended
train rolled away and derailed in
the town of Lac-Megantic near the
Maine border and several of its oil
cars exploded. The downtown was
destroyed.
The trains shipment of North
Dakota oil was mislabeled as a Group
3 ammable liquid, when it should
have been given a more explosive
Group 2 classication, the Canadian
transportation safety boards chief
investigator, Donald Ross, said.
BOSTON
Low-T? Study
hints its low-E
TV ads tout testosterone treat-
ments for low T, but surprising new
research shows a different hormone
may play a role in less sex drive and
more fat as men age. Estrogen the
female hormone is needed by men,
too, and the study gives the rst clear
evidence that too little of it can cause
certain male menopause symptoms.
A lot of things we think are due
to testosterone deciency are actu-
ally related to the estrogen deciency
that accompanies it, said Dr. Joel
Finkelstein of Massachusetts General
Hospital.
Testosterone is the main male sex
hormone. Mens bodies convert some
of it into estrogen, and levels of both
decline with age.
BALTIMORE
Ring owned by
Hitler sells for $65K
A ring once owned by Adolf Hitler
fetched $65,725 at an auction in
Maryland this week.
Alexander Historical Auctions sold
the silver ring, which is plated in gold
and features a ruby-encrusted swastika
on its base. The business has previous-
ly sold Nazi memorabilia, including a
desk belonging to Hitler.
We are very happy with the result,
Andreas Kornfeld, vice president of
international client relations for the
Cecil County auction house, said in an
email. It is very difcult to estimate
objects and relics such as the ring,
since there are, or have been, no com-
parisons on the market.
AP photo
People gather Wednesday at the site of a car bombing in Benghazi, Libya.
The bomb exploded Wednesday near Libyas Foreign Ministry building in
the heart of Benghazi.
AP photo
A true survivor heads home
Kali Hardig, 12, who survived a rare and
often-fatal infection caused by a brain-eating
amoeba, hugs Scout, the Arkansas Childrens
Hospital mascot, Wednesday in Little Rock,
Ark., before being released. Before Kali, doc-
tors could only point to one known survivor
of the infection in the U.S. and another in
Mexico.
Blast hits Benghazi on attack anniversary
Ambassador, three
other Americans
killed a year ago
The Associated Press
NSAmachine:
Too big, too
complicated
WASHINGTON The sur-
veillance machine grew too big
for anyone to understand.
The National Security Agency
set it in motion in 2006 and
the vast network of supercom-
puters, switches and wiretaps
began gathering Americans
phone and Internet records by
the millions, looking for signs
of terrorism.
But every day, NSA analysts
snooped on more American
phone records than they were
allowed to. Some ofcials
searched databases of phone
records without even realizing
it. Others shared the results of
their searches with people who
werent authorized to see them.
It took nearly three years
before the government gured
out that so much had gone
wrong. It took even longer to
gure out why.
Newly declassied docu-
ments released Tuesday tell a
story of a surveillance apparatus
so unwieldy and complex that
nobody fully comprehended it,
even as the government pointed
it at the American people in the
name of protecting them.
There was no single person
who had a complete technical
understanding, government
lawyers explained to a federal
judge in 2009.
During a summer in which
former NSA systems analyst
Edward Snowden released
Americas surveillance secrets
to the world, the Obama admin-
istration has repeatedly tried to
reassure people that the NSAs
powers were kept in check by
Congress and the courts. The
mistakes discovered in 2009
have been xed, the president
said, a reection of that over-
sight.
But the documents from
the Foreign Intelligence
Surveillance Court show that,
in developing the worlds most
sophisticated surveillance
network, even senior lawyers
and ofcials werent sure how
the system worked and didnt
understand what they were
told.
It appears there was never a
complete understanding among
the key personnel . regarding
what each individual meant by
the terminology, lawyers wrote
in March 2009 as the scope of
the problems came into focus.
As a result, the judges on the
surveillance court, who rely on
the NSA to explain the surveil-
lance program, approved a pro-
gram that was far more intru-
sive than they believed.
Given the executive branchs
responsibility for and expertise
in determining how best to pro-
tect our national security, and
in light of the scale of this bulk
collection program, the court
must rely heavily on the govern-
ment to monitor this program,
Judge Reggie B. Walton wrote
in a 2009 order that found the
NSA had repeatedly misrepre-
sented its programs.
Info gathering extensive and
far fromwhat was intended
MATT APUZZO
Associated Press
NYC mayoral race becoming a referendum on the outgoing ofce holder
NEW YORK The race to succeed
Mayor Michael Bloomberg is shaping up
as a referendum on the 12-year legacy of
the billionaire who guided the nations
biggest city through the aftermath of
9/11 and the meltdown on Wall Street.
The top vote-getter in Tuesdays
Democratic primary, Public Advocate
Bill de Blasio, was the most vocally anti-
Bloomberg of the major candidates, rail-
ing against the mayors pro-police, pro-
development, pro-business, pro-trickle-
down politics.
On the Republican side, Joe Lhota,
a one-time deputy mayor to Rudolph
Giuliani, handily won his partys nomina-
tion after tying himself closely to many
of Bloombergs policies.
It is clear that the narrative going for-
ward is that this election is a verdict on
Bloomberg, said Jeanne Zaino, a New
York University political science profes-
sor.
Bloomberg, a Republican-turned-
independent who made his vast fortune
from the nancial news company that
bears his name, is leaving ofce after
three terms.
The Democrat most closely allied
with Bloomberg, City Council Speaker
Christine Quinn, was crushed at the bal-
lot box in Tuesdays mayoral primary,
nishing a distant third amid polling that
showed that New Yorkers were eager for
a change after more than a decade with
Bloomberg in charge.
But those same polls showed that
most New Yorkers still generally approve
of Bloombergs tenure.
If you were dropped into the
Democratic primary from space,
youd think that voters simply hated
Bloomberg, Zaino said. Its a more
complex picture than that.
Whether de Blasio will, in fact, be the
Democratic nominee in the November
election remains to be seen.
With 99 percent of precincts report-
ing, he had 40.3 percent of the vote, just
above the 40 percent needed to win the
nomination outright and avoid an Oct. 1
runoff against second-place nisher Bill
Thompson.
Election ofcials said that it will be at
least Monday before all votes, including
absentee ballots, are counted.
Neither de Blasio nor Thompson
addressed the election on Wednesday, as
both followed city tradition by abstain-
ing from campaigning on Sept. 11.
De Blasio ran as a Bloomberg antago-
nist, putting the ght to end economic
inequality at the heart of his campaign
and accusing the mayor of creating a
tale of two cities by favoring real estate
developers and Wall Street.
With far greater clarity than his
Democratic rivals, he positioned himself
as an opponent of the New York Police
Departments stop-and-frisk program of
aggressively questioning people deemed
suspicious.
The programs critics said it unfairly
targeted minorities, while its support-
ers including Bloomberg credited
it with helping to drive crime down to
historic lows.
When a federal judge ruled stop-and-
frisk was being conducted improperly,
Blasio got far more of a lift than Quinn
or Thompson.
AP photo
New York City Democratic mayoral hopeful Bill de Blasio embraces his son, Dante, daughter, Chiara, second from left, and wife Chirlane McCray,
right, at his election headquarters after polls closed Tuesday in the citys primary election.
Bloomberg legacy shapes election
JONATHAN LEMIRE
Associated Press
Gay marriage stirs little uproar in N.M.
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.
Lynn Ellins stunned New
Mexico last month when the
county clerk decided to begin
issuing marriage licenses to
same-sex couples. But even
he was shocked by the lack of
public outrage or protest to
his decision, which set off a
chain reaction that has for all
practical purposes made gay
marriage legal in the state.
The only crowds that gath-
ered outside his Dona Ana
County ofce were gay cou-
ples wanting to marry. The
states top politicians stayed
neutral. New Mexicos three
Catholic bishops said it was
a matter for lawmakers. And
an evangelical mega-church
in the states largest city was
mum.
I have gotten some fairly
nasty religious-related tele-
phone messages, Ellins
said. But generally speak-
ing, I am surprised by the
relatively muted response
from those who clearly dis-
agree.
Experts and gay rights
advocates say the relative
lack of an uproar is a sign of
how quickly public opinion
has turned on the issue.
If this had happened ve
years ago, there would have
been a public outcry, said
Andrew Cherlin, an expert
on sociology of families
and public policy at Johns
Hopkins University. If it
had happened two to three
years ago, there would have
been public concern Its as
if the dam broke quickly.
JERI CLAUSING
Associated Press
AP photo
Dona Ana County Clerk Lynn Ellins, left, talks with Thom Hinks, and
Richard Sunman, far right, last month after they obtained their mar-
riage license at the Dona Ana County Clerks Office in Las Cruces, N.M.
IN BRIEF
Ofcials decision met
with little public reaction,
but fght not over
EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
WEST PITTSTON
The owners of an Exeter
smoke shop were arraigned
Wednesday on charges
they sold synthetic mari-
juana, racking up as much
as $5,000 in sales a day,
according to arrest papers.
The state Ofce of
Attorney Generals Bureau
of Narcotics Investigation
allege Sharleen Palaima,
62, and her husband,
Alfonse Richard Palaima,
64, of Division Street,
Pittston, sold synthetic
marijuana from their busi-
ness, Magikal Garden, on
Wyoming Avenue from
March 2012 through the
end of July 2012.
Magikal Garden was
one of many retail smoke
stores and gasoline service
stations across the state
raided on July 26, 2012,
in Operation Articial
High, an investigation by
the Attorney Generals
Ofce, state police and the
U.S. Drug Enforcement
Administration.
The searches resulted in
the seizure of more than
300,000 doses of synthetic
marijuana and illegal bath
salts, with an estimated
street value of $1.25 mil-
lion, and more than 50,000
pieces of drug parapherna-
lia related to the smoking
or consumption of synthet-
ic drugs, according to the
Attorney Generals Ofce.
A Magikal Garden
employee allegedly told
authorities that on a good
day the store sold up to
$5,000 worth of synthetic
marijuana, according to
arrest papers.
Agents seized the
Palaimas bank account
records, learning checks
were drafted to Liberty
Herbal, Liberty Enterprises
and AK Distributing to
purchase the supply of
synthetic marijuana sold
at Magikal Garden, arrest
papers state.
Sharleen Palaima is
listed as the president
of Magikal Garden. She
was charged with corrupt
organizations, possession
with intent to deliver a
controlled substance and
three counts of criminal
conspiracy.
Alfonse Palaima was
charged with two counts
each of possession with
intent to deliver a con-
trolled substance and crim-
inal conspiracy and a single
count of corrupt organiza-
tions.
They were arraigned
by District Judge Joseph
Carmody in West Pittston
and both released on
$25,000 unsecured bail.
Preliminary hearings are
scheduled on Oct. 2.
Attorney Peter Moses,
who is representing the
Palaimas, said the couple
has owned and operated
their business for more
than 30 years and are
excellent law-abiding citi-
zens. They maintain their
innocence and I can guar-
antee they will ght this to
the end.
The commonwealth ini-
tially charged the corpora-
tion with a crime, Moses
said. When we decided
we would ght this, the
commonwealth decided to
charge them individually,
he said. But no matter
what the commonwealth
does, theres no way theyre
going to deter us from
exercising our constitu-
tional rights.
He said there will be a
lot of legal and scientic
arguments in this case, and
we believe the science and
the lawwill be on our side.
PAGE 6A Thursday, September 12, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Our Lady of Victory
HARVEYS LAKE
Our Lady of Victory Harveys Lake continues to host the
Annual Six Month Devotion to Our Lady of Fatima
This months service will take place on THURSDAY,
JUNE 13TH AT 7:00 PM, the Devotions will continue to be
held on the 13th of each month through October 13th.
Handicap Parking & Access is Available
All are welcome!
The Devotions to Our Lady of Fatima consist of
The Rosary, Beautiful Marian Hymns and Benediction.
For Further Information Call 639-1535
This months service will take place on FRIDAY
SEPTEMBER 13THAT 7:00PM, the Devotions will
continue to be held on the 13th of each
month through October 13th.
The Devotions to Our Lady of Fatima consist of The Rosary,
Beautiful Marian Hymns and Benediction.
Complimentary Refreshments following the Service
All are welcome!
For Further Information Call 639-1535
Handicap Parking & Access is Available
Visit: CatholicsComeHome.org
Commission on Economic Opportunity
165 Amber Lane
Wilkes-Barre
570.862.0510
NeighborWorks NEPA
709 East Market St.
Scranton
570.558.2490
CCCS of Northeastern PA, Inc.
401 Laurel St.
Pittston
800.922.9537
United Neighborhood
Centers of NEPA
410 Olive St.
Scranton
570.346.0759
American Credit
Counseling Institute
100 Porter Road, Suite 108
Pottstown
610.620.5369
When foreclosure is looming, it feels like a monster is on your trail. Your
nerves are on edge. You cant sleep at night.
Dont live in fear of foreclosure. Expert housing counselors are available who
will review your situation and help identify your options. Funding provided by
the Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency covers the cost of this service,
so theres no fee.
Call today to schedule a free foreclosure counseling session.
Get the foreclosure monster off your back.
Call the counseling agency closest to you for free help:
Dont get chomped by
foreclosure
NeedaNewRoof?
80002629
Equal Opportunity Lender
1.800.822.3321 | www.mysmallbizbank.com
funded
Custom loans for large and small businesses.
When you need to borrow money at competitive rates and exible
terms, make us your rst choice. National Penn business advisors
will help you choose the best loan or line of credit. And well come
to you. Book a free lunch or breakfast meeting with us at
mysmallbizbank.com.
Its not revolutionary. Its the way lending should be.
BANKING INSURANCE INVESTMENTS TRUST
KINGS COLLEGE
W I L K E S - B A R R E, P E N N S Y L V A N I A
A Catholic College Sponsored by the Congregation of Holy Cross
MyOwnWilkes-Barre.com
Fall 2013 Theatre Schedule
Rabbit Hole
Nov. 14, 15, 16 & 21, 22, 23 at 7:30 p.m.
Nov. 17 at 2:00 p.m.
Almost, Maine
Oct. 3, 4, 5 at 7:30 p.m.
Oct. 5 and 6 at 2:00 p.m.
For tickets, call (570) 208 5825
Pittston couple charged
with selling syznthetic pot
Owners of Magikal Garden in Exeter
maintain their innocence, lawyer says
School set to be Nuangola sewers frst client
TOMHUNTINGTON
Times Leader Correspondent
NUANGOLA
According to comments
at Mondays sewer author-
ity meeting, the Rice
Elementary School in Rice
Township could become
the rst client of the
Nuangola sewer system to
go on line.
RichKresge of the Quad3
Group said the school is
hooked up and it is just a
matter of getting approval
from the ofcials involved
to begin having waste ow
into the treatment facilities
of the Mountain Top Area
Joint Sewer Authority.
Kresge, project engineer,
said that overall Phase 1 of
the Nuangola project has
met its Sept. 15-comple-
tion goal. Besides the
school, Nuangola residents
can also begin the connec-
tion process, which con-
sists of installing a 3-inch
PVC line and connecting
an electrical service line
from a residence to a grind-
er pump.
Kresge said installa-
tion and testing at Rice
Elementary have been suc-
cessful, so the school is
ready to be the rst unit
in the boroughs $9 million
project to become opera-
tional. Overall, Kresge
said, 231 grinder pumps
have been tested success-
fully.
The sanitary system was
also a topic of discussion at
Tuesdays council meeting.
Chairman John Kochan
said procedures will be
formulated to create the
fewest hardships in closing
on-site systems.
The systems have to be
closed, he said. Septic
tanks can be crushed, lled
with dirt or sand or what-
ever. We just dont want
it to be a major hardship.
Kochan said council will
conduct further discus-
sions on deactivating on-
site systems.
The issue of a connec-
tion being a nancial bur-
den also came before coun-
cil and Councilman Joe
Tucker responded council
has a guarantee from the
sewer authority that hard-
ship cases will be reviewed
on an individual basis
before any legal action is
instituted.
In other matters that
came before council and
the authority:
Councilwoman Regina
Plodwick alleged the
Sunshine Law was violated
when council met in execu-
tive session to discuss
extending relief on residen-
tial fees associated with
borough-mandated septic
system pumping.
Councilman Ron
Kaiser called for additional
stop signs and 25 mph
signs on Nuangola Avenue,
but he was told impos-
ing additional regulations
are the responsibility of
PennDOT.
Tucker reported bor-
ough streets are in bad
condition because of the
sewer system installation
and he called for a meet-
ing involving council, the
sewer authority and the
contractors to develop a
plan to rectify the situa-
tion.
It was announced the
budget and nance com-
mittee will present a pre-
liminary 2014 budget at
the Oct. 8 meeting.
Council stated letters
of interest are still being
accepted from individuals
willing to ll the seat of
Dan Pekar, who resigned in
July, on the sewer author-
ity.
Kochan said a review
of recent decisions by the
zoning hearing board will
be initiated by council fol-
lowing complaints that
some decisions have been
termed unfair and unrea-
sonable. Included in com-
ment about the board, was
a complaint registered
by Councilman Michael
Johnson about stipulations
set down by zoning board
members for a project he
is undertaking at his resi-
dence.
LAKE CAREY Two
Wyoming County town-
ships continue their ght
for compliance with state
sewage treatment stan-
dards after their action
plan was denied last month
by the state Department of
Environmental Protection.
After receiving a rst
letter on July 16 outlin-
ing the plans deciencies,
Lemon and Tunkhannock
township ofcials met
with state agency ofcials
Aug. 13 to review a sew-
age-abatement plan for the
community surrounding
Lake Carey.
DEP issued a formal
denial letter Aug. 28
informing both townships
their plan remains de-
cient.
Of highest importance
to DEP: The plan depend-
ed on too many conditions,
such as available outside
funding.
Public notice, notably
of how customers will pay
for sewage services, did
not meet state standards,
according to the letter.
DEP also took exception
to the needs study per-
formed by township of-
cials to identify problem
areas, stating the reports
are inconclusive.
These were the same
aws noted in DEPs rst
letter.
According to the Sewage
Facilities Act, commonly
known as Act 537, all
municipalities must have
some form of sewage treat-
ment system in place,
either on-lot private sys-
tems or a communal treat-
ment program.
As a formality, Lemon
Township Board of
Supervisors voted last
week to appeal DEPs deni-
al, said board Chairman
John Keefe.
But engineers on the job,
Harleth Davis of Harleth
W. Davis Consulting and
Ned Slocum of Milnes
Construction, are moving
forward to allay DEP con-
cerns, Slocum said. The
six total deciencies can
be resolved without much
additional effort, and
they are moving forward
to complete the plan in a
timely manner, he said.
The townships had iden-
tied a central sewage
system as the most cost-
effective solution, choos-
ing pipes that run around
the lake. But the plan must
equally consider other via-
ble solutions, Keefe said.
The plan was budgeted
to cost about $130,000 to
nish. However, the town-
ships assert that together
they have shelled out more
than $360,000, and some
of the residents are frus-
trated with the delay.
The townships plan
includes a separate sew-
age plan for the Hilltop
Drive and Maple Lane
neighborhood, which is in
Tunkhannock Township.
This leg of the project
has not received as much
scrutiny, as it taps into
the existing Tunkhannock
Borough system. The Lake
Carey pipes would run as
part of its own system and
be moved to a treatment
center near Tunkhannock
Creek and Shadowbrook
Inn & Resort.
DEP spokeswoman
Colleen Connolly said
there is no one trick to
completing the complex
sewage plan, but as long as
the townships show good
faith to carry on, the agen-
cy will offer support.
Were not looking to
hurt any municipality.
Unfortunately the law is
what it is, Connolly said.
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER NEWS Thursday, September 12, 2013 PAGE 7A
Contact Rob Finlay, CLS 570.822.5126
www.humford.com Broker Protected
H U M F O R D R E A L T Y
Prime Leasing Opportunities
Explore these Prime Commercial Properties Exclusively from Humford Now Available For Lease and Sale
Space Available - Country Club Shopping Center, Dallas PA
Anchored by Thomas Super Foodtown with 6 inline tenants. Center has
strong sales volume and is located on the coming home side of Route 309,
which is also the main thruway from Wyoming County to/from Wilkes-Barre.
FOR LEASE
2000 SF Medical - Office
Mundy Street - Wilkes-Barre
Ideal for medical, office, rehab, etc.
Located next to Allied Services John
Heinz Campus and side entrance
to Home Depot. Easy access
to Route 81 and Pennsylvania
Turnpike. Just one mile from
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital
and Geisinger Wyoming Valley
Medical Center.
Wilkes-Barre
2,800 SF - located on the top
(10th) floor. Overlooking
the Wyoming Valley. Tenant
improvement allowance.
Call for more details.
Public Square
FOR LEASE
WB Center
39 Public Square 2,800 SF
Wilkes-Barre
FOR LEASE
Dallas Shopping Center
1,200 SF
Space is between Peking Chef
& The Medicine Shoppe
Shopping Center is located in the
heart of the Back Mountain prior
to the Route 309/415 split. Center
has two entrances, traffic light and
a traffic count of approximately
32,000 cars daily.
Dallas
THE LOCATION: Country Club Shopping Center is located on the through way to/
from Tunkhannock (Wyoming County). Major Employers include Dallas School District,
Misercordia University, Frontier Communications & Proctor & Gamble Mehoopany Plant.
Also located in the Marcellus Shale region. Current Tenants: Thomas Super Foodtown,
Malcolms Haircutters, Country Club Laundrymat, Stevens Town & Country Cleaners,
Junuzzis Pizza, Proctor & Gamble Federal Credit Union & Radio Shack.
R
T
.
3
0
9
T
U
N
K
H
A
N
N
O
C
K
H
IG
H
W
A
Y
UPPER DEMUNDS ROAD.
FOR LEASE
Country Club Shopping Center
9,375 SF End Cap/Will Subdivide 1,500 SF
Country Club Shopping Center, Dallas PA
Tenant Improvement and Moving Allowance Available!
Our patients are saying that ReSound Verso is simply the best hearing aid available. Period.
I truly think these hearing aids are amazing. I have always appreciated being able to hear better, but,
until these hearing aids, I didnt remember truly what that was like.
- ReSound Verso

user, St. Louis, MO So easy to use


Compatible with smartphone technology
Clear, comfortable calls
Tuesday, August 13Friday, August 16, 2013 Call to learn more....
LEARN HOW TO ENHANCE YOUR HEARING DURING OUR DEMO DAYS
Call today for a FREE consultation and try the advanced Verso
hearing aids plus one free accessory FREE FOR 30 DAYS.
FAMILY HEARING CENTER
400 3RD AVE PARK OFFICE BLDG STE 109
KINGSTON, PA 18704
Jill S. knecht AuD, James A. Zeigler AuD, Judith J Johnston
AuD, Robert S Asby MS
Now
seeing former
Eye Care Hearing
Solutions patients.
We will honor existing
warranties.
I have to tell you, these are fantastic! Its like I dont have anything in my ears but my hearing.
-ReSound Versa user, Kingston, PA
Park Ofce Bldg.
400 Third Ave. Suite 109
Kingston, PA (570) 714-2656
1132 Twin Stacks Drive
Twin Stacks Center
Dallas, PA (570) 675-8113
...all ages and all stages...
Family
Hearing Center
Evening hours available
www.afamilyhearingcenter.com
Call today for a
FREE consultation
and try the advanced
Verso hearing aids plus
one free accessory
FREE FOR 30 DAYS.
80016893
Sewage solution elusive at Lake Carey
Townships ofcials so far unable to draf plan
that meets state environmental standards
JON OCONNELL
joconnell@timesleader.com
Judge vows quick
decision in
5-year-old,
hit-and-run case
WILKES-BARRE A
Luzerne County senior
judge said Wednesday he
would decide within 24
hours whether defense
attorneys in the 2008 case
of a deadly hit-and-run inci-
dent will be able to use a
mental inrmity defense.
Senior Judge Charles
Brown, at a hearing
Wednesday morning, said
he would make the ruling
soon so that the case can
go forward. A trial is sched-
uled to begin for Megan
Panowicz, of Forty Fort, on
Sept. 23.
Panowicz, 28, is charged
in the August 2008 death
of Sharon Shaughnessy,
who was killed on Wyoming
Avenue in Kingston when
she was reportedly struck
by three vehicles.
Recently, Panowiczs
attorneys her father,
Robert Panowicz, and
Basil Russin led court
papers notifying Brown they
intend to use a mental inr-
mity defense in the case.
Panowicz has a longstand-
ing disorder, a post-trau-
matic stress disorder, that
causes her to avoid stressful
situations by attempting to
over self control, they say.
The events which caused
her to have post-traumatic
stress rendered her incapa-
ble of appreciating the sig-
nicance or consequences
of her behavior and affected
her ability to determine
what was right or wrong at
that crucial moment, the
attorneys wrote.
Deputy Attorney General
Clarke Madden, who is pros-
ecuting the case, said the l-
ing should have been done
earlier and is not relevant
at this juncture. Madden
also has asked that prosecu-
tors be permitted to have an
expert examine Panowicz, a
request that is on hold until
Brown makes a ruling.
SHEENA DELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
PAGE 8A Thursday, September 12, 2013 www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
SPECIAL ADVERTISING FEATURE 2013 UNIVERSAL COMMERCE 8000 FREEDOM AVE., N. CANTON OH 44720
PENNSYLVANIA - Todays announcement
by CompTek has the Free TV Hotlines ringing
off the hook.
Thats because Wilkes-Barre area residents
who find their zip code listed in todays pub-
lication are getting Free TV channels thanks
to an amazing razor-thin invention called
Clear-Cast.
Wilkes-Barre area residents who call the
Toll Free Hotlines before the 48-hour order
deadline to get Clear-Cast can pull in Free TV
channels with crystal clear digital picture and
no monthly bills.
This announcement is being so widely
advertised because a U.S. Federal law makes
TV broadcasters transmit their signals in dig-
ital format, which allows everyone to receive
these over-the-air digital signals for free with
no monthly bills.
Heres how it works. Clear-Cast, the sleek
micro antenna device with advanced technol-
ogy links up directly to pull in the Free TV sig-
nals being broadcast in your area with crystal
clear digital picture and no monthly bills.
Clear-Cast was invented by a renowned
NASA Space Technology Hall of Fame scien-
tist who currently holds 23 U.S. Govt issued
patents. For the past 20 years, he has special-
ized in developing antenna systems for NASA,
Motorola, XM Satellite Radio and companies
around the world.
His latest patent-pending invention, Clear-
Cast, is a sleek micro antenna device engi-
neered to pull in the Free TV signals through
advanced technology with no cable, satellite or
internet connection and no monthly bills.
Clear-Cast is being released to the gen-
eral public because we just dont think people
should keep paying for TV when they can get it
for free, said Conrad Miller, Manager of Oper-
ations at CompTek.
Theres never a monthly bill to pay and all
the channels you get with Clear-Cast are abso-
lutely free. So you see, Clear-Cast is not like
cable or satellite. It was engineered to access
solely the over-the-air signals that include all
the top rated national and regional networks,
like ABC, NBC, CBS, FOX, PBS, CW and about
90% of the most watched TV shows like Amer-
icas Got Talent, NCIS, 60 Minutes, American
Idol, The Big Bang Theory, The Bachelorette,
Person of Interest, CSI, The Mentalist, Two
and a Half Men, Sunday Night Football plus
news, weather and more all for free with no
monthly bills, Miller said.
Thats why Clear-Cast is such a great alter-
native for everyone who is sick and tired of
paying expensive cable and satellite bills every
month, he said.
People who get Clear-Cast will say it feels
like getting an extra paycheck every month.
You see, with Clear-Cast youll receive free
over-the-air broadcast channels with crystal
clear digital picture, not the cable or satellite
only channels. So being able to eliminate those
channels puts all the money you were spending
back in your pocket every month, Miller said.
And heres the best part. The sleek micro
antenna device called Clear-Cast is so tech-
nically advanced it pulls in even more of the
channels being broadcast in your area for Free
with no monthly bills.
That way you can channel surf through the
favorite TV shows. The number of shows and
channels youll get depends on where you live.
People living in large metropolitan areas may
get up to 53 static-free channels, while peo-
ple in outlying areas will get less. That means
even if youre in a rural area that just pulls in
NBC, ABC, CBS, FOX and PBS broadcasts
theres hundreds of shows each year to watch
for free.
Consumers report that the crystal clear pic-
ture quality with Clear-Cast is the best theyve
ever seen. Thats because you get virtually all
pure uncompressed signals direct from the
broadcasters for free.
Clear-Cast was engineered to link up
directly like a huge outdoor directional
antenna but in a lightweight, slim-line pack-
age. Its sturdy copper alloy and polymer con-
struction will most likely far outlast your TV.
It just couldnt be any easier to get Free
over-the-air digital TV shows with Clear-Cast.
Simply plug it into your TV, place Clear-Cast
on a window pane and run autoscan. It works
on virtually any model TV and is easily hid-
den out of sight behind a curtain or window
treatment.
Thousands of Wilkes-Barre area residents
are expected to call to get Clear-Cast because
it just doesnt make any sense to keep paying
for TV when you can get hundreds of shows
absolutely free.
So, Wilkes-Barre area residents lucky
enough to find their zip code listed in todays
publication need to immediately call the Free
TV Hotline before the 48-hour deadline to get
Clear-Cast that pulls in Free TV with crystal
clear digital picture. If lines are busy keep try-
ing, all calls will be answered.
How It Works: Just plug it in to your TV and pull in Free TV channels in crystal clear
digital picture with no cable, satellite or internet connection and no monthly bills
NEVER PAY A BILL AGAIN: Pennsylvanians will be on the lookout for their postal carrier because thousands of Clear-Casts will soon be deliv-
ered to lucky Wilkes-Barre area residents who beat the 48-hour order deadline and live in any of the zip code areas listed above. Everyone is getting
Clear-Cast because it pulls in nothing but Free TV channels with no cable, satellite or internet connection and no monthly bills.
How to get Free TV: Listed below are the Wilkes-Barre area zip codes that can get Free TV channels with no
monthly bills. If you live in one of these areas immediately call 1-888-874-3480 beginning at precisely 8:30am this morn-
ing. Todays announcement photo above shows just a handful of the major over-the-air broadcast networks you can receive
with Clear-Cast for free. It saves a ton of money by not picking up expensive cable only channels like ESPN so theres never
a monthly bill. This is all possible because a U.S. Federal Law makes TV broadcasters transmit their signals in digital for-
mat, which allows everyone to use Clear-Cast to pull in Free TV channels with no monthly bills. CompTek is giving every
U.S. household a 50% off discount to help cover the cost of Clear-Cast. Clear-Cast, the sleek micro antenna device is a one-
time purchase that plugs in to your TV to pull in Free TV channels in crystal clear digital picture with no monthly bills.
Each Clear-Cast normally costs $98, but U.S. households who beat the 48-hour deadline are authorized to get a 50% off
discount for each Clear-Cast and cover just
$
49 and shipping as long as they call the Free TV Hotline at 1-888-874-3480
before the deadline ends or online at www.clear-cast.com. Trademarks and programs are the property of their respective
owners and are not affiliated with or endorsing Clear-Cast.
Public gets Free TV with no monthly bills
Federal law makes TV network giants broadcast Free TV signals regionally in crystal clear digital picture in
all 50 states allowing U.S. households to pull in Free TV with a sleek $49 micro antenna device engineered to pull
in nothing but Free TV channels with no cable, satellite or internet connection and no monthly bills
Who Gets Free TV: Listed below are the Wilkes-Barre area zip codes that can get Free over
the air TV channels. If you live in one of these areas immediately call: 1-888-874-3480
NO MORE BILLS: Clear-Cast, the sleek micro antenna device is engineered to pull in nothing but Free TV channels. It was invented by a
renowned NASA Space Technology Hall of Fame scientist, who currently holds 23 U.S. Govt patents. Clear-Cast links up directly to pull in Free
over-the-air TV channels with crystal clear digital picture and no monthly bills.
SLG1295
P6418A OF17176R-1
SLG1295
18224
18237
18254
18411
18614
18623
18629
18711
destroying them, diplomats
said.
The U.N.-Arab League
envoy for Syria, Lakhdar
Brahimi, was also heading
to Geneva to be available
to meet Kerry and Lavrov,
whose efforts to start peace
talks to end the 2 1/2-year
Syrian conict have been
stymied by a government
offensive and a deadly sus-
pected poison gas attack on
Aug. 21.
The diplomatic urry
follows the threat of U.S.
strikes against President
Bashar Assads regime and
a surprise offer from Kerry
that Syria could avert U.S.
military action by turning
over every single bit of
his chemical weapons to
international control within
a week. Russia, Syrias most
important ally, and Assads
government quickly agreed
on the broad proposal,
but details still need to be
worked out.
A senior U.N. diplomat,
speaking on condition of
anonymity because con-
tacts have been private,
said todays meeting
between Kerry and Lavrov
will be an exploratory ses-
sion to gauge whether they
can embark on the hercu-
lean task of dismantling
Syrias chemical weapons
while the country is at war.
While serious differences
have already emerged
especially on whether a
U.N. resolution should be
militarily enforceable as
the U.S. and its Western
allies are demanding the
diplomatic moves repre-
sent the rst major effort in
more than a year to try to
get supporters of the Syrian
government and opposition
on the same page.
Russia and China have
vetoed three Western-
backed resolutions aimed
at pressuring Assad to end
the conict, which has left
the U.N.s most powerful
body paralyzed as the war
escalates and the death toll
surpasses 100,000. U.N.
Secretary-General Ban
Ki-moon earlier this week
called the councils paraly-
sis embarrassing.
What the secretary-
general has been pressing
for is the Security Council
to come to a united deci-
sion, U.N. associate
spokesman Farhan Haq
said Wednesday. Its cru-
cially important at this
late stage of the war that
they come together and
take some action that can
prevent both the problems
regarding the use of chemi-
cal weapons and the wider
problem of solving this con-
ict.
The White House said
Wednesday it is not putting
a timeline on a diplomatic
resolution to the crisis in
Syria.
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER NEWS Thursday, September 12, 2013 PAGE 9A
BEL L ES
C O N S TRUC TIO N C O .
C AL L
824- 7220
FREE Trip le Pa ne
Up gra d e o n a ll
Plygem L ifestyle
W ind o w s
PA012959
ENERG Y S AVING S
W INDO W S AL E
Maximum Efficiency& Sound Control
Ro o fing & S id ing
Exp erts To o !
Ro o fing & S id ing
Exp erts To o !
Like our prices
Love our quality
824- 7220
From page 1A
Bullying
From page 1A
Syria
autism, his awkwardness,
his failure in athletics and
his struggle to t in with
the cool kids. The hour-
long presentation takes
viewers through the fam-
ilys attempts to resolve the
conicts in Ryans life, the
guilt that followed his death
and the forgiveness of
those who directly impact-
ed Ryan and inuenced his
decision to end his life.
Beginning with the fran-
tic phone call Halligan
received from his wife
informing him that Ryan
committed suicide to
struggling to answer the
question, Why? Halligan
painted a clear picture of
his son. There was the dif-
culty in accepting what
had happened and the self-
blame for not being able to
do whatever it would have
taken to prevent it.
Among their consider-
ations: self-defense lessons,
possible home-schooling,
counseling, confrontation
and computer safeguards.
Halligan said one his
sons supposed friends
proved to be untrue she
led Ryan to believe she
cared about him as a friend,
when in reality she was talk-
ing behind his back. When
she called Ryan a loser in
front of her friends, Ryan
was distraught, Halligan
said.
Internet rumor
That and an untrue
rumor Ryan was gay that
spread like wildre in
school, and on the Internet,
eventually pushed Ryan to
his unfortunate end.
There is no greater pain
than that of a parent who
has lost a child, Halligan
said. All of you are loved
beyond belief. Dont ever
believe for a second that
you dont matter.
Halligan said there are
no perfect families; that
there are people in every-
bodys life who truly care.
Ryans death was the
result of a disease called
depression, Halligan said.
After Ryans death, the
boy who was the main bully
was still spreading untruths
about his son, Halligan
said. He went to the boys
home and sat with him and
his parents. I looked at him
and told him he had no idea
the amount of pain he had
brought into my sons life,
Halligan said. I told him
there is no do-over here;
my son is gone forever.
Halligan said he hasnt
spoken to the bully since
that day and he just wants
to tell Ryans story to as
many people as he can with
the hope that some will lis-
ten and change their ways
or their intentions.
Dont be a bystander,
he said. Be an up-stander.
This is not about throwing
punches; its about throw-
ing words. Be a friend.
Halligan said he and
his wife still struggle with
Ryans death, as do their
two other children: Megan,
now 27, and Conor, who is
in the 11th grade.
Halligan, who has spoken
at hundreds of high schools
across the U.S., said telling
Ryans story takes its toll
on him. By the end of the
school year, Im physically
and emotionally exhaust-
ed, he said. Sometimes I
wonder how much longer I
can do this.
For now, his mission to
prevent further family and
community tragedies con-
tinues. These are all good
kids, he said. They just
need to have the courage to
talk to somebody.
Fred Adams | For The Times Leader
John Halligan hugs one of the students who especially appreciated
his anti-bullying message at an assembly Wednesday at Greater
Nanticoke Area High School.
High school
presentations
Today Northwest
Area, 8 a.m.
Friday Crestwood,
8:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m.
Monday Hanover
Area, 8:30 a.m., 12:30
p.m.
Tuesday Pittston
Area, 8:30 a.m.; 12:30
p.m.
Wednesday Wyoming
Valley West, 8:30 a.m.,
12:30 p.m.
Sept. 19 Lake-
Lehman, 8:30 a.m.,
12:30 p.m.
Sept. 20 Dallas, 1:30
p.m. @High School;
Middle School, morning
TBA
Sept. 23 West Side
CTC, 8:30 a.m., 12:30
p.m.
Sept. 24 GAR, 8:30
a.m., 12:30 p.m.
Sept. 25 Meyers, 8:30
a.m., 12:30 p.m.
Sept. 26 Coughlin,
8:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m.
Sept. 27 Holy
Redeemer, 9:15 a.m.
Parents
presentations (7 p.m.)
Today Northwest Area
MondayPittston Area
Sept. 19 Wyoming
Valley West
Sept. 23 Misericordia
University
Sept. 25 Hanover
Area High School
Sept. 26 McCann
School of Business
BULLYING
PREVENTION
PROGRAM
PAGE 10A Thursday, September 12, 2013 OBITUARIES www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Estate & Medicaid Planning; Wills; Revocable and Irrevocable Trusts: Estate
Probate and Administration; Guardianships; and Special Needs Trusts.
Attorney DAviD r. LipkA
Certifed As an Elder Law Attorney by the National Elder Law Foundation
50 East Main Street, Plymouth, PA (570) 779-5353
IF NURSING HOME PLACEMENT BECOMES
NECESSARY DONT PRESUME ALL IS LOST!
Even under current law, there ARE still ways to legally protect your home
and other hard-earned assets from being spent down on long term care
when you, your spouse or a loved one are either in or about to enter a
nursing home.
Can you save your residence?
Can you transfer assets within the fve year look-back period?
How can annuities help?
Can more income be protected for the spouse at home?
STRAIGHTFORWARD ANSWERS TO COMPLEX QUESTIONS!
THE SOONER YOU ACT, THE MORE YOURE ABLE TO SAVE!
In Memory of
JOHN LAZAR
on his 100th Birthday
ANGELELLA - Magdalene,
funeral Mass 11 a.m. Sept. 21 in
Prince of Peace Parish, St. Marys
Church, West Grace Street, Old
Forge. Friends may call 10:30
a.m. until Mass.
BAKER - WilliamJr., visitation
with prayer and military services
7 to 9 p.m. Friday at George
Strish Funeral Home, 105 N. Main
St., Ashley. Services 9 to 10 a.m.
Saturday with prayer service at
10 a.m.
BANASHEFSKI - Elynore, divine
liturgy and requiemservices 10
a.mtoday in John the Baptist
Byzantine Catholic Church,
Chestnut Street, Wilkes-Barre
Township. Friends may call 8:30
a.m. to services.
BENOSKI - Stella, funeral 11 a.m.
Friday at George A. Strish Inc.
Funeral Home, 105 N. Main St.,
Ashley. Mass of Christian Burial
11:30 a.m. in St. Leos/Holy
Rosary Church. Friends may call
10 a.m. to services.
BOLITA - Eleanor, Mass of
Christian Burial 9:30 a.m. today
in St. Benedicts Parish, St.
Dominics Church, Austin Avenue,
Wilkes-Barre.
BRDARIC - John Jr., Mass of
Christian Burial 10 a.m. Friday
in Holy Family Parish, Luzerne.
Friends may call 3 to 8 p.m. today
at Holy Family Parish.
CRAWFORD- Millie, funeral 2
p.m. Friday at Sheldon-Kukuchka
Funeral Home Inc., 73 W. Tioga
St., Tunkhannock. Friends may
call noon to service.
FOCHT - Phyllis, memorial
service 11:30 a.m. Sunday in
McKendree United Methodist
Church, 477 McKendree Road,
Shickshinny.
GREY - Linda, memorial service 1
p.m. Saturday in Nulton-Kopcza
Funeral Home, 5749 State
Route 309, Beaumont, Monroe
Township. Friends may call noon
to service.
HARRISON- Lorraine, funeral
11 a.m. Friday at Clarke Piatt
Funeral Home Inc., 6 Sunset Lake
Road, Hunlock Creek. Friends
may call 5 to 8 p.m. today and 10
a.m. to services Friday.
KOSCIELNIK - Esther, funeral
11 a.m. today at Grontkowski
Funeral Home P.C., 51-53 W.
Green St., Nanticoke. Mass of
Christian Burial 11:30 a.m. in St.
Marys, Nanticoke.
NEARE - Ray Sr., memorial Mass
9:30 a.m. Saturday in St. Joseph
Marello Parish, 237 WilliamSt.,
Pittston.
RHOADS - Dorene, memorial
services 11:15 a.m. Sept. 28 in
Trucksville United Methodist
Church. Friends may call 10 a.m.
to services.
ROGERS - Kenneth, blessing
services 3 p.m. Saturday at
Thomas P. Kearney Funeral
Home Inc., 517 N. Main St., Old
Forge. Friends may call 1 p.m. to
services.
SEASHOCK - Michael, visitation
2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. today at
Mayo Funeral Home Inc., 77 N.
Main St., Shickshinny.
SOBOLESKI - Arlene, funeral 9
a.m. today at George A. Strish
Inc. Funeral Home, 105 N. Main
St., Ashley. Mass of Christian
Burial 9:30 a.m. in Holy Family
Parish, Sugar Notch. Friends may
call 8 a.m. to services.
STEMPLESKI - Stephen,
blessing services 7 p.m. today
at Stanley S. Stegura Funeral
Home Inc., 614 S. Hanover St.,
Nanticoke. Friends may call 5
p.m. to services. Military honors
and interment services 10:30
a.m. Friday at Indiantown Gap
National Cemetery, Annville.
THOMAS - Charlie, funeral 10
a.m. Friday at Mamary Durkin
Funeral Service, 59 Parrish St.,
Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call 5
to 8 p.m. today.
VALUNAS - Albert, Mass of
Christian Burial 10 a.m. today
in Exaltation of the Holy Cross
Church, 420 Main Road,
Buttonwood, Hanover Township.
FUNERALS
HELEN ZOLTEWICZ,
87, of Park Towers, Nanticoke,
passed away peacefully
Wednesday evening at Hospice
Community Care, Geisinger
South Wilkes-Barre.
A complete obituary will be
published in Fridays edition of
the newspaper. Arrangements
by Grontkowski Funeral Home
P.C., Nanticoke.
ANDREW M. SAVAGE II,
70, of Wilkes-Barre, passed
away Saturday, Sept. 7,
2013, at Geisinger Wyoming
Valley Medical Center, Plains
Township. Born in Scranton
on Aug. 8, 1943, he was a son
of the late Andrew M. Savage
Sr. and the late Jay Helen
(Elsinger) Savage Natishyn.
He was a graduate of Scranton
Tech High School. He was
a U.S. Navy veteran of the
Vietnam War. Surviving are his
cousins, John Moore and his
wife, Romaine, Scranton, and
Ruth Sharkey.
Services will be
private from Kniffen
OMalley Funeral
Home, 465 S. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre. Interment will
be in Indiantown Gap National
Cemetery. Condolences may
be shared at www.bestlifetrib-
utes.com.
DENNIS MORGAN,
66, of Moosic, passed away
Wednesday at his home.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from Kiesinger Funeral
Services Inc., 255 McAlpine St.,
Duryea.
MARGARET KOONRAD,
63, of East Green Street,
Nanticoke, passed away
Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2013, at
home. Born Nov. 16, 1949,
in Wilkes-Barre, she was a
daughter of the late Edward
and Margaret Maloney Pius.
Preceding her were son, Joseph
Daniele; and brother, Edward
Pius. Surviving are daughter,
Lori Hoopengardner, and her
husband, Rick; son, Matthew
Daniele, and his wife, Jayme;
seven grandchildren, Rick,
Justin, Krystal, Matthew, Jared,
Zoey and Carter; sisters, Sally
Lieser and Millie DeCaustis;
brother, Jim Pius; numerous
nieces, nephews, great-nieces
and great-nephews.
A family memorial ser-
vice will be at a later date.
Arrangements by George A.
Strish Inc. Funeral Home, 105
N. Main St., Ashley.
CHARLENE M. SHOOP
(nee Mannear), 71, of Ft.
Lauderdale, Fla., passed away
Monday at the Catholic Hospice
Inpatient Unit at Holy Cross
Hospital, Ft. Lauderdale.
Funeral service will be held
at 11 a.m. Saturday from the
Harold C. Snowdon Funeral
Home Inc., 140 N. Main St.,
Shavertown. The Rev. Judy L.
Walker, pastor of Shavertown
United Methodist Church, will
ofciate. Interment will be
made in Fern Knoll Burial Park,
Dallas. Family and friends may
call 10 a.m. until the time of
service at the funeral home. A
complete obituary will run in
Fridays edition.
JOHNJACK NICHOLSON
Sept. 10, 2013
John Jack Nicholson, of
Moosic, passed away Tuesday,
Sept. 10, 2013.
Born in Jenkins Township on
Oct. 28, 1945, he was a son of
the late Theodore and Margaret
Ermel Nicholson.
He graduated from Exeter
High School in 1965. Prior to
retirement, he was employed by
Tobyhanna Army Depot.
Jack was an avid golfer.
He was a U.S. Navy vet-
eran, having served during the
Vietnam War.
He was preceded in death by
his brothers Daniel and Robert
Nicholson.
Surviving are his compan-
ion, Cathy Collins, Lain; son,
Christopher, and his wife,
Marissa, Waymart; daughter,
Heather Nicholson, Moosic;
brother Kenneth, Florida; sis-
ters, Peggy Stofko, Harding, and
Trudy Holleran, West Pittston;
grandchildren, Alexis and
Parker; and several nieces and
nephews.
Funeral services will
be at 11 a.m. Monday at
the Howell-Lussi Funeral
Home, 509 Wyoming
Ave., West Pittston. Friends
may call 5 to 8 p.m. Sunday.
Interment will be in Fairview
Memorial Park, Elmhurst.
ADAM BENJAMIN SLAMAS
Sept. 7, 2013
Adam B. Slamas, 28, a resi-
dent of Fort Myers, Fla., died
tragically Saturday from injuries
sustained in an automobile acci-
dent in Luzerne County.
Born in Scranton, he was a
son of Barbra Williams Slamas,
Naples, Fla.
Adam was baptized at the
Church of St. Gregory and,
along with his brother, Nathan,
was raised by their mother
in Waverly as The Power of
Three. In this pastoral environ-
ment, Adam had room to roam,
thus beginning his lifelong love
of the outdoors, nature and stay-
ing active.
Soon, his talent for athletics
became apparent. Much like
many young men, Adam par-
ticipated in multiple sports. One
became his clear favorite: golf.
Countless hours were spent
honing his skillset on the shores
of the Scranton Canoe Club at
Lake Winola. He split his time
playing with both his grand-
parents and many encouraging
members, quickly learning that
everything breaks to the lake!
Growing stronger every year,
Adam became the Junior Club
Champion in 1999 and 2000.
His good nature and strong golf
game were soon recognized
and Adam was recruited by
Wyoming Seminary in Kingston,
graduating in 2003. The Power
of Three were headed south to
South Kingston.
Out of the woods and now in
an urban locale, Adam began to
ourish in this new social arena.
He attended school and played
four different sports, but when
Adam had free time his spirit
took control.
Effortlessly, Adam started
forging life-long friendships.
Fast. An army of Kingston
Kidds were at his beck and call.
A really hip and cool 15-year-
old father gure to so many,
Adam went farther south,
enrolling at Coastal Carolina
University in Conway, S.C.
Equipped with condence and
street smarts, Adam took on
college with vigor and enthusi-
asm. He worked hard and played
even harder, while continuing to
make many friends and live his
life to the fullest.
Balancing school and a full-
time job, he was becoming a
responsible and considerate
adult. Earning a degree in busi-
ness administration in 2008,
Adam turned his attention
with passion towards a career
in golf. Already a seasoned
employee, Adam became a pro-
fessional and continued spend-
ing his springs and summers at
Wyoming Valley Country Club
in Hanover Township.
Adams impact on the local
golf community was ineffable.
He treated everyone with
respect and dignity, working at
the club for eight years while
never missing a day of work.
He never took one sick day. Not
once. A true professional.
In 2011, Adam began to
establish roots in southwest
Florida during the fall and
winter seasons. One year later,
after he had done his fair share
of shing the previous winter,
he began a full-time position at
Heritage Palms Country Club in
Fort Myers.
Adam thrived in his new envi-
ronment and immediately made
a positive impact there as well.
Just like Mr. Hogan, he was now
truly following the sun!
It was at this time he met
the love of his life, Ms. Daniela
Turner. They were perfect
together instantly.
Adam did not just go north
to south and vice versa; he was
built to travel. Adam and his
brother, Nathan, backpacked
across Europe one summer. The
next, he was on a cross-country
trip to California and back again.
He loved meeting new people
and taking in the local color of
an unfamiliar and new place.
Music. Adam and his music.
He loved hardcore punk rock. He
loved live and loud music. When
the stage lit up and the show
started, Adam was smiling. He
spent a signicant amount of
time behind the scenes, trav-
eling with many bands. He sold
merchandise and helped carry
heavy equipment. He also took
care of travel arrangements and
logistics and was the driver of
the van on many trips all over
North America.
Words cannot express how
much he will be missed. Adam
and his legacy will live on inside
us all. His life was well-lived.
Adam made bad times good,
made good times better, was
loved and he gone.
He was preceded in death
by his maternal grandfather,
Thomas Williams Sr.
In addition to his mother,
he is survived by his brother,
Nathan Slamas, South Carolina;
his maternal grandmother, Sally
Williams, Naples, Fla.; his uncle,
Thomas Williams Jr., Jackson,
Wyo.; and godmother, Mary
Alice Burke, Scranton.
The funeral will be today
with a Mass of Christian Burial
at 10 a.m. at Church of St.
Gregory, 330 N. Abington Road,
Clarks Green, concelebrated by
the Rev. John Lapera. Interment
will be at the convenience of the
family.
In lieu of owers, memorial
contributions may be made to
the Anthracite Golf Association,
Adam Slamas Memorial Jr.
Scholarship Fund, 617 Keystone
Ave., Peckville, PA 18452.
Arrangements have been
entrusted to the Donahue
Funeral Home, 303 S. Main
Ave., Scranton.
Jeanne C. Basta, 87, of
Wilkes-Barre, passed away on
Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013, at
Little Flower Manor, Wilkes-
Barre.
The former Jeanne Catala,
she was born Aug. 7, 1926, in
Algeria.
She met her husband and
love of her life, Frank, and
returned with him to the
United States.
She enjoyed planting vegeta-
bles and tending to her garden.
In addition to her parents,
she was preceded in death by
her husband, Frank Basta, who
passed away on Oct. 17, 1997.
Surviving are her sister,
who resides in Paris, France;
sister-in-law, Yvonne Wertman,
Levittown; nieces and neph-
ews; and neighbors and care-
givers, Lillian Danilack and
Bernadine Benkoski.
Friends are invited to
attend committal services
at 11 a.m. Friday in the
Resurrection Chapel of St.
Marys Mausoleum, Hanover
Township. Services will be
conducted by the Rev. Joseph
A. Kearney, pastor of St.
Benedicts Parish, Wilkes-
Barre.
Condolences can be sent to
the family at www.eblakecol-
lins.com.
DANIEL MIHNOVICH
Sept. 10, 2013
Daniel Mihnovich, of East
Northport, N.Y., passed away on
Sept. 10, 2013, at the young age
of 20 years.
He was the beloved son
of John Jr. and Jill (Achey)
Mihnovich; loving brother of
Michael and Caity; devoted
grandson of Elinor (Boyle)
Achey, Wilkes-Barre, and John
Sr. and Johanna Mihnovich,
East Northport; beloved neph-
ew of John Achey III; great-
nephew of Richard and Sharon
(Boyle) Maritato, Robert and
Beth Boyle, Michael and Janet
(Achey) Holovach; and cousin
to many around the country.
His deepest passions were
paintball, soccer, pole vaulting
and the NFL, particularly the
Philadelphia Eagles.
He was a student at SUNY
Cortland and most recently at
St. Josephs College, Patchogue,
N.Y.
Visiting hours will be 2 to
4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Friday at
the Brueggemann Funeral
Home, 522 Larkeld Road,
East Northport. Funeral Mass
will be at 9:15 a.m. Saturday
in St. Anthony of Padua, East
Northport. Interment will be
at Holy Cross Polish National
Catholic Cemetery, Commack,
N.Y.
Memorial donations may
be made to the Epilepsy
Foundation of Long Island, 506
Stewart Ave., Garden City, NY
11530.
For information, visit the
funeral homes website at www.
bfhli.com.
PETER J. JUDGE
Sept. 10, 2013
Peter J. Judge, 69, of Avoca,
passed away Tuesday, Sept.
10, 2013, at Geisinger CMC
Hospital, Scranton.
He was born in Pittston
on Jan. 12, 1944, a son of the
late William and Rosemary
(Scherer) Judge.
Peter was a member of
Queen of the Apostles Parish,
Avoca. He was a 1961 graduate
of Pittston Area High School.
Upon graduating, he worked
for Party Favor, Pittston.
Peter retired from Thompson
Electronics after 35 years of
service.
He was a very active mem-
ber of the American Pool
Association, an avid sherman
and enjoyed the sport of golf.
He was also a die-hard fan of the
Rolling Stones, Penn State foot-
ball, the Philadelphia Phillies
and the Miami Dolphins.
Peter was a very kind and
giving person, and he will for-
ever be missed by his family
and friends.
In addition to his parents, he
was preceded in death by his
daughter, Maureen.
Peter is survived by his
wife of 45 years, the former
Lucille (Hunter) Judge; his
sisters, Mary Ellen Paranich
and her husband, Joseph,
Lake Spangenberg; Judy Black
and her husband, Paul, Lake
Spangenberg; and Ann Marie
Guido and her husband, Frank,
Kingston; nieces and nephews,
Keith and Kevin Paranich;
Paul and his wife, Martha;
and Christopher Guido; Kelly
Apuzzo and her husband, Chris;
Eric and his wife, Erin Myers;
his niece and goddaughter,
Melissa and her husband, Brady
Bacorn; great-nephews, Gavin
and Ian Myers, and Carter
Guido; great-nieces, Ireland
Myers and Madison Guido; and
his beloved bird, Rudy.
Funeral services will be at
9:30 a.m. Friday at Kiesinger
Funeral Services Inc., 255
McAlpine St., Duryea, with a
Mass of Christian Burial at 10
a.m. in Queen of the Apostles
Church, Hawthorne Street,
Avoca, with Father Phillip
Sladicka ofciating. Friends
may call 5 to 8 p.m. today.
Interment will be held in St.
Marys Cemetery, Avoca.
In lieu of owers, memo-
rial contributions may be
made to the Humane Society
of Lackawanna County, 967
Grifn Pond, South Abington
Township, PA 18411.
Online condolences may be
made to www.kiesingerfuner-
alservices.com.
EDYTHE ANN KRUEGER
Sept. 10, 2013
Edythe Ann Krueger, 75,
of Laurel Run, passed away
Tuesday morning, Sept. 10,
2013, at her home, with her fam-
ily by her side, after a valiant
four-year courageous battle with
cancer.
Born in Neptune, N.J., she
was a daughter of the late
Richard and Emily (Feurhelm)
Poppele.
Edythe was a graduate of
Irvington High School, New
Jersey, and was a homemaker all
of her life.
Edythe was totally devoted
to her family, especially her hus-
band and best friend, Fred, with
whom she traveled extensively.
She took great pride in all her
childrens and grandchildrens
accomplishments and sur-
rounded herself in pictures and
mementos of the people and
places that were most impor-
tant.
She loved to cook, craft and
sew. All family babies were
blessed with a special hand-
made blanket or stuffed animal
made with love. Her grandchil-
dren have been blessed to have
many special memories from
Grandma.
Visitors to her home were
always treated to delicious
meals. Edythe spent many
hours perfecting recipes, but
was most famous for her brown-
ies. She was affectionately
dubbed The Brownie Queen.
She never failed to make them
for family parties, to send them
off to college with her grandchil-
dren or to take them to doctors
appointments as gratitude for
the wonderful care she received.
Edythes courage through-
out her illness was her familys
strength. She was always a role
model; her quiet, loving devo-
tion to her husband, children
and grandchildren have been an
inspiration to the family.
Surviving are her husband
of 53 years, Fred; daughter,
Gretchen Himlin, Kingston;
son, Garett Krueger, and his
wife, Marge, Plains Township;
grandchildren, Matthew,
Samantha, Alex and Cory
Himlin, and Kara and Kyle
Krueger; brother, Richard
Poppele, Minneapolis, Minn.;
and sister, Judy Rudas, Marco
Island, Fla.
A memorial service for
Edythe will be at 10 a.m. Sept.
21 in Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church, South Main Street,
Wilkes-Barre. Presiding will be
the Rev. Peter Kuritz and the
Rev. Janell Wigen. Interment
will be held at the convenience
of the family. There will be no
calling hours.
Arrangements by the
Corcoran Funeral Home Inc., 20
S. Main St., Plains Township.
Donations may be made
to Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church, 190 S. Main St., Wilkes-
Barre, PA 18701, in Edythes
memory.
Online condolences may be
made at www.corcoranfuneral-
home.com.
OBITUARY POLICY
The Times Leader publishes free obituaries, which have
a 27-line limit, and paid obituaries, which can run with a
photograph. Afuneral home representative can call the
obituary desk at 570-829-7224, send a fax to 570-829-5537
or email to ttlobits@civitasmedia.com. If you fax or email,
please call to confrm. Obituaries must be submitted by 7:30
p.m. for publication in the next edition. Obituaries must be
sent by a funeral home or crematory, or must name who is
handling arrangements, with address and phone number.
More OBITUARIES | 2A
To view
Legacy
obituaries
online, visit
www.timesleader.com
JEANNE C. BASTA
Sept. 11, 2013
Angeline M. Sylakiewicz,
86, of Ashley, passed away
Tuesday afternoon at Hospice
Community Care at Geisinger
South Wilkes-Barre, with her
family at her bedside.
She was born in Pittston,
a daughter to the late Joseph
and Angelina Giuliani Tozzi.
Angeline was educated in the
Pittston Area school system.
She was employed in the
local garment industry for
many years and was a member
of the International Ladies
Garment Workers Union.
Angeline was a member of
Our Lady of Hope Parish, Park
Avenue, Wilkes-Barre. She was
an excellent cook and enjoyed
gardening in the spring, grow-
ing flowers and vegetables.
She was preceded in
death by her husband, Louis
Sylakiewicz, in 1978; brothers,
Matthew, Joseph and Natazeo
Tozzi; and sisters, Mary
Reynolds and Theresa Perotta.
Surviving are her daughters,
Elaine Richards and her hus-
band, Ivor, Ashley, with whom
she resided, and LuAnn Umlah
and her husband, Joseph,
Virginia Beach, Va.; grand-
children, Andrew, Angela,
Aaron and Michael Richards;
Stacey Umlah, and Emanuele
and Brian Umlah; two great-
grandchildren; sister, Lillian
Sweeney, Hughestown; and
several nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be 9
a.m. Saturday at Nat & Gawlas
Funeral Home, 89 Park Ave.,
Wilkes-Barre, with a funeral
Mass to follow at 9:30 a.m.
in Our Lady of Hope Parish,
40 Park Ave., Wilkes-Barre.
Interment will be in the
Pittston Cemetery, Pittston.
Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m.
Friday at the funeral home.
Memorial contributions
may be made to the charity of
the donors choice.
Online condolences may
be sent by visiting Angelines
obituary at www.natandgaw-
lasfuneralhome.com.
ANGELINE M.
SYLAKIEWICZ
Sept. 10, 2013
STEPHEN STEMPLESKI
Sept. 9, 2013
Stephen Stempleski, 67, of
Hanover Township, also known
as Stemp to his close friends
and family, entered into eternal
life on Sept. 9, 2013, surround-
ed by his loving family at the
Geisinger Hospice after his long
battle with cancer.
Stephen was born in Korn
Krest, a son of the late Kathryn
Stempleski and Stanley
Stempleski.
Stephen served in the U.S.
Army for six years with the artil-
lery division, during which time
he also participated and served
a tour of the Vietnam War, earn-
ing a Purple Heart for being
wounded.
Returning from his service, he
started his family, marrying his
late wife, Marion, in 1972, with
his son, Christopher Rodgers.
Stephen was employed by
Penn Refrigeration for 35 years
with the Sheet Metal Union and
retired in 2011.
Stemp will be best remem-
bered for his love for the
Philadelphia Phillies and
Philadelphia Eagles. He looked
forward to his yearly trips to the
Phillies games with his son and
grandchildren.
Stemp was a family man who
loved spending time with his
only son, Christopher, and his
family.
Stemp also enjoyed playing
golf, going to Mohegan Sun and
playing poker games at home
with his family.
He will be sadly missed by
many.
In addition to his parents,
he was preceded in death by
his wife, Marion Kovalchick
Stempleski; and sister, Janice
Grose.
Stephen is survived by his
son, Christopher Rodgers, and
his wife, Maureen Rodgers;
grandsons, Darryl Rodgers,
Justin Klein and Zachary Klein;
niece, Wendy and John Kane
and family; nephew, Donald and
Debbie Grose and family; and
his extended family, the Baggs
family, the Brady family and the
Rushton family.
Deacon Thaddeus
Wadas will conduct
blessing services at 7
p.m. today at Stanley
S. Stegura Funeral Home Inc.,
614 S. Hanover St., Nanticoke.
Friends may call 5 p.m. until the
time of services. Military hon-
ors will be at 10:30 a.m. Friday
at Indiantown Gap National
Cemetery, Annville.
Most mark the day itself, the date and
hour the hijacked airplanes struck, con-
suming thousands of lives and reshaping
both global and personal notions of safe-
ty with a denitive act of random death
by irrational violence.
Few mark the day after, the limbo of
rawemotion mixing with nascent under-
standing, when the images were harshly
seared into the brain but comprehension
and coping remained profoundly elusive.
Here are quotes from area natives and
residents on Sept. 12, 2001.

Sam Angelo, Plains Township


native,who worked on the 72nd oor of
the second tower:
The building is supposed to move
but you dont feel it, Angelo, a bridge
engineer, said of the the skyscrapers
subtle daily sway in the wind, compar-
ing that to the jets impact. It felt like it
was going to fall down.
They looked toward the windows,
saw debris raining down and headed for
the stairs, taking turns helping carry a
woman who had trouble walking. The
stairway began to ll with smoke; at the
44th oor, an open lobby allowed them
to switch stairways and to look out-
side to see that debris was aming.
These people went to work and
were going about their business. To
attack people without any afliation ,
Angelo said, pausing in thought. I dont
know.

Millie Warrent, Tobyhanna, who


worked on the 14th oor of the rst
tower:
All I could think about was staying
alive. Seeing my kids and my grandson.
I just had this feeling that if I stayed I
would die.
After getting out and running for safe-
ty, she turned to see a moment of hell.
I looked back and actually sawpeople
hanging from the building and jumping
off. It was awful.

Luis Vazquez, Tobyhanna,who


worked in a building adjacent to the
towers.
It was like watching a movie. I saw
people covered in blood running. And
people carrying other people covered in
blood. It was horrifying.
When I got home last night I hugged
my wife and I hugged my son, and I
cried.

Gloria Trocki, Wright Township,


whose cousin Loretta Filipov lost her
husband, Alexander, a passenger on one
of the hijacked planes:
My hearts broken. When youre with
someone just last Saturday and then
(he) is dead. Here we were, hugging
and kissing and everything.

Bernie Walko, Edwardsville, whose


son Robert was a chief master sergeant
with the U.S. Air Force at the Pentagon:
His ofce was right on the other side
of the building. If it hadbeenhit, it would
have been completely wiped out, Walko
said, noting he waited 12 hours after the
attack before hearing from Robert.
From here on theyll be recovering
bodies. His job is to contact the next of
kin. Hes not looking forward to that.

Gary Wincz, Weatherly, who


worked in a New Jersey rail yard when
a co-worker called his attention to the
rst tower already in ames in the dis-
tance, in time to see the second plane
approach:
We said, Holy crap, look at how low
that thing is, Wincz said. We saw
it bank, straighten out and go into the
building. The jet just disintegrated.
On Sept. 12 Wincz saw a blank space
and smoke where the towers should be.
Its sickening, Wincz said. You cant
help but look over.
Our OpiniOn: september 12, 2001
When terrorismstruck:
Thoughts the day after
mALLArD FiLLmOre DOOnesburY
Keep a librarian
in middle school
I am writing today because I am
concerned about the removal of the
library program from the Wyoming
Valley West middle school. Middle
school library is the most
important library in any school dis-
trict. It teaches the students how
to not only nd the books they may
need, but also how to use the resourc-
es that are available. Students are at
the age where they are ready to use
the Internet, books and
encyclopedias for research.
The removal/omission of such a
program is not only detrimental to
the grades in that school, it is also
detrimental to the grades that come
after. Not only do these students in
sixth, seventh and eighth grade need
these resources, the impact will reach
beyond the here and now and into
their high school days. Schools that
have a library have higher test scores.
We need to think about what is best
for the students in the district. For a
lot of these students, between the ages
of 11 to 14, this library is the only
library they have. Its the only time
and way for them to check out books
and become better readers, and in
turn better students.
As a taxpayer who lives and works
in the Wyoming Valley West School
District, I implore you to do what is
best for the students, and reinstate
the middle school library. Changing
the name from Library to Media
Room makes no difference. We still
need a librarian to help the students
learn the most they can.
Thank you for your time.
Steven Jowanna
Larksville
YOur OpiniOn: Letters tOtHe eDitOr
senD us YOur OpiniOn
Letters to the editor must include the writers name, address and daytime phone
number for verifcation. Letters should be no more than 250 words. We reserve
the right to edit and limit writers to one published letter every 30 days.
Email: mailbag@timesleader.com
Fax: 570-829-5537
Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Thursday, September 12, 2013 PAGE 11A
Editorial
The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust
Environment Explorer isnt the most
glamorous mission NASA has ever
launched, but it represents a giant
step forward for Americas re-engage-
ment with the moon.
Last Friday, the unmanned LADEE
spacecraft was launched from Wallops
Island, Va., atop a Minotaur V rocket.
Unlike the Apollo missions of a gen-
eration ago, the LADEE will orbit the
moon for 100 days studying the exo-
sphere its very thin atmosphere. It
will also be searching for clues to how
dust moves across the lunar surface.
One of the great unresolved ques-
tions of the Apollo missions was the
source of the mysterious yellow glow
on the moons horizon reported by
the astronauts conducting experi-
ments on the surface. NASA had no
explanation for the mysterious yellow
glow.
For 100 days, the $280 million
LADEE mission will study how moon
dust interacts with light far above
the lunar surface. Understanding the
subtle interaction between dust, light
and atmosphere of the moons exo-
sphere will enhance the understand-
ing of the similarly thin atmosphere
around asteroids, icy planets and
Mercury.
At the end of a mission recording
all it can about dust and light, the
LADEE will execute a suicide crash
into the moons surface, setting up
a plume of dust into the atmosphere
that will be studied by the next probe.
It may be true that theres nothing
new under the sun, but even dust can
sometimes be fascinating.
Pittsburgh Post Gazette
OtHer OpiniOn: LunAr missiOn
Worthy unmanned trip
for study of moon dust
Over the past three
weeks, I visited 28
Pennsylvania coun-
ties. I met with
business owners,
students, and workers
along the way. I host-
ed town hall meetings
and jobs roundtable
discussions with
many hundreds of
Pennsylvanians. At all
these stops, one mes-
sage came through
loud and clear.
People are worried about
jobs.
I heard agreement from
one corner of the state to
the other the economy
is sluggish and the job mar-
ket is disappointing. Folks
understand that the policies
out of Washington are exac-
erbating the problem.
Pennsylvanians cited
many examples of policies
that are stiing job cre-
ation. But two areas were
mentioned above others
and have people worried
the most: ObamaCare and
energy.
Examples of how
ObamaCare is already affect-
ing employment can be seen
in the news most days, but I
heard it rst hand in the last
few weeks. Small business
owners are worried about
the threshold that subjects
them to additional health
care mandates if they have
more than 50 full-
time workers. One
town hall participant
an entrepreneur
with 60 employees
asked me, What am
I supposed to do, lay
off 11 people?
Workers are also
worried that their
hours may be cut.
The law states that
employers must
comply with the
often unaffordable
Obamacare mandates for
full-time workers clocking
30 or more hours per week.
In response, businesses are
cutting employees hours to
less than 30. It is perverse
indeed when laws encourage
less hiring and fewer hours.
Since the laws adop-
tion, Ive been clear we
need to repeal it. I have
voted to defund or repeal
the Presidents health care
law at every turn. I am an
original cosponsor of the
ObamaCare Repeal Act and
the Defund ObamaCare Act
introduced by Senator Ted
Cruz.
As the American people
become increasingly aware
of how awful this law is for
them, I remain hopeful that
momentum will continue to
build to overturn it.
In the meantime, I am
working to dismantle the
law piece-by-piece. We could
start off with repeal of the
harmful medical device tax.
Such action has bipartisan
support and I am working
with Sen. Amy Klobuchar
(D-Minn.) to strike down
this tax which is particularly
harmful to Pennsylvania
the fourth-largest producer
of medical devices in the
country and home to 576
medical device companies.
In addition, the President
has implicitly acknowledged
his law is unworkable by
giving waivers to his politi-
cal allies and announcing
he will not enforce a central
part of the law by delaying
the employer mandate. Why
not delay the whole thing?
Government poli-
cies are also threatening
Pennsylvania energy jobs.
Two weeks ago, I visited a
Trainer, Pa. renery, which
is now required to blend mil-
lions of gallons of biofuels
notably corn ethanol
into the gasoline supplies.
Under these require-
ments, the amount of biofuel
required to blend is increas-
ing, while gasoline sales are
not. In order to comply with
these mandates, reners
are forced to make a choice:
increase the ethanol content
in their fuel blends or pay
a penalty by purchasing
what are known as credits
from government-moderated
markets.
Ethanol is a good example
of how government central
planning harms good pay-
ing jobs about 600 in
Southeast Pennsylvania.
Moreover, the policy drives
up gas prices, increase food
costs, and actually harms
the environment. The
Environmental Working
Group, an environmental
health research group,
said the policy is polluting
Americas air and water, con-
tributing to climate change,
and hurting consumers.
For the good of our
economy, we must repeal
mandates for corn ethanol in
our gasoline and I am work-
ing in a bipartisan fashion to
do just that.
Pennsylvanians dont
mince words. They are
worried about jobs. They
understand that the red tape
from Washington is making
matters worse in many ways,
and the Presidents health
care law and nonsensical
fuel requirements are the
most egregious.
As Congress returns in
September, I will continue
my work reforming these
expensive, ill-conceived
regulations so the economy
can grow and produce jobs.
Thank you for the feed-
back.
Pat Toomey is Republican U.S. Sena-
tor for Pennsylvania.
Pennsylvanians are worried about jobs
COmmentArY: pAt tOOmeY
TIMES LEADER ARCHIVES
A candle is held during a vigil on public square September 11, 2001.
Pat
Toomey
Contributing
Columnist
Pittston levee have ranged
from $13 million to more
than $30 million.
Bob Russin, chairman of
West Pittston Tomorrows
levee committee, wants
county, state and federal
government leaders to
rally behind the push for a
levee, saying many prom-
ised to back the borough
immediately after the
record ooding.
He believes the benet
cost ratio would be in the
boroughs favor but said
the project should proceed
regardless.
We need our elected
ofcials to play an active
role because this is an
injustice, Russin said. I
think the survival of our
whole town is dependent
on a levee.
He points to the county
and federal government
spending of $23 million on
the River Common park
in Wilkes-Barre, Wyoming
Valley Levee portal open-
ings and other recreational
amenities in Wilkes-Barre
for recreational purposes
without a benet cost
ratio.
They spent all that
money to bring people
back to the river. We in
West Pittston had the river
right in our living room,
Russin said.
Roberts said the ben-
et cost ratio is standard
protocol for the Army
Corps to proceed with a
new levee or ood wall,
and Congressional action
would be required to pro-
ceed if the potential dam-
ages dont exceed the
expense.
It is possible to not
include the benet cost
ratio, but thats not a call we
at the Army Corps could
make. Congress would
have to get involved, she
said.
Russin said the Army
Corps built a levee
upstream in the Exeter
area around Hicks Creek
but left the low-lying West
Pittston an unprotected
bowl.
Some have blamed the
boroughs removal from
the original Wyoming
Valley Levee plans on a
group of residents who
had objected to the loss of
their river view, while oth-
ers say the West Pittston
portion of the project was
dropped because the ben-
et cost ratio didnt justify
the expense.
Russin said these past
decisions should have no
bearing on a proposed
borough levee today but
stressed he has owned
his Susquehanna Avenue
home since 1985 and was
never asked to provide
input on a levee before
September 2011.
Flood insurance
He had 33 inches of
water on the rst oor of
his house in 2011 and said
he pays $4,500 per year for
ood insurance that would
cost only several hundred
dollars annually in a levee-
protected area.
The value of bor-
ough properties also has
declined since 2011 due
to the ood risk and high
cost of ood insurance, he
said.
The 64-year-old said he
has somewhat obsessively
monitored weather reports
since the record ood to
determine if his commu-
nity is in danger.
Its always in the back
of my mind. If we dont get
a levee, I cant rest. Thats
why Im relentless, he
said.
PAGE 12A Thursday, September 12, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Monterrey
84/66
Chihuahua
79/57
Los Angeles
82/64
Washington
91/66
New York
89/67
Miami
87/77
Atlanta
89/70
Detroit
77/52
Houston
95/72
Kansas City
85/57
Chicago
78/53
Minneapolis
73/49
El Paso
84/70
Denver
65/54
Billings
79/55
San Francisco
71/57
Seattle
88/61
Toronto
77/50
Montreal
73/52
Winnipeg
64/46
SEVEN-DAY FORECAST
HIGH
LOW
TEMPERATURES
ALMANAC NATIONAL FORECAST
PRECIPITATION
Lehigh
Delaware
Sunrise Sunset
Moonrise Moonset
Today Today
Today Today
Susquehanna Stage Chg Fld Stg
RIVER LEVELS
ACROSS THE REGION TODAY
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation today. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Shown is
todays weather.
Temperatures are
todays highs and
tonights lows.
SUN & MOON
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Wilkes-Barre
Scranton
Philadelphia
Reading
Pottsville
Allentown
Harrisburg
State College
Williamsport
Towanda
Binghamton
Syracuse
Albany
Poughkeepsie
New York
PHILADELPHIA
THE JERSEY SHORE
FRI SUN
MON TUE
SAT
WED
TODAY
87
58
Cooler; a
p.m. show-
er
67 43
Sunny and
nice
73 47
Partly
sunny
70 44
Sunny and
comfort-
able
70 48
Partly
sunny and
cool
67 38
Clouds and
sunshine
69 55
Showers
and a
heavier
t-storm
COOLING DEGREE DAYS
Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the
total degree days, the more energy is necessary to cool.
Yesterday 18
Month to date 61
Year to date 763
Last year to date 860
Normal year to date 552
Anchorage 59/51/pc 58/49/c
Baltimore 91/66/t 77/54/pc
Boston 88/66/t 73/55/c
Buffalo 75/52/t 58/45/c
Charlotte 89/66/pc 86/57/pc
Chicago 78/53/pc 66/47/pc
Cleveland 77/55/t 61/49/c
Dallas 97/75/s 96/74/s
Denver 65/54/r 66/53/t
Honolulu 89/75/pc 88/73/pc
Indianapolis 84/55/s 70/47/s
Las Vegas 91/74/pc 95/77/s
Milwaukee 74/51/pc 62/47/pc
New Orleans 91/73/s 91/75/s
Norfolk 89/71/t 79/57/pc
Okla. City 93/69/s 86/65/s
Orlando 89/72/t 92/73/t
Phoenix 101/81/t 103/81/s
Pittsburgh 78/55/t 63/42/c
Portland, ME 79/64/t 69/53/sh
St. Louis 88/62/pc 77/54/s
San Francisco 71/57/pc 72/59/pc
Seattle 88/61/s 84/59/s
Wash., DC 91/66/t 76/53/pc
Bethlehem 1.69 -0.09 16
Wilkes-Barre 1.88 -0.17 22
Towanda 1.41 -0.02 16
Port Jervis 3.00 +0.09 18
In feet as of 7 a.m. Wednesday.
Today Fri Today Fri Today Fri
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. 2013
Sept 12 Sept 19
Sept 26
First Full
Last New
Oct 4
6:41 a.m.
2:10 p.m.
7:18 p.m.
none
THE POCONOS
Highs: 78-84. Lows: 51-57. Showers and a heavier thunderstorm today.
A shower or heavy thunderstorm tonight.
Highs: 81-87. Lows: 65-71. Humid today with a shower or heavy thun-
derstorm in the area.
THE FINGER LAKES
Highs: 76-82. Lows: 52-58. Showers and a heavier thunderstorm today.
Cooler tonight. Cooler tomorrow with a passing shower.
NEW YORK CITY
High: 89. Low: 67. A couple of showers and a heavy thunderstorm
today; humid.
High: 89. Low: 66. Humid today with a shower or heavy thunderstorm.
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport
through 7 p.m. Wed.
High/low 95/70
Normal high/low 74/54
Record high 95 (2013)
Record low 37 (1995)
24 hrs ending 7 p.m. 0.02"
Month to date 0.12"
Normal m-t-d 1.40"
Year to date 18.49"
Normal y-t-d 26.43"
87/58
85/57
89/66
87/63
85/59
86/62
86/60
80/55
83/58
83/56
79/52
79/55
82/60
83/61
89/67
Summary: Showers and storms will reach from the central Plains to the Northeast
today. Cooler air will expand over the Midwest as heat holds in the South. More
rain will fall on the Southwest, as the West Coast is dry.
Aimee Dilger | The Times Leader
Bob Russin talks about the advantages of a flood-control levee
that would protect West Pittston from Susquehanna River flood-
ing while outside his home on Susquehanna Avenue.
From page 1A
Levee
arm-in-arm. Former Gov.
George Pataki, New
Jersey Gov. Chris Christie
and others were in atten-
dance. As with last year,
no politicians spoke.
Mayor Michael Bloomberg
watched the ceremony for
his nal time in ofce.
Carol Eckna recalled the
contagious laugh of her
son, Paul Robert Eckna,
who was killed in the north
tower.
Just yesterday, you
were 28, she said. Today,
you are 40. You are forever
young. Dad and I are proud
to be your parents.
Outside Washington,
hundreds of people gath-
ered for a short, simple
ceremony at an Arlington
County plaza three miles
from the Pentagon. First
responders from the coun-
ty were among the rst on
the scene that day.
Fire Chief James
Schwartz said ceremonies
like Wednesdays which
featured an honor guard
and a moment of silence
serve as a reminder of why
rst responders spend so
much time preparing for
disaster.
Ive often said this has
been the fastest 12 years
of my life, Schwartz said.
But if you are a surviving
family member, Id imag-
ine this has been the lon-
gest 12 years of your life,
because youre waking up
every day with a hole in
your heart.
Bloomberg also spoke
at a remembrance service
for the 84 Port Authority
employees killed on Sept.
11 at St. Peters Roman
Catholic Church, in the
shadowof where the World
Trade Center once stood.
On that terrible day, we
were united in prayer and
compassion for all of you
who lost loved ones, the
mayor said. As we woke
up this morning, our rst
thoughts were with you as
well.
Dozens of family mem-
bers and colleagues lled
the pews as the Port
Authority Police Pipes and
Drums played during the
posting of colors.
Around the world,
thousands of volunteers
pledged to do good deeds,
honoring an anniversary
that was designated a
National Day of Service
and Remembrance in
2009.
By next years anni-
versary, a 9/11 museum
is expected to be open
beneath the memorial
plaza in New York City.
While the memorial hon-
ors those killed, the muse-
um is intended to present a
broader picture, including
the experiences of survi-
vors and rst responders.
As things evolve in the
future, the focus on the
remembrance is going to
stay sacrosanct, memo-
rial President Joe Daniels
said.
Douglas Hamatie,
whose 31-year-old cousin
Robert Horohoe worked
for Cantor Fitzgerald
and died on 9/11, drew
applause from the crowd
when he declared that
the day should become a
national holiday.
The kids today, they
know when the next
iPhones coming out, and
they know when the next
Justin Bieber concert
is, but they dont know
enough about 9/11, he
said. So lets change that,
please.
From page 1A
Remembering 9/11
each for secretaries, cus-
todians and administra-
tors have yet to be
settled. In fact, the teacher
contract was set at four
years in large part to help
stagger the expiration of
future contracts so such a
conuence does not hap-
pen again, Solicitor Ray
Wendolowski said.
But teachers make up a
large majority of both sal-
ary and insurance costs,
so Przywara expects that
even after the other three
contracts are settled, the
district should see a net
annual savings from the
teachers contract.
The total raises for
the four years are simple
math. The contract calls
for $1,000 increases in all
15 steps in the pay scale
each of the four years.
That effectively means
$1,000 raises each year for
each of about 550 teachers
$550,000 a year for four
years equals $2.2 million.
The savings from the
insurance changes high-
er deductibles and co-pays
are much more compli-
cated because the savings
vary depending on how
many teachers have what
type of policies: single or
family. But the changes
from the last contract,
which expired this sum-
mer, are substantial:
Deductibles: The
expired contract had no
deductible for service pro-
vided by physicians and
others within its network.
Out-of-network deduct-
ibles were $200 for individ-
ual coverage and $400 for
family. The new plan calls
for in-network deductibles
of $150 and $450, and out-
of-network deductibles of
$300 and $900.
Offce visit co-pays:
The old plan had $7 co-
pays regardless of type of
visit. The new plan has co-
pays of $10 for regular doc-
tor visits and $25 and $35
for specialist visits.
Prescription co-pays:
The old plan had a at $7
co-pay, regardless of type
of prescription. The new
plan goes to a three-tier
system, becoming increas-
ingly common, with $10
for generic prescriptions,
$20 for name-brand drugs
$30 for drugs not on the
rst two lists.
Percentage-wise, that
means teachers will see
deductibles for out-of-net-
work services rise 50 to
125 percent and see pre-
scription co-pays rise 43
percent to 400 percent.
By comparison, the
$1,000 at pay increase for
all is a shrinking percent-
age the higher up the pay
scale you go.
All area school districts
pay on a step/column pay
matrix, providing raises
every year for a limited
number of years the
steps and raises for
increased education mea-
sured in set numbers of
college credits, the col-
umns.
The Wilkes-Barre Area
matrix has 11 columns,
giving increases for 15
credits, 30 credits, a mas-
ters degree or bachelorss
plus 39 credits, and for
every nine credits above a
masters degree through a
doctorate. The percentage
increases range between
2 and 3 percent in most
cases, though the bump for
a masters degree can run
as high as 5.6 percent. A
larger masters increase is
common in contracts.
The matrix has 15 steps.
But while most other dis-
tricts give a small raise
every step after step 1,
Wilkes-Barre Area steps
are banded, meaning
raises come only every
few years but are typically
much larger. A teacher
gets a substantial raise
from 8 percent to more
than 19 percent at steps
two, ve, 10 and 15, with
much smaller raise of less
than 2 percent at step 12.
Salary remains at every
year in between, unless
increases are negotiated
into a contract.
The at, $1,000 raise
becomes a shrinking
percentage as teachers
climb the pay scale. For
a second-year bachelors
degree teacher, a $1,000
raise (above the built-in
step two raise) is a 2.4 per-
cent boost. For a 10th-year
teacher with a masters,
its 1.6 percent. And for a
teacher at the top of the
scale with 15 years and a
doctorate, its 1.2 percent.
From page 1A
Contract
Aimee Dilger | The Times Leader
The Rev. Genero Augulair, CSC, held a Mass of Remembrance
Wednesday for the victims of the Sept. 11 attacks at Misericordia
Universitys University Chapel in Mercy Hall.
AP photo
President Barack Obama lowers his head during a moment of
silence Wednesday at the Pentagon during a ceremony to mark
the terror attacks.
Navy Quartermaster Matthew Konchan of Johnstown stands in a field of black-eyed Susans as he
waits to participate in a wreath-laying ceremony at the Flight 93 National Memorial on Wednesday
in Shanksville.
SHANKSVILLE
Under a blue sky and
against a backdrop of rolling
hills, family, friends and oth-
ers gathered Wednesday in a
western Pennsylvania eld
to mourn and praise the pas-
sengers and crew who died
12 years ago after ghting
back against the hijackers of
United Flight 93.
In a period of 22 min-
utes, our loved ones made
history, said Gordon Felt,
the president of the Families
of Flight 93, whose brother,
Edward, was among the
aboard the hijacked plane
on Sept. 11, 2001.
At the Flight 93 National
Memorial ceremony, fami-
lies of those aboard the
plane, along with about
200 people, read the names
of 33 passengers and seven
crew members aloud, and
bells tolled for each, as they
marked the 12th anniver-
sary of the Sept. 11 attacks.
As the names were read,
a light haze began to burn
off the surrounding hills.
The memorial wall of white
stone has each victims
name engraved on a sepa-
rate panel, and the scene
was framed by yellow wild-
owers in the nearby elds.
Flight 93 was travel-
ing from Newark, N.J., to
San Francisco when it was
hijacked with the likely goal
of crashing it into the White
House or Capitol.
As passenger Todd
Beamer issued the rally-
ing cry Lets roll, he and
others rushed down the
airliners aisle to try to over-
whelm the hijackers after
learning of the coordinated
attacks on the World Trade
Center and the Pentagon.
The 9/11 Commission
concluded that the hijack-
ers downed the plane as the
hostages revolted.
Later Wednesday, park
rangers and volunteers gave
presentations about Flight
93 and the creation of the
memorial park, located in
Shanksville.
Marking 22 minutes of
bravery, a lifetime of loss
KEVIN BEGOS
Associated Press
AP photo
timesleader.com
THETIMES LEADER Thursday, September 12, 2013
SPORTS
Baseball pays respect to the fallen
AP photo
The United States and Texas flags wave in the breeze at half-staff, in honor of the 12th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, during the first inning of Wednesdays game
between the Pirates and Rangers in Arlington, Texas.
SEPTEMBER 11 TRIBUTES
Lions like rotation at running back
Cano deals Orioles
another setback
See TribuTe | 3b
See JeTS | 3b
See NASCAr | 3b
STEPHEN HAWKINS
AP Sports Writer
Texas rangers third base coach Gary Pettis
still has vivid memories of that day 12 years
ago, when two hijacked jets were own into the
World Trade Center towers.
back then, Pettis was a coach for the Chicago
White Sox, who had arrived in town only a few
hours earlier for a scheduled game that night
against the New York Yankees.
You could smell the smoke. it wasnt a good
feeling that day, Pettis said Wednesday before
a home game against the Pittsburgh Pirates.
its so sad that so many people lost their lives,
and its ruined other peoples lives. its like it
was a movie, its like that wasnt something that
actually happened. i still cant believe it.
What he does believe is the importance for
Major League baseball and all Americans
to take a moment to remember Sept. 11.
Players, coaches and umpires wore American
ag patches embroidered on the side of their
caps in commemoration of the tragedy. Special
lineup cards were used, and patriotic on-eld
tributes were planned for the days 15 games,
involving all 30 teams. Flags were half-staff, and
there were moments of silence across baseball.
There were impromptu remembrances, too.
in New York, art students made a chalk draw-
ing in blue and orange on the sidewalk outside
Citi Field, showing the Twin Towers, the Mets
logo and the words Never Forget.
New York Mets manager Terry Collins wore
an NYPD hat and his players wore caps repre-
senting other rst responders during batting
practice before hosting Washington.
Youll always remember how you felt on
9/11, Collins said.
With so many tributes planned at the sta-
dium, a memo was written on a board in the
Nationals clubhouse Note: everyone on the
eld 6:55.
both dugouts were lled with applauding
players, managers and coaches as members of
DEREK LEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com
For some coaches, its a
problem to be solved. For
bill Obrien, its been a
situation to exploit.
running back by com-
mittee isnt so bad, the
Penn State coach said,
when you have three
good running backs.
Obrien of course had
plenty of success as offen-
sive coordinator of the
New england Patriots
by rotating his backeld,
getting carries for three,
four, even ve different
players in a game.
So it shouldnt come
as a surprise to see the
Nittany Lions release
their depth chart for
Saturdays uCF game
with Zach Zwinak, bill
belton and Akeel Lynch
all listed as co-starters at
running back.
Zwinak, the 1,000-yard
rusher who took the reins
in the nal two months
of last season, is still the
presumptive starter. but
going forward, its less
likely that hell see the
30-plus carries a game
he saw at the very end of
2012.
Obrien has made it
clear since the spring
that all three of his tail-
backs will see the eld
as the season goes along,
and that was the case on
Saturday against eastern
Michigan.
i like all three of these
guys playing, Obrien
said. i think one of the
things that we try to do
is, if a guy gets really
hot, well stick with a hot
back.
Against the eagles,
it was nine carries for
belton, seven for Zwinak
and 13 for Lynch, many
coming in the second half
with the Lions up big and
looking to run clock.
it was nothing against
Zwinak He rushed
seven times for 43 yards
a 6.1 average i think
hes pretty healthy,
Obrien said but an
opportunity to get longer
See PSu | 3b
AP photo
Bill Belton (1) ran for a career-high 108 yards and two scores on
Saturday. Hell be part of the Lions running back rotation going
foward.
HOWARD ULMAN
AP Sports Writer
FOXbOrOuGH, Mass. Geno Smith
was 10 years old when Tom brady played
his rst game against the Jets. On Thursday
night, New Yorks rookie quarterback
makes his debut in the rivalry with the New
england Patriots.
Hes hoping for a better result than brady
had.
in his second season, brady replaced an
injured Drew bledsoe in the fourth quarter
of the second game in 2001. The Jets won
10-3.
From an outside view, its always been
one of the best rivalries in the NFL, Smith
said. Looking to see who can come out
and be the toughest team, and hopefully
(we) get the victory. From being on this
team now, i know it means a lot to everyone
around here.
Since that loss 12 years ago, brady is 18-5
as a starter against the Jets, including the
postseason. Hes won three Super bowls and
two regular-season MVP awards. Facing the
Jets, though, is still special.
its awesome, brady said. its boston-
New York. its been that way for a long time,
long before me, and any time you see them
on the schedule you just think of all the great
games that youve had against them and you
think of how challenging the game will be.
both teams are coming off openers that
Geno to get
frst taste of
Pats rivalry
AP photo
NewEngland Patriots quarterback TomBrady, seen in
last weeks game against the Bills, is 18-5 as a starter
against the Jets. The Patriots and Jets play tonight.
The Associated Press
Five-time NASCAr
champion Jimmie
Johnson denied any
wrongdoing the Chase
field-deciding race at
richmond international
raceway over the week-
end that has been marred
by controversy.
Johnson defended him-
self one day after fellow
driver Clint bowyer said
his spinout at richmond
was no different than
when a Johnson mishap
brought out a caution
earlier in the race.
Clint brought it up
from what ive been
able to see and read,
Johnson said Wednesday
at Charlotte Motor
Speedway. i think he
was just having a bad
day. And as things kept
piling on, he just tried to
suck someone else into
the mix with him.
bowyers spin ended
ryan Newmans bid to
win the race and make the
Chase for the Sprint Cup
championship field and
instead helped Michael
Waltrip racing teammate
Martin Truex Jr. land a
berth. NASCAr, howev-
er, determined that MWr
had manipulated the race
and replaced Truex with
Newman in addition to
punishing MWr.
The implication by
bowyer was that Johnson
spun intentionally with
55 laps remaining to
assist the Chase chances
of Jeff Gordon, Johnsons
teammate at Hendrick
Motorsports.
Johnson blamed a flat
tire for his caution and
pointed out correctly
that Gordon already
was on pit road when it
occurred.
if anyone has any
questions, just go back
and look at the race and
youll see that our tire
blowing was bad for
the 24 (of driver Jeff
Gordon), bad for the 5
(of driver Kasey Kahne,
another Hendrick team-
mate) bad for a lot of
guys who were coming to
pit road, Johnson said.
The only silver lining
for the 24 was that he was
preserved on pit road,
and was able to get the
Lucky Dog (to get back
on the lead lap). but even
then, you have to start at
the tail end (of the lead-
lap cars). . There was no
benefit.
At Dover Air Force
base in Delaware, Kyle
busch was asked what he
thought of the scandal.
i say you do whatever
youve got to do to get
your team in, busch said
of the Chase. if youre in
that position, and you
have multi-team cars,
thats what theyre there
for. Some people say im
full of crap and youre not
supposed to manipulate
the end of the race. Just
let it play out as it plays
out. Let the best man
win.
but, i was in the same
position last year. There
were ways it could have
been manipulated and i
could have gotten myself
in the Chase. but i didnt
do it. And i missed the
Chase.
Johnson said NASCAr
needs to use more offi-
cials and more technol-
ogy resources, such as
television replays and
even in-car audio, to
make better calls during
the races.
in the overall issue
of officiating, i think we
need to expect things
and when we get to the
Chase time of the year
and really we should
have it all year but
Johnson denies wrongdoing in
NASCARChase controversy
DAVID GINSBURG
AP Sports Writer
bALTiMOre
robinson Cano hit a tie-
breaking homer leading
off the ninth inning, and
the New York Yankees also
got solo shots from Alex
rodriguez and Curtis
Granderson in a 5-4 vic-
tory over the baltimore
Orioles on Wednesday
night.
The Yankees moved past
baltimore and Cleveland
in the AL wild-card hunt.
New York has hit eight
home runs in winning two
of three in the four-game
series that concludes
Thursday night.
The Yankees trailed
3-1 before Granderson
homered in the fth
New Yorks rst hit
and rodriguez tied it in
the sixth with his 653rd
career home run.
in the ninth, after Cano
connected off Tommy
Hunter (4-4), Granderson
tripled with one out and
scored on an ineld hit by
Lyle Overbay.
David robertson (5-1)
worked the eighth and
Mariano rivera gave
up a run-scoring single
to brian roberts before
securing his 43rd save,
tied for the major league
lead with baltimores Jim
Johnson.
Orioles slugger Chris
Davis drove in two runs
with a double, making
him the rst player in
team history to have 40
doubles and 40 homers in
a season. Danny Valencia
tied a career high with
four hits, and roberts had
three singles.
baltimore outhit New
York 13-6.
before the game, the
Yankees announced that
shortstop Derek Jeter
would miss the rest of the
season with an injured
left ankle. The Yankees
captain played in only 17
games this season and
made four trips to the dis-
abled list.
The announcement
coincided with the arriv-
al of shortstop brendan
ryan, obtained one night
earlier in a trade with
Seattle. Although ryan
went hitless, he performed
awlessly and showed
good range in the eld.
Yankees starter Andy
Pettitte gave up three runs
and nine hits over 6 1-3
innings. The 41-year-old
lefty has gone 13 straight
starts since September
2007 without losing to
baltimore, going 8-0 over
that stretch. Pettitte has
lost only twice to the
Orioles since 2002 and is
28-6 lifetime against them.
Pettitte has pitched at
least six innings in each
of his last six starts and is
3-0 in seven outings since
Aug. 5.
baltimores Scott
Feldman allowed only
three hits in 7 2-3 innings,
two of them homers. The
right-hander struck out
six and walked two. His
rst walk came against
the rst batter of the game
and the second was to the
last batter he faced.
New York got a rst-
inning run when lead-
off hitter brett Gardner
walked, stole second and
scored on two groundouts.
The Orioles took a 2-1
lead in the third. roberts
and Manny Machado sin-
gled with two outs before
Davis lined a two-run dou-
ble through the shift into
right-eld.
Doubles by Valencia and
J.J. Hardy made it 3-1 in
the fourth, but baltimore
stranded runners at the
corners.
NOTES: New Yorks
David Huff squares off
against Wei-Yin Chin in
a duel of left-handers in
the series nale Thursday
night. Pettitte has held
the opposition scoreless
in the rst inning over
six straight starts after
allowing at least one
rst-inning run in eight
consecutive games before
that. Granderson is 7
for 17 with four homers
lifetime against Feldman.
Feldman threw a sea-
son-high 112 pitches.
AP photo
Baltimores Manny Machado (center) slides between Yankees
catcher Chris Stewart (right) and home plate umpire Jeff Nelson
for a run on a double by Chris Davis on Wednesday.
PAGE 2B Tuesday, September 10, 2013 scoreboard www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Major League Baseball
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
Atlanta -140 at Miami
+130
Washington -130 at New
York +120
at Pittsburgh -180 Chicago +170
at Philadelphia -120 San Diego
+110
at St. Louis -185 Milwaukee +175
at Los Angeles -160 San Francisco
+150
American League
Oakland -155 at Minnesota
+145
at Baltimore -170 New York
+160
Los Angeles -110 at Toronto
+100
Boston -115 at Tampa
Bay +105
Cleveland -120 at Chicago
+110
___
NCAAFootball
Tonight
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U
UNDERDOG
TCU 6 3 (63)
at Texas Tech
at Louisiana Tech 7 7 (57)
Tulane
at Arkansas St. 10 8 (66)
Troy
Tomorrow
at Boise St. 24 23 (57)
Air Force
Saturday
at Rutgers 34 27 (51)
E. Michigan
Stanford 30 29 (51)
at Army
at West Virginia 38 39 (56)
Georgia St.
Louisville 7 13 (59)
at Kentucky
Marshall 6 8 (68)
at Ohio
at Michigan 35 37 (56)
Akron
at Indiana 4 2 (64)
Bowling Green
Virginia Tech 7 7 (51)
at East Carolina
Maryland 7 6 (48)
at UConn
at Pittsburgh 20 21 (52)
New Mexico
at Wake Forest 3 3 (53)
Louisiana-Monroe
W. Kentucky 7 10 (54)
at South Alabama
Fresno St. 10 9 (66)
at Colorado
at Florida St. 35 33 (65)
Nevada
at Nebraska 4 4 (70)
UCLA
Georgia Tech 10 8 (56)
at Duke
at Oregon 20 27 (70)
Tennessee
at Texas 3 2 (64)
Mississippi
at Southern Cal 17 14 (43)
Boston College
Iowa 3 2 (48)
at Iowa St.
Alabama 7 7 (61)
at Texas A&M
N. Illinois 24 28 (62)
at Idaho
at Auburn 7 6 (51)
Mississippi St.
Washington-x 7 9 (63)
Illinois
at Penn St. 3 5 (50)
UCF
Ball St. 2 3 (61)
at North Texas
at Middle Tenn. 3 7 (52)
Memphis
at Arkansas 19 22 (49)
Southern Miss.
at South Carolina 11 13 (51)
Vanderbilt
at Oklahoma 28 24 (50)
Tulsa
at California OFF OFF (OFF)
Ohio St.
at Kansas St. 35 39 (54)
UMass
at South Florida 10 12 (43)
FAU
at Rice Pk 6 (58)
Kansas
at LSU 38 37 (55)
Kent St.
Notre Dame 23 20 (50)
at Purdue
UTEP 6 5 (55)
at New Mexico St.
at Northwestern 35 31 (59)
W. Michigan
at Arizona 24 26 (65)
UTSA
at Utah +3 3 (58)
Oregon St.
at UNLV 16 7 (56)
Cent. Michigan
at Arizona St. 4 5 (52)
Wisconsin
x-at Chicago
OfKey
Ohio St. QB questionable
___
NFL
Tonight
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U
UNDERDOG
at NewEngland 10 12 (43)
N.Y. Jets
Sunday
at Philadelphia 7 7 (54)
San Diego
at Baltimore 6 6 (43)
Cleveland
at Houston 8 9 (43)
Tennessee
at Indianapolis Pk 2 (42)
Miami
Carolina 2 3 (43)
at Bufalo
at Atlanta 6 7 (47)
St. Louis
at Green Bay 6 7 (49)
Washington
at Kansas City 2 3 (46)
Dallas
at Chicago 5 6 (42)
Minnesota
NewOrleans 3 3 (47)
at Tampa Bay
Detroit Pk 1 (47)
at Arizona
at Oakland 3 5 (39)
Jacksonville
Denver 3 4 (55)
at N.Y. Giants
at Seattle 3 3 (44)
San Francisco
Monday
at Cincinnati 6 7 (41)
Pittsburgh
___
Boxing
Saturday
Super Welterweight Unifcation Title
At Las Vegas
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
Floyd Mayweather Jr. -280 Saul Alvarez
+230
LATEST LINE
INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE
PLAYOFFS
First Round
(Best-of-5)
Durham3, Indianapolis 0
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Durham2, Indianapolis 0
Thursday, Sep. 5: Durham6, Indianapolis 5
Friday, Sep. 6: Durham2, Indianapolis 1
Pawtucket 3, Rochester 2
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Rochester 7, Pawtucket 1
Thursday, Sep. 5: Pawtucket 7, Rochester 2
Friday, Sep. 6: Pawtucket 5, Rochester 1
Saturday, Sep. 7: Rochester 9, Pawtucket 1
Sunday, Sep. 8: Pawtucket 3, Rochester 0
Championship
(Best-of-5)
Pawtucket 1, Durham0
Tuesday, Sep. 10: Pawtucket 2, Durham1
Wednesday, Sep. 11: Pawtucket at Durham, 7:05
p.m.
Friday, Sep. 13: Durhamat Pawtucket, 7:05 p.m.
x-Saturday, Sep. 14: Durham at Pawtucket, 7:05
p.m.
x-Sunday, Sep. 15: Durham at Pawtucket, 1:05
p.m.
EASTERN LEAGUE PLAYOFFS
Wild-Card
(Best-of-5)
Trenton 3, Binghamton 0
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Trenton 6, Binghamton 5,
10 innings
Thursday, Sep. 5: Trenton 2, Binghamton 1
Friday, Sep. 6: Trenton 3, Binghamton 0
First Round
(Best-of-5)
Harrisburg 3, Erie 1
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Harrisburg 5, Erie 4
Thursday, Sep. 5: Erie 2, Harrisburg 1, 12 innings
Friday, Sep. 6: Harrisburg 4, Erie 1
Saturday, Sep. 7: Harrisburg 5, Erie 1
Harrisburg 3, Trenton 1
Tuesday, Sep. 10: Trenton 8, Harrisburg 2
Wednesday, Sep. 11: Harrisburg at Trenton,
7:05 p.m.
Thursday, Sep. 12: Trenton at Harrisburg, TBA
Friday, Sep. 13: Trenton at Harrisburg, TBA
x-Saturday, Sep. 14: Trenton at Harrisburg, TBA
NEWYORK - PENN LEAGUE
PLAYOFFS
First Round
(Best-of-3)
State College 2, Jamestown 1
Friday, Sep. 6: Jamestown 6, State College 5
Saturday, Sep. 7: State College 12, Jamestown 4
Sunday, Sep. 8: State College 6, Jamestown 0
Tri-City 2, Aberdeen 0
Friday, Sep. 6: Tri-City 1, Aberdeen 0
Saturday, Sep. 7: Tri-City 3, Aberdeen 0
Championship
(Best-of-3)
State College 1, Tri-City 0
Tuesday, Sep. 10: State College 2, Tri-City 1, 11
innings
Wednesday, Sep. 11: Tri-City at State College,
7:05 p.m.
x-Thursday, Sep. 12: Tri-City at State College,
7:05 p.m.
PACIFIC COAST LEAGUE
PLAYOFFS
First Round
(Best-of-5)
Salt Lake 3, Las Vegas 1
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Salt Lake 4, Las Vegas 3
Thursday, Sep. 5: Salt Lake 5, Las Vegas 4
Friday, Sep. 6: Las Vegas 3, Salt Lake 2
Saturday, Sep. 7: Salt Lake 4, Las Vegas 3
Omaha 3, Oklahoma City 0
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Omaha 3, Oklahoma City 1
Thursday, Sep. 5: Omaha 7, Oklahoma City 4
Friday, Sep. 6: Omaha 7, Oklahoma City 6
Championship
(Best-of-5)
Salt Lake vs. Omaha
Tuesday, Sep. 10: Salt Lake at Omaha, 2:05 p.m.,
susp., rain
Wednesday, Sep. 11: Salt Lake at Omaha, 8:05
p.m.
Friday, Sep. 13: Omaha at Salt Lake, 8:35 p.m.
Saturday, Sep. 14: Omaha at Salt Lake, 8:35 p.m.
x-Sunday, Sep. 15: Omaha at Salt Lake, 3:05 p.m.
First Round
TUESDAYS MLB LATE BOx
SCORES
Pirates 5, Rangers 4
Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
J.Harrison 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .260
a-N.Walker ph-2b 1 1 0 0 1 0 .255
Mercer ss 5 1 4 0 0 1 .279
McCutchen cf 5 1 3 3 0 1 .326
Byrd rf 5 1 1 0 0 0 .288
G.Sanchez 1b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .254
1-S.Marte pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .282
Pie lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .200
R.Martin dh 5 0 1 0 0 2 .236
P.Alvarez 3b 2 0 0 0 2 1 .231
Tabata lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .273
b-Morneau ph-1b 0 0 0 0 1 0 .222
T.Sanchez c 4 1 1 0 0 1 .229
Totals 37 5 12 4 4 7
Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Kinsler 2b 5 1 2 2 0 1 .271
Andrus ss 5 0 2 0 0 1 .268
Rios rf 5 1 3 1 0 0 .284
A.Beltre 3b 4 0 2 1 1 1 .318
Pierzynski c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .279
2-E.Beltre pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .263
G.Soto c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .231
Je.Baker 1b 4 0 1 0 0 3 .286
J.Butler dh 1 1 0 0 2 1 .500
c-Dav.Murphy ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .220
Gentry lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .254
d-Moreland ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .238
L.Martin cf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .266
Totals 37 4 13 4 3 11
Pittsburgh 001 030 0015 12 0
Texas 000 010 0124 13 2
a-fied out for J.Harrison in the 6th. b-was inten-
tionally walked for Tabata in the 8th. d-struck out
for Gentry in the 9th.
1-ran for G.Sanchez in the 8th. 2-ran for Pierzyn-
ski in the 8th.
EPierzynski (2), Gentry (2). LOBPittsburgh
10, Texas 9. 2BMercer 2 (19), T.Sanchez (3),
Kinsler (27), Rios (29), A.Beltre (28), Pierzynski
(19). RBIsMcCutchen 3 (79), G.Sanchez
(36), Kinsler 2 (60), Rios (68), A.Beltre (85).
SBS.Marte (36), Rios (36). CSAndrus (7).
STabata.
Runners left in scoring positionPittsburgh 7
(Byrd, Tabata, G.Sanchez, R.Martin 2, N.Walker,
T.Sanchez); Texas 7 (A.Beltre 2, L.Martin, Andrus,
Je.Baker 3). RISPPittsburgh 5 for 19; Texas
4 for 11.
Runners moved upMcCutchen, P.Alvarez,
L.Martin. GIDPTabata, Pierzynski, L.Martin.
DPPittsburgh 2 (G.Sanchez, Mercer), (Mercer,
G.Sanchez); Texas 1 (Kinsler, Andrus, Je.Baker).
Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
LirianoW, 16-7 6 6 1 1 2 5 91 2.92
Ju.Wilson H, 13 1 0 0 0 1 1 16 2.19
Grilli H, 2 2-3 2 1 1 0 1 20 2.62
Watson H, 19 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 11 2.55
Melancon S, 13-15 1 4 2 2 0 3 30 1.12
Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
M.Perez L, 9-4 5 9 4 4 2 2 73 3.60
Ogando 2 0 0 0 0 3 28 3.30
Frasor 1 1 0 0 1 0 13 2.49
R.Ross 0 0 1 1 1 0 6 3.38
Soria 1 2 0 0 0 2 18 2.60
M.Perez pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
R.Ross pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
Inherited runners-scoredWatson 1-0, Ogando
1-0, Soria 1-1. IBBof Frasor (Morneau). WP
M.Perez.
UmpiresHome, Jef Kellogg; First, Chad
Fairchild; Second, Paul Schrieber; Third, Mike
Muchlinski.
T3:20. A36,313 (48,114).
baseball
local calendar
what s on tv
NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
NewEngland 1 0 0 1.000 23 21
Miami 1 0 0 1.000 23 10
N.Y. Jets 1 0 0 1.000 18 17
Bufalo 0 1 0 .000 21 23
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 1 0 0 1.000 21 17
Tennessee 1 0 0 1.000 16 9
Houston 1 0 0 1.000 31 28
Jacksonville 0 1 0 .000 2 28
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 0 1 0 .000 21 24
Pittsburgh 0 1 0 .000 9 16
Baltimore 0 1 0 .000 27 49
Cleveland 0 1 0 .000 10 23
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Kansas City 1 0 0 1.000 28 2
Denver 1 0 0 1.000 49 27
San Diego 0 1 0 .000 28 31
Oakland 0 1 0 .000 17 21
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia 1 0 0 1.000 33 27
Dallas 1 0 0 1.000 36 31
Washington 0 1 0 .000 27 33
N.Y. Giants 0 1 0 .000 31 36
South
W L T Pct PF PA
NewOrleans 1 0 0 1.000 23 17
Tampa Bay 0 1 0 .000 17 18
Carolina 0 1 0 .000 7 12
Atlanta 0 1 0 .000 17 23
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 1 0 0 1.000 34 24
Chicago 1 0 0 1.000 24 21
Green Bay 0 1 0 .000 28 34
Minnesota 0 1 0 .000 24 34
West
W L T Pct PF PA
St. Louis 1 0 0 1.000 27 24
San Francisco 1 0 0 1.000 34 28
Seattle 1 0 0 1.000 12 7
Arizona 0 1 0 .000 24 27
Football
transactI ons
BULLETIN BOARD
BASEBALL
American League
NEWYORKYANKEES Placed SS Derek Jeter
on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Sept. 8.
California League
HIGH DESERT MAVERICKS Named Ryan
Cook general manager.
Atlantic League
LONG ISLAND DUCKS Acquired RHP Josh
Strawn from Grand Prairie (AA). Signed RHP
Josh Strawn. Placed RHP Pete Budkevics on the
inactive list.
SUGAR LAND SKEETERS Added LHP Jason
Lane, OF Ryan Langerhans, OF Steve Moss and
RHP Michael Nix to the roster. Signed OF Brian
Burgamy.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
MIAMI HEATSigned F Michael Beasley.
NEW YORK KNICKS Signed G Chris Smith
and GToure Murry.
Womens National Basketball Association
WNBA Suspended Phoenix G Diana Taurasi
one game for an accumulation of technical fouls.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CAROLINA PANTHERS Re-signed DT Sione
Fua. Placed GGarry Williams on injured reserve.
DALLAS COWBOYS Named Jason Cohen
general counsel.
MINNESOTA VIKINGS Signed DB Robert
Steeples to the practice squad.
NEW YORK GIANTS Signed LB Emmanuel
Acho to the practice squad.
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS Signed TE Kellen Da-
vis. Released LB Allen Bradford. Signed G Ryan
Seymour and LB to the practice squad. Released
G-CJared Smith and DTMichael Brooks fromthe
practice squad.
Canadian Football League
CFL Fined Hamilton DB Dee Webb an undis-
closed amount for a dangerous hit to the head of
BC WR Marco Iannuzzi in a Sept. 7 game. Fined
Saskatchewan C Dominic Picard an undisclosed
amount for throwing a punch during a Sept. 8
game Winnipeg.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS Signed vice presi-
dent and general manager Stan Bowman to a
two-year contract extension through 2017-18.
NEW YORK ISLANDERS Agreed to terms
with D Radek Martinek and F Justin Johnson on
professional tryout contracts.
SAN JOSE SHARKS Re-signed D Nick Pet-
recki to a one-year contract.
American Hockey League
MILWAUKEE ADMIRALS Signed F Vinny
Saponari, F Barry Almeida, D Theo Ruth and G
Scott Darling.
ECHL
READING ROYALS Agreed to terms with D
Ryan Kavanagh.
COLLEGE
GRAMBLING STATE Fired football coach
Doug Williams. Named George Ragsdale interim
coach.
HOLY CROSS Named Shayne Toporowski
mens assistant ice hockey coach.
LIMESTONE Named Tony Iliano equipment
manager.
UTSA Named Nicole Dunson womens as-
sistant basketball coach.
Tigers 9, White Sox 1
Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
A.Jackson cf 6 1 2 1 0 2 .276
Dirks lf 6 1 1 0 0 1 .258
Mi.Cabrera 3b 5 1 0 0 0 1 .349
R.Santiago 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .224
Fielder 1b 5 1 4 2 0 1 .277
V.Martinez dh 3 1 2 1 1 0 .298
1-H.Perez pr-dh 0 1 0 0 0 0 .207
D.Kelly rf 4 1 0 0 1 0 .233
Infante 2b 5 0 0 0 0 0 .318
Avila c 4 2 4 2 1 0 .221
Iglesias ss 5 0 2 1 0 0 .321
Totals 43 9 15 7 3 5
Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
De Aza cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .263
Beckham2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .274
Semien 2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250
Al.Ramirez ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .281
A.Dunn dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .221
Konerko 1b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .251
A.Garcia rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .283
Gillaspie 3b 2 0 2 1 0 0 .255
a-Le.Garcia ph-3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .171
Viciedo lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .264
Phegley c 2 0 1 0 0 0 .215
Mig.Gonzalez c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Totals 32 1 7 1 1 5
Detroit 203 110 0029 15 1
Chicago 000 100 0001 7 4
a-struck out for Gillaspie in the 7th.
1-ran for V.Martinez in the 9th.
ED.Kelly (2), Konerko (4), Gillaspie 3 (16).
LOBDetroit 11, Chicago 5. 2BA.Jackson
(27), Avila (12), Iglesias (16), Gillaspie (13). HR
Fielder (23), of Er.Johnson. RBIsA.Jackson
(43), Fielder 2 (99), V.Martinez (75), Avila 2 (42),
Iglesias (29), Gillaspie (34). SFV.Martinez.
Runners left in scoring positionDetroit 6
(Iglesias, D.Kelly, Dirks 2, A.Jackson 2); Chicago
4 (Viciedo 2, Al.Ramirez, Phegley). RISPDetroit
5 for 16; Chicago 1 for 5.
Runners moved upBeckham. GIDP
V.Martinez, Infante, Al.Ramirez, Konerko.
DPDetroit 2 (Infante, Iglesias, Fielder), (Igle-
sias, Infante, Fielder); Chicago 2 (Gillaspie, Beck-
ham, Konerko), (Gillaspie, Beckham, Konerko).
Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
PorcelloW, 12-8 9 7 1 1 1 5 105 4.56
Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Er.Jonso L, 0-2 32-3 7 6 2 3 4 96 4.66
Purcey 11-3 1 1 0 0 0 21 1.29
Leesman 2 3 0 0 0 0 26 1.59
Veal 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 5.56
D.Webb 1 4 2 2 0 0 18 9.00
Inherited runners-scoredPurcey 2-0. WP
Porcello, Er.Johnson. PBPhegley.
UmpiresHome, Tony Randazzo; First, Larry
Vanover; Second, Manny Gonzalez; Third, Brian
Gorman.
T2:52. A19,172 (40,615).
Twins 4, Athletics 3
Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Crisp cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .257
Donaldson 3b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .297
Lowrie dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .286
Moss rf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .251
Cespedes lf 3 1 1 1 0 1 .238
Callaspo 2b 4 1 1 2 0 1 .256
Barton 1b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .250
b-Freiman ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .283
Vogt c 2 0 1 0 0 0 .260
a-D.Norris ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .229
Sogard ss 3 0 2 0 0 0 .268
Totals 32 3 8 3 0 9
Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Presley cf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .350
Pinto c 3 0 0 0 1 2 .500
Dozier 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .243
Arcia rf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .255
1-Thomas pr-rf 0 1 0 0 0 0 .223
Doumit dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .240
Willinghamlf 3 2 2 3 1 0 .207
Mastroianni lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .216
Ploufe 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .248
Parmelee 1b 2 0 1 0 2 0 .224
Florimon ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .228
Totals 32 4 9 4 4 7
Oakland 000 021 0003 8 0
Minnesota 010 001 02x4 9 0
a-fied out for Vogt in the 7th. b-struck out for
Barton in the 9th.
1-ran for Arcia in the 8th.
LOB Oakland 4, Minnesota 8. HR Callaspo
(7), of Hendriks; Willingham (13), of J.Parker;
Arcia (11), of J.Parker; Willingham (14), of Cook.
RBIs Cespedes (66), Callaspo 2 (48), Arcia
(34), Willingham 3 (48). SB Crisp (18). CS
Vogt (1).
Runners left in scoring position Oakland
1 (Moss); Minnesota 5 (Arcia, Presley, Dozier,
Florimon 2). RISP Oakland 1 for 4; Minnesota
0 for 6.
Runners moved up Pinto. GIDP Sogard,
Florimon.
DP Oakland 1 (Callaspo, Sogard, Barton);
Minnesota 2 (Dozier, Florimon, Parmelee), (Pre-
sley, Presley, Florimon).
Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
J.Parker 6 7 2 2 3 4 101 3.55
Doolittle H, 24 11-3 1 1 1 0 3 15 3.48
Cook L, 6-4 BS, 7-91-31 1 1 1 0 13 2.18
Blevins 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 3.54
Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Hendriks 51-3 7 3 3 0 6 96 5.25
Thielbar 12-3 1 0 0 0 0 19 1.83
Swarzak W, 2-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 2.82
Perkins S, 34-38 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 2.50
Inherited runners-scored Cook 1-1, Blevins
1-0, Thielbar 2-0. HBP by Hendriks (Cespedes,
Moss).
Umpires Home, CB Bucknor; First, Dale
Scott; Second, Bill Miller; Third, ToddTichenor.
T2:56. A26,017 (39,021).
Astros 13, Mariners 2
Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Villar ss 5 3 2 1 1 1 .277
Altuve 2b 6 3 3 3 0 1 .282
Crowe lf 5 1 0 0 1 3 .243
B.Laird 1b 5 1 2 3 0 2 .209
M.Dominguez 3b 5 1 3 2 1 0 .239
Carter dh 4 2 3 1 2 1 .222
Hoes rf 4 0 2 3 1 1 .268
C.Clark c 5 0 0 0 0 3 .000
B.Barnes cf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .243
a-Elmore ph-cf 1 1 1 0 0 0 .250
Totals 44 13 17 13 6 12
Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
B.Miller ss 3 0 0 0 2 1 .259
A.Almonte cf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .265
M.Saunders cf 2 0 1 0 0 0 .238
Seager 3b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .276
K.Morales dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .278
Ibanez lf 4 1 1 0 0 3 .252
F.Gutierrez rf 4 0 2 2 0 1 .252
Smoak 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .247
Zunino c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .218
Franklin 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .219
Totals 33 2 5 2 4 7
Houston 114 000 22313 17 1
Seattle 010 001 000 2 5
a-singled for B.Barnes in the 9th.
E Villar (9), A.Almonte (3). LOB Houston
11, Seattle 9. 2B Altuve 2 (28), B.Laird (3),
M.Dominguez (22), Carter 2 (22), Hoes (5),
B.Barnes (17), Ibanez (19). HR Villar (1), of
J.Saunders; B.Laird (3), of Capps. RBIs Villar
(7), Altuve 3 (49), B.Laird 3 (8), M.Dominguez 2
(70), Carter (75), Hoes 3 (8), F.Gutierrez 2 (18).
SBVillar 2 (16), Altuve 3 (35).
Runners left in scoring position Houston 7
(B.Barnes, C.Clark 3, Hoes 2, Carter); Seattle 5
(K.Morales 3, B.Miller, Smoak). RISPHouston 8
for 19; Seattle 2 for 9.
Runners moved up A.Almonte, Smoak,
Zunino.
Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Lyles W, 7-7 6 4 2 1 2 5 108 4.92
De Leon 1 1 0 0 2 1 28 5.79
R.Cruz 2 0 0 0 0 1 25 3.86
Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
J.Saunders L, 11-143 7 6 6 1 5 69 5.18
Wilhelmsen 2 0 0 0 0 1 15 4.06
Capps 12-3 4 2 2 1 3 41 5.37
Rufn 1 1 2 2 3 2 39 6.23
Luetge 11-3 5 3 3 1 1 26 4.81
Inherited runners-scored Rufn 2-0, Luetge
3-1. HBPby R.Cruz (Zunino), by Rufn(B.Laird).
WPRufn.
Umpires Home, Brian Knight; First, Mark
Carlson; Second, Gerry Davis; Third, Dan Ias-
sogna.
T3:23. A10,245 (47,476).
Cardinals 4, Brewers 2
Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Aoki rf 5 0 0 0 0 3 .285
Segura ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .299
Lucroy 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .284
Ar.Ramirez 3b 3 0 2 0 1 0 .275
C.Gomez cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .280
Gennett 2b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .336
Gindl lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .245
Maldonado c 1 0 0 0 2 0 .173
c-L.Schafer ph 1 1 1 2 0 0 .223
W.Peralta p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .149
Mic.Gonzalez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
D.Hand p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .091
Badenhop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
d-J.Francisco ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .235
Totals 33 2 7 2 3 8
St. Louis AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
M.Carpenter 2b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .316
Jay cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .266
Holliday lf 3 1 1 2 1 2 .285
S.Robinson rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .274
Beltran rf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .308
1-Chambers pr-lf 0 1 0 0 0 0 .133
Y.Molina c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .318
Freese 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .263
Descalso 3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .238
Ma.Adams 1b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .266
Kozma ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .219
S.Miller p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .082
Siegrist p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
a-Wong ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .159
Rosenthal p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
b-B.Peterson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .100
Mujica p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Totals 31 4 6 4 5 10
Milwaukee 000 000 0022 7 2
St. Louis 000 002 11x4 6 0
a-walkedfor Siegrist inthe 7th. b-struck out for
Rosenthal inthe 8th. c-homeredfor Maldonadoin
the 9th. d-fied out for Badenhop in the 9th.
1-ran for Beltran in the 8th.
E Maldonado (4), Lucroy (6). LOB Milwau-
kee 8, St. Louis 8. 2B Gennett (8), Gindl (7).
HR L.Schafer (4), of Mujica; Holliday (19), of
W.Peralta. RBIs L.Schafer 2 (30), M.Carpenter
(70), Holliday 2 (81), Ma.Adams (39). S
W.Peralta.
Runners left in scoring position Milwaukee
4 (W.Peralta 2, Maldonado, Aoki); St. Louis 5
(Y.Molina, Jay 2, B.Peterson 2). RISPMilwaukee
1 for 6; St. Louis 3 for 7.
Runners moved upGindl 2.
Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
W.Prlta L, 9-15 62-3 2 3 3 4 7 105 4.49
Mic.Gonzalez 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 5 4.44
D.Hand 2-3 2 1 1 1 2 24 3.73
Badenhop 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 7 3.60
St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
S.Miller W, 13-9 62-3 5 0 0 2 4
108 3.05
Siegrist H, 9 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 0.56
Rosenthal H, 28 1 0 0 0 1 3 22 2.27
Mujica 1 2 2 2 0 0 18 2.23
Inherited runners-scored Mic.Gonzalez 2-1,
Badenhop 2-0, Siegrist 1-0. WPW.Peralta.
UmpiresHome, TomHallion; First, Phil Cuzzi;
Second, Chris Guccione; Third, Ron Kulpa.
T3:02. A35,050 (43,975).
Padres 8, Phillies 2
San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Venable rf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .272
Denorfa lf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .272
Gyorko 2b 5 3 3 1 0 1 .246
Headley 3b 5 1 3 2 0 2 .243
Blanks 1b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .259
Amarista cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .260
R.Cedeno ss 4 1 2 2 0 0 .313
R.Rivera c 4 0 1 2 0 2 .184
Cashner p 4 0 0 0 0 2 .271
Thayer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Brach p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Gregerson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 40 8 13 8 0 10
Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Bernadina cf-rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .170
Rollins ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .242
C.Hernandez 2b 0 0 0 1 1 0 .280
Utley 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .276
M.Martinez cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .171
Ruf rf-lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .250
Frandsen 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .234
Asche 3b 3 1 1 1 1 1 .268
Galvis lf-ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .212
Rupp c 4 1 1 0 0 2 .250
Cloyd p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .077
Miner p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
E.Martin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
a-Orr ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .214
Lu.Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
b-Mayberry ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .230
Savery p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 33 2 7 2 2 10
San Diego 100 340 0008 13 0
Philadelphia 000 010 0102 7 1
a-fouled out for E.Martin in the 6th. b-singled
for Lu.Garcia in the 8th.
EUtley (16). LOBSan Diego 5, Philadelphia
6. 2B Gyorko (25), R.Cedeno (2), R.Rivera (2),
Utley (24), Frandsen (9). HR Asche (5), of
Cashner. RBIs Gyorko (45), Headley 2 (40),
Blanks (35), R.Cedeno 2 (9), R.Rivera 2 (5),
C.Hernandez (4), Asche (20).
Runners left in scoring position San Di-
ego 3 (Blanks, Cashner 2); Philadelphia 5 (Ruf,
M.Martinez 2, Rupp 2). RISPSan Diego 7 for 13;
Philadelphia 1 for 6.
Runners moved upAmarista. GIDPGalvis.
DPSan Diego 1 (Gyorko, R.Cedeno, Blanks).
San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Cashner W, 9-8 72-3 4 2 2 1 7 108 3.40
Thayer 1-3 1 0 0 1 1 17 3.48
Brach 0 2 0 0 0 0 12 3.81
Gregerson 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 2.93
Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Cloyd L, 2-4 4 9 7 7 0 4 73 4.56
Miner 1 3 1 1 0 3 28 4.15
E.Martin 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 6.68
Lu.Garcia 2 1 0 0 0 0 15 5.01
Savery 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 1.84
Cloyd pitched to 3 batters in the 5th.
Brach pitched to 2 batters in the 9th.
Inherited runners-scoredThayer 2-1, Greger-
son 2-0, Miner 2-2. WPMiner.
UmpiresHome, MarkWegner; First, TimTim-
mons; Second, Mike Winters; Third, Laz Diaz.
T2:46. A29,242 (43,651).
Dodgers 5, Diamondbacks 3, 11 innings,
Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Bloomquist lf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .340
Eaton cf 5 0 0 0 0 0 .254
Goldschmidt 1b 5 1 2 0 0 1 .291
Prado 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .283
M.Montero c 4 0 1 1 0 2 .233
Davidson 3b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .167
G.Parra rf 3 1 0 0 1 0 .267
Gregorius ss 4 1 1 2 0 1 .260
Cahill p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .091
D.Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
b-Pollock ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .253
W.Harris p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
d-Nieves ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .303
Collmenter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .091
Totals 38 3 5 3 1 9
Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Puig rf 4 0 0 1 1 2 .338
C.Crawford lf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .283
H.Ramirez ss 3 1 0 0 2 0 .339
Ad.Gonzalez 1b 4 0 3 0 1 0 .296
1-D.Gordon pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .218
M.Young 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .278
Ethier cf 4 0 1 1 1 0 .272
Uribe 3b 4 1 0 0 1 2 .276
A.Ellis c 5 0 0 0 0 0 .244
M.Ellis 2b 5 2 2 0 0 0 .271
Volquez p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .108
a-HairstonJr. ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .230
P.Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Belisario p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Jansen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
c-Schumaker ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .268
Howell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Withrowp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
e-Van Slyke ph 1 1 1 2 0 0 .259
Totals 39 5 7 4 6 6
Arizona 000 120 000 003 5 2
Los Angeles 020 010 000 025 7 0
One out when winning run scored.
a-poppedout for Volquez inthe 6th. b-linedout
for D.Hernandez in the 8th. c-grounded out for
Jansen in the 9th. d-fied out for W.Harris in the
10th. e-homered for Withrowin the 11th.
1-ran for Ad.Gonzalez in the 10th.
E M.Montero (5), Gregorius (13). LOB
Arizona 3, Los Angeles 9. 2BGoldschmidt (30),
Ethier (32). HR Gregorius (7), of Volquez; Van
Slyke (7), of Collmenter. RBIsM.Montero (38),
Gregorius 2 (26), Puig (35), Ethier (52), Van Slyke
2 (18). SBPuig (11), D.Gordon (7).
Runners left in scoring position Arizona 1
(Prado); Los Angeles 7 (Ethier, C.Crawford, Uribe
4, Ad.Gonzalez). RISPArizona 1 for 3; Los Ange-
les 2 for 10.
Runners moved up H.Ramirez. GIDP Da-
vidson.
DP Los Angeles 1 (Uribe, M.Ellis,
Ad.Gonzalez).
Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Cahill 6 4 3 1 4 2 103 4.22
D.Hernandez 1 0 0 0 1 1 20 5.16
W.Harris 2 0 0 0 0 2 25 2.11
Cllmnter L, 4-3 11-3 3 2 2 1 1 31 2.76
Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Volquez 6 4 3 3 1 5 80 5.99
P.Rodriguez 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 2.12
Belisario 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 3.47
Jansen 1 1 0 0 0 2 19 1.91
Howell 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 2.28
WithrowW, 3-0 11-3 0 0 0 0 1 12 2.83
IBB of Collmenter (Ethier). WP Cahill,
D.Hernandez, Collmenter, Volquez 2.
Umpires Home, Adrian Johnson; First, Bill
Welke; Second, Fieldin Culbreth; Third, Jordan
Baker.
T3:35. A41,867 (56,000).
Rockies 9, Giants 8
Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Co.Dickerson lf 5 1 2 1 0 0 .289
C.Gonzalez lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .302
LeMahieu 2b 3 1 1 2 1 0 .286
Tulowitzki ss 4 0 0 0 1 0 .308
Cuddyer rf 5 2 3 4 0 0 .330
W.Rosario c 5 0 1 0 0 1 .288
Helton 1b 3 1 1 0 2 1 .248
Arenado 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .268
Blackmon cf 4 3 2 1 1 1 .277
J.De La Rosa p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .038
Manship p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
a-Pacheco ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .244
Scahill p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
d-R.Wheeler ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .192
Boggs p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Corpas p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
f-J.Herrera ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .276
W.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Brothers p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Totals 37 9 14 9 5 4
San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Pagan cf 4 2 2 0 2 2 .278
Scutaro 2b 6 2 3 1 0 0 .297
Belt 1b 4 1 1 0 1 1 .283
Posey c 4 1 1 1 1 1 .311
Pence rf 5 1 4 6 0 1 .289
Sandoval 3b 3 0 0 0 2 0 .276
Arias ss 5 0 1 0 0 0 .275
J.Perez lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .218
b-G.Blanco ph-lf 2 0 2 0 0 0 .256
g-Pill ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .219
Vogelsong p 1 1 0 0 1 1 .077
c-Kieschnick ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .218
Mijares p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Machi p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Kontos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
e-H.Sanchez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .276
Kickhamp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .167
Dunning p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Romo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
h-Abreu ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .229
Totals 39 8 14 8 8 7
Colorado 000 052 0119 14 0
San Francisco 310 200 0208 14 0
a-doubled for Manship in the 5th. b-singled
for J.Perez in the 5th. c-walked for Vogelsong in
the 5th. d-singled for Scahill in the 6th. e-fouled
out for Kontos in the 7th. f-singled for Corpas in
the 8th. g-grounded out for G.Blanco in the 9th.
h-struck out for Romo in the 9th.
LOB Colorado 8, San Francisco 12. 2B
Blackmon (11), Pacheco (14), Pagan (13), Scutaro
(22), Belt (33), Pence (35). HR Cuddyer (19),
of Vogelsong; Cuddyer (20), of Romo; Pence
(20), of J.De La Rosa. RBIs Co.Dickerson (12),
LeMahieu 2 (24), Cuddyer 4 (80), Blackmon (13),
R.Wheeler (3), Scutaro (30), Posey (71), Pence 6
(79). SB Blackmon (6). CS G.Blanco (7). S
Arenado. SFLeMahieu.
Runners left in scoring position Colorado 5
(J.De La Rosa 2, Cuddyer 2, Tulowitzki); San Fran-
cisco 7 (Posey 2, Sandoval 2, Scutaro 2, Arias).
RISPColorado 6 for 12; San Francisco 5 for 18.
Runners movedupCo.Dickerson, Pill. GIDP
LeMahieu, W.Rosario, Sandoval.
DP Colorado 2 (W.Rosario, W.Rosario, Tulow-
itzki), (LeMahieu, Tulowitzki, Helton); SanFrancis-
co 2 (Arias, Scutaro, Belt), (Arias, Scutaro, Belt).
Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
J.De La Rosa 2 4 4 4 3 1 56 3.49
Manship 2 3 2 2 2 2 39 7.11
Scahill 1 1 0 0 1 1 22 3.91
Boggs H, 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 16 8.84
Corpas H, 3 1 1 0 0 0 1 11 4.00
W.Lpz W, 3-4 BS, 5-5 1 3 2 2 0 0 16 4.13
Brothers S, 16-18 1 1 0 0 1 1 16 1.78
San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Vogelsong 5 8 5 5 2 0 80 5.82
Mijares 0 1 1 1 0 0 3 4.31
Machi BS, 2-2 2-3 2 1 1 1 0 17 2.76
Kontos 11-3 0 0 0 1 2 17 4.65
Kickham 1-3 2 1 1 0 0 1310.08
Dunning 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 2.86
Romo L, 4-7 1 1 1 1 1 2 23 2.56
Mijares pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
Inherited runners-scored Machi 1-1, Kontos
2-0, Dunning 2-1.
Umpires Home, Alan Porter; First, Greg Gib-
son; Second, Hunter Wendelstedt; Third, Jerry
Layne.
T4:02. A41,171 (41,915).
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Top 25 Football Schedule
All Times EDT
(Subject to change)
Thursday, Sept. 12
No. 24TCUat Texas Tech, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 14
No. 1 Alabama at No. 6Texas A&M, 3:30 p.m.
No. 2 Oregon vs. Tennessee, 3:30 p.m.
No. 4 Ohio St. at California, 7 p.m.
No. 5 Stanford at Army, Noon
No. 7 Louisville at Kentucky, Noon
No. 8 LSUvs. Kent State, 7 p.m.
No. 10 Florida State vs. Nevada, 3:30 p.m.
No. 11 Michigan vs. Akron, Noon
No. 12 Oklahoma St. vs. Lamar, 7:30 p.m.
No. 13 South Carolina vs. Vanderbilt, 7 p.m.
No. 14 Oklahoma vs. Tulsa, Noon
No. 16 UCLAat No. 23 Nebraska, Noon
No. 17 Northwestern vs. Western Michigan, 9
p.m.
No. 19Washingtonvs. Illinois at Chicago, 6p.m.
No. 20Wisconsin at Arizona State, 10:30 p.m.
No. 21 Notre Dame at Purdue, 8 p.m.
No. 25 Mississippi at Texas, 8 p.m.
BULLETINBOARD
CAMPS/CLINICS
Sem Cradle Lacrosse is
offering a clinic for boys and
girls ages 4 to 8 at Wyoming
Seminary Upper School in
Kingston. Program sessions
will be held Saturdays from
noon to 1 p.m. at Klassner
Field on North Maple Street
beginning Saturday, Sept. 21
and continuing through Nov.
2. Cost is $120. The program
provides all necessary equip-
ment with no additional feel.
The curriculumis designed to
teach the basics of lacrosse. It
will be directed by Sem coach
Catie Kersey. For more infor-
mation or to register, contact
Kersey at ckersey@wyoming-
seminary.org.
LEAGUES
Newport Biddy
Basketball registration for
grades 1-7 will be Sept. 16,
18, 21 and 22 from 6-8 p.m.
at K.M. Smith Elementary
School.
MEETINGS
GAR Memorial High
School Football Booster
Club will meet Thursday
Sept. 12at 7p.m. intheChoral
Roomat the highschool.
TODAYSEVENTS
HIGHSCHOOLFIELDHOCKEY
Berwick at Hanover Area
GARat Elk Lake
Meyers at PittstonArea
Northwest at Tunkhannock
HIGHSCHOOLBOYSSOCCER
Coughlinat WyomingSeminary
Crestwoodat Tunkhannock
Dallas at Holy Redeemer
HazletonArea at PittstonArea
MMI at Nanticoke
WyomingValleyWest at Lake-Lehman, 7 p.m.
HIGHSCHOOLGIRLSSOCCER
Holy Redeemer at Dallas
Lake-Lehmanat WyomingValleyWest
MMI Prepat Nanticoke
PittstonArea at Hanover Area
HIGHSCHOOLGIRLSVOLLEYBALL
Berwick at HazletonArea
Crestwoodat NorthPocono, 4:30p.m.
GARat Hanover Area
Holy Redeemer at DelawareValley, 4:30p.m.
Nanticoke at Lake-Lehman
COLLEGE GOLF
Kings at Moravian(Woodstone), 1 p.m.
COLLEGE MENSSOCCER
Wilkes at Baptist Bible, 4p.m.
COLLEGEWOMENSSOCCER
LebanonValley at Wilkes, 4:30p.m.
COLLEGEWOMENSVOLLEYBALL
PSUHazletonat PennCollege, 1 p.m.
PSU-York at PSUWilkes-Barre, 7 p.m.
WilliamPatersonat Kings, 7 p.m.
FRIDAY, SEPT. 13
HIGHSCHOOLFOOTBALL
AbingtonHeights at Williamsport
Carbondale at GAR
Hanover Area at Lakeland
HazletonArea at DelawareValley
Holy Cross at Northwest
Lake-Lehmanat WyomingArea
Meyers at LackawannaTrail
Montrose at Tunkhannock
PittstonArea at Crestwood
WyomingValleyWest at Scranton
HIGHSCHOOLFIELDHOCKEY
Nanticoke at WyomingValleyWest, 4:15p.m.
HIGHSCHOOLGOLF
Hanover Area at MMI Prep
Holy Redeemer at GAR, 4:15p.m.
Meyers at WyomingSeminary
Nanticoke at Lake-Lehman
HIGHSCHOOLBOYSSOCCER
Berwick at GAR
Hanover Area at Meyers
Tunkhannock at HazletonArea
HIGHSCHOOLGIRLSSOCCER
Crestwoodat Lake-Lehman
Tunkhannock at HazletonArea
HIGHSCHOOLGIRLSTENNIS
Berwick at HazletonArea
Holy Redeemer at Hanover Area, 4p.m.
MMI Prepat GAR
PittstonArea at Dallas
Tunkhannock at Crestwood, 4:15p.m.
WyomingArea at Coughlin
Wyomingt Seminary at WyomingValleyWest
COLLEGE FIELDHOCKEY
Wilkes at Widener, 7 p.m.
COLLEGEWOMENSTENNIS
Wilkes at Marywood, 4p.m.
SATURDAY, SEPT. 14
HIGHSCHOOLFOOTBALL
Nanticoke at Susquehanna, 1 p.m.
OldForge at Holy Redeemer, 1 p.m.
Berwick at Dallas, 2p.m.
WesternWayne at Coughlin, 7 p.m.
HIGHSCHOOLFIELDHOCKEY
Line Mountainat Crestwood, 10a.m.
HIGHSCHOOLBOYSSOCCER
Holy Redeemer at Coughlin
Lake-Lehmanat Crestwood
Williamsport at HazletonArea, 11 a.m.
PittstonArea at Dallas
Nanticoke at WyomingArea, 2p.m.
WyomingSeminary at WyomingValleyWest
HIGHSCHOOLGIRLSSOCCER
Coughlinat Holy Redeemer
Nanticoke at WyomingArea
WyomingValleyWest at WyomingSeminary
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
DelawareValley at Misericordia, 1 p.m.
Wilkes at Lycoming, 1 p.m.
COLLEGE CROSSCOUNTRY
Wilkes at Misericordia Cougar Classic, 10:30
a.m.
COLLEGE FIELDHOCKEY
Montclair St. at Misercordia, 5 p.m.
Susquehanna at Kings, 1 p.m.
COLLEGE CO-EDSOCCER
PSUBrandywine at PSUWilkes-Barre, 1 p.m.
COLLEGE MENSSOCCER
Kings at Juniata, 3:30p.m.
Arcadia at Misericordia, 7:30p.m.
COLLEGEWOMENSSOCCER
Kings at Juniata, 1 p.m.
Misericordia at Stevenson, 5p.m.
COLLEGE MENSTENNIS
Elmira, McDaniel, Oneonta at Kings, 10a.m.
Misericordia at Rutgers-Camden, noon
Scranton, Lycomingat Wilkes, 10:30a.m.
COLLEGEWOMENSTENNIS
Kings at Moravian, 1 p.m.
Misericordia at Rutgers-Camden, noon
PennCollege at PSUHazleton
COLLEGEWOMENSVOLLEYBALL
Kings at Albright, 1 p.m.
Kings vs. Gwynedd-Mercy at Albright, 3p.m.
PSU-Worthingtonat PSUWilkes-Barre, 11 a.m.
Wilkes at Lycoming, 10a.m.
Wilkes vs. Baptist Bible at Lycoming, 12:30p.m.
Wilkes vs. PennCollege at Lycoming, 3p.m.
SUNDAY, SEPT. 15
COLLEGE MENSTENNIS
Elmira, McDaniel, Oneonta at Kings, 10a.m.
COLLEGE MENSSOCCER
DYouville at Wilkes, 1 p.m.
PSUNewKensingtonat PSUHazleton, 1 p.m.
COLLEGEWOMENSTENNIS
Wilkes at Lycoming, 10:30a.m.
Wilkes at PennCollege, 2:30p.m.
COLLEGEWOMENSVOLLEYBALL
PSUBrandywine at PSUHazleton, 2p.m.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
7:30 p.m.
ESPNTCUat Texas Tech
GOLF
7:30 a.m.
TGC LPGA, The Evian Championship, frst
round, at Evian-les-Bains, France
12:30 p.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, KLM Open, frst
round, at Zandvoort, Netherlands (same-day
tape)
3 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, BMW Championship, frst
round, at Lake Forest, Ill.
6:30 p.m.
TGC Web.com Tour, Nationwide Childrens
Hospital Championship, frst round, at Columbus,
Ohio (same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m.
SNYWashington at N.Y. Mets
7 p.m.
CSNSan Diego at Philadelphia
ROOTChicago Cubs at Pittsburgh
YES N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore
WGNChicago Cubs at Pittsburgh
NFL
8 p.m.
NFLN.Y. Jets at NewEngland
Thursdays Game
Denver 49, Baltimore 27
Sundays Games
NewOrleans 23, Atlanta 17
Chicago 24, Cincinnati 21
NewEngland 23, Bufalo 21
Tennessee 16, Pittsburgh 9
N.Y. Jets 18, Tampa Bay 17
Kansas City 28, Jacksonville 2
Seattle 12, Carolina 7
Miami 23, Cleveland 10
Detroit 34, Minnesota 24
Indianapolis 21, Oakland 17
San Francisco 34, Green Bay 28
St. Louis 27, Arizona 24
Dallas 36, N.Y. Giants 31
Mondays Games
Philadelphia 33, Washington 27
Houston 31, San Diego 28
Thursday, Sep. 12
N.Y. Jets at NewEngland, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday, Sep. 15
Dallas at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Houston, 1 p.m.
Washington at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
San Diego at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Miami at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
Carolina at Bufalo, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
NewOrleans at Tampa Bay, 4:05 p.m.
Jacksonville at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.
Denver at N.Y. Giants, 4:25 p.m.
San Francisco at Seattle, 8:30 p.m.
Monday, Sep. 16
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 8:40 p.m.
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SPORTS Thursday, September 12, 2013 PAGE 3B
ROB MAADDI
AP Pro Football Writer
PHILADELPHIA While Chip
Kellys offense received most of the
attention for a sensational start, the
Philadelphia Eagles defense also had
an impressive debut.
Thats the bigger surprise.
The Eagles were expected to score
plenty of points with Michael Vick,
LeSean McCoy and DeSean Jackson
playing in Kellys up-tempo offense.
But the defense gured to have some
growing pains learning new coordi-
nator Billy Davis 3-4 scheme.
Instead, they had no trouble adjust-
ing.
Led by Trent Cole, Mychal
Kendricks and Cary Williams, the
defense was aggressive and opportu-
nistic. They forced three turnovers,
sacked Robert Grifn III three times
and recorded a safety in a 33-27 win
over the Washington Redskins on
Monday night.
It was a great effort, a great per-
formance by the defense, Davis said
Wednesday. The plan going in was
to take care of the running game,
which is really what theyre built off
of, and I think the guys did a great job
of executing the plan. Now, within
that were lots of mistakes and tech-
nique errors and things that we need
to work on and must improve on.
Taking advantage of a rusty RG3,
the defense forced a fumble, inter-
cepted a pass and got a safety on
Washingtons rst three possessions.
They held the Redskins to three rst
downs and 75 yards in the rst half
and pitched a shutout before allow-
ing 20 points in the nal 16 minutes.
Those three turnovers, including
Grifns career-high two picks, were
a drastic turnaround from last season
when the Eagles couldnt force the
ball away from teams. They tied for
the NFL-worst with 13 turnovers,
one of many reasons for a dismal 4-12
nish.
I think we still have some work to
do, said Williams, who had a sack
and interception in his rst game
with the Eagles. I still think were
not where we need to be yet. But its
a building block. I think we have a
lot to build on. We played extremely
well, we made plays when we needed
to, guys came up big for us and the
offense had our backs.
It was just a great collective win.
The switch from a 4-3 alignment
to a 3-4 meant Cole, a two-time Pro
Bowl defensive end, had to move
to outside linebacker after eight
seasons in the league. Not an easy
assignment for a guy who turns 31
next month and is coming off the
worst season of his career.
But Cole made the transition seem
natural. He forced a fumble, was cred-
ited with a safety, had one tackle for
a loss, had several quarterback pres-
sures and played well in coverage.
Wherever they put me, Im going
to play, Cole said. Im not going to
fail. Im going to do whatever I can
and do my best at it. I feel like I can
play the position. This is a start for
me. Im excited. This is exciting for
me, a new position. Im just going to
continue improving and improving.
The fourth quarter left a bad taste
in many players minds, however.
Grifn led the Redskins to a touch-
down late in the third quarter and two
more in the fourth to turn a blowout
into a close one. The Redskins were
an onside kick away from having the
ball with a chance to win at the end,
but the Eagles recovered the kick.
When you put the tape on, you
saw how much work we have left to
do, Davis said.
Philip Rivers and the San Diego
Chargers (0-1) present another chal-
lenge this Sunday. Rivers, a four-time
Pro Bowl pick, threw four TD passes
in a 31-28 loss to the Houston Texans
on Monday night.
Eagles new-look defense also impresses
AP photo
Eagles linebacker Mychal Kendrick helped keep Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III (10)
under control in Mondays opener as Philadelphias defense had a solid debut.
WILL GRAVES
AP Sports Writer
PITTSBURGH Kelvin
Beachum wasnt built to play
center. Sorry, grow up the big-
gest kid on the block and you
tend to get stereotyped by
football coaches.
So Beachum spent his child-
hood at tackle, where a quiet
kid from Texas could use his
frame to push defensive line-
men around with relative ease.
Eight plays into last Sundays
16-9 loss to Tennessee, that
all changed. One minute, the
Pittsburgh Steelers reserve
offensive lineman/was stand-
ing on the sideline watching
the Steelers drive deep into
Tennessee territory, the next,
he was snapping the ball to
Ben Roethlisberger after Pro
Bowl standout Maurkice
Pouncey left on a cart, his
right knee mangled and his
season already over.
While Roethlisberger knelt
on the eld, his hands on his
head, Beachum red off a
couple of snaps trying to make
sure he knew what he was
doing. There werent any jit-
ters. It all happened so quick-
ly, he didnt have the luxury of
getting nervous.
There no time to go
through the emotions or feel
your way through, Beachum
said. You have to just go play
football.
And for all the chaos that
surrounded Pittsburghs for-
gettable opening weekend,
Beachums ability to handle a
position he hadnt played since
Pee Wee is cause for optimism
heading into Monday nights
game at Cincinnati.
Beachum is going to do
well, guard Ramon Foster
said. Were going to help him
as much as possible. The oper-
ation should be the same.
Even if the guy who usually
runs the switchboard is sched-
uled to undergo surgery on
Thursday to repair torn liga-
ments in his knee. While the
Steelers preach a next man
up philosophy, theres little
doubt Pounceys absence on
the eld will be felt.
The loss might be even more
acute in a locker room where
the 24-year-old commands the
respect of players a decade
older. He is the only one of
Pittsburghs four captains on
the younger side of 30, a testa-
ment to his leadership in the
huddle and his magnetic pres-
ence on the sideline.
Given a full week to pre-
pare for the Bengals, Beachum
is condent hell be a capa-
ble ll-in thanks in part to
Pounceys guidance. Members
of the offensive line meet
at Pounceys house every
Thursday, where they watch
lm and get massages.
During those sessions
Pouncey will hit the clicker
and point out what he sees.
Beachum is a rapt student.
Hes picked up the line calls
quickly and studies the assign-
ments at all ve line positions.
Its that cerebral approach that
led the Steelers to take a sev-
enth-round ier on Beachum
in 2012.
Kelvin knows his stuff,
Roethlisberger said.
Beachum beat the odds to
make the 53-man roster. By
the end, he was starting at
right tackle. The path from
survivor to contributor is one
he couldnt have made without
Pouncey.
Beachum likened Pouncey
to a big brother even though
Beachum is actually six weeks
older.
Hes been in the league for
awhile, Beachum said. He
can really talk to you about
things.
That includes cramming
for a test he never expected
to take. Beachum spent por-
tions of training camp work-
ing at tight end, a wrinkle in
offensive coordinator Todd
Haleys system designed to
give the line another thumper
in short-yardage situations.
Steelers Beachuma quick study at center
PSU
From page 1B
looks at Belton and Lynch.
Both delivered against an overmatched opponent.
Each nished with 108 yards on the ground as Belton
scored twice to match Zwinak. Lynch added a late
touchdown of his own.
As a group, we come in each week preparing no
matter who is gonna be the guy, Belton said. We
dont have any problem with each others success. We
all support each other and feed off each other.
For Belton, it was his rst standout performance
since October of last year when he scored three touch-
downs at Iowa.
The junior had dealt with a high ankle sprain early
in 2012 and then spent almost all of November on the
sideline. Over the summer he was able to buckle down
and focus on academics to ensure he was eligible to
play in the fall.
OBrien lauded Belton this week for sticking to a
plan and improving habits in practice and in the class-
room.
Billys come a long way, OBrien said. Billy and I
have had a number of conversations about a lot of dif-
ferent things, not just football. I just have a connection
withBilly, andI think hes a great kid, andhes working
extremelyhardinthe classroom. He workedextremely
hard this summer to be where hes at right now.
Hes running the ball better. Hes being more deci-
sive running the ball, and his pass-catching ability out
of the backeld is good.
Overall, hes a much better player, and hes turned
the corner off the eld too, I believe.
Coach OBrien and my parents did a great job of
keeping me level-headed and telling me to keep work-
ing, Belton said. And then everything would work
out.
Belton acknowledged that last week was a good
start for him and the running back group as a whole,
but that thats all it was. Eastern Michigan had the
countrys worst run defense a year ago and the Eagles
look to be headed toward the bottomagain.
If the Lions are going to hold off a tough challenge
fromUCF, the trio will need to come through again.
That includes Lynch, who played exclusively on
special teams in the opener before getting his rst real
action this past week.
It was goodtoget himinthere, OBriensaid. Hes
a fantastic kidandhes a guy whohas workedextreme-
ly hard to improve his game.
JETS
From page 1B
they won in the nal seconds. The
Patriots struggled against the
Buffalo Bills before winning
23-21 on Stephen Gostkowskis
35-yard field goal with 5 sec-
onds left. The Jets beat the
Tampa Bay Buccaneers 18-17
on Nick Folks 48-yarder with
2 seconds remaining.
And Smiths passer rating of
80.6 was better than Bradys
76.4. There are some new
faces that are part of the rival-
ry, so its going to be an excit-
ing game, Brady said.
Its going to be tough. I
expect it to be a packed house,
Smith said. Everyone is going
to be excited and amped.
Here are four things to watch
for Thursday in the Patriots
home opener:
BANGED-UP PATRIOTS:
After just one game, the
ranks of Patriots runners and
receivers are being depleted.
Shane Vereen broke his left
wrist early in his 101-yard
rushing performance against
the Bills and went on injured
reserve with a designation to
return, forcing him to miss
eight games. Wide receiver
Danny Amendola, who led the
Patriots with 10 receptions in
the opener but aggravated a
groin injury, and tight end Rob
Gronkowski, coming back from
forearm and back surgery, are
listed as doubtful.
CHASING BRADY: For all
his accomplishments, Brady
does have a weakness: Hes
rather immobile. Combine
that with a Jets defense that
is younger and faster than
it was last year and he could
be under a lot of pressure.
The Jets got that last Sunday
against Josh Freeman and held
the Buccaneers to 250 yards.
We played against (Brady)
last year and got some three-
and- outs, defensive lineman
Muhammad Wilkerson said.
As long as we do that, well
have no problem. The Patriots
are familiar with the Jets after
playing against Bills defensive
coordinator Mike Pettine, who
held that job in New York the
past four years. And they have
a solid, veteran offensive line.
ROOKIE REDUX: Two
games, two rookie quarter-
backs. The Patriots face Smith,
the 39th pick in the draft, just
four days after going against
EJ Manuel, the 16th choice.
Both quarterbacks are able
to scramble and use their feet
a little bit to extend plays, so
you just have to be smart as a
defensive lineman, Patriots
defensive end Rob Ninkovich
said. Manuel had a good debut,
even posting a better passer
rating than Brady. Smith was
cool and productive on the
winning drive against the
Buccaneers and finished with
256 yards passing and 47 yards
rushing. But can the rookie do
it against coach Bill Belichicks
intricate defensive schemes?
KEEPING THE BALL: Its
imperative that the Jets main-
tain possession and keep the
ball away from the Patriots
productive, fast-paced offense.
New England led the NFL in
points and yards last season
and ran 89 plays in the opener,
28 more than the Bills. But
Smith will be without wide
receiver Jeremy Kerley, out
with a concussion after catch-
ing three passes against the
Buccaneers. Santonio Holmes
had one catch and 45 snaps
after missing most of last sea-
son with a foot injury.
Tribute
From page 1B
rescue and security organizations marched
ontothe eld. The Mets andNationals then
linedupalongthebaselines for amoment of
silence andthe national anthem.
At Rangers Ballpark in Texas, the 531st
U.S. Air Force Quintet performed the
national anthem instrumentally. The hon-
orary rst pitch was thrown out by former
prisoner of war Jessica Lynch, who was
19 when she was captured along with ve
other soldiers after the U.S. Armys 507th
Maintenance Company took a wrong turn
and came under attack in Iraq in 2003. She
was heldfor nine days before beingrescued.
The Cleveland Police Department pre-
sentedthe colors at Progressive Fieldbefore
the national anthem at the Indians game
against Kansas City.
Clevelands Jason Giambi was with
Oakland when the Athletics were in the
2001 playoffs against the Yankees. He
recalled the atmosphere at Yankee Stadium
being unbelievable, even more electric
thanusual for the postseason.
It will always be a time Ill remember,
going out there playing against the Yankees
during that time, Giambi said. It kind of
healedthe nation, especially the city of New
York, which was hit so hard. There they
were, the Yankees playing in the playoffs,
goingall the way to the WorldSeries.
Giambi signed with the Yankees after
that, andspent sevenseasons inNewYork.
Playingthereall thoseyears, thekids, the
reghters, the people who lost their lives
saving the other lives, Ill always remember
that, very muchso, Giambi said.
At Cincinnatis Great AmericanBall Park,
where the Reds hosted the Chicago Cubs,
a steel beam from the World Trade Center
was on display courtesy of the Cincinnati
Fire Museum.
Before San Francisco hosted Colorado
at AT&T Park, rst pitches were thrown
out by two San Francisco reghters who
went to NewYork in the days after Sept. 11
to provide help and support. Dean Crispen,
captain of Station 28, and Derek OLeary,
driver of rescue squad one from Station 1,
ew on the rst commercial ight allowed
to landinNewYork.
Pettis and the White Sox had arrived in
NewYork12years agoaround2-3a.m., and
he was awokenbya phone call froma friend
checking tomake sure he was OK.
I said, Yeah, ImOK, Imasleep. Hesaid,
you dont know, do you? Pettis recalled. I
turnontheTVandI seethat thebuilding
smokes coming out of the building and
they saidthere hadbeena plane crash.
Like so many others, Pettis thought
maybe it was just a tragic accident before
the secondplane hit the other tower.
The White Sox were staying in a hotel
at Grand Central Station, a little more than
three miles from the World Trade Center
site.
Pettis and the rest of the staff worked to
locate everybody with the team, and to get
out of the building, with concerns about
more potential attacks.
We were going down the stairs and you
hear this rumble, and were going what the
heck is that? Pettis said. We just kind of
take off running out the doors, and nowwe
see people running out of the train station,
andwe hadnoidea what theywere running
from.
Pettis cant believe its been 12 years.
Before going to the ballpark on Wednesday
morning, he turned on his TV knowing
what hewas goingtosee. It tookmeamin-
ute to get up and get my day going because
I started watching some of the stories and
listening to some of the people talk about
being there, and then seeing some of the
messagesthat wereleft forfamilies,hesaid.
Pirates inelder Clint Barmes remem-
bers exactly where he was and what he was
doing 12years ago.
He was only 22 years old in his second
season of pro ball, and on the way home
after winning the championship with high-
ASalemthe night before.
I didnt get a chance to see anything on
TV until I got home later that evening.
Had my car already packed ready to go,
Barmes said. I woke up, jumped in my car
and started driving home before I realized
exactly what happened.
Theres a lot of things that goes through
your mind when something like that hap-
pens. It was a scary moment for sure.
To veteran Tampa Bay manager Joe
Maddon, it was a day to remember the ter-
rible images ontelevision, anda pal.
Oneof mybest friends incollegehas just
been appointed the head of the N.Y. Port
Authority. Neil Levin, he said. So then
Im thinking, OK, Neils pretty cool, hes
the boss, hes going to showuplate, hes not
going tobe there early.
As it turns out he was having breakfast
that morning in that restaurant on the top
oor. So we lost Neil on that one, he said.
Sowhenever I hear 9/11, this date while
I was ridingmybiketoday, seeingtheagat
half-mast, I thought of Neil.
Washingtonstar Bryce Harper was just 8
and at home in Las Vegas when the attacks
occurred.
I was in my moms bed, watching TV.
I used to watch CHiPs and Saved by the
Bell inthose days. Thenit came on, all over
the news, he saidWednesday.
I was trying to understand it, we were
trying to decide whether I should go to
school.
I remember my dad came right home
fromwork. I remember he came inthe door
and I ran right to him, gave him a big hug
andtoldhim, I love you.
Harper said he and some Washington
teammates hopedtovisit the National Sept.
11 Memorial plaza in lower Manhattan late
Wednesday night, after their game against
the Mets, tosee the Tribute inLight.
We wanted to see the beams, Harper
said. I think its important.
should have people
staffed up instead of
downsizing, Johnson
said. Not only from
the aspect of what were
talking about right here,
but also on restarts and
a lot of other procedures
that take place.
It is tough for the
(officials in the scor-
ing) tower to take care
of it all. They need
other people, qualified
people, other resources
and technology to make
these decisions.
Johnson said if there
was any question that
the race needed to be
stopped.
If there is any ques-
tion they need to stop
the race immediately,
Johnson said. Red flag.
Pits are closed. Figure it
out and make the best
judgment that they can
because trying to
go back on a Monday
or a Tuesday to fix the
situation, that is just
too much. Ive learned
something about the
ripple effect.
NASCAR
From page 1B
PAGE 4B Thursday, September 12, 2013 FOOTBALL www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Throwing the ball no passing fancy
JOHN ERZAR
jerzar@timesleader.com
Coughlin coach Ciro Cinti
rarely misses an opportunity to
throw some good-natured (at
least I think it is) sarcasm into
his postgame comments.
Two touchdown passes. I
think we had two, didnt we?
Cinti said last Friday night.
The two touchdown passes
put the Crusaders halfway to
last years regular-season total.
And they still have eight games
left until a possible postseason
game.
When Cinti says something,
its very difcult to tell wheth-
er hes serious. He said in the
preseason that his Coughlin
team would throw more this
year. No one believed him.
After all, the Crusaders have
made six consecutive post-
seasons on the legs of their
tailback and brute strength of
their offensive line.
And just seven passing
attempts in the opener did
nothing to make the coach
sound truthful. Last Friday
changed that.
Coughlin quarterback
Tim Pilch threw 13 times,
completing seven for 137 yards
and two touchdowns. The lat-
ter two stats were career highs
for the senior.
I like that they have more
faith in me, Pilch said. We are
known as a running team and
to come out and pass the ball.
We read the papers, everybody
knows (running) is what were
trying to do. But we showed we
can throw the ball and people
should at least respect it.
Pilch showed more zip on the
ball than last year. He doesnt
have to sling it 20-25 times a
game. But if he and the receiv-
ers could pick their spots and
make Coughlin a little more
diversied then it will only
make the Crusaders a better
team in the long run.
SCHEDULE REMINDER
Saturdays Berwick at Dallas
game starts at 2 p.m. Dallas
home games against Crestwood
on Oct. 19 and Tunkhannock
on Oct. 26 will also start at 2
p.m.
The other two home games
will have the normal 1 p.m.
kickoff.
NOT SO FAST
Defending District 2 Class
3A champion Abington
Heights defeated Dallas 17-0
Saturday to post its second
consecutive shutout. New
starting quarterback J.C. Show
looked smooth transitioning
from receiver. Receiver Nate
Hollander picked up where he
left off last year, and running
back Sean Rock wasnt spec-
tacular but looks like he can
provide solid running.
Therefore, the Comets are on
a collision course for a rematch
with Berwick for the D2-3A
title. Right? Not so fast, coach
Joe Repshis cautioned.
Right now we have a long
way to go, Repshis said. We
had a lot of things we did well,
but we have a lot of things we
need to improve upon. We go
out each and every week and
want to be perfect. Thats our
goal, but well go back, watch
lm and try to improve on all
three phases of the game.
MEASURING UP
Class 4A schools can usu-
ally line up big boys along the
line of scrimmage. So it was
surprising to see who was
starting at left guard for
Hazleton Area on Saturday
No. 72 Zeb Kopczynskie, who
is 5-foot-6 and 195 pounds.
Kopczynskie did a solid job
on offense. He also played
some defense and while over-
powered a couple times he
more than held his own.
SEEING YELLOW
Holy Redeemer did so many
things right in the second half
of its victory against Holy
Cross. Lining up for a nal
snap wasnt one of them.
Instead, the Royals were
called for a penalty on the
games nal play when they
couldnt get set for a nal snap.
I dont know. Guys are tired,
got some coming out, Royals
coach Pat Reece said. Were
just going to kneel the ball
down. Im not even in a victory
formation or anything.
It was the last of 10 penalties
for Redeemer. The Royals have
been penalized 20 times for
173 yards through two games.
We cant afford to do even
a little bit wrong, Reece said
after his team was agged for
92 yards of penalties Saturday.
Weve got to do everything
right out there.
Its probably been a tough
week of practice at Nanticoke
as well, as the Trojans were
another winner who over came
many mistakes. Nanticoke was
called for 13 penalties totaling
96 yards.
Im always disappointed
with penalties, Nanticoke
coach Ron Bruza said.
Especially the stupid ones.
HISTORY REPEATS
GAR failed to score on
offense in its 48-7 loss to
Dunmore. The only touch-
down came via an 87-yard punt
return by Anthony Maurent.
The loss also snapped a
streak of 10 consecutive games
with a rushing touchdown. The
last team to keep GARs rush
offense out of the end zone was
Dunmore in Week 2 of 2012.
AHEAD OF PACE
Berwicks C.J. Curry and
Holy Redeemers Jimmy
Strickland each have six
touchdown passes through
two games, putting them on
pace to throw 30 during the
regular season. Its doubtful
either will get to 30 and there
is no chance either will reach
the national record.
According to maxpreps.
com, the national high school
record for touchdown passes
in a season is 91 set by Corey
Robinson of Lone Oak (Ky.)
High School in 2007. The mark
included playoff games.
Robinson is the current
starting quarterback at Troy
University.
EXPECTED, UNEXPECTED
Three of each from games
played Week 2:
Expected
Dallas to struggle on offense
once again. The Mountaineers
were shut out for a second time,
17-0 to Abington Heights. And
considering the Comets shut
out Pittston Area, a team with
a better overall group of skill
players compared to Dallas, a
week earlier there was no rea-
son to believe Dallas would do
any better.
Nanticoke to roll Columbia-
Montour Vo-Tech 48-0. Kids
dont go to tech schools
because they are the gateway
to the NFL. Vo-Tech coach
Mark Varner does what he can
with the hand dealt to him.
The Rams have been a solid
team on occasion, but this year
they are expected to have their
struggles.
A struggling team to hurt
itself. That was Hazleton Area
in its 26-16 loss to Coughlin.
Quarterback Julius Ward had
two passes dropped that would
have been touchdowns, or at
the very least long gains. The
end result was the Cougars los-
ing their eighth in a row.
Unexpected
Holy Redeemer to run for
two touchdowns vs. Holy Cross.
The two scoring runs gave the
Royals three for the season.
They had just 11 all of last year,
with ve of them coming from
quarterback Jimmy Strickland.
GARs poor tackling.
Look, Dunmore running back
Daiqwon Buckley is a load to
bring down at 225 pounds. But
there were times Buckley made
it to the second level and the
Grenadiers had him surrounded
only to whiff on tackles. Other
times, the effort appeared lack-
ing.
Williamsports offense to
tank vs. Mifin County. The
Millionaires looked like they
were going to break out of their
slump after defeating 24-21 in
Week 1. But the offense took a
big step backward in the 25-0
loss to Mifin County.
HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK
Tanner Kahlau
RB Crestwood
Kahlau has been one of the top newcomers of the newseason. The sophomore
running back turned in an outstanding performance in Crestwoods 40-21
victory over North Pocono. Kahlau rushed eight times for 128 yards and four
touchdowns. His TD runs of 39 and 40 yards in the fourth quarter fnally allowed
the Comets to pull away. He also had touchdown runs of 15 and 27 yards in the
frst half.
Through two games, he is averaging 17.3 yards per carry.
Given Consideration
Paul Cole RB Coughlin
Pat Hempel RB Nanticoke
Mike Sands WR Wyo. Val. West
Past Winners
Week 1: Tyler Burger RB Northwest
Ti mes Leader PLayer of The Week
Teams are ranked on performance, not on which teamwould defeat the other.
Number in parentheses before teams is last weeks rankings. NR means not ranked
the previous week. District 4s Williamsport is including when applicable since it
plays in the WVC.
1. (1) Berwick (2-0) Outscored frst two opponents 97-14 and gets winless
Dallas.
2. (2) Dunmore (2-0) The defense showed vs. GAR it can really get to the ball.
3. (4) Old Forge (2-0) Gave up a long TD run vs. Meyers but that was it in 49-6
win.
4. (3) Abington Heights (2-0) Not overly impressive but solid enough vs.
Dallas.
5. (5) Wyoming Valley West (2-0) Cant be sloppy this week with unbeaten
Scranton.
6. (6) Scranton (2-0) Has shown a nice balance of run-pass through two
games.
7. (7) Scranton Prep (2-0) First-teamdefense hasnt surrendered a score yet.
8. (8) Wallenpaupack (2-0) Should win again vs. shaky Allentown Dieruf team.
9. (9) Lake-Lehman (1-1) As expected, trampled Montrose with ease 60-0.
10. (10) West Scranton (2-0) Well knowmore once it plays Dunmore Friday.
11. (13) Coughlin (2-0) Adash of passing and usual power running has been
successful.
12. (NR) Lackawanna Trail (2-0) Scored 34 consecutive points in defeating
Hanover Area.
13. (12) Lakeland (1-1) Rest of September schedule not overly taxing.
14. (14) GAR (0-2) Too many turnovers, too many missed tackles vs. Dunmore.
15. (15) Crestwood (1-1) Finally put away slumping North Pocono in the fourth
quarter.
Dropped out: Meyers (1-1).
Given consideration: Carbondale (2-0); Meyers (1-1); Northwest (2-0); Valley
View(1-1)
Ti mes Leader di sTri cT 2 ToP 15 ranki ngs
Times Leader | File Photo
Coughlin quarterback Tim Pilch, shown running against Scranton in a scrim-
mage last year, left, has been throwing the ball more so far this season.
Berwick (2-0)
Fri., Aug. 30 Crestwood (1-1) W41-7
Fri., Sept. 6 at Pottsville (1-1) W56-7
Saturday at Dallas (0-2) 2 p.m.
Fri., Sept. 20 Wyo. Valley West (2-0) 7 p.m.
Fri., Sept. 27 Selinsgrove (2-0) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 4 at Tunkhannock (0-2) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 11 at Williamsport (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 19 PittstonArea (0-2) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 25 at Coughlin (2-0) 7 p.m.
Fri., Nov. 1 at HazletonArea (0-2) 7 p.m.
Coughlin (2-0)
Fri., Aug. 30 at Tunkhannock (0-2) W18-13
Fri., Sept. 6 HazletonArea (0-2) W26-16
Saturday WesternWayne (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Sept. 20 Dallas (0-2) 7 p.m.
Fri., Sept. 27 at Wyo. Valley West (2-0) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 4 Williamsport (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 11 at PittstonArea (0-2) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 18 at Pocono Mtn. East (2-0) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 25 at Berwick (2-0) 7 p.m.
Sat., Nov. 2 Crestwood (1-1) 7 p.m.
Crestwood (1-1)
Fri., Aug. 30 at Berwick (2-0) L41-7
Fri., Sept. 6 at North Pocono (0-2) W40-21
Friday PittstonArea (0-2) 7 p.m.
Fri., Sept. 20 at Wallenpaupack (2-0) 7 p.m.
Fri., Sept 27 Tunkhannock (0-2) 7 p.m.
Sat., Oct. 5 HazletonArea (0-2) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 11 Pocono Mtn. West (0-2) 7 p.m.
Sat., Oct. 19 at Dallas (0-2) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 25 Williamsport (1-1) 7 p.m.
Sat., Nov. 2 at Coughlin (2-0) 7 p.m.
Dallas (0-2)
Fri., Aug. 30 at Wyo. Valley West (2-0) L40-0
Sat., Sept. 7 at Abington Heights (2-0) L17-0
Saturday Berwick (2-0) 2 p.m.
Fri., Sept. 20 at Coughlin (2-0) 7 p.m.
Sat., Sept 28 Williamsport (1-1) 1 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 4 at PittstonArea (0-2) 7 p.m.
Sat., Oct. 12 HazletonArea (0-2) 1 p.m.
Sat., Oct. 19 Crestwoood (1-1) 2 p.m.
Sat., Oct. 26 Tunkhannock (0-2) 2 p.m.
Sat., Nov. 2 at Lake-Lehman (1-1) 2 p.m.
GAR (0-2)
Fri., Aug. 30 at Lakeland (1-1) L27-19
Sat., Sept. 7 Dunmore (2-0) L48-7
Friday Carbondale (2-0) 7 p.m.
Fri., Sept. 20 at Northwest (2-0) 7 p.m.
Sat., Sept. 28 Holy Redeemer (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 4 at Lake-Lehman (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 11 Hanover Area (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 18 WyomingArea (0-2) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 25 at Nanticoke (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Nov. 1 at Meyers (1-1) 7 p.m.
Hanover Area (1-1)
Fri., Aug. 30 at MidValley (1-1) W12-7
Fri., Sept. 6 Lackawanna Trail (1-1) L54-40
Friday at Lakeland (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Sept. 20 WyomingArea (0-2) 7 p.m.
Fri., Sept. 27 Northwest (2-0) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 4 Meyers (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 11 at GAR (0-2) 7 p.m.
Sat., Oct. 19 at Holy Redeemer (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 25 at Lake-Lehman (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Nov. 1 Nanticoke (1-1) 7 p.m.
Hazleton Area (0-2)
Fri., Aug. 30 Scranton (2-0) L45-29
Fri., Sept. 6 at Coughlin (2-0) L26-16
Friday at Delaware Valley (0-2) 7 p.m.
Fri., Sept. 20 Williamsport (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Sept. 27 PittstonArea (0-2) 7 p.m.
Sat., Oct. 5 at Crestwood (1-1) 7 p.m.
Sat., Oct. 12 at Dallas (0-2) 2 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 18 at Wyo. Valley West (2-0) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 25 East Stroud. South (2-0) 7 p.m.
Fri., Nov. 1 Berwick (2-0) 7 p.m.
Holy Redeemer (1-1)
Sat., Aug. 31 at Northwest (2-0) L28-24
Sat., Sept. 7 at Holy Cross (0-2) W44-20
Saturday Old Forge (2-0) 1 p.m.
Fri., Sept. 20 at Lake-Lehman (1-1) 7 p.m.
Sat., Sept. 28 at GAR (0-2) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 4 at WyomingArea (0-2) 7 p.m.
Sat., Oct. 12 Nanticoke (1-1) 1 p.m.
Sat., Oct. 19 Hanover Area (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 25 at Meyers (1-1) 7 p.m.
Lake-Lehman (1-1)
Fri., Aug. 30 at Old Forge (2-0) L13-7
Fri., Sept. 6 at Montrose (0-1) W60-0
Friday at WyomingArea (0-2) 7 p.m.
Fri., Sept. 20 Holy Redeemer (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Sept. 27 at Meyers (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 4 GAR (0-2) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 11 Northwest (2-0) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 18 at Nanticoke (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 25 Hanover Area (1-1) 7 p.m.
Sat., Nov. 2 Dallas (0-2) 2 p.m.
Meyers (1-1)
Fri., Aug. 30 Holy Cross (0-2) W57-7
Fri., Sept. 6 at Old Forge (2-0) L49-6
Friday at Lackawanna Trail (2-0) 7 p.m.
Fri., Sept. 20 at Nanticoke (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Sept. 27 Lake-Lehman (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 4 at Hanover Area (1-1) 7 p.m.
Sat., Oct. 12 WyomingArea (0-2) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 18 at Northwest (2-0) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 25 Holy Redeemer (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Nov. 1 GAR (0-2) 7 p.m.
Nanticoke (1-1)
Fri., Aug. 30 Lackawanna Trail (2-0) L39-7
Fri., Sept. 6 Col-Mont Vo-Tech (0-2) W48-0
Saturday at Susquehanna (0-2) 1 p.m.
Fri., Sept. 20 Meyers (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Sept 27 at WyomingArea (0-2) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 4 Northwest (2-0) 7 p.m.
Sat., Oct. 12 at Holy Redeemer (1-1) 1 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 18 Lake-Lehman (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 25 GAR (0-2) 7 p.m.
Fri., Nov. 1 at Hanover Area (1-1) 7 p.m.
Northwest (2-0)
Sat., Aug. 31 at Holy Redeemer (1-1) W28-24
Sat., Sept. 7 at Susquehanna (0-2) W12-7
Friday Holy Cross (0-2) 7 p.m.
Fri., Sept. 20 GAR (0-2) 7 p.m.
Fri., Sept. 27 at Hanover Area (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 4 at Nanticoke (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 11 at Lake-Lehman (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 18 Meyers (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 25 WyomingArea (0-2) 7 p.m.
Fri., Nov. 1 Montrose (0-2) 7 p.m.
Pittston Area (0-2)
Fri., Aug. 30 Abington Heights (2-0) L28-0
Fri., Sept. 6 Scranton (2-0) L34-18
Friday at Crestwood (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Sept. 20 at Tunkhannock (0-2) 7 p.m.
Fri., Sept. 27 at HazletonArea (0-2) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 4 Dallas (0-2) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 11 Coughlin (2-0) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 18 at Berwick (2-0) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 25 Wyo. Valley West (2-0) 7 p.m.
Fri., Nov. 1 at WyomingArea (0-2) 7 p.m.
Tunkhannock (0-2)
Fri., Aug. 30 Coughlin (2-0) L18-13
Fri., Sept. 6 at West Scranton (2-0) L35-0
Friday Montrose (0-2) 7 p.m.
Fri., Sept. 20 PittstonArea (0-2) 7 p.m.
Fri., Sept. 27 at Crestwood (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 4 Berwick (2-0) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 11 Wyo. Valley West (2-0) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 18 at Williamsport (1-1) 7 p.m.
Sat., Oct. 26 Dallas (0-2) 2 p.m.
Fri., Nov. 1 at Carbondale (2-0) 7 p.m.
Williamsport (1-1)
Fri., Aug. 30 at Central Mountain (0-2) W24-21
Fri., Sept. 6 Mifin County (2-0) L25-0
Friday Abington Heights (2-0) 7 p.m.
Fri., Sept. 20 at Hazleton Area (0-2) 7 p.m.
Sat., Sept. 28 at Dallas (0-2) 1 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 4 at Coughlin (2-0) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 11 Berwick (2-0) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 18 Tunkhannock (0-2) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 25 at Crestwood (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Nov. 1 Wyo. Valley West (2-0) 7 p.m.
Wyoming Area (0-2)
Sat., Aug. 31 at Scranton Prep (2-0) L35-7
Fri., Sept. 6 MidValley (1-1) L29-14
Friday Lake-Lehman (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Sept. 20 at Hanover Area (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Sept. 27 Nanticoke (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 4 Holy Redeemer (1-1) 7 p.m.
Sat., Oct. 12 at Meyers (1-1) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 18 at GAR (0-2) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 25 at Northwest (2-0) 7 p.m.
Fri., Nov. 1 PittstonArea (0-2) 7 p.m.
Wyoming Valley West (2-0)
Fri., Aug. 20 Dallas (0-2) W40-0
Fri., Sept. 6 Delaware Valley (0-2) W35-12
Friday at Scranton (2-0) 7 p.m.
Fri., Sept. 20 at Berwick (2-0) 7 p.m.
Fri., Sept. 27 Coughlin (2-0) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 4 Stroudsburg (2-0) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 11 at Tunkhannock (0-2) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 18 HazletonArea (0-2) 7 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 25 at PittstonArea (0-2) 7 p.m.
Fri., Nov. 1 at Williamsport (1-1) 7 p.m.
WVc scheduLes and resuLTs
The Associated Press
ANNVILLE Police
have opened a criminal
investigation after a high
school football player
ripped the helmet off an
opposing player and beat
him over the head with it
during a game in central
Pennsylvania.
Video aired by WGAL-
TV shows Hamburg quar-
terback Joey Cominsky
tearing the helmet off
Annville-Cleona lineman
Josh Hartman, then hit-
ting him with it at least
twice, after a play in the
third quarter of Friday
nights game at Annville-
Cleona Secondary School
near Lebanon.
Several other players
pushed and shoved each
other, and Annville-Cleona
player Taylor Prentice
jumped in and threw sev-
eral punches, the video
shows.
Cominsky and Prentice
were ejected from the
game. Hartman suffered a
cut on top of his head but
was otherwise OK. Order
was restored and Hamburg
won the game 25-22.
The police investigation
will be a very lengthy pro-
cess, I can tell you that,
South Annville Township
police chief Ben Sutcliffe
told PennLive.com. It is
premature at this point to
say anything about charg-
es being led or not being
led.
Sutcliffe did not imme-
diately return a message
left Wednesday.
Hamburg Principal
Christopher J. Spohn
declined to say whether
any disciplinary action
will be taken against
Cominsky.
We followed our
board-approved policies
and procedures dealing
with this situation, Spohn
told the Reading Eagle.
Under PIAA rules,
Cominsky and Prentice
will miss the next game.
PIAA District 3 of-
cials said in a statement
that they are content for
now to allow the schools
to handle the matter
internally.
Football helmet incident
causes investigation
The Associated Press
STILLWATER, Okla. More than a
dozen Oklahoma State football players
admitted to academic misconduct over
the past decade, including receiving exam
answers in advance, passing classes for
little or no work and using tutors who com-
pleted work for them, according to a Sports
Illustrated article released Wednesday.
The philosophy, the main focus, was
to keep (top players) eligible through any
means necessary, former safety Fath
Carter told the magazine. The goal was
not to educate but to get them the passing
grades they needed to keep playing. Thats
the only thing it was about.
The article was the second of five planned
by Sports Illustrated looking at alleged mis-
conduct in the Oklahoma State football
program dating to 2001 under coaches Les
Miles and Mike Gundy. SI says it interviewed
more than 60 former players and found evi-
dence of potential NCAA violations includ-
ing boosters and assistant coaches paying
players thousands of dollars for their play;
sham jobs arranged by boosters; selective
enforcement of anti-drug policy for players;
and football program hostesses who had sex
with recruits.
Oklahoma State said it has notified the
NCAA about the allegations and launched
its own investigation.
The magazine named 13 former players
who said they had work done for them or
received other improper academic assis-
tance. One of them, former receiver Artrell
Woods, said he didnt write a single paper
during his three years at Oklahoma State
and simply typed what tutors dictated to
him.
Dez Bryant, a star receiver now with the
Dallas Cowboys, was named second-team
academic All-Big 12 in 2008. Former cor-
nerback Calvin Mickens and former safety
Victor Johnson both said they saw tutors
do coursework for Bryant, who denied the
claim to SI.
Miles, now the head coach at LSU, was
Oklahoma States coach beginning in 2001.
Gundy, his assistant, replaced him after the
2004 season and remains the head coach.
Miles said he repeatedly told players to
attend class and do the right things.
Every guy was encouraged to get his
degree, to stay the course, and to fight,
Miles said Wednesday on the SEC coaches
teleconference. He said those making the
allegations werent there long enough to
figure it out because they were dismissed
from the program.
I can tell you that staff, family and
friends, and anybody that sat in our meet-
ing rooms, knew that this thing was done
right, he said.
Former Oklahoma State quarterback
Brandon Weeden, now with the Cleveland
Browns, called the allegations comical
and said he did not see any wrongdoing
during his time at the Big 12 school.
First of all, clean slate, I didnt take any
money or do anything like that, Weeden
said. It all happened before I got there.
But the guys that they did question were
not very good sources to question because
they are kids that got kicked off the team
for drugs or for whatever it might be. They
were dismissed and so these are guys that
arent real credible.
Carter told SI a teammate introduced him
to Ronald Keys, an academic coordinator
for athletes from 1998 until 2001. Carter
said he and several other players would
visit Keys, drop off their assignments and
return a few days later to pick up the fin-
ished work.
I have no idea why he did it, Carter
said. All we knew was that if you wanted
a paper done, you called Keys. His name
was infamous.
Keys, now at Texas Southern, told the
magazine he never did work for athletes.
Terry Henley, an academic adviser for the
football program since 2000, said he didnt
know anything about Keys doing work for
athletes.
Several players said Henley steered them
toward potentially easier majors with the
goal of getting them passing grades.
What I do with degrees and scheduling,
I base it on aptitude, attitude, Henley told
SI. Now a guy may have wanted to be a
business major, but he cant get through a
math class. Thats a big reason why we dont
initially declare a major for a player. Id
love to tell every single one of them who
walks in that door, You go be what you said
you wanted to be, but at the same time Ive
got to look at aptitude, attitude and work
ethic.
Henley was also asked about players alle-
gations that a number of instructors handed
them passing grades for little or no work:
That was never brought to my attention,
but they wouldnt necessarily do that and,
number two, I dont have control over what
a professor does.
Report: Academic fraud common at Oklahoma St.
. Soft Full Grain Leather Upper
. Electrical Hazard Protection
. Oil And Slip Resistant Outsole
. 30 Day Comfort Guarantee
163 E. MAINST. (Miners Mills Section) of WILKES-BARRE
OPENMONDAYTOFRIDAY 9-8 SAT 9-5 SUN12-5 825-5346
PENN LEE FOOTWEAR
LIGHTWEIGHT PROTECTION
FOR A HEAVY DUTY WORLD
The Timberland
PROTITAN
Mens Sizes 7-17
Available in soft toe &safety toe
Model#26063
868-GOLF
260 Country Club Drive, Mountaintop
www.blueridgetrail.com
Tuesday thru Friday
Play & Ride for Just
$
33.00
Weekday Special
Must Present Coupon.
One coupon per foursome. Cannot be used in
tournaments or with any other promotion. TL
Monday Special $32
Senior Day Monday-Friday $28
Ladies Day Thursday $28
Weekends After 1 p.m. $36
GPS CART INCLUDED
27 Unique Holes
One Breathtaking Course
80018448
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER SPORTS Thursday, September 12, 2013 PAGE 5B
PAUL SOKOLOSKI
psokoloski@timesleader.com
As he dashes through
the woods, most often lead-
ing the boys cross country
pack, Dominic DeLuca can
feel a crowd coming up fast.
First, theres Dominic
Hockenbury, his rival from
Lake-Lehman.
Then theres the
Tunkhannock team thats
ranked rst in the state
among PIAA Class 2A
schools.
And then theres an
always-challenging Holy
Redeemer team led by
Vinay Murthy.
No wonder he spent so
much time in the offseason
running like a deer.
Its a lot better to be the
hunter than the hunted,
said DeLuca, the leader of
defending District 2 cham-
pionDallas. Theres always
pressure - pressure from
kids from other teams as
well as on my team. They
depend on me.
For good reason.
DeLuca is the
states top returner
from last years PIAA
championships, where he
nished 11th in a time of
16:44.
Coaching him, I think
hes one of the top guys in
this country, Dallas coach
Matt Samuel said. Hes
really focused on doing well
(at states). Hes excited.
Now a senior, the Dallas
standout is trying to lead
the Mountaineers to a
second straight Class
2A Wyoming Valley
Conference title, among
other honors.
Its really pressure to be
a team that can possibly
win districts and be in the
state tournament, DeLuca
said.
That wont be easy.
Tunkhannock is ranked
as the states top pre-
season Class 2A team
by PennTrackXC, after
nishing fourth in the state
championships last season.
The Tigers are led by junior
Jack Tidball, who placed
30th in last years state
championship eld, along
with senior Ben Siegel
(49th) and Carson Ayers
and sophomore Jake
Toczko - who both nished
among the PIAAs top 136
boys.
And Holy Redeemer,
although hit hard by gradu-
ation, is traditionally a
strong challenge and has
Murthy back from his top-
150 state nish a year ago.
Some of the best
teams in the state in
double-A boys cross
country, Samuel said.
You have Holy Redeemer,
were a good team,
Tunkhannocks a good
team. Its a good, good con-
ference.
Best Ive ever seen on a
whole.
Some of the individual
battles could be even better.
Especially when DeLuca
gets in a eld that includes
Lehmans star sophomore
Hockenbury, debuted at
states with a 22nd-place
nish as a freshman last
season.
The two duked it out
again at the preseason
Cliff Robbins meet, where
DeLuca and Hockenbury
nished 1-2 in the high
school portion of the event.
Hes one of my
good friends, DeLuca
said. Its really fun to
compete against him. I
wouldnt consider it a
rivalry. Its more of a com-
petition. He hasnt gotten
me - yet. Thats really a
motivation, to keep con-
sistency with him. Hes
getting better, Im getting
better. Its denitely fun to
run against him.
For DeLuca, the real fun
may be just down the road.
Theres always
something to chase
after - district title,
medaling in states,
DeLuca said. I have a
couple personal goals.
Actually, competing at my
best, peaking at the end of
the season would be a big
one and something I want
to do.
DeLuca and Dallas ready to challenge Tunkhannock
TIMES LEADER FILE PHOTO
Dominic DeLuca is the states
top returner from last years
PIAA championships, where he
finished 11th in a time of 16:44.
HIGH SCHOOL CROSS
COUNTRY BOYS CAPSULES
BERWICK BULLDOGS
Coach: Karen May (2nd year)
Home Course: Evansville Lake
2012 Record: 9-8
Key Runners Lost: Ryan May
Key Runners Kept: Dylan
Dearinger, Jr.; Victor Guarveo, Jr.;
Bo Blass, So.
Coachs Outlook: Were looking
to have a very good season this
year.
COUGHLIN CRUSADERS
Coach: Paul McGrane (15th year)
Home Course: Kirby Park
2012 Record: 12-5
Key Runners Lost: Luke Slenzak,
Ted Mykulyn, Nate Sauers
Key Runners Kept: David
Sadvary, Jr.; Zach Mykulyn,
Jr.; Jeremy Gravinski, Jr.; Zach
Hinkle, Jr.; Mikey Koury, So.;
Ruben Dourdeau, Sr.;
Coachs Outlook: We dont have
a lot of numbers, but our top
fve is very competitive. David
Sadvary was a state qualifer last
season. Were hoping he has a
good year. The other guys are
putting in good work.
CRESTWOOD COMETS
Coach: Fran Gough (4th year)
Home Course: Crestwood High
School
2012 Record: 7-10
Key Runners Lost: Ryan
Schwartz, J.Q. Quinn
Key Runners Kept: Nick McGuire,
Sr.; Raj Patel, Sr.; Steve Ross, Jr.;
Brian Knorr, Sr.
Coachs Outlook: Were about
the same as we were last year,
one of those on-the fence teams.
Weve got some potential but
there are a lot of close meets.
Our number four and fve
runners will decide whether well
have a winning record or a losing
slate.
DALLAS MOUNTAINEERS
Coach: Matt Samuel (10th year)
Home Course: Dallas High
School
2012 Record: 17-0
Key Runners Lost: None
Key Runners Kept: Dominic
DeLuca, Sr.; Travis Mattson, Sr.;
Bryce Mattson, Sr.; Kyle Borland,
Sr.; Brenden Ehret, Sr.;
Coachs Outlook: This is one of if
not the strongest conferences in
the state with Tunkhannock and
Holy Redeemer so if we could
mix it up with those teams and
get to states, that would be great.
Were feeling confdent, but we
will not overlook them.
GAR GRENADIERS
Coach: Frank Spagnuolo (7th
year)
Home Course: On the road this
season
2012 Record: 0-17
Key Runners Lost: Nick
Oldziejewski
Key Runners Kept: Rudy Rivera,
So.; Anthony Talenchi, So.
Coachs Outlook: We have a
young teamand we hope to have
a full teambe competitive and
improve as the season goes on.
HANOVER AREA HAWKEYES
Coach: Jef DeRocco
Home Course: Hanover Area
High School
2012 Record: 3-14
Key Runners Lost: Matthew
Williams, Ethen Hoolick, Ryan
Josefowicz
Key Runners Kept: Jayce
Temperine, Sr.; Joe August, Sr.
HAZLETONAREA COUGARS
Coach: Jason Smolinski
Home Course: Hazleton Area
High School
2012 Record: 14-3
Key Runners Lost: Jacob
Fetterman, Tyler Pecora, Tyler
Steiner
Key Runners Kept: Andrew
Myers, Sr.; Klynt Jones, Jr.;
Jeremy Nenstiel, Jr.
Outlook: The Cougars try to
defend their District 2 Class 3A
title without the feet-footed
Fetterman, but have a solid
nucleus of returners to build
around.
HOLY REDEEMER ROYALS
Coach: Paul Hoda (2nd year)
Home Course: Kirby Park
2012 Record: 15-2
Key Runners Lost: Frazee
Sutphen, Mitchell Ford, Josh
Foust, Vinny Amarando.
Key Runners Kept: Vinay Murthy,
Jr.; Cameron Gill, Jr.; Corey
Holby, Jr.; Brandon Chacken, Sr.;
Nico Palermo, Sr.
LAKE-LEHMAN BLACK
KNIGHTS
Coach: John Sobocinski (12th
year)
Home Course: Lake-Lehman
High School
2012 Record: 8-9
Key Runners Lost: Kieran Sutton
Key Runners Kept: Dominic
Hockenbury, So.; Jordan Lindley,
Sr.; Chris Sabol, So.; Neil Mraz, Jr.
Coachs Outlook: Were led by
Dominic Hockenbury who is one
of the top runners in the state.
Well be pretty solid in our top
four guys. If we develop a ffth
runner we could be pretty good.
MEYERS MOHAWKS
Coach: Erik ODay
Home Course: Kirby Park
2012 Record: 3-14
Key Runners Lost: Matt Snyder,
Conner Gallagher
Key Runners Kept: Andrew
Martinez
Coachs Outlook: Were a small
teamand were just looking to
improve as the year moves on.
MMI PREP PREPPERS
Coach: Jon Weaver (8th year)
Home Course: MMI Prep High
School
2012 Record: 3-14
Key Runners Lost: David
Palshenski, Jacob Driscoll
Key Runners Kept: C.J. Snyder,
Jr.; Jef Bridges, Sr.
Coachs Outlook: We dont have
a lot of depth but we have fve
solid runners. I think well be
competitive in our division.
NANTICOKE TROJANS
BOYS CROSS COUNTRY CAPSULES
Coach: Chris Thompson (1st
year)
Home Course: Nanticoke Area
High School
2012 Record: 1-16
Key Runners Lost: Drew
DeRocco.
Key Runners Kept: Nelvin
Villafranca, Jr.; Garrett Allabaugh,
Soph.; Evan Plantamora, Jr.
NORTHWEST RANGERS
Coach: Brian Barchik (4th year)
Home Course: Northwest High
School
2012 Record: 8-9
Key Runners Lost: AndrewStola.
Key Runners Kept: Mike Lewis,
Sr.; Zack Briggs, Sr.; Josh
Piestrak, Sr.; Tanner Kennedy,
Soph.; David Samulevich, Sr.;
Mason Peters, Sr.
Coachs Outlook: As far as
the division goes, I think well
do well. As far as the season
goes, we move in a cluster with
Berwick and Valley West. Its like
us competing in an Invitational
every meet. Mike Lewis was our
only state qualifer last year, Im
expecting good things based on
howhes doing. And we may have
a fewmore.
PITTSTONAREA PATRIOTS
Coach: Dave Jiunta (9th year)
Home Course: Pittston Area High
School
2012 Record: 10-7
Key Runners Lost: Cody McLean,
Kyle Berlinski.
Key Runners Kept: Mike Havrilla,
Jr.; Dimitri Shea, Sr.; Patrick
Cadden, Jr.; Spencer Saxon, Jr.;
Vince Shea, soph.; Eric Sklanka,
Jr.
Coachs Outlook: I have seven
guys on a good day, the least
amount since Ive been here.
The numbers are down. But we
should have a winning record
and try to get Mike (Havrilla) to
states and possibly Vince.
TUNKHANNOCK TIGERS
Coach: Randy White (15th year)
Home Course: Wyoming County
Fair Grounds
2012 Record: 16-1
Key Runners Lost: Alex Nole, Nick
Ide, James Proulx
Key Runners Kept: Jack Tidball,
Jr.; Jake Toczko, So.; Carson
Ayers, Sr.; Ben Siegel, Sr.; John
Loomis, Sr.;
Coachs Outlook: We want to
be at our peak performance
for the district meet to get to
the state meet. We will look to
improve each race. Our strength
is experience and they have
the drive to want to be in states
again this year.
WYOMINGAREAWARRIORS
Coach: Mike Stefanik (2nd year)
Home Course: Luzerne County
Sports Complex
2012 Record: 10-7
Key Runners Lost: Eric Filipak,
Steven Barush, Nick Heck,
Michael Harding
Key Runners Kept: Zach Gibbons,
Jr.; Chris Wall, Sr.; Nico Vasquez,
So.; Joseph Buczynski, So.; Jude
Polit-Moran, Jr.
Coachs Outlook: We have an
extremely young team, but my
outlook is still to be competitive
to fnish along the lines of what
we did last year.
WYOMING SEMINARY BLUE
KNIGHTS
Coach: John Dickinson
Home Course: Kirby Park
2012 Record: 4-13
Key Runners Lost: Gus Smith.
Key Runners Kept: Neel
Gadhoke, Jr.; Stewart Kiealing,
Sr.; AndrewLevandowski, Sr.;
Hongyl Wang, Sr.
WYOMINGVALLEYWEST
SPARTANS
Coach: Anthony Dicton
2012 Record: 13-4
Key Runners Lost: Bennett
Williams, Will Butkiewicz, Ben
Becker, P.J. Endler.
Key Runners Kept: JefAustin,
Sr.; Tye Sutphen, Jr.; Zach
Specht, Jr.; Joe Del Santo, Sr.;
Zeke Berger, Fr.
Coachs Outlook: Its going to
be tough, because we lost our
top four runners. We have a good
grouping and our number three,
four, fve, six and seven guys are
all close together. We can win
meets if they come in as they
should.
TOM FOX
For The Times Leader
EXETER Playing on
the road is nothing new
to Tunkhannock, consid-
ering three of the Tigers
rst ve games have been
away from home.
Thats why it surprised
Mick Goodwin a little
when his squad struggled
in the rst set at Wyoming
Area last night.
Weve actually played
better on the road than we
have at home. We came
out a little at tonight,
he said.
The next three, though,
his girls returned back to
form.
Michelle Goodwin had
a team-high 12 kills, Erin
Smith did a nice job of dis-
tributing the ball and the
Tigers rebounded from
a sluggish start for a 3-1
win in Wyoming Valley
Conference volleyball.
Game scores were
17-25, 25-17, 25-17 and
27-25.
The win was the fourth
straight for Tunkhannock
(4-1) after a season-open-
ing, 3-2 loss to Nanticoke.
I give a lot of credit to
Wyoming Area, and we
were just a little at and
they caught us off-guard.
They played great, Mick
Goodwin said.
No doubt, the Warriors
(1-2) came out swinging.
In fact, it was nine
straight points on Audrey
Hiedacavages serve and
numerous big swings by
Samantha Acacio that
gave Wyoming Area a
13-4 lead in the opening
set.
Not a bad start for a
team lled with sopho-
mores looking to score a
conference upset.
It was the best game
weve had all year,
Wyoming Area rst-year
head coach Nick Diaco
said. The rst game was
exciting. Our blocks were
big. Our attacks were
big.
Thats when the alarm
clock sounded for the
Tigers.
We have some kids
that just dont like to lose,
and it woke them up. And
they pulled their team-
mates with them, coach
Goodwin said.
Credit senior setter
Smith, who did a great job
of spreading the offense
around in the nal three
periods.
She set ve differ-
ent attackers in the sec-
ond set, and helped out
Tunkhannocks cause in
the third, racking up two
of her three aces.
Tunkhannock closed
the second set on an 11-5,
taking advantage of six
Wyoming Area hitting
errors, and pulled out on
a 14-5 run in the third.
I try to get it to dif-
ferent people because it
gives the defense different
looks, said Smith, who
nished with a game-high
21 assists. You just cant
key on one set formation
that way. I think we did a
good job of spreading the
ball around.
Wyoming Area (1-3)
jumped out to another
large lead in the nal
stanza, 16-9, only to see
Tunkhannock answer
with a 12-6 run, knotting
the score at 22.
The Tigers fought off
two set points, and ended
the match on a Sommer
Gaydos kill and a game-
ending ace.
Its always nice to get a
road win, Mick Goodwin
said. I would like to see
a little more offense out
of the middle. They did
a great job in that rst
game of taking away our
primary source of points
with our outsides. We
made some lineup adjust-
ments that kept them off
their game.
Acacio nished with a
game-high 13 kills, while
Jessica Sorick added 10
kills for Wyoming Area.
Most of my team is
sophomores that played
junior varsity last year,
and its a big difference
jumping up to varsity,
Diaco said. We look for-
ward to teaching them
further. Im proud of the
effort each match.
Tigers shake of sleepy start
Tunkhannock 3, Wyoming Area 1
Tunkhannock 17 25 25
27
Wyoming Area 25 17 17
25
TUNK: Michelle Goodwin 12 kills, 3 aces; Al-
lison Wetherbee 6 kills, 13 points; Erin Smith 21
assists, 8 points.
WA: Samantha Acacio 13 kills, 6 blocks; Jes-
sica Sorick 10 kills, 2 blocks; Audrey Hiedacav-
age 20 assists, 5 digs.
****
Wyoming Valley West 3, Pittston Area 0
The Spartans won by scores of 25-17, 25-23,
25-18 behind 18 service points from Sarah Fu-
gate.
The Patriots efort was led by seven service
points fromMarley OBrien.
Dallas 3, Coughlin 0
Behind Amy Boltons 15 assists Dallas shut
out Coughlin by scores of 25-13, 25-10, 25-15.
Mykia Taylor led the Crusaders efort with
four kills.
Lake-Lehman 3, Nanticoke 1
Danae Sutlif recorded 20 kills to lead the
Black Knights to a victory with scores of 17-25,
25-20, 25-17, 27-25.
Kahli Kotulski contributed with 21 service
points while Lexi Oplinger contributed 22 ser-
vice points.
Nanticoke was led by Lauren Rinehimers 13
kills.
Dallas 3, Coughlin 0
Dallas 25 25 25
Coughlin 13 10 15
DAL: Amy Bolton 1 block, 15 assists, 4 service
points, Erin Muldoon 4 kills 1 block, 2 service
points; Mallory Faux 4 kills, 2 blocks, 8 service
points, 2 aces.
COU: Nykia Taylor 3 digs, 4 kills, 5 assists; Liz
Ellsworth 2 digs, 4 kills, 1 ace, 2 service points.
Wyoming Valley West 3, Pittston Area 0
Pittston Area 17 23
18
Wyoming Valley West 25 25
25
PIT: Marley OBrien 7 service points, 5 aces,
5 kills; Kirstin Durling 6 service points, 2 aces,
4 assists.
WVW: Sarah Fugate 18 service points, 8 aces,
5kills; GavynGiza8kills, 4servicepoints, 2aces;
Savannah Piazza 17 assists.
Lake-Lehman 3, Nanticoke 1
Nanticoke 25 20 17 25
Lake-Lehman 17 25 25 27
NAN: Lauren Rinehimer 1 assisrt, 4 assists,
13 kills, 3 blocks, 5 digs, 3 assists; Taylor Biggs 1
service point, 3 assists, 6 kills, 15 digs.
MEY: Kahli Kotulski 21 service points, 4 as-
sists, 13 kills, 3 blocks, 5 digs, 3 assists; Danae
Sutlif 9 service points, 20 kills, 8 blocks, 9 digs;
Lexi Olinger 22 service points, 5 assists, 9 kills, 1
block, 4 digs, 3 assists.
WVWfeld hockey earns close win
The Times Leader staff
Alex Gondas late goal lifted Wyoming Valley West
to a 2-1 win over Delaware Valley on Wednesday in
a Wyoming Valley Conference field hockey match-
up.
Gonda scored with just 1:45 to play in regulation
after the Warriors had tied the game earlier in the
second half.
Haley Gayloski also scored for the Spartans.
Crestwood 11, Nanticoke 0
The Comets scored nine goals in the first half
and would go on to defeat the Trojans.
Maury Cronauer, Casey Cole and Daniella
Callaghan all recorded multiple goals.
GIRLS SOCCER
Tunkhannock 1, Crestwood 0
Cheyenne Brown scored the games only goal to
give the Tigers to win.
Berwick 4, Meyers 0
The Bulldogs were led by two scores and one
assist from Brianna Floryshak to earn the shutout
victory.
GOLF
Holy Redeemer 144, MMI Prep 176
Chase Makowski shot a 34 while Mariano Medico
shot a 35 to pace Holy Redeemer at Wilkes-Barre
Municipal.
Alex Rowan added a 36 for the Royals.
Nanticoke 151, Meyers 166
Medalist Mike Malshefski shot a 35 to lead
the Trojans to the win against Meyers at par-33
Hollenback. Joe Olszyk and Eric Grodzinski fol-
lowed right behind him, each shooting a 36.
Billy Norton topped the Mohawks with a 40.
Crestwood 82, Berwick 97
Joe hurn shot an 18 in five holes of play in the
Comets win over the Bulldogs.
Jason Dotzel and Seth Korch each shot a 20 for
Crestwood.
Ryan Stashko led Berwick with a 21.
TENNIS
Holy Redeemer 3, MMI Prep 2
Tied at two matches apiece, the team of Annie
Cosgrove and Libby Pinto were victorious by scores
of 6-0, 6-1 to give Holy Redeemer the close win.
Stephanie Pudish won in singles to for MMI
Prep.
BOYS CROSS COUNTRY
Tigers sweep cluster
Tunkhannock had five runners finish in the top 10
to win at the cross country meet at Pittston Area.
Jack Tidball, Jake Toczko, Carson Ayers and Ben
Siegelall finished within 18 minutes for the Tigers.
Lake-Lehmans Dominic Hockenbury took first
place in the five-team cluster.
HIGH SCHOOL FIELD HOCKEY
Wyoming Valley West 2, Delaware Valley 1
Wyoming Valley West 0 2 2
Delaware Valley 0 1 1
First half No Scoring. Second half 1. WVW
Haley Gayloski, 24:50; 2. DVAlissa Detabua, 13:45; 3.
WVWAlex Gonda, 1:45.
Shots WVW 14; DV 5. Saves WVW 4 (Alicia
Moore); DV 9 (Eileen Dauria). Penalty corners
WVW15; DV1.
Crestwood 11, Nanticoke 0
Nanticoke 0 0 0
Crestwood 9 2 11
First half 1. CRE Elizabeth Dessoye (Maury Cro-
nauer), 29:36; 2. Cronauer (Marissa Surdy), 28:33; 3.
CRE Casey Cole (Ashleigh Thomas), 23:14; 4. Surdy,
(Cronauer), 21:20; 5. CRE Hunter Pitman (Morgan
Kile), 19:50; 6. CRE Daniella Callaghan (Samantha
Geroski), 15:25; 7. Cole, (Geroski), 19:59; 8. Callaghan
(Lexie Jones), 5:18; 9. Callaghan, 1:25; Second half
10. CRE Kelly Mickowski, 25:17; 11. Geroski (Hunter
Pitman), 16:30.
Shots NAN2; CRE29. Saves NAN12(Maddie
ODonahue); CRE 1 (Kellie Kalada). Penalty corners
NAN1; CRE 14.
HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS SOCCER
Berwick 4, Meyers 0
Berwick 0 4 4
Meyers 0 0 0
First half No Scoring. Second half 1. BER
Brianna Floryshak, 35:33; 2. BER Olivia Conklin; 3.
Floryshak (Carly Montecalo), 15:47; 4. BER Gabby
Kishbaugh (Floryshak), 14:47.
Shots BER 8; MEY 2. Saves BER 2 (Allison
Rinehimer); MEY 4 (Sarah McCann). Corners kicks
BER 3; MEY0.
Tunkhannock 1, Crestwood 0
Crestwood 0 0 0
Tunkhannock 1 0 1
First half 1. TUNKCheyenne Brown, 32:20. Sec-
ond half No Scoring.
Shots CRE 7; TUNK 9. Saves CRE 7 (Meg
White); TUNK 3 (Traci Kromko). Corners kicks
CRE 0; TUNK1.
HIGH SCHOOL GOLF
Holy Redeemer 144, MMI Prep 176
at Wilkes-Barre Municipal, par 36
MMI (176) SamHarmon 42, Charlie Karcher 42,
Devin McCarrie 45, Emily Morrison 47.
HR (144) Chase Makowski 34, Mariano Medico
35, Alex Rowan 36, Ryan Crossin 38, Andrew Crossin
38.
Nanticoke 151, Meyers 166
at Hollenback Golf Course, par 33
NAN (151) Mike Malshefski 35, Joe Olszyk 36,
Eric Grodzicki 36, Kyle Rosick 44.
MEY (166) Billy Norton 40, Lee Falcone 41, Paul
Fox 42, Matt Norton 43.
Crestwood 82, Berwick 97 fve holes
at Berwick Golf Course, par 36
CRE (82) Joe Hurn 18, Jason Dotzel 20, Seth
Korch 20, Billy Dombroski 24.
BER (97) Ryan Stashko 21, Ty Morzilla 22, Tyler
Evans 25, Matt Dalo 29
HIGH SCHOOLTENNIS
Holy Redeemer 3, MMI Prep 2
SINGLES Stephanie Pudish (MMI) d. Morgan
McGraw 6-1, 6-0; Emily Kabalka (HR) d. Gaby Becker
6-3, 6-1; 3. Natalie Cofee (HR) d. Claire Sheen 6-4,
6-1.
DOUBLES Kelsy Donaldson/Jessica Smith
(MMI) d. Angela Malinovich/Hannah Thornton 5-7,
6-4, 6-1; Annie Cosgrove/Libby Pinto (HR) d. Soprina
Guarneri/Chiara Demelf d. 6-0, 6-1.
HIGH SCHOOL CROSS COUNTRY
Tunkhannock 17, Pittston Area 45; Lake-
Lehman 26, Pittston Area 35; Pittston Area 15,
Meyers 50; Tunkhannock 15, Wyoming Area 50;
Lake-Lehman 21, Wyoming Area 37; Wyoming
Area 15, Meyers 50
at Pittston, 3.1 miles
1. LLDominic Hockenbury 16:35; 2. TUNKJackTid-
ball 17:19; 3. TUNKJake Toczko 17:19; 4. TUNKCarson
Ayers 17:25; 5. TUNK Ben Siegel 17:45; 6. PIT Mike
Harvilla 17:50; 7. PIT Vince Shea 18:08; 8. LL Jordan
Lindlen 18:08; 9. LL Chris Sabol 19:15; 10. TUNKJosh
Moftt 19:18.
Pete G. Wilcox | The Times Leader
Samantha Acacio (31) of Wyoming Area is congratulated by her
teammates after winning a point in Wednesdays volleyball match
with Tunkhannock.
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com baseball Thursday, September 12, 2013 PAGE 7B
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Boston 89 58 .605 8-2 W-2 47-25 42-33
Tampa Bay 78 66 .542 9 3-7 L-2 44-28 34-38
NewYork 78 68 .534 10 1 6-4 W-2 44-31 34-37
Baltimore 77 68 .531 11 1 5-5 L-2 42-32 35-36
Toronto 67 78 .462 21 11 6-4 L-2 35-36 32-42
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Detroit 84 62 .575 4-6 W-2 44-27 40-35
Cleveland 77 68 .531 6 1 6-4 L-2 45-30 32-38
Kansas City 77 69 .527 7 2 7-3 W-2 40-35 37-34
Minnesota 63 80 .441 19 14 5-5 W-2 30-39 33-41
Chicago 58 87 .400 25 20 2-8 L-2 33-36 25-51
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Oakland 83 61 .576 7-3 L-1 47-27 36-34
Texas 81 64 .559 2 2-8 L-3 39-32 42-32
Los Angeles 69 76 .476 14 9 6-4 W-2 35-40 34-36
Seattle 65 80 .448 18 13 3-7 L-3 33-41 32-39
Houston 49 96 .338 34 29 5-5 W-2 23-49 26-47
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Atlanta 87 58 .600 4-6 L-1 51-20 36-38
Washington 76 69 .524 11 6 8-2 W-5 40-31 36-38
Philadelphia 67 78 .462 20 15 5-5 W-1 40-34 27-44
NewYork 64 80 .444 22 17 2-8 L-3 28-41 36-39
Miami 54 90 .375 32 27 5-5 W-1 31-43 23-47
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
St. Louis 85 60 .586 7-3 W-5 46-25 39-35
Pittsburgh 84 61 .579 1 5-5 W-3 45-25 39-36
Cincinnati 83 64 .565 3 7-3 W-1 48-26 35-38
Milwaukee 62 82 .431 22 19 3-7 L-2 31-40 31-42
Chicago 62 83 .428 23 20 5-5 L-1 29-46 33-37
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Los Angeles 85 59 .590 6-4 W-2 45-28 40-31
Arizona 72 72 .500 13 9 3-7 L-3 40-31 32-41
San Diego 66 78 .458 19 15 6-4 L-1 41-33 25-45
Colorado 67 80 .456 19 16 3-7 L-1 41-31 26-49
San Francisco 66 80 .452 20 16 5-5 W-1 38-38 28-42
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Tuesdays Games
Kansas City 6, Cleveland 3
N.Y. Yankees 7, Baltimore 5
L.A. Angels 12, Toronto 6
Boston 2, Tampa Bay 0
Pittsburgh 5, Texas 4
Detroit 9, ChicagoWhite Sox 1
Minnesota 4, Oakland 3
Houston 13, Seattle 2
Wednesdays Games
Kansas City 6, Cleveland 2
Pittsburgh 7, Texas 5
N.Y. Yankees 5, Baltimore 4
L.A. Angels 5, Toronto 4
Boston 7, Tampa Bay 3, 10 innings
Detroit 1, ChicagoWhite Sox 0
Oakland at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Houston at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
Thursdays Games
Oakland (Grifn 13-9) at Minnesota (Diamond
5-10), 1:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Huf 2-1) at Baltimore (W.Chen 7-7),
7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Richards 6-6) at Toronto (Happ 4-5),
7:07 p.m.
Boston (Peavy 11-5) at Tampa Bay (Hellickson
11-8), 7:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Kluber 8-5) at Chicago White Sox
(Joh.Danks 4-12), 8:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Tuesdays Games
San Diego 8, Philadelphia 2
Atlanta 4, Miami 3
Chicago Cubs 9, Cincinnati 1
Washington 6, N.Y. Mets 3
Pittsburgh 5, Texas 4
St. Louis 4, Milwaukee 2
L.A. Dodgers 5, Arizona 3, 11 innings
Colorado 9, San Francisco 8
Wednesdays Games
Cincinnati 6, Chicago Cubs 0
Pittsburgh 7, Texas 5
San Francisco 4, Colorado 3
Philadelphia 4, San Diego 2
Miami 5, Atlanta 2
Washington 3, N.Y. Mets 0
St. Louis 5, Milwaukee 1
Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
Thursdays Games
Atlanta (F.Garcia 0-1) at Miami (Eovaldi 3-6),
12:40 p.m.
Washington (Roark 5-0) at N.Y. Mets (Harang
0-0), 1:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Rusin 2-3) at Pittsburgh (Locke
9-5), 7:05 p.m.
San Diego (T.Ross 3-7) at Philadelphia (Halladay
3-4), 7:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (Thornburg 1-1) at St. Louis (J.Kelly
8-3), 8:15 p.m.
San Francisco (M.Cain 8-9) at L.A. Dodgers (Gre-
inke 14-3), 10:10 p.m.
MLB STANDINGS STATS
Pirates 7, Rangers 5
Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Tabata lf 5 0 1 1 0 1 .271
S.Marte lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .282
N.Walker 2b 5 0 1 1 0 2 .254
Morneau 1b 5 2 4 0 0 1 .313
Byrd rf 5 1 2 0 0 1 .289
P.Alvarez 3b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .231
R.Martin c 4 1 1 0 1 1 .236
G.Jones dh 2 0 1 0 1 0 .236
a-J.Harrison ph-dh1 0 0 0 0 1 .256
Barmes ss 3 1 1 2 1 0 .220
Pie cf 3 1 0 0 1 2 .174
Totals 36 7 12 5 5 9
Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Kinsler dh 5 0 2 1 0 1 .273
Andrus ss 5 0 2 3 0 1 .269
Rios rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .282
A.Beltre 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .318
Pierzynski c 4 1 2 0 0 1 .281
Moreland 1b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .236
1-Adduci pr-1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .300
Profar 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .236
Dav.Murphy lf 3 2 1 1 1 0 .221
L.Martin cf 3 1 0 0 1 0 .264
Totals 35 5 9 5 3 9
Pittsburgh 001 210 2107 12 0
Texas 000 002 3005 9 0
1-ran for Moreland in the 8th.
LOBPittsburgh 8, Texas 6. 2BMorneau (2),
Byrd (33), P.Alvarez (20), Pierzynski 2 (21). HR
Barmes (5), of Scheppers. RBIs Tabata (26),
N.Walker (45), P.Alvarez (89), Barmes 2 (22),
Kinsler (61), Andrus 3 (56), Dav.Murphy (44).
SBPie (1). SFP.Alvarez.
Runners left in scoring position Pittsburgh
4 (Barmes, Byrd, N.Walker, R.Martin); Texas
4 (Profar, A.Beltre, Rios, Dav.Murphy). RISP
Pittsburgh 2 for 10; Texas 6 for 15.
Runners moved up P.Alvarez. GIDP
P.Alvarez, Rios.
DP Pittsburgh 1 (Barmes, N.Walker,
Morneau); Texas 1 (Andrus, Moreland).
Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
A.J.Brntt W, 8-10 61-36 5 5 2 7 103 3.45
J.Gomez H, 3 1-3 2 0 0 0 0 15 3.05
Morris H, 6 2-3 1 0 0 1 0 17 3.64
Mazzaro H, 6 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 15 2.62
Farnsworth S, 1-1 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 0.00
Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Garza L, 3-4 4 5 3 3 4 6 89 4.46
J.Ortiz 2 1-3 3 2 2 1 1 31 4.29
Frasor 0 1 1 1 0 0 5 2.70
Cotts 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 10 1.13
Scheppers 1 2 1 1 0 2 21 2.09
R.Ross 1 1 0 0 0 0 8 3.32
Frasor pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
Inherited runners-scored J.Gomez 2-2,
Morris 2-0, Mazzaro 2-0, Frasor 1-0, Cotts 2-2.
WPCotts.
Umpires Home, Chad Fairchild; First, Paul
Schrieber; Second, Mike Muchlinski; Third, Jef
Kellogg.
T3:36. A30,629 (48,114).
Reds 6, Cubs 0
Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
St.Castro ss 3 0 1 0 1 1 .241
Valbuena 3b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .228
b-Do.Mrphy ph-3b1 0 0 0 0 1 .279
Rizzo 1b 3 0 0 0 1 3 .228
Schierholtz rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .255
Bogusevic lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .275
Lake cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .313
Raley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Al.Cabrera p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Rosscup p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
d-D.McDonald ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .229
Castillo c 2 0 1 0 1 0 .274
e-Boscan ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Barney 2b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .215
Watkins 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .125
Samardzija p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .125
Sweeney cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .284
Totals 30 0 6 0 4 9
Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Choo cf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .290
B.Phillips 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .262
Votto 1b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .306
Bruce rf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .265
Frazier 3b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .235
Paul lf 3 0 1 1 0 1 .238
1-D.Robinson pr-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .247
Cozart ss 4 1 0 1 0 0 .254
Mesoraco c 4 2 3 1 0 0 .248
Leake p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .190
Hoover p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
a-Hannahan ph 1 1 1 3 0 0 .225
Simon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .143
M.Parra p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500
c-Heisey ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .233
LeCure p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 32 6 8 6 4 6
Chicago 000 000 0000 6 0
Cincinnati 020 103 00x6 8 0
a-homered for Hoover in the 6th. b-struck
out for Valbuena in the 8th. c-grounded out for
M.Parra in the 8th. d-grounded into a double play
for Rosscupinthe 9th. e-groundedout for Castillo
in the 9th.
1-ran for Paul in the 6th.
LOBChicago 7, Cincinnati 6. 2BSchierholtz
(28), Lake (14), Frazier (27). HR Mesoraco (9),
of Samardzija; Hannahan (1), of Samardzija.
RBIs Paul (32), Cozart (54), Mesoraco (38),
Hannahan 3 (14). SBVotto (6).
Runners left in scoring position Chicago 4
(Bogusevic 2, Schierholtz, Castillo); Cincinnati
3 (Paul 2, D.Robinson). RISP Chicago 0 for 4;
Cincinnati 2 for 6.
Runners moved up Frazier, Paul, Cozart.
GIDPSt.Castro, D.McDonald, Barney.
DP Cincinnati 3 (B.Phillips, Cozart, Votto),
(Cozart, B.Phillips, Votto), (B.Phillips, Cozart,
Votto).
Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Saadzija L, 8-12 52-3 8 6 6 3 5 114 4.44
Raley 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 13 2.84
Al.Cabrera 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 0.00
Rosscup 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 0.00
Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Leake W, 13-6 52-3 4 0 0 4 6 107 3.35
Hoover H, 13 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 2.83
Simon 1 1 0 0 0 1 9 3.24
M.Parra 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 3.24
LeCure 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 2.73
Inherited runners-scored Raley 1-0,
Al.Cabrera 1-0, Hoover 1-0. WPSamardzija.
Umpires Home, Alfonso Marquez; First, Ted
Barrett; Second, Mike DiMuro; Third, Paul Emmel.
T3:03. A22,088 (42,319).
Royals 6, Indians 2
Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
A.Gordon lf 4 2 1 1 1 1 .271
Bonifacio 2b 5 2 3 0 0 0 .242
Hosmer 1b 5 1 2 1 0 0 .304
B.Butler dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .291
S.Perez c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .285
Maxwell rf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .257
J.Dyson cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .269
L.Cain cf-rf 3 1 2 1 1 1 .261
Carroll 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .212
Moustakas 3b 1 0 1 1 0 0 .232
A.Escobar ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .235
Totals 37 6 11 4 2 7
Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Bourn cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .258
Aviles ss 3 1 0 0 0 0 .264
Kipnis 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .280
C.Santana 1b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .265
Brantley lf 4 0 1 2 0 1 .278
Y.Gomes c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .297
Kubel dh 3 0 0 0 0 2 .176
a-As.Cabrera ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .233
Chisenhall 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .227
Stubbs rf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .230
Totals 32 2 4 2 1 10
Kansas City 300 010 1106 11 2
Cleveland 200 000 0002 4 2
E Shields 2 (3), R.Hill (1), Kazmir (3). LOB
Kansas City 6, Cleveland 5. 3B Bonifacio (3).
HR A.Gordon (19), of Kazmir. RBIs A.Gordon
(79), Hosmer (75), L.Cain (44), Moustakas (39),
Brantley 2 (62). SB Maxwell (6), L.Cain 2 (14),
Kipnis (27), C.Santana (3).
Runners left in scoring position Kansas City
4 (Carroll 2, A.Gordon, B.Butler); Cleveland 3
(C.Santana, As.Cabrera 2). RISP Kansas City 5
for 10; Cleveland 1 for 7.
Runners moved up Hosmer, Carroll, Kipnis.
GIDPB.Butler.
DP Cleveland 1 (Chisenhall, Kipnis,
C.Santana).
Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Shields W, 11-9 8 4 2 2 1 7 108 3.38
G.Holland S, 42-451 0 0 0 0 3 15 1.35
Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Kazmir L, 8-8 4 9 4 3 0 4 87 4.24
Shaw 2 1-3 0 0 0 0 3 17 3.76
R.Hill 1-3 1 1 1 1 0 8 6.51
M.Albers 11-3 1 1 1 1 0 28 3.39
Rapada 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 0.00
Kazmir pitched to 2 batters in the 5th.
Shields pitched to 2 batters in the 9th.
Inherited runners-scored G.Holland 2-0,
Shaw2-1, M.Albers 1-0. HBPby Shields (Aviles).
Umpires Home, Mike Estabrook; First, Paul
Nauert; Second, Doug Eddings; Third, Dana
DeMuth.
T2:58. A12,085 (42,241).
Giants 4, Rockies 3
Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Blackmon rf 4 0 0 0 1 1 .271
Rutledge 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .229
Co.Dickerson cf 3 2 1 0 1 0 .290
Cuddyer 1b 4 1 3 0 0 0 .334
Arenado 3b 4 0 2 2 0 1 .271
Pacheco c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .239
Culberson lf 3 0 1 1 0 2 .222
g-Helton ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .247
J.Herrera ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .276
Nicasio p 1 0 0 0 1 1 .147
Bettis p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
b-R.Wheeler ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .185
Outman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Ottavino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .111
Belisle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
h-Tulowitzki ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .310
2-C.Gonzalez pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .302
Totals 34 3 9 3 3 8
San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
G.Blanco cf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .257
c-J.Perez ph-cf 0 1 0 0 1 0 .218
f-Posey ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .311
1-F.Peguero pr-lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .160
Scutaro 2b 4 0 2 1 1 0 .299
Belt 1b 3 0 1 1 2 1 .284
Pence rf 3 0 1 1 1 0 .289
Sandoval 3b 4 0 1 1 1 1 .276
S.Casilla p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
H.Sanchez c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .265
B.Crawford ss 4 1 2 0 0 1 .260
Kieschnick lf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .213
d-Pagan ph-cf 1 1 1 0 0 0 .281
Petit p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .077
Kontos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
a-Abreu ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .227
Moscoso p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
e-Adrianza ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Arias 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .275
Totals 31 4 9 4 8 3
Colorado 000 102 0003 9 0
San Francisco 001 000 12x4 9 0
a-fied out for Kontos in the 6th. b-popped
out for Bettis in the 7th. c-walked for G.Blanco
in the 7th. d-singled for Kieschnick in the 8th.
e-sacrifced for Moscoso in the 8th. f-was
intentionally walked for J.Perez in the 8th. g-lined
out for Culberson in the 9th. h-singled for Belisle
in the 9th.
1-ran for Posey in the 8th. 2-ran for Tulowitzki
in the 9th.
LOB Colorado 7, San Francisco 13. 2B
Scutaro (23), B.Crawford (24). RBIs Arenado 2
(49), Culberson(8), Scutaro(31), Belt (56), Pence
(80), Sandoval (73). SAdrianza. SFPence.
Runners left in scoring position Colorado 1
(Pacheco); San Francisco 9 (Petit 2, H.Sanchez
5, Sandoval 2). RISP Colorado 4 for 6; San
Francisco 3 for 11.
Runners moved upSandoval.
DPSan Francisco 1 (Pence, Belt).
Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Nicasio 5 5 1 1 4 1 92 4.58
Bettis H, 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 4.89
Outman 0 0 1 1 3 0 14 4.32
Ottavino H, 6 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 2.84
Blisle L, 5-7 BS, 5-51 4 2 2 1 1 36 4.63
San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Petit 52-3 6 3 3 2 7 102 2.53
Kontos 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 5 4.62
MoscosoW, 2-2 2 1 0 0 1 0 22 4.07
S.Casilla S, 2-3 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 1.91
Outman pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.
Inherited runners-scored Ottavino 3-1,
Kontos 2-0. IBB of Belisle (Posey), of Nicasio
(Kieschnick).
Umpires Home, Greg Gibson; First, Hunter
Wendelstedt; Second, Jerry Layne; Third, Alan
Porter.
T3:19. A41,128 (41,915).
Phillies 4, Padres 2
San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Denorfa cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .269
Headley 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .243
Gyorko 2b 3 1 1 1 1 2 .247
Guzman lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .233
b-Venable ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .271
Blanks rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .255
Medica 1b 4 1 1 1 0 2 .250
R.Cedeno ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .313
Hundley c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .239
Stults p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .164
Vincent p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
a-Forsythe ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .214
Boxberger p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Totals 32 2 5 2 1 11
Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
C.Hernandez cf 4 0 0 1 0 3 .259
Rollins ss 3 1 2 1 1 0 .244
Frandsen 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .235
Bernadina rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .170
Ruiz c 4 1 1 0 0 0 .279
Ruf lf-1b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .251
Asche 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .259
Galvis 2b 3 2 3 2 0 0 .225
Mayberry rf-lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .228
Cl.Lee p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .135
Papelbon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 30 4 8 4 3 6
San Diego 000 011 0002 5 0
Philadelphia 000 011 11x4 8 0
a-grounded out for Vincent in the 8th. b-struck
out for Guzman in the 9th.
LOB San Diego 4, Philadelphia 7. 2B Ruf
(9), Galvis (5). HRMedica (1), ofCl.Lee; Gyorko
(18), of Cl.Lee; Galvis (6), of Stults; Rollins
(6), of Stults. RBIs Gyorko (46), Medica (1),
C.Hernandez (5), Rollins (37), Galvis 2 (18). S
Galvis, Cl.Lee.
Runners left in scoring position San Diego
1 (Blanks); Philadelphia 4 (Asche 2, Frandsen,
Mayberry). RISPSan Diego 0 for 1; Philadelphia
0 for 5.
Runners moved upC.Hernandez.
San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Stults 6 6 2 2 0 5 88 4.03
Vincent L, 4-3 1 1 1 1 2 0 21 2.58
Boxberger 1 1 1 1 1 1 17 3.38
Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Cl.Lee W, 13-6 8 5 2 2 1 9 110 2.97
Papelbon S, 26-33 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 2.54
IBBofVincent (Rollins).
Umpires Home, Tim Timmons; First, Mike
Winters; Second, Laz Diaz; Third, Mark Wegner.
T2:29. A30,351 (43,651).
Angels 5, Blue Jays 4
Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Shuck lf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .294
Cowgill lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .254
Aybar ss 3 0 0 1 0 1 .266
Trout cf 2 2 0 0 2 1 .336
J.Hamilton dh 3 1 3 0 1 0 .247
Trumbo 1b 3 1 1 2 1 0 .244
Calhoun rf 2 0 1 2 0 0 .295
Conger c 2 0 1 0 0 1 .258
a-Iannetta ph-c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .223
G.Green 2b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .250
An.Romine 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .226
Totals 29 5 8 5 5 5
Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Reyes ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .292
R.Davis lf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .264
Lawrie 3b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .257
Lind 1b 3 1 0 0 1 2 .277
Sierra rf 4 2 3 1 0 0 .291
DeRosa dh 3 0 1 1 0 0 .225
c-Kawasaki ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .223
Goins 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .271
Gose cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .233
Thole c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .144
b-Arencibia ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .205
Totals 31 4 4 2 4 6
Los Angeles 020 110 0105 8 2
Toronto 300 100 0004 4 0
a-struck out for Conger in the 6th. b-grounded
out for Thole in the 7th.
E Aybar (13), An.Romine (2). LOB Los
Angeles 5, Toronto 4. 2B J.Hamilton (31),
G.Green (6), Sierra 2 (9). 3B Sierra (1). HR
Trumbo (33), of Dickey. RBIs Aybar (52),
Trumbo 2(93), Calhoun2(25), Sierra (8), DeRosa
(32). SB R.Davis (41), Sierra (1). CS Calhoun
(1). SFAybar, Calhoun 2.
Runners left in scoring position Los Angeles
1 (Iannetta); Toronto 3 (Goins, Lind, Gose). RISP
Los Angeles 2 for 5; Toronto 2 for 8.
Runners moved up Trumbo, R.Davis, Lawrie.
GIDPG.Green.
DP Toronto 2 (Reyes, Goins, Lind), (R.Davis,
R.Davis, Lawrie, Goins, Lawrie).
Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
C.WilsonW, 16-6 7 4 4 3 4 6 104 3.44
D.De La Rosa H, 161 0 0 0 0 0 16 3.12
Frieri S, 32-36 1 0 0 0 0 0 17 3.86
Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Dickey 51-3 7 4 4 2 2 92 4.36
Loup 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 2.42
McGowan 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 1.71
Delabar L, 5-3 1 1 1 1 2 1 22 2.82
Oliver 1 0 0 0 1 0 13 3.97
Inherited runners-scoredLoup 2-0. IBBof
Delabar (Trumbo). WPC.Wilson. PBThole.
Umpires Home, Toby Basner; First, Hal
Gibson; Second, Mike Everitt; Third, TimWelke.
T2:43. A17,994 (49,282).
Marlins 5, Braves 2
Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
J.Schafer cf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .261
J.Upton rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .257
F.Freeman 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .305
Gattis lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .248
McCann c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .261
C.Johnson 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .328
Simmons ss 3 1 2 0 1 0 .250
El.Johnson 2b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .277
Minor p 2 0 1 0 0 1 .182
a-Terdoslavich ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .236
Varvaro p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
c-Uggla ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .181
Totals 34 2 7 2 3 8
Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Hechavarria ss 5 0 1 0 0 1 .228
Polanco 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .251
Yelich lf 4 2 2 0 0 0 .284
Stanton rf 3 1 2 3 1 0 .253
Ruggiano cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .223
Lucas 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .237
Morrison 1b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .254
K.Hill c 4 0 2 0 0 1 .233
Fernandez p 3 1 2 1 0 0 .220
M.Dunn p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
b-Pierre ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .246
Cishek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 36 5 13 5 1 4
Atlanta 000 001 0012 7 1
Miami 100 121 00x5 13 0
a-walked for Minor in the 7th. b-grounded out
for M.Dunn in the 8th. c-struck out for Varvaro in
the 9th.
E El.Johnson (2). LOB Atlanta 8, Miami 8.
2BJ.Schafer (8), Simmons (23), El.Johnson(4),
Polanco (11), Yelich (9), Lucas (9). 3BSimmons
(5). HRGattis (19), ofFernandez; Stanton (20),
of Minor; Fernandez (1), of Minor. RBIs Gattis
(55), El.Johnson (5), Stanton 3 (50), Morrison
(34), Fernandez (5).
Runners left in scoring position Atlanta 6
(Gattis, El.Johnson 3, F.Freeman, J.Schafer);
Miami 4 (Stanton, Hechavarria 2, Lucas). RISP
Atlanta 1 for 10; Miami 2 for 8.
Runners moved upJ.Upton 2, Pierre. GIDP
Polanco.
DP Atlanta 1 (Simmons, El.Johnson,
F.Freeman).
Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Minor L, 13-7 6 11 5 4 0 4 94 3.15
Varvaro 2 2 0 0 1 0 29 2.79
Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Fernandez W, 12-6 7 5 1 1 3 5 101 2.19
M.Dunn 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 2.86
Cishek 1 2 1 1 0 2 21 2.59
IBBofVarvaro (Stanton).
Umpires Home, Sam Holbrook; First, Andy
Fletcher; Second, Rob Drake; Third, Joe West.
T2:42. A25,111 (37,442).
Nationals 3, Mets 0
Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Span cf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .281
Zimmerman 3b 5 1 2 1 0 2 .275
Z.Walters 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000
Werth rf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .327
Harper lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .273
Desmond ss 4 1 2 0 0 1 .285
Ad.LaRoche 1b 3 1 1 0 1 2 .238
W.Ramos c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .272
Rendon 2b 4 0 2 2 0 0 .262
Haren p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .171
a-Lombardozzi ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .250
X.Cedeno p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Storen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
b-Tracy ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .192
Clippard p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
R.Soriano p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 37 3 11 3 1 9
NewYork AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
E.Young lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .253
Lagares rf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .266
Dan.Murphy 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .282
Duda 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .236
Satin 3b 2 0 1 0 1 1 .282
den Dekker cf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .250
T.dArnaud c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .152
R.Tejada ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .205
Z.Wheeler p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .133
Black p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
c-Baxter ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .202
Hawkins p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 30 0 3 0 1 11
Washington 000 001 0203 11 0
NewYork 000 000 0000 3 0
a-singled for Haren in the 7th. b-popped out for
Storen in the 8th. c-fied out for Black in the 8th.
LOB Washington 9, New York 4. 2B Werth
(21), Rendon (22). HR Zimmerman (22), of
Z.Wheeler. RBIs Zimmerman (70), Rendon
2 (31). SB Zimmerman (6), Lagares (6). S
Haren.
Runners left in scoring position Washington
8 (Desmond 2, Ad.LaRoche, Span, W.Ramos,
Werth 2, Tracy); NewYork 2 (Satin, Duda). RISP
Washington 1 for 10; NewYork 0 for 2.
Runners moved upDesmond.
Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
HarenW, 9-13 6 1 0 0 1 8 86 5.02
X.Cedeno H, 2 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 8 3.86
Storen H, 21 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 7 4.85
Clippard H, 32 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 2.18
R.Soriano S, 41-47 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 3.30
NewYork IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Z.Wheeler L, 7-5 7 8 1 1 1 6 101 3.22
Black 1 3 2 2 0 1 13 5.00
Hawkins 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 3.30
PBT.dArnaud.
Umpires Home, James Hoye; First, Jim
Reynolds; Second, Bob Davidson; Third, John
Hirschbeck.
T2:49. A20,151 (41,922).
Yankees 5, Orioles 4
NewYork AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Gardner cf 2 1 0 0 2 2 .273
A.Rodriguez dh 4 1 1 1 0 1 .299
Cano 2b 4 1 2 2 0 0 .309
A.Soriano lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .247
Granderson rf 4 2 2 1 0 0 .248
Mar.Reynolds 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .226
Overbay 1b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .252
Ryan ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .189
C.Stewart c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .215
Totals 33 5 6 5 2 8
Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
B.Roberts 2b 5 1 3 1 0 2 .246
Machado 3b 5 1 2 0 0 2 .292
C.Davis 1b 4 0 1 2 0 1 .295
A.Jones cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .291
Valencia dh 4 1 4 0 0 0 .330
Wieters c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .229
Hardy ss 4 0 1 1 0 0 .264
Morse rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .221
Ch.Dickerson rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .243
a-Markakis ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .271
McLouth lf 3 1 2 0 1 0 .267
Totals 37 4 13 4 1 6
NewYork 100 011 0025 6 0
Baltimore 002 100 0014 13 0
a-grounded out for Ch.Dickerson in the 9th.
LOB New York 3, Baltimore 7. 2B C.Davis
(40), Valencia (12), Hardy (23), McLouth (28).
3B Granderson (1). HR Granderson (5), of
Feldman; A.Rodriguez (6), of Feldman; Cano
(27), of Tom.Hunter. RBIs A.Rodriguez (13),
Cano 2 (100), Granderson (12), Overbay (57),
B.Roberts (34), C.Davis 2 (128), Hardy (72). SB
Gardner (24). CS McLouth (7).
Runners left in scoring position Baltimore 3
(A.Jones, B.Roberts, Wieters). RISP NewYork 1
for 4; Baltimore 4 for 9.
Runners moved up A.Rodriguez, Cano. GIDP
Wieters, Hardy.
DP New York 2 (Mar.Reynolds, Cano,
Overbay), (Ryan, Cano, Overbay).
NewYork IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Pettitte 61-3 9 3 3 1 3 109 4.04
Kelley 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 3.96
D.RobertsonW, 5-11 2 0 0 0 1 18 1.82
M.Rivera S, 43-50 1 2 1 1 0 1 20 2.34
Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Feldman 72-3 3 3 3 2 6 112 3.62
Tom.Hunter L, 4-4 1 2 2 2 0 1 13 2.93
Patton 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 6 3.79
Inherited runners-scored Kelley 1-0, Tom.
Hunter 1-0, Patton 1-1.
Umpires Home, Jef Nelson; First, Jim Wolf;
Second, Ed Hickox; Third, JimJoyce.
T3:18. A20,141 (45,971).
Red Sox 7, Rays 3, 10 innings,
Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Pedroia 2b 4 2 2 0 1 0 .298
Victorino rf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .292
D.Ortiz dh 3 2 0 0 2 0 .308
Napoli 1b 3 1 1 2 2 1 .260
Nava lf 3 0 2 1 0 0 .300
c-J.Gomes ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .239
d-Carp ph 1 1 1 4 0 0 .314
Berry lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .667
Drewss 5 0 1 0 0 2 .244
Middlebrooks 3b 5 0 0 0 0 0 .238
D.Ross c 3 0 0 0 1 2 .202
Bradley Jr. cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .176
Totals 36 7 9 7 6 8
Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
DeJesus lf 2 0 1 1 1 1 .271
a-S.Rodriguez ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .247
b-Ke.Johnson ph-lf2 0 0 0 0 2 .244
W.Myers rf 5 0 1 0 0 3 .288
Zobrist 2b 4 1 0 0 1 0 .274
Longoria 3b 3 0 2 1 1 0 .266
Joyce dh 2 0 0 0 3 2 .243
De.Jennings cf 4 0 0 0 1 3 .245
Loney 1b 5 1 1 1 0 1 .305
Lobaton c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .258
Y.Escobar ss 4 1 1 0 0 0 .261
Totals 35 3 6 3 7 14
Boston 003 000 000 47 9 0
Tampa Bay 001 000 110 03 6 0
a-was announced for DeJesus in the 7th.
b-struck out for S.Rodriguez in the 7th. c-fied
out for Nava in the 8th. d-homered for J.Gomes
in the 10th.
LOB_Boston 6, Tampa Bay 10. 2B_Victorino
(25), Napoli (36), Bradley Jr. (4), DeJesus (4),
Longoria 2 (34), Y.Escobar (25). HR_Carp (9), of
Ro.Hernandez; Loney (12), of Workman. RBIs_
Napoli 2 (87), Nava (60), Carp 4 (37), DeJesus
(2), Longoria (75), Loney (64). S_Victorino.
Runners left in scoring position_Boston 5
(D.Ross 2, Drew, Pedroia, Bradley Jr.); Tampa Bay
7 (Lobaton 2, De.Jennings 4, Joyce). RISP_Boston
2 for 10; Tampa Bay 1 for 10.
Runners moved up_Nava, Loney. GIDP_D.Ortiz,
Middlebrooks, D.Ross, Zobrist.
DP_Boston 1 (Pedroia, Drew, Napoli); Tampa
Bay 3 (Longoria, Zobrist, Loney), (Longoria,
Zobrist), (Zobrist, Longoria, Loney).
Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Dempster 5 4 1 1 5 7 106 4.70
F.Morales H, 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 17 5.03
Workman BS, 1-1 2 2 2 2 1 4 39 4.58
Uehara W, 4-0 1 0 0 0 0 2 17 1.08
Tazawa 1 0 0 0 1 1 13 2.80
Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Cobb 52-3 7 3 3 3 4 98 3.08
W.Wright 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 3.81
J.Wright 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 6 3.13
McGee 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 4.02
Al.Torres 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 1.59
Rodney 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 3.68
Jo.Peralta L, 2-7 1-3 0 2 2 2 0 11 3.03
Ro.Hernandez 2-3 1 2 2 1 1 15 4.93
Inherited runners-scored_W.Wright 2-0,
McGee 1-0, Ro.Hernandez 2-2. IBB_of Jo.Peralta
(D.Ortiz), of Cobb (D.Ortiz). HBP_by Dempster
(Longoria).
Umpires_Home, Vic Carapazza; First, Lance
Barksdale; Second, Gary Cederstrom; Third,
Angel Hernandez.
T4:05. A19,215 (34,078).
Tigers 1, White Sox 0
Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
A.Jackson cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .275
Tor.Hunter rf 5 0 2 0 0 1 .298
Mi.Cabrera 3b 4 0 1 0 1 1 .349
R.Santiago 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .224
Fielder 1b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .277
V.Martinez dh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .297
N.Castellanos lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .273
D.Kelly lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .233
Infante 2b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .320
Avila c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .221
Iglesias ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .317
Totals 36 1 10 1 2 7
Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Le.Garcia 2b 4 0 3 0 0 1 .200
Jor.Danks rf 2 0 1 0 2 1 .248
Al.Ramirez ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .279
Konerko 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .248
A.Dunn dh 4 0 0 0 0 4 .219
A.Garcia cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .277
Viciedo lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .261
Phegley c 2 0 1 0 1 1 .218
a-Gillaspie ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .254
Semien 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .182
Totals 31 0 5 0 4 13
Detroit 000 000 0101 10 0
Chicago 000 000 0000 5 1
a-struck out for Phegley in the 9th.
E_Al.Ramirez (22). LOB_Detroit 11, Chicago
8. 2B_Infante (22), Avila (13). RBIs_Infante (45).
SB_Le.Garcia 2 (5), Phegley (1).
Runners left in scoring position_Detroit
8 (N.Castellanos 3, Tor.Hunter 2, Avila 2,
Mi.Cabrera); Chicago 5 (Konerko, Al.Ramirez 3,
A.Dunn). RISP_Detroit 1 for 13; Chicago 1 for 8.
Runners moved up_V.Martinez, Avila. GIDP_
Mi.Cabrera, Infante, Konerko.
DP_Detroit 1 (Mi.Cabrera, Infante, Fielder);
Chicago 2 (Semien, Le.Garcia, Konerko), (Al.
Ramirez, Le.Garcia, Konerko).
Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Ani.Snchz W, 14-7 71-35 0 0 4 10 116 2.50
Veras H, 5 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 2.88
Smyly H, 15 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 2.30
Benoit S, 18-18 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.05
Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Quintana 7 5 0 0 2 6 114 3.56
LindstromL, 2-42-3 3 1 1 0 0 15 3.02
Veal 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 5.48
Petricka 1 2 0 0 0 0 15 1.64
Inherited runners-scored_Veras 2-0, Smyly
2-0, Veal 2-0. HBP_by Quintana (A.Jackson).
WP_Veal.
Umpires_Home, Larry Vanover; First, Manny
Gonzalez; Second, Brian Gorman; Third, Tony
Randazzo.
T3:16. A15,799 (40,615).
NATIONAL LEAGUE ROUNDUP
AMERICAN LEAGUE ROUNDUP
Lee strikes out nine to lift Philadelphia
AP photo
Phillies shortstop Jimmy Rollins broke a long slump by homering
against San Diego on Wednesday.
Grand slamgives Soxwin in extras
AP photo
The Boston Red Soxs David Ortiz, left, scores past Tampa Bay Rays catcher Jose Lobaton on a third-
inning ground out by teammate Daniel Nava during Wednesdays game.
The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA
Cliff Lee pitched eight
sharp innings and Freddy
Galvis had three hits to
lead the Philadelphia
Phillies to a 4-2 victory
over the San Diego Padres
on Wednesday night.
Lee (13-6) allowed two
runs and ve hits, struck
out nine and walked one.
It was the second straight
eight-inning outing and
fourth in the last six starts
for Lee, who pounded his
glove and skipped toward
the dugout after fanning
Jedd Gyorko to end the
eighth.
Gyorko and Tommy
Medica homered for the
Padres, who had won four
in a row. Medicas solo shot
in the fth was his rst hit
in his major league debut.
Jonathon Papelbon
pitched a scoreless ninth
for his 26th save in 33
chances.
Nationals 3, Mets 0
NEW YORK Dan
Haren pitched one-hit
ball for six innings, Ryan
Zimmerman homered and
the Washington Nationals
won their fth straight
game, beating the New
York Mets in a night full of
9/11 tributes.
Mets manager Terry
Collins wore an NYPD hat
during batting practice,
and there were several
remembrances on the eld,
on the scoreboard and over
the public-address system
of those affected by the ter-
ror attacks 12 years ago.
The Nationals improved
to 22-9 in their late charge
toward a playoff spot.
They remained six
games behind Cincinnati
for the nal NL wild-card
spot with only 17 to play.
Denard Span extended
his hitting streak to a
career-high 22 games and
Anthony Rendon added
a two-run double that
broke it open in the eighth
inning. Jayson Werth deliv-
ered another extra-base hit
and Bryce Harper beat out
an ineld hit after missing
four games because of a
sore left hip.
Reds 6, Cubs 0
CINCINNATI Devin
Mesoraco hit his rst home
run in more than a month
and Jack Hannahan added
his rst career pinch-hit
homer as Cincinnati avoid-
ed being swept by last-
place Chicago.
Mesoraco, hitless in his
previous 13 at bats, col-
lected three to lead the
Reds to their seventh win
on a 10-game home stand.
It included a 3-1 record
against St. Louis and
three-game sweep of NL
West Division-leading Los
Angeles.
Cincinnati went into
the game in third place in
the Central, three games
behind the division-leading
Cardinals and two behind
Pittsburgh.
Marlins 5, Braves 2
MIAMI In his sea-
son nale, Miami Marlins
rookie sensation Jose
Fernandez pitched seven
innings, hit his rst major-
league homer and engaged
in a standoff with the
annoyed Atlanta Braves
that cleared both benches
and bullpens.
When he had complet-
ed his eventful evening,
Fernandez slowly walked
off the mound one last
time, removing his cap
as the crowd gave him
a standing ovation. Two
relievers pitched the nal
two innings, and the woe-
ful Marlins beat the playoff-
bound Braves.
The game was the
last of the season for the
demonstrative 21-year-
old Fernandez because he
passed his 170-inning limit
set by the Marlins. A top
candidate for NL Rookie of
the Year, he nished 12-6
with an ERA of 2.19, sec-
ond-lowest in the majors
behind only the Dodgers
Clayton Kershaw.
Giants 4, Rockies 3
SAN FRANCISCO
Marco Scutaro and
Brandon Belt hit consecu-
tive RBI singles in the
eighth inning to help San
Francisco edge Colorado.
The Giants loaded the
bases with one out against
Matt Belisle (5-7), and
Scutaro followed with a
tying single into right eld.
Belts hit drove in Angel
Pagan and gave San
Francisco a 4-3 lead.
Guillermo Moscoso
(2-2) pitched two score-
less innings for the victory,
securing the rst winning
homestand for the Giants
since May 20-26. Santiago
Casilla nished for his sec-
ond save.
The Associated Press
ST. PETERSBURG,
FLA. Mike Carp had
a pinch-hit grand slam
in the 10th inning and
the AL East-leading
Boston Red Sox beat the
Tampa Bay Rays 7-3 on
Wednesday night.
Carp sent a drive over
the center-eld fence
on the rst pitch from
Roberto Hernandez. It
was the rst pinch-hit
grand slam for Boston
since Kevin Millar hit one
at Milwaukee on June 7,
2003.
Dustin Pedroia opened
the 10th with a walk
against Joel Peralta (2-7)
and went to second on
Shane Victorinos bunt.
After David Ortiz was
intentionally walked,
Hernandez replaced
Peralta and walked Mike
Napoli on four pitches
before Carp connected for
his ninth homer.
Royals 6, Indians 2
CLEVELAND Alex
Gordon homered on the
games rst pitch, James
Shields dominated after
a shaky rst inning,
and Kansas City beat
Cleveland in a matchup
of teams ghting for an
American League playoff
spot.
Kansas City took two
of three in the series
between clubs that are
in contention for the
second wild card spot in
the AL. The Royals, who
entered Wednesday trail-
ing Tampa Bay by three
games, moved a game
closer to the Indians.
Cleveland was 1 games
behind the Rays.
The Royals had a home
run, a triple and a single
on the games rst seven
pitches to take a 2-0 lead.
Kansas City added a run
in the rst inning.
Angels 5, Blue Jays 4
TORONTO Kole
Calhoun hit a tiebreaking
sacrice y in the eighth
inning and C.J. Wilson
won his eighth straight
decision for Los Angeles.
Mark Trumbo hit a two-
run home run, his career-
high 33rd, and Josh
Hamilton had three hits
as the Angels won for the
ninth time in 12 meetings
with the Blue Jays.
Mike Trout drew a
one-out walk off Steve
Delabar (5-3) in the
eighth and went to third
on Hamiltons double.
Trumbo was intentionally
walked to load the bases
for Calhoun, who hit a
sacrice y to left.
Pirates 7, Rangers 5
ARLINGTON, Texas
Clint Barmes homered
and drew a bases-load-
ed walk for Pittsburgh,
which completed a three-
game sweep in an inter-
league matchup of wild-
card leaders with a vic-
tory over slumping Texas
Justin Morneau,
acquired from Minnesota
less than two weeks ago,
snapped an 0-for-14 slump
with four hits while scor-
ing twice. The Pirates
(84-61) moved within a
half-game of NL Central-
leading St. Louis.
Texas (81-63) has
dropped nine of its last
12, a stretch in which the
Rangers have lost four
consecutive series. They
have gone from a three-
game lead in the AL West
to 2 behind Oakland.
City aims to seize
bad mortgages
A San Francisco Bay Area city is mov-
ing ahead with its rst-in-the-nation plan
to use the governments constitutional
power of eminent domain to seize hun-
dreds of underwater mortgages.
The Richmond City Council voted 4-3
early Wednesday to set up a Joint Powers
Authority to bring more cities into the
plan. Mayor Gayle McLaughlin says the
city of El Monte in Southern California
has expressed interest, and she believes
other cities will follow.
Under the plan, Richmond would use
eminent domain to seize the underwater
mortgage. It would then offer the bank fair
market value for it and give the homeown-
er a new loan that would lower monthly
payments and improve the owners chanc-
es of staying.
Banks have led lawsuits to stop
Richmond fromgoing ahead.
Airways say govt
wrong about them
American Airlines and US Airways say
that the governments opposition to their
planned merger shows that it doesnt
understand the airline industry.
The airlines said in court lings late
Tuesdaythat theU.S. JusticeDepartments
analysis of the merger ignores competi-
tion that nowexists fromlow-cost carriers
such as Southwest. American says that the
government instead relies on anecdotes
involving small numbers of passengers
and an idealized but outdated vision of the
industry.
A trial on the governments lawsuit is
scheduledtobeginNov. 25inWashington.
The airlines raised familiar arguments
in the lings to support the merger. They
said that it would offer customers more
ight options and improve competition by
creating a stronger rival to the nations big-
gest carriers, United and Delta.
Economists back
Yellen for Fed
Morethan350economistshaveasigned
a letter to President Barack Obama calling
on him to nominate Federal Reserve Vice
Chair Janet Yellen to be the Feds next
chairman. The letter is designed to draw
attention back to Yellen amid signs that
Obama is leaning toward nominating his
former economic adviser Larry Summers.
The letter, whose signers include econo-
mists with past ties to Obama, credits
Yellen for prescience in warning in 2005
about an impending real estate meltdown,
for her consensus style of leadership and
for her commitment to job growth.
Obama is expected to announce his
nomination as early as this month. Fed
Chairman Ben Bernankes term ends Jan.
31, 2014.
IntPap 49.36 +.09 +23.9
JPMorgCh 53.26 -.41 +22.0
JacobsEng 57.61 -.90 +35.3
JohnJn 89.23 +.70 +27.3
JohnsnCtl 42.74 +.22 +39.4
Kellogg 60.08 +.62 +7.6
Keycorp 12.06 -.08 +43.2
KimbClk 94.56 +.66 +12.0
KindME 80.51 -.81 +.9
Kroger 37.67 +.13 +44.8
Kulicke 11.51 -.01 -4.0
L Brands 58.70 +.45 +24.7
LancastrC 75.07 +.30 +8.5
LillyEli 52.80 -.07 +7.1
LincNat 45.14 +.16 +74.3
LockhdM 126.57 +1.50 +37.1
Loews 46.11 +.38 +13.2
LaPac 16.96 +.21 -12.2
MarathnO 36.49 +.72 +19.0
MarIntA 42.96 +1.35 +15.3
Masco 20.99 +.27 +26.6
McDrmInt 7.55 -.06 -31.5
McGrwH 62.22 +.27 +13.8
McKesson 127.70 +1.78 +31.7
Merck 48.14 +.16 +17.6
MetLife 49.55 -.07 +50.4
Microsoft 32.74 +.35 +22.6
MorgStan 28.25 +.21 +47.8
NCR Corp 38.13 -.20 +49.6
NatFuGas 65.25 -1.05 +28.7
NatGrid 58.61 +.41 +2.0
NY Times 11.36 -.06 +33.2
NewellRub 26.66 +.34 +19.7
NewmtM 29.46 +.26 -36.6
NextEraEn 79.61 -1.00 +15.1
NiSource 29.59 -.20 +18.9
NikeB s 67.59 +.77 +31.0
NorflkSo 76.32 -.02 +23.4
NoestUt 40.70 -.26 +4.1
NorthropG 95.11 +.66 +40.7
Nucor 48.68 +.71 +12.8
NustarEn 38.29 -.40 -9.9
NvMAd 11.81 -.08 -22.4
OGE Egy s 34.99 -.34 +24.3
OcciPet 90.82 +1.16 +18.5
OfficeMax 11.52 +.03 +33.7
Olin 23.10 ... +7.0
ONEOK 51.43 -1.04 +20.3
PG&E Cp 41.04 -.37 +2.1
PPG 164.42 +.71 +21.5
PPL Corp 30.16 -.18 +5.3
PVR Ptrs 24.15 -.59 -7.0
PepBoy 12.30 +.26 +25.1
Pfizer 28.67 +.22 +14.3
PinWst 52.32 -.60 +2.6
PitnyBw 17.14 ... +61.1
Praxair 121.10 +1.17 +10.6
PSEG 32.04 -.27 +4.7
PulteGrp 16.59 +.30 -8.6
Questar 22.20 -.08 +12.3
RadioShk 3.99 +.10 +88.2
RLauren 163.90 +.86 +9.3
Raytheon 77.43 +.54 +34.5
ReynAmer 48.21 +.46 +16.4
RockwlAut 103.74 -.28 +23.5
Rowan 38.12 -.01 +21.9
RoyDShllB 68.39 +.86 -3.5
RoyDShllA 65.49 +.84 -5.0
Ryder 60.25 +1.44 +20.7
Safeway 26.60 ... +47.0
Schlmbrg 87.05 +.15 +25.6
Sherwin 176.61 +1.38 +14.8
SilvWhtn g 25.39 +.57 -29.6
SiriusXM 3.87 +.02 +33.9
SonyCp 21.42 -.30 +91.3
SouthnCo 41.02 -.39 -4.2
SwstAirl 13.85 -.05 +35.3
SpectraEn 33.13 -.26 +21.0
Sysco 32.51 +.28 +3.6
TECO 16.49 -.21 -1.6
Target 64.99 +.26 +9.8
TenetHlt rs 38.75 -.35 +19.3
Tenneco 50.81 +.24 +44.7
Tesoro 46.00 +.06 +4.4
Textron 29.38 -.10 +18.5
3M Co 118.71 +1.12 +27.9
TimeWarn 63.32 +.38 +32.4
Timken 62.30 -.22 +30.3
Titan Intl 16.05 +.05 -26.1
UnilevNV 38.21 -.25 -.2
UnionPac 157.25 ... +25.1
UPS B 88.75 +.68 +20.4
USSteel 20.46 +.44 -14.2
UtdTech 107.83 +1.57 +31.5
VarianMed 74.95 +1.33 +6.7
VectorGp 16.93 -.02 +13.9
ViacomB 82.05 +1.60 +55.6
WestarEn 30.23 -.15 +5.6
Weyerhsr 28.43 -.35 +2.2
Whrlpl 135.79 -1.17 +33.5
WmsCos 35.75 -.07 +9.2
Wynn 150.87 +1.63 +34.1
XcelEngy 27.64 -.08 +3.5
Xerox 10.29 +.07 +50.9
YumBrnds 72.21 +.68 +8.8
Mutual Funds
Alliance Bernstein
CoreOppA m 17.03 +.06 +21.8
GlblRskAllB m14.87 +.04 -3.1
American Cent
IncGroA m 32.78 +.01 +21.9
American Century
ValueInv 7.64 +.02 +21.2
American Funds
AMCAPA m 26.38 +.09 +24.3
BalA m 22.79 +.10 +12.7
BondA m 12.32 +.04 -3.4
CapIncBuA m56.32 +.21 +8.6
CpWldGrIA m42.19 +.18 +15.1
EurPacGrA m45.42 +.11 +10.2
FnInvA m 48.15 +.20 +18.7
GrthAmA m 41.72 +.18 +21.5
HiIncA m 11.18 +.01 +2.8
IncAmerA m 19.63 +.07 +10.6
InvCoAmA m 35.92 +.13 +20.1
MutualA m 33.05 +.10 +17.8
NewPerspA m36.10 +.10 +15.5
NwWrldA m 56.93 +.18 +4.5
SmCpWldA m47.99 -.01 +20.2
WAMutInvA m37.04 +.16 +19.9
Baron
Asset b 60.90 +.23 +24.6
BlackRock
EqDivI 22.47 +.11 +13.8
GlobAlcA m 21.28 +.05 +8.5
GlobAlcC m 19.77 +.04 +7.9
GlobAlcI 21.38 +.05 +8.6
CGM
Focus 36.95 +.18 +26.1
Mutual 31.89 +.14 +12.2
Realty 29.98 +.33 +2.7
Columbia
AcornZ 36.31 +.02 +20.8
DFA
EmMkCrEqI 19.28 +.07 -4.2
EmMktValI 28.18 +.11 -4.2
USLgValI 28.65 +.13 +26.5
DWS-Scudder
EnhEMFIS d 10.24 +.02 -8.2
HlthCareS d 34.74 +.11 +33.2
LAEqS d 29.74 -.05 -9.0
Davis
NYVentA m 39.43 +.22 +22.5
NYVentC m 37.82 +.22 +21.9
Dodge & Cox
Bal 91.45 +.35 +18.4
Income 13.43 +.02 -1.7
IntlStk 40.27 +.36 +16.3
Stock 152.31 +.76 +26.0
Dreyfus
TechGrA f 41.04 +.22 +19.0
Eaton Vance
HiIncOppA m 4.54 +.01 +4.0
HiIncOppB m 4.54 ... +3.2
NatlMuniA m 8.84 +.04 -11.0
NatlMuniB m 8.83 +.03 -11.5
PAMuniA m 8.60 +.01 -4.0
FPA
Cres d 32.14 +.08 +14.7
Fidelity
AstMgr20 13.31 +.02 +2.3
Bal 22.41 +.05 +11.9
BlChGrow 58.13 +.09 +25.4
Contra 92.50 +.39 +20.3
DivrIntl d 34.06 +.13 +13.8
ExpMulNat d 25.30 +.06 +15.6
Free2020 15.26 +.04 +7.3
Free2030 15.68 +.04 +10.4
GrowCo 117.77 +.12 +26.3
LatinAm d 39.58 +.12 -14.5
LowPriStk d 46.35 +.12 +23.2
Magellan 89.05 +.21 +22.1
Overseas d 37.20 +.17 +15.1
Puritan 21.53 +.05 +11.8
TotalBd 10.42 +.02 -3.0
Value 94.90 +.14 +24.3
Fidelity Advisor
ValStratT m 35.07 +.03 +19.2
Fidelity Select
Gold d 22.42 +.06 -39.4
Pharm d 18.46 +.07 +24.8
Fidelity Spartan
500IdxAdvtg 60.10 +.19 +20.2
500IdxInstl 60.11 +.20 +20.2
500IdxInv 60.10 +.20 +20.1
TotMktIdAg d 49.82 +.14 +21.2
First Eagle
GlbA m 53.46 +.16 +10.0
FrankTemp-Franklin
CA TF A m 6.79 +.01 -7.0
Income C m 2.34 ... +7.6
IncomeA m 2.32 ... +8.1
FrankTemp-Mutual
Discov Z 33.57 ... +17.8
Euro Z 24.89 +.02 +17.9
Shares Z 26.77 +.08 +19.6
FrankTemp-Templeton
GlBondA m 12.99 +.03 -0.6
GlBondAdv 12.95 +.03 -0.4
GrowthA m 23.29 +.13 +19.9
GMO
IntItVlIV 23.90 +.18 +15.1
Harbor
CapApInst 51.80 +.30 +21.8
IntlInstl 68.40 +.34 +10.1
INVESCO
ConstellB m 25.84 +.08 +21.8
GlobQuantvCoreA m13.68+.07 +20.2
PacGrowB m 21.51 -.07 +6.1
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
Combined Stocks
AFLAC 60.82 +.90 +14.5
AT&T Inc 33.97 ... +.8
AbtLab s 34.75 +.66 +10.9
AMD 3.82 -.05 +59.2
AlaskaAir 60.77 -.65 +41.0
Alcoa 8.19 +.14 -5.6
Allstate 50.11 +.67 +24.7
Altria 35.41 +.43 +12.6
AEP 42.21 -.68 -1.1
AmExp 75.18 +.58 +31.3
AmIntlGrp 49.75 +.33 +40.9
Amgen 111.97 +.81 +29.9
Anadarko 94.67 +1.27 +27.4
Annaly 11.74 +.26 -16.4
Apple Inc 467.71-26.93 -12.1
AutoData 74.01 +.71 +30.0
AveryD 44.78 +.03 +28.2
Avnet 41.30 -.36 +34.9
Avon 20.65 +.15 +43.8
BP PLC 42.29 +.27 +1.6
BakrHu 50.14 -.08 +22.7
BallardPw 1.60 +.02+161.9
BarnesNob 13.81 +.03 -8.5
Baxter 72.24 +.81 +8.4
Beam Inc 65.27 +.31 +6.8
BerkH B 114.28 +.69 +27.4
BlockHR 27.09 -.15 +45.9
Boeing 109.23 +1.06 +44.9
BrMySq 43.26 +.74 +34.2
Brunswick 39.00 -.66 +34.1
Buckeye 66.39 -.38 +46.2
CBS B 54.53 +.48 +43.3
CMS Eng 25.99 -.12 +6.6
CSX 26.17 +.11 +32.6
CampSp 41.47 +.23 +18.9
Carnival 37.41 +.22 +1.7
Caterpillar 87.13 +.52 -2.8
CenterPnt 22.86 -.25 +18.8
CntryLink 32.59 -.03 -16.7
Chevron 123.92 +.91 +14.6
Cisco 24.38 +.22 +24.1
Citigroup 50.73 -.36 +28.2
Clorox 83.82 +.24 +14.5
ColgPalm s 59.25 +.66 +13.4
ConAgra 31.89 +.35 +8.1
ConocoPhil 69.16 +.50 +19.3
ConEd 55.00 -.90 -1.0
Corning 14.89 +.03 +18.0
CrownHold 44.20 -.26 +20.1
Cummins 132.34 +.59 +22.1
DTE 66.86 +.15 +11.3
Deere 84.31 +.13 -2.4
Diebold 29.52 +.09 -3.6
Disney 63.94 +1.11 +28.4
DomRescs 58.61 +.20 +13.1
Dover 89.44 -.10 +36.1
DowChm 39.85 -.13 +23.3
DryShips 3.03 +.07 +89.4
DuPont 58.83 +.79 +30.8
DukeEngy 65.31 -.64 +2.4
EMC Cp 26.99 +.02 +6.7
Eaton 68.00 +.12 +25.5
EdisonInt 44.84 -.79 -.8
EmersonEl 63.59 -.07 +20.1
EnbrdgEPt 29.83 +.31 +6.9
Energen 69.44 -.09 +54.0
Entergy 62.87 -.40 -1.4
EntPrPt 59.16 -.80 +18.1
Ericsson 13.65 +.26 +35.1
Exelon 30.12 -.61 +1.3
ExxonMbl 88.84 +1.02 +2.6
FMC Corp 70.34 +1.06 +20.2
Fastenal 50.25 -.01 +7.7
FedExCp 110.25 -.34 +20.2
Fifth&Pac 24.94 -.03+100.3
FirstEngy 37.49 -.38 -10.2
Fonar 5.50 +.02 +27.0
FootLockr 33.50 +.19 +4.3
FordM 17.54 -.01 +35.4
Gannett 25.31 -.09 +40.5
Gap 41.48 +.14 +33.6
GenCorp 15.66 +.02 +71.1
GenDynam 86.90 +.16 +25.5
GenElec 24.09 +.22 +14.8
GenMills 48.80 +.09 +20.7
GileadSci s 62.93 +.07 +71.4
GlaxoSKln 51.31 +.89 +18.0
Hallibrtn 50.19 -.13 +44.7
HarleyD 63.35 -.17 +29.7
HarrisCorp 58.31 +.24 +19.1
HartfdFn 31.91 +.16 +42.2
HawaiiEl 24.73 -.28 -1.6
HeclaM 3.31 +.06 -43.2
Heico 64.49 +.12 +44.1
Hess 78.10 +.31 +47.5
HewlettP 22.27 ... +56.3
HomeDp 75.04 +.44 +21.3
HonwllIntl 84.03 -.10 +32.4
Hormel 42.79 +.35 +37.1
Humana 97.97 +.88 +42.8
INTL FCSt 20.29 +.13 +16.5
ITT Corp 35.06 -.40 +49.4
ITW 74.32 -.11 +22.2
IngerRd 63.87 -.73 +33.2
IBM 190.70 +4.10 -.4
Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD
Stocks of Local Interest
111.00 76.78 AirProd APD 2.84 106.28 +.08 +26.5
43.72 35.50 AmWtrWks AWK 1.12 39.54 -.41 +6.5
50.45 37.63 Amerigas APU 3.36 42.56 +.34 +9.9
28.12 19.25 AquaAm s WTR .61 24.39 -.15 +19.9
38.81 24.38 ArchDan ADM .76 36.13 +.05 +31.9
452.19 341.98 AutoZone AZO ... 420.83 +.91 +18.7
15.03 8.53 BkofAm BAC .04 14.65 +.04 +26.2
32.36 22.42 BkNYMel BK .60 31.23 -.05 +21.5
22.68 9.34 BonTon BONT .20 11.82 +.08 -2.8
62.36 44.33 CVS Care CVS .90 59.60 +.38 +23.3
81.75 45.80 Cigna CI .04 82.30 +.61 +53.9
43.43 35.58 CocaCola KO 1.12 38.78 +.15 +7.0
46.33 34.03 Comcast CMCSA .78 43.80 +.96 +17.2
34.85 25.50 CmtyBkSy CBU 1.12 33.91 -.07 +23.9
51.29 26.33 CmtyHlt CYH .25 38.77 -.26 +26.1
68.00 40.06 CoreMark CORE .76 65.67 -.38 +38.7
63.83 47.10 EmersonEl EMR 1.64 63.59 -.07 +20.1
68.39 41.72 EngyTEq ETE 2.62 63.24 -.80 +39.1
11.00 5.98 Entercom ETM ... 8.53 +.04 +22.2
15.75 11.14 FairchldS FCS ... 13.63 +.33 -5.3
5.15 3.71 FrontierCm FTR .40 4.35 +.03 +1.6
21.30 15.09 Genpact G .18 19.63 +.16 +26.6
10.12 5.14 HarteHnk HHS .34 8.50 +.05 +44.1
98.00 68.09 Hershey HSY 1.94 91.62 +.13 +26.9
47.51 28.09 Lowes LOW .72 47.37 +.22 +33.4
119.54 89.35 M&T Bk MTB 2.80 112.65 -.50 +14.4
103.70 83.31 McDnlds MCD 3.08 97.46 +.57 +10.5
32.91 24.50 Mondelez MDLZ .56 31.29 +.25 +22.9
23.25 18.92 NBT Bcp NBTB .80 21.91 -.02 +8.1
39.75 8.99 NexstarB NXST .48 35.23 -.06 +232.7
77.93 53.36 PNC PNC 1.76 73.56 -.09 +26.2
33.55 27.74 PPL Corp PPL 1.47 30.16 -.18 +5.3
22.54 13.25 PennaRE PEI .72 18.03 +.02 +2.2
87.06 67.39 PepsiCo PEP 2.27 79.85 +.42 +16.7
96.73 82.10 PhilipMor PM 3.76 86.56 +2.33 +3.5
82.54 65.83 ProctGam PG 2.41 78.27 +.32 +15.3
83.67 48.17 Prudentl PRU 1.60 80.23 -.37 +50.4
3.70 .95 RiteAid RAD ... 3.66 -.02 +169.1
26.17 15.56 SLM Cp SLM .60 24.94 +.18 +45.6
74.46 46.87 SLM pfB SLMBP 2.07 70.50 ... +33.0
54.66 40.08 TJX TJX .58 54.57 +.65 +28.6
43.24 30.15 UGI Corp UGI 1.13 38.72 -.13 +18.4
54.31 40.51 VerizonCm VZ 2.12 46.52 +.05 +7.5
79.96 67.37 WalMart WMT 1.88 74.05 +.09 +8.5
51.92 37.65 WeisMk WMK 1.20 48.55 -.04 +23.9
44.79 31.25 WellsFargo WFC 1.20 42.50 +.05 +24.3
USD per British Pound 1.5823 +.0092 +.58% 1.4929 1.6070
Canadian Dollar 1.0320 -.0029 -.28% 1.0264 .9733
USD per Euro 1.3310 +.0043 +.32% 1.3038 1.2860
Japanese Yen 99.94 -.42 -.42% 96.27 77.78
Mexican Peso 13.0655 -.0415 -.32% 12.5250 13.0008
6MO. 1YR.
CURRENCY CLOSE PVS. %CH. AGO AGO
Copper 3.26 3.26 -0.15 -6.96 -12.22
Gold 1363.90 1364.10 -0.01 -13.56 -21.19
Platinum 1473.50 1474.10 -0.04 -7.98 -10.68
Silver 23.12 22.97 +0.67 -19.75 -30.43
Palladium 689.60 691.05 -0.21 -11.26 +1.59
Foreign Exchange & Metals
JPMorgan
CoreBondSelect11.50+.02 -3.0
John Hancock
LifBa1 b 14.79 +.05 +9.8
LifGr1 b 15.38 +.05 +14.2
RegBankA m 17.71 -.08 +24.7
SovInvA m 18.36 +.09 +15.2
TaxFBdA m 9.45 +.02 -7.3
Lazard
EmgMkEqtI d 18.92 +.06 -3.2
Loomis Sayles
BdInstl 14.95 +.03 +2.0
Lord Abbett
ShDurIncA m 4.54 ... +0.2
MFS
MAInvA m 25.65 +.09 +19.6
MAInvC m 24.70 +.08 +19.0
ValueI 31.11 +.19 +23.3
Merger
Merger b 16.14 +.01 +2.0
Metropolitan West
TotRetBdI 10.47 +.02 -1.7
Mutual Series
Beacon Z 15.90 +.05 +20.1
Neuberger Berman
SmCpGrInv 25.35 -.02 +31.9
Oakmark
EqIncI 32.96 +.10 +15.6
Intl I 25.67 +.16 +22.6
Oppenheimer
CapApB m 49.02 +.08 +15.8
DevMktA m 36.58 +.19 +3.7
DevMktY 36.23 +.19 +3.9
PIMCO
AllAssetI 12.12 +.05 -2.1
AllAuthIn 10.17 +.04 -6.7
ComRlRStI 5.70 +.03 -13.2
HiYldIs 9.43 +.01 +2.0
LowDrIs 10.21 +.02 -1.5
TotRetA m 10.62 +.03 -4.1
TotRetAdm b 10.62 +.03 -4.0
TotRetIs 10.62 +.03 -3.8
TotRetrnD b 10.62 +.03 -4.0
Permanent
Portfolio 47.63 +.14 -2.1
Principal
SAMConGrB m16.29+.04 +13.1
Prudential
JenMCGrA m 36.91 +.14 +18.2
Prudential Investmen
2020FocA m 18.92 +.11 +22.2
BlendA m 22.63 +.08 +22.7
EqOppA m 19.69 +.05 +24.1
HiYieldA m 5.61 +.01 +2.7
IntlEqtyA m 7.04 +.04 +12.1
IntlValA m 22.22 +.07 +11.5
JennGrA m 25.36 +.15 +21.5
NaturResA m 49.06 +.46 +8.8
SmallCoA m 27.46 +.03 +22.5
UtilityA m 13.37 -.06 +14.6
ValueA m 19.50 +.07 +24.9
Putnam
GrowIncB m 17.95 ... +23.2
IncomeA m 7.06 +.02 -0.7
Royce
LowStkSer m 15.16 ... +9.5
OpportInv d 15.33 +.01 +28.3
ValPlSvc m 16.79 -.01 +21.4
Schwab
S&P500Sel d 26.65 +.08 +20.1
Scout
Interntl 35.47 +.08 +7.4
T Rowe Price
BlChpGr 56.63 +.37 +24.1
CapApprec 25.60 +.07 +15.1
DivGrow 31.20 +.13 +19.3
DivrSmCap d 22.61 -.03 +29.6
EmMktStk d 32.00 +.06 -6.0
EqIndex d 45.68 +.15 +20.0
EqtyInc 31.42 +.06 +19.8
FinSer 18.67 +.04 +25.0
GrowStk 46.41 +.28 +22.8
HealthSci 56.80 -.07 +37.8
HiYield d 6.97 ... +4.2
IntlDisc d 52.33 +.09 +13.5
IntlStk d 15.52 +.02 +7.8
IntlStkAd m 15.44 +.02 +7.6
LatinAm d 33.07 -.05 -13.1
MediaTele 66.82 +.45 +25.4
MidCpGr 71.42 +.23 +26.5
NewAmGro 43.81 +.23 +22.0
NewAsia d 16.12 +.03 -4.1
NewEra 46.10 +.20 +10.0
NewHoriz 44.88 -.09 +35.3
NewIncome 9.29 +.02 -3.9
Rtmt2020 19.78 +.05 +10.6
Rtmt2030 21.57 +.06 +14.0
ShTmBond 4.78 +.01 -0.4
SmCpVal d 46.53 +.06 +18.8
TaxFHiYld d 10.68 +.01 -7.7
Value 32.93 +.05 +24.8
ValueAd b 32.55 +.05 +24.6
Thornburg
IntlValI 30.54 +.07 +9.8
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 26.49 +.08 +14.0
Vanguard
500Adml 156.36 +.50 +20.2
500Inv 156.33 +.50 +20.1
CapOp 44.41 +.05 +32.1
CapVal 14.60 +.02 +31.7
Convrt 14.29 +.02 +14.0
DevMktIdx 11.09 +.05 +13.7
DivGr 19.86 +.14 +20.5
EnergyInv 66.50 +.51 +12.6
EurIdxAdm 67.41 +.51 +14.1
Explr 103.70 +.13 +30.5
GNMA 10.36 +.04 -3.5
GNMAAdml 10.36 +.04 -3.5
GlbEq 21.80 +.09 +16.8
GrowthEq 14.86 +.07 +21.0
HYCor 5.89 ... +0.3
HYCorAdml 5.89 ... +0.4
HltCrAdml 76.21 +.46 +29.3
HlthCare 180.60+1.10 +29.2
ITGradeAd 9.64 +.02 -3.7
InfPrtAdm 25.84 +.15 -9.0
InflaPro 13.16 +.08 -9.0
InstIdxI 155.33 +.49 +20.2
InstPlus 155.35 +.50 +20.2
InstTStPl 38.82 +.11 +21.4
IntlExpIn 17.50 +.07 +19.0
IntlGrAdm 69.52 +.40 +13.4
IntlStkIdxAdm 26.80 +.11 +8.7
IntlStkIdxIPls 107.21 +.47 +8.7
LTInvGr 9.49 +.05 -9.3
MidCapGr 25.09 +.02 +23.2
MidCp 27.88 +.07 +24.1
MidCpAdml 126.63 +.35 +24.2
MidCpIst 27.97 +.07 +24.2
MuIntAdml 13.52 +.01 -3.9
MuLtdAdml 10.96 +.01 -0.5
PrecMtls 11.44 +.03 -28.2
Prmcp 87.46 +.44 +25.9
PrmcpAdml 90.77 +.46 +25.9
PrmcpCorI 18.65 +.07 +24.9
REITIdx 22.12 +.15 +2.9
REITIdxAd 94.40 +.65 +3.0
STCor 10.64 +.01 -0.4
STGradeAd 10.64 +.01 -0.3
SelValu 26.96 +.10 +28.5
SmGthIdx 31.77 +.03 +26.9
SmGthIst 31.85 +.03 +27.1
StSmCpEq 27.33 -.01 +25.9
Star 22.81 +.09 +10.4
StratgcEq 26.92 +.02 +25.5
TgtRe2015 14.38 +.04 +7.5
TgtRe2020 26.06 +.07 +9.4
TgtRe2030 26.31 +.08 +12.5
TgtRe2035 16.08 +.05 +14.1
TgtRe2040 26.69 +.09 +15.1
TgtRe2045 16.75 +.05 +15.1
Tgtet2025 15.08 +.05 +11.0
TotBdAdml 10.52 +.03 -3.4
TotBdInst 10.52 +.03 -3.4
TotBdMkSig 10.52 +.03 -3.4
TotIntl 16.02 +.07 +8.6
TotStIAdm 42.84 +.13 +21.3
TotStIIns 42.84 +.12 +21.3
TotStISig 41.34 +.12 +21.3
TotStIdx 42.82 +.13 +21.2
TxMIntlAdm 12.58 +.05 +13.9
TxMSCAdm 39.23 +.03 +25.9
USGro 25.71 +.09 +20.9
USValue 14.50 +.03 +22.3
WellsI 24.78 +.10 +4.3
WellsIAdm 60.03 +.22 +4.4
Welltn 37.53 +.15 +12.3
WelltnAdm 64.82 +.26 +12.3
WndsIIAdm 62.13 +.24 +20.5
WndsrII 35.01 +.14 +20.4
Wells Fargo
DvrCpBldA f 7.90 +.03 +13.6
DOW
15,326.60
+135.54
NASDAQ
3,725.01
-4.01
S&P 500
1,689.13
+5.14
RUSSELL 2000
1,055.34
-.38
6-MO T-BILLS
.04%
...
10-YR T-NOTE
2.91%
-.06
CRUDE OIL
$107.56
+.17
p p n n p p q q
q q q q p p q q
NATURAL GAS
$3.57
-.01
6MO. 1YR.
METALS CLOSE PVS. %CH. AGO AGO
PAGE 8B Thursday, September 12, 2013 www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
BUSINESS
IN BRIEF
KEN SWEET
AP Markets Writer
NEW YORK Verizon
raised $49 billion on
Wednesday in the largest cor-
porate bond deal ever.
The sale dwarfs the pre-
vious record, Apples sale
of $17 billion in bonds in
April, and proceeds from the
sale on Wednesday will help
Verizon buy the rest of its
U.S. wireless business from
partner Vodafone.
That $130 billion buyout of
Vodafone is expected to rank
as the second-largest deal
when completed. Along with
the money from its bond sale,
Verizon will use cash and
stock to pay for the buyout.
Verizons bond sale was
huge in every way: The
offering is nearly triple
Apples sale. The debt will
come due at eight different
times, from three to 30 years.
Demand for the debt was
high, a sign that investors
are still interested in buying
higher-yielding bonds.
Despite the demand,
Verizon did have to pay a
hefty price to investors.
It priced $11 billion of its
10-year notes at a yield of
5.19 percent, according to
a deal document obtained
by The Associated Press.
That is well above the 4.51
percent yield for similar
bonds Verizon had issued
previously. Apple, a compa-
ny with near-pristine credit
and $147 billion in cash, is
paying investors who own its
10-year bonds a yield of 3.86
percent.
Verizon likely decided to
pay higher interest rates
because it needed to wrap up
its $130 billion buyout quick-
ly, bond investors said.
(The buyout) is a big
strategic deal for them and
they needed the money,
said Michael Collins, chief
investment ofcer of
Prudential Fixed Income,
who bought Verizon bonds
as part of Wednesdays sale.
Verizons massive bond
sale comes at a critical time
for bond investors. In June,
Federal Reserve Chairman
Ben Bernanke said the
central bank was consid-
ering pulling back on its
bond-buying program, which
has kept interest rates at
historic lows in an effort to
stimulate the economy.
As a result, the yield of the
U.S. 10-year Treasury note,
the benchmark for all bonds
public and private, is at 2.96
percent, almost double the
1.63 percent yield from early
May.
Verizons bond sale biggest in history
BMW CEO Norbert Reithofer gets out of the BMW i8 plug-in hybrid sports car during its world premiere
this week at the 65th Frankfurt Auto Show in Frankfurt, Germany.
AP photo
ANICKJESDANUN
APTechnology Writer
CUPERTINO, Calif. Its
still ofcially summer, yet
major electronic companies
have already announced a slew
of holiday gift ideas: iPhones
of different colors, video game
players and a new category
of wristwatches designed to
mimic the functionality of
smartphones.
Much of the early attention
has been on smartwatches.
Although the devices have been
around for years, consumer
interest has been low. Samsung
Electronics Co. is hoping to
change that with its $300
Galaxy Gear. When its linked
wirelessly with newer Samsung
phones and tablets, the Gear
lets you set alarm clocks, check
email and Facebook updates,
and make phone calls on your
wrist, secret agent-style. The
watch will be available in a few
weeks in six colors.
That doesnt mean compa-
nies have given up on phones
and tablets, or other gadgets.
Heres a look at whats in
store.
PHONES
The iOS software that runs
iPhones is showing signs of
aging, so Apple is refresh-
ing its look and functionality.
Recent phones can get the
iOS 7 update for free, starting
Wednesday. The software also
comes with the new iPhones
going on sale on Sept. 20.
Apple is departing from its
practice of keeping choices
simple. In the past, Apple
released one iPhone a year, in
black or white. This time, the
company has a regular model,
the iPhone 5S (selling for $199
with a two-year service agree-
ment) and a less expensive
model, the iPhone 5C (which
goes for $99). The 5S comes in
three colors and the 5C in ve.
Samsung, meanwhile,
announced the Galaxy Note 3,
the latest phone in a line that
comes with a stylus for hand-
writing on its large, 5.7-inch
(measured on the diagonal)
touch screen. Sony will have
the Xperia Z1, notable for its
high-resolution, 20.7-mega-
pixel camera and the ability
to attach better lenses. Both
devices use Googles Android
operating system.
TABLETS
Tablets with screens that
measure about 7 inches diago-
nally are becoming popular
because theyre cheaper than
full-sized tablets and are easier
to carry around.
Google updated its Nexus
7 in July, offering the basic
model for $229. Amazon and
Apple will likely update their
devices, too. Meanwhile, sev-
eral companies are expected to
release smaller tablets running
Microsoft Corp.s Windows
8.1 operating system when the
software update comes out on
Oct. 17.
GAME MACHINES
Many people have shifted
to smartphones and tablets to
play games, but hard-core gam-
ers still like standalone video
game consoles.
Microsofts Xbox One wants
to be the all-in-one device that
lets you watch television, play
movies, listen to music and
browse the Internet as well
as play video games. It will
start selling on Nov. 22 and cost
$499. A Kinect motion-control
system will be included.
Sonys PlayStation 4 is com-
ing out Nov. 15 for $399. Its
touted as a supercharged PC,
which should make it easier for
developers to create games for
it.
Gadget makers
tout holiday gifs
DAVID McHUGH
AP Business Writer
FRANKFURT, Germany
Judging by the slew of
electric and hybrid vehi-
cles being rolled out at the
Frankfurt Auto Show, it
might seem carmakers are
tapping a large and eager
market.
But in fact almost no one
buys such cars yet.
More and more automak-
ers are coming out with elec-
tric versions of existing vehi-
cles such as Volkswagens
all-electric versions of its Up!
city car and Golf compact
or ones they have designed
as electrics from the ground
up, like small BMWs electric
city car i3.
Analyst Christoph
Stuermer at IHS automotive
called Frankfurt the rst
full-throttle electric propul-
sion show thats about get-
ting electric drive cars out
of the eco-nerd, tree-hugger
segment and into the cool
group.
To whet appetites, auto-
makers are making high-per-
formance, luxury versions
that give up little or nothing
in performance to conven-
tional models. BMWs i8
goes 0-62 mph in a speedy
4.5 seconds. Audis Quattro
sport concept meaning
its for demonstration, not
for sale is an aggressive
looking sports car with large
air intakes anking the grille
and a whopping 700 horse-
power from its hybrid drive.
The company says it can
reach 190 mph.
The Mercedes S-Class
plug-in hybrid version, mean-
while, has a powerful six-
cylinder internal combustion
engine plus an all-electric
range of about 20 miles. This
way, owners could commute
all-electric during the week,
recharging overnight but
use the gasoline engine on
a family vacation. The com-
pany says mileage is 78 miles
per gallon.
All this, to cater to a mar-
ket that doesnt really exist
in mass terms. Only 0.2 per-
cent of all cars registered in
Europe are hybrids, which
combine batteries with inter-
nal combustion engines, or
electrics, according to the
ACEA European automakers
association. In the United
States, the Toyota Prius
hybrid has broken into the
top 10 selling passenger cars.
However, electric vehicles
have struggled to increase
sales numbers because of
high prices and so-called
range anxiety: buyers fear of
running out of power.
Analysts and executives
say there are several solid
reasons to make and pro-
mote such cars now. They
can help lower average eet
emissions to meet govern-
ment requirements in
Europe, offsetting increasing
sales of conventionally pow-
ered SUVs. And automak-
ers want to be ready in case
governments perhaps in
heavily polluted China
push people into emission-
free vehicles.
Automakers gaga over alt-fuel cars
$3.61 $3.56 $3.89
$4.06
on 7/17/08
LIFE
www.timesleader.com Thursday, September 12, 2013 PAGE 1C THE TIMES LEADER
FORT WORTH, Texas
Carson Huey-You wears his pur-
ple TCU Pride T-shirt with the
same ease that he wears a grin.
Carson started college last
month, one of the 1,935 rst-year
students tallied on the rst day of
classes at TCU.
Like many college freshmen,
Carson entered his new sur-
roundings hoping to get good
grades and make new friends. He
also emphasized that he doesnt
want to get lost on the TCU cam-
pus.
Unlike most college freshmen,
Carson is 11.
I am studying physics, he
said. Thats my major.
Specically, he wants to be a
quantum physicist, but rst he
has to get through a rst semes-
ter complete with calculus, phys-
ics, history and religion. (Thats a
typical course load for students
majoring in physics at TCU.)
Classes got off to a good start,
he said. Still, he got some atten-
tion when he walked into his
classes.
People denitely noticed,
Carson said. There was denite-
ly some whispering in the back of
the class.
The youngest student attend-
ing TCU, Carson shrugs off the
attention with a smile. He said
hes used to it. He was 5 in the
eighth grade. He graduated in
May from the Accommodated
Learning Academy in Grapevine,
Texas, where he was co-valedicto-
rian at age 10.
It was actually fun graduat-
ing, he said.
Carson was reading chap-
ter books by age 2, his mother,
Claretta Huey-You, said. Numbers
and math simply came easy for
him, she said. And he speaks
Mandarin Chinese.
Carson has been starting his
college days at 6:30 a.m. in his
Southlake, Texas, home where
his mother helps him and young-
er brother, Cannan, 7, get ready
each morning.
Cannan also has an afnity
for math and science and is test-
ing at an eighth-grade level even
though he is in the second grade
in Southlake, Huey-You said.
After dropping Cannan off at
school, Huey-You drives Carson
tothe TCUcampus andhelps him
get around campus. The 4-foot-7,
75-pound tween often nds that
his backpack is too heavy for him
to carry far.
It weighs more than he does,
Huey-You said.
Mother and son spent many
hours trying to gure out which
college Carson should attend.
They considered several, but
decided TCU was a good t with
a strong physics program. The
school also gave Carson a scholar-
ship and a nancial aid package.
C. Magnus L. Rittby, senior
associate dean for administra-
tion and graduate programs
in the College of Science &
Engineering, said the school
put together a group Team
Carson, if you will of faculty
and representatives from other
areas of campus life to work
out any issues related to having
Carson on campus.
Rittby said one issue was mak-
ing sure Carson would t and
be comfortable in school labs.
He was also connected with the
undergraduate chemistry club,
which met for the rst time this
week.
Rittby, Carsons academic
adviser, wrote to his professors
to let themknowa young student
would be entering their class-
rooms.
We are trying to help make a
good place for him here, Rittby
said.
Before Carson, TCUs young-
est student was piano prodigy
Sam Hong, who entered at 12 in
2006 and graduated in 2011 with
a bachelors degree in piano per-
formance.
As it happens, Carson has been
playing the piano for about 2-plus
years, he said. He taught himself
at rst.
Id actually heard about the
piano and math, he said. They
can relate and coincide with each
other.
Carson has time to just be a
kid. He is a Star Wars fan, with
Episodes 3, 5 and 6 ranking high
as favorites. He likes to play a
video game called Mine Craft
in which he builds things using
only cubes.
What about the other interests
of a typical 11-year-old?
Im not really an athletic kind
of guy other than checkers and
chess, he said with a grin.
One very tall TCU football
player jokingly promised that if
Carson tackled him, he would
land an automatic spot on the
football team.
Word is spreading across cam-
pus about the 11-year-old physics
major.
I was shocked when I rst
heard it, said KeArrius Brunson,
an 18-year-old freshman from
Dallas. Brunson said he expects
Carson will be treated just like
any other student.
We are all Frogs onthe inside,
Brunson said.
DIANE SMITH
Fort Worth Star-Telegram
wftv.com
Carson Huey-You is the youngest student ever to attend Texas Christian
University.
We are all Frogs on the inside.
KeArrius Brunson,
18-year-old TCU freshman from Dallas, who expects Carson Huey-You
will be treated just like any other student.
This physics major at Texas Christian University is all of 11
Teen moms
look for love,
fnd struggle
AKRON, Ohio The sweet-faced girls
sat around a conference table munching on
Chicken McNuggets and fries. They could
have been with friends hanging out at a shop-
ping malls food court or eating lunch in a
school cafeteria. Instead, they had gathered
to talk about sippy cups, their boyfriends and
what it was like to have a child.
The number of teenage girls having babies
has come down in recent years, but theres still
a staggering number who, instead of going to
a school dance, are stuck at home changing
diapers and breast feeding. In fact, the teenage
birth rate in the United States continues to be
higher than that of other developed countries.
This group, facilitated by researcher Alice
Rodgers of Rodgers Marketing Research, dis-
cussed what its like to be a child with a
child.
They were granted anonymity to allow for
an open conversation about personal experi-
ences and feelings.
Since he came to me at the age of 14, I
was happy because Id always have somebody
that would always love me, said a 19-year-old
about her son. No matter what. Somebody
who will always be by my side, who will
always love me who wont walk out of my life
or nothing like that.
Karen Freeman, director of the Teen Moms
program at First Glance Student Center in
Akron, Ohio, doesnt think the girls intention-
ally try to get pregnant. Instead, they like the
attention they get from boys.
The boys know the right things to say and
promise them the right things where they
KIM HONE-MCMAHAN
Akron Beacon Journal
Akron Beacon Journal
Tyreon Blair bites into his birthday cake during a
meeting of First Glance at the Teen Moms Club new
facility in Akron, Ohio.
See MOMS | 2C
MCT Photos
Marty Anderson, front, and others mediate at the start of a yoga class in Robbinsdale, Minn.
Meditation has gone mainstream
MINNEAPOLIS
When the Rev. Ron Moor
began meditating 30 years
ago, he did so in secret.
When I started, medi-
tation was a dirty word,
said Moor, pastor of
Spirit United Church in
Minneapolis. (Evangelist)
Jimmy Swaggart called
it the work of the devil.
Because of its basis in
Eastern religions, fun-
damentalists considered
it satanic. Now those
same fundamentalists are
embracing it. And every
class I teach includes at
least a brief meditation.
The faith community isnt
alone in changing its atti-
tude. Businesses, schools
and hospitals not only have
become more accepting of
meditation, but many offer
classes on it. Meditating
has gone mainstream.
Why? Because it works,
Moor said.
Adherents have been say-
ing that for centuries, of
course, but now theres a
difference: Scientists can
prove it.
Propelled by technologi-
cal breakthroughs in neuro-
science enabling research-
ers to monitor brain activ-
ity, the medical community
is awash in studies showing
that meditating has bene-
cial physical effects on the
brain. Those studies are
being joined by others dem-
onstrating that advantages
include everything from
raising the effectiveness
of u vaccines to lowering
rejection rates for organ
transplants.
Meditation has become
a huge topic in medi-
cal circles, said Dr. Selma
Sroka, medical director
of the Hennepin County
Medical Center Alternative
Medicine Clinic. The
health benets are so
strong that if nothing else,
people should learn the
relaxation techniques.
The practice is being
embraced by an audience
that isnt interested in its
religious contexts, typi-
cally Buddhist or Hindu,
but is fascinated by its
mechanics and techniques.
Sroka compared the Wests
co-opting of meditation to
what happened to yoga,
which came to this country
as a spiritual discipline and
has morphed into a form of
physical tness.
Some would-be medita-
tors opt simply to ignore
the religious element, said
Mark Nunberg, co-found-
er of Common Ground
Meditation Center in
Minneapolis. Although his
center is a Buddhist orga-
nization, at least half the
people who enroll in class-
es are there just for instruc-
tion in meditation, he said.
Its the same practice
whether it involves reli-
gion or not, he said. Its
training the mind to be in
the present moment in a
relaxed way. Its the most
practical thing in the world;
some might even say its
just common sense.
Whats in a name?
You dont have to call it
meditation. In fact, Sroka
said, a lot of people would
prefer that you dont.
Terms such as mindful-
ness stress reduction and
relaxation response are
less threatening to some
folks. They also make it
easier to introduce the
practice in ofces and
schools, where even a tan-
gential reference to religion
can raise red ags.
Since 2001, doctors
doing their residencies in
the alternative-medicine
clinics family medicine pro-
gram have been required to
take a class in meditation,
not necessarily to pass on
the information to their
patients though they are
encouraged to do so, Sroka
said so much as to help
them deal with the stress of
their jobs. At rst, the pro-
gram ran into resistance.
Then the hospital quit call-
ing it meditation.
I think a lot of it is in
the language, she said.
Because of meditations
association with Eastern
religions, members of
other religions often are
uncomfortable with the
term. People want to know
that Im not selling them a
religion.
Medical community awash
in studies proving benefts
of relaxation techniques
JEFF STRICKLER
Star Tribune
See MEDITATION | 2C
O
COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE SOLUTIONS
FROM1,000 SF TO 1 MILLION SF.
PAGE 2C Thursday, September 12, 2013 LIFE www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
Meditation
From page 1C
Moms
From page 1C
give it up (have sex) and
end up pregnant, she said.
And once they get preg-
nant, Freeman added, the
girls fantasize that their
babys father will stick
around.
The ultimate thing is
that the boys make them
feel like they are loved,
Freeman said.
I think thats called men-
tal abuse because they sit
there and tell you what you
want to hear and theyre like
messing with your mind
one of the teenagers said.
With the exception of
the 19-year-old, all of the
girls around the table at the
University of Akron were
single.
They grumbled about
how their baby daddies
often denied fatherhood,
and they referred to guys
who just want to get into
girls pants as dogs.
Some maintained that
their childs father neglected
to divulge that they already
had babies with other
women. One of the teen
moms, for instance, gave
birth to an infant whose
father had four children by
the time he was 18. I dont
get along with my baby
dad, one of the girls said,
probably because he has so
many kids.
And at least a couple
often showed great immatu-
rity by ip-opping on feel-
ings about the father.
My baby daddy, hes a
very caring person. I plan
on marrying him in about
three years, and we kind of
set a date. Its December
of 2015, said a talkative
14-year-old who maintained
that her boyfriend planned
on playing basketball with
an NBA team someday.
But Im not sure exactly
how its going to work out.
He does have two kids. He
has my son and another.
And he does a lot for his
other son. Our relationship
isnt so strong because he
has another son.
Freeman joked that she
needs a chart to follow the
girls often immature love-
hate relationships.
They will cuss them out
one side and the other
and the next thing theyre
writing on Facebook that
they love their boys, she
said.
Despite all the drama,
Freeman added, all the girls
dreamof a loving home with
a white picket fence.
Still, during the two-hour
discussion, it became clear
that the girls were anything
but all sugar and spice.
When the discussion veered
toward what they would
have done, or would do, if
they caught their boyfriends
in the arms of another
woman, most didnt mince
words.
He knows I would have
shot his (penis) off, boast-
ed one of the teens.
Another said she told
her babys father that she
planned to carve her name
into his neck.
So if he tried to sleep
with another woman, they
would know that he was
owned, she said, with a
chuckle.
After a baby is born, its
common for some families
with whom Freeman is
familiar to get into a public
debate when things go awry.
During a recent visit with
Freeman, whose ofce is
decorated with pictures of
some of the girls babies, she
turned to her laptop com-
puter and noted the heated,
often vulgar, public argu-
ment taking place between
the families of a young
mother and her boyfriend
on Facebook.
Its been ingrained in
these girls that they dont
give up their baby unless
it is to family, Freeman
said.
Because?
Its blood, she added.
You play, you pay. Thats
just the consequence of the
lifestyle theyve been living,
and if they have a kid thats
just what happens.
Kathy Royer, clinical
nurse psychiatrist with 4
Kid Help Center for Child
& Adolescent Psychiatry in
North Canton, Ohio, used
to work with teens in a fam-
ily planning clinic.
Its a generational cycle,
she said. Too many girls
start having sex young
because they wanted to
know what it was like. Sex
is just something they do.
Its like breathing or eating a
hamburger.
Indeed, one of the girls
in the Beacons focus group
was 14 born to a mother
who was also pregnant with
her at age 14 a grand-
mother before she turned
30.
Still, not all of the girls
followed in their parents
footsteps.
I got pregnant my senior
year. For me, I gave up. I felt
like once my mom told me,
Oh, youre disgusting, youll
never be anything, youve
ruined your life, I stopped
trying for school, said the
adopted teen. I mean I still
graduated with a 3.6, but I
didnt try to get in any major
colleges, no scholarships.
They had so many high
expectations. I was always
on top did everything
right, sports and my grades
and everything else. And
once that (pregnancy) hap-
pened, my whole family
stopped talking to me.
Some 41 percent of
todays births are to single
women. Fifty years ago, it
was ve percent, reports the
Pew Research Center.
We have such a cultural
acceptance now of unmar-
ried parenting, explained
Cheryl Biddle, director of
Alliance for Healthy Youth
in Akron. One of the con-
cerns I have is children in
poverty. Unfortunately, that
is one of the outcomes of
unmarried, single moms.
Today, the children of
single moms are four times
more likely to be poor,
Biddle added.
The 19-year-old said she
has been struggling with
homelessness since the
birth of her child ve
years ago.
I was in a situation
where I had nowhere to go,
nowhere to live, had a child
were (including husband
and child) staying with our
friends now, she offered.
They alluded to issues of
homelessness and money
during the focus group ses-
sion. Certainly, government
assistance is something that
these women count on to
clothe, feed and house their
children.
Freeman understands
why people get incensed
when teen moms, who dont
have a family who can nan-
cially support them, are
forced to use tax money to
survive.
People get irate. Its
because they are support-
ing someone (through their
taxes), she said.
Still, she doesnt think
the girls intentionally get
pregnant just to collect
assistance. Instead, its just
something that happens.
Because, of the cycles
and the communities of
poverty in which many live,
its just a given if a girl gets
pregnant she will get hous-
ing, grocery money and a
subsidy check, Freeman
added. Again, I dont think
its intentional but there
are no negatives for them.
The scientic com-
munitys interest in
meditation springs from
tests in which electrodes
attached to subjects
heads show their brains
calming down during
meditation, lowering
stress levels and increas-
ing the ability to focus.
The tests are gener-
ating so much interest
that leading experts
have almost become
rock stars. In October,
1,200 people turned
out for a lecture by Dr.
Richard Davidson at the
University of Minnesotas
Center for Spirituality
and Healing. Davidson
is a professor at the
University of Wisconsin
who has been on the cut-
ting edge of using neuro-
science to monitor medi-
tation-induced changes in
the brain.
He is convinced that
the brain can be trained
to deal with stress the
same way a muscle can
be conditioned to lift a
heavy weight.
2 Frames*
2 Pair SV Polycarbonte Lenses
1 Comprehensive Eye Exam
2 Pair Glasses and Exam
Your Choice:
2 Boxes of Acuvue Oasys or
30 Pair Acuvue 1-Day Moist 1 Contact
Lens Eye Exam Fitting & Follow-Up Care
$80. off a complete pair of glasses
And This Little Piggy...
We
Insurance
Eyeglasses Package
Discount Designers
ACUVUE Packages
$125.
$69.
2 Boxe
$$
Oasys or
Complete
Complete
*
s
o
m
e
r
e
s
t
r
i
c
t
i
o
n
s
m
a
y
a
p
p
l
y
$149.
Starting at
Contact Lenses and Exam
Dr. Shelly Eskin &Assoc.
2422 Memorial Hwy,. Dallas, PA675-6020
Wilkes-Barre, 602 Carey Ave.
Dr. Shelley Eskin and Associates 826-1700
Mountaintop, 14 N. MaountainBlvd.
Dr. Marc Pensak 474-1100
Wyoming, Midway Shopping Center
Dr. Lew Lisses, 288-7471
www.crystalvisioncenter.com
1.800.377.5222 | LUZERNE.edu | Followus on:
College
MakeitHappen. ||
Fall
Classes
Wilkes-Barre Area
start
Sept.
23
You can still go to
College this Fall!
Only $110 per credit hour
A small price to pay
to take big steps towards
your goal. So this Fall,
give yourself a little credit.
View course schedules at the
Corporate Learning Center and
Main Campus in Nanticoke
online at luzerne.edu
You can Make it happen
for yourself at LCCC
Over 100 academic programs
Degrees and credits transfer
to 4-year colleges
LCCC is 50-75% less cost
than any other college
many online classes incuding
4 degree programs
WILKES-BARRE CLC CENTER 570-822-6156
2 Public Square Wilkes-Barre
@the Wilkes-Barre Corporate Learning Center
Must be 21. Drivers license, passport or military ID required. Offer is complimentary and is issued one (1) per person. Slot Free Play is valid
on date of issuance only; will expire at the end of the day at 5:59am. Offers are non-transferable. Offer and schedules are subject to change
without notice. Anyone prohibited from gaming by the PGCB is ineligible for this offer. Must arrive via line run bus to receive offer.
Last sunday of the Month
and thursday service
servicing scranton, Wilkes-Barre and Mount Pocono
provided by Martz
www.martzgroup.com 800-233-8604
WTL
GAMBLInGPrOBLeM?CALL1-800-GAMBLer.
ENJOY
$
35 SLOT FREE PLAY
this sEptEmbEr!
the outLetsat the sandsBethLeheM fashionMeetsfaBuLous.
visit Pasands.com for motorcoach information and details on our many exciting promotions.
SteelworkS Buffet
& Grill nowopen!
Henry ries will only be
made in America or they
wont be made at all.
For a FREE color catalog
visit www.henryries.com
or call Toll Free (866) 200-2354
Its not a prideful boast. Its a solemn
oath from all of us at Henry Repeating Arms.
Every Henry rie is and always will be made
in America by American workers. Decent, hard
working folks like you who take great pride in
their work. We wont follow the path of other
manufacturers who have their products made
overseas and slap their name on them. When you
read the rollmark on the barrel of a Henry, its
going to read Made in the USA.
We start with only the nest ingredients - gun
barrel quality steel from Ohio, genuine American
walnut from Missouri and Iowa, steel castings
from Wisconsin and brass components from
Pennsylvania. We manufacture a rie that you
will be proud to own with the smoothest action,
awless reliability, and pinpoint accuracy. Made in
America with the same integrity as the Henry rie
President Lincoln owned.
We are a family owned business and we
stand behind every rie that leaves our plant.
You will nd our customer service second to none,
and well do whatever it takes to guarantee your
complete satisfaction.
We invite you to become part of the Henry
family. Please order our free catalog, which
includes information
about our ries, a list of
dealers in your area and
a free Henry decal.
Henry Golden Boy .22 LR /.22 Mag / .17HMR
Henry Big Boy .44 Magnum / 45C / .357 Mag
Henry U.S. Survival .22 LR
Henry Acu-Bolt .22 LR / .22 Mag / .17 HMR
Anthony Imperato
President of Henry Repeating Arms
Henry .22 Lever Frontier Model with Octagonal Barrel.
An affordable, beautiful rifle with superior tack-driving accuracy.
Crafted by American workers for American shooting enthusiasts.

MADE IN AMERICA OR NOT MADE AT ALL


www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER BIRTHDAYS/COMMUNITY NEWS Thursday, September 12, 2013 PAGE 3C
Vincent R. Contardi
Vincent Rocco Contardi,
son of Paul and Heather
Contardi, West Pittston,
is celebrating his eighth
birthday today, Sept.
12. Vincent is a grand-
son of John and JoAnn
Petrochko, Exeter, and
Kathleen Contardi and
the late Joseph Contardi,
Scranton.
HAPPYBIRTHDAY!
Asher J. Dicton
Asher Jude Dicton, son
of Anthony and Rebecca
Dicton, Kingston, is cel-
ebrating his rst birthday
today, Sept. 12. Asher is
a grandson of Paul and
Cheryl Dicton, Forty Fort,
and Jeffrey and Charlene
Finkel, Larksville.
Melanni M. Wrubel
Melanni Margaret
Wrubel, daughter of
Simon and Heidi Wrubel,
Nanticoke, is celebrating
her fth birthday today,
Sept. 12.
Melanni is a grand-
daughter of Lynda
Wickkiser and Andy
Archacavage, Hanover
Green, and the late Cy
and Phyllis Wrubel. She
is a great-granddaugh-
ter of the late Jim and
Peggy Wickkiser; Ben
Archacavage and the late
Bernadine Archacavage,
Hunlock Creek; and Sally
Humphreys, Plymouth.
Melanni is a great-
great-granddaughter of
Catherine Lachowecz,
Nanticoke. She has a
brother, Matthew.
Physician assistant students begin clinical rotations
The students entering their final year of the masters degree physician assistant studies program at Kings College recently began their clinical rotations. A 12-week rota-
tion in family medicine and separate six-week rotations in medical specialties including emergency medicine, internal medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics,
psychiatry and general surgery will conclude with their graduation from the program in August 2014. Students, from left, first row, are Lindsey Evans, Elizabeth Perhacs,
Lauren Pristash, Emily Buchman, Alyssa Bozzett, Shelby Munson, Ashley Bahlatzis, Lynnae Imdorf, Amanda Gummo, Kristin Henchenski, Ann Marie Coar, Julia Zafia,
Amanda Waligun and Lauren Reese. Second row: Eric Hummel, Heather Bowman, Kirsten Wetzel, Ashtyn Stang, Olga Herman, Audra Gould, Kaitlen Jones, Tammy Frost,
Cornelia Roberts, Melanie Call, Elyse Laneski, Christopher Tobias, Rebecca Rittle and Joyce Carson. Third row: Christina Gugliotti, Stephen Macioch, Nicholas Orlowsky,
Jonathan Beekman, Andrew McMaster and Tapan Talati. Fourth row: Celeste Mazzoni, Munazza Khan, Dana Zovko, Justine Lisella, Enoma Evbuomwan, Douglas Krysan,
Michael Prentice and Tara Banville.
Editors Note: To have your
announcement published in
this column please submit the
information to Reunions, The
Times Leader, 15 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA18711. Email
submissions must be sent to
people@timesleader.com. Please
typeReunion Newsin the
subject line. The deadline is each
Monday for all copy.
COUGHLINHIGHSCHOOL
Class of 1949 will hold a
luncheon meeting at 1 p.m. on
Tuesday at the Olive Garden,
561 Arene Hub Plaza, Wilkes-
BarreTownship. All classmates,
spouses and friends are invited.
For reservations and more
information, call Betsy Rodack at
823-2750.
Class of 1964 will meet at 7
tonight at Norms Pizza and
Eatery. Plans for the 50th
anniversary reunion will be
discussed. All classmates and
spouses are welcome.
CRESTWOOD HIGHSCHOOL
Class of 1963, the frst
graduating class of Crestwood
High School, is holding its 50th
anniversary reunion at 6 p.m.
on Sept. 21 at Sitkos Barn and
Restaurant, White Haven. The high
school was called Central Luzerne
County School Jointure in 1963
and had 63 students in the senior
class. It was named Crestwood
the next year.
GAR MEMORIAL HIGHSCHOOL
Class of 1952 is holding its
monthly luncheon at 1 p.m.
on Sept. 24 at Marianaccis
Restaurant, 252W. Eighth St.,
West Wyoming. Classmates and
friends are invited. For more
information call 570-693-1778.
HANOVERTOWNSHIP HIGH
SCHOOL
Class of 1960is hosting aclass
70th birthday partyon Oct. 6 at
Cris Nics Irish Pub, formerly the
Barney Inn, Barney Street, Wilkes-
Barre. All classmates are invited.
For more information call Jane
Thomas at 822-9248.
MEYERS HIGHSCHOOL
Class of 1952 will meet at 1 p.m.
onWednesday at Norms Pizza
and Eatery.
Class of 1963 is hosting its
monthly dinner at 6 p.m. on
Sept. 25 at Logans Roadhouse,
Highland Boulevard, Wilkes-Barre
Township. For more information
contact Maddy Shaver at 570-
829-1529.
PITTSTONHIGHSCHOOL
Class of 1955 reunion committee
invites all classmates and spouses
to a pizza party at 7 p.m. on Sept.
20at Bruticos Bistro, Main Street,
Old Forge. Reservations must be
made by Friday by calling Grace
Dimick at 693-0293.
PLYMOUTHHIGHSCHOOL
Class of 1956reunion planning
committee will meet at 6 p.m. on
Sept. 24 at Theos Metro, Mercer
Avenue, Kingston. Plans for the
future reunion will be discussed.
All classmates are welcome and
urged to attend.
WEST SIDE CENTRAL
CATHOLIC HIGHSCHOOL
Class of 1964 is holding a
reunion meeting at 7 p.m.
onTuesday at Grotto Pizza,
Edwardsville. All are welcome.
Childrens birthdays
will be published free
Photographs and informa-
tion must be received two
full weeks before your childs
birthday. Your information must
be typed or computer-gener-
ated. Include your name and
your relationship to the child
(parent, grandparent or legal
guardians only, please), your
childs name, age and birthday,
parents, grandparents and
great-grandparents names and
their towns of residence, any
siblings and their ages. Email
your birthday announcement to
people@timesleader.com.
NAMES AND FACES
Paige Darrow
and Mariah Serra,
students from MMI
Preparatory School,
were selected to take
part in a cultural pro-
gram in China this
summer. The stu-
dents, who study
Chinese at MMI, participated
in the Ameson Chinese Elite
Program (ACE), sponsored
by the Ameson
Education and
Cultural Exchange
Foundation. ACE
is an annual event
that brings togeth-
er hundreds of top
students from the
United States,
China and Russia for a week
of cultural exchange and lec-
tures from high-level profes-
sionals in government
and education. This
years program was
held on the campus
of the Experimental
High School attached
to Beijing Normal
University. Students
also participated in a
mock Chinese Peoples Political
Consultative Conference,
which was designed to
give students a firsthand
understanding of how policy
decisions are made in the
Chinese government. Before
the program began, the stu-
dents visited many historical
sites in and around Beijing,
including the Great Wall,
Summer Palace, Tienanmen
Square, the Forbidden City
and the Temple of Heaven.
Darrow, the daughter of
John and Gertie Darrow of
Hazleton, is planning to pursue
wminors in Chinese and
Russian. Serra, the daughter
of Jamie Serra, Sugarloaf, and
Maureen Serra, Conyngham,
intends to major in Chinese
and pursue an international
career. Both students are
beginning their senior year
at MMI. Christina Spencer is
their Chinese instructor.
Darrow
Serra
REUNIONS
822-8222
We Accept
The Access Card &
All Major Credit Cards
C&D SEAFOOD
(By The Big Cow) www.cdqualityseafood.com
Route 309, Wilkes-Barre Twp. Boulevard
Store Hours
Wed. 9-5 Turs. & Fri. 9-6 Sat. 9-4
Haddock, Flounder, Scallops and much more! Dont forget the cole slaw!
Colossal Shrimp ............ 13
99 lb.
White Littleneck Clams...12
99/50
Jumbo Lump Crab Cakes.........2
99 ea.
9-10 oz. Lobster Tails ........14
99 ea.
Seafood Salad...................... 5
49 lb.
Fried Scallop Platter ....... 5
99 plus tax
X-Large Shrimp $9.99 lb
White LittleneckClams $12.99/50
Sea Scallop Pieces $5.99 lb
Seafood Salad $5.49 lb
Fresh Steamed Hardshell Crabs Available!
Haddock Sandwich Platter$4.75 plus tax
Store Hours
Wed. 9-5 Turs. & Fri. 9-6 Sat. 9-4
Route 309, Wilkes-Barre Twp. Boulevard
We Accept
The Access Card &
All Major Credit Cards
822-8222
Fresh Steamed Hardshell Crabs Available!
White Littleneck Clams $12.99 per 50
9 - 10 oz. Lobster Tails $14.99 ea.
Jumbo Lump Crab Cakes $2.99 ea.
Seafood Salad $5.49 lb.
Shrimp in a Basket Platter $4.99 plus tax
80012932
Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association.
Registered Mark of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association.
Get answers
from someone you trust.
1.877.544.1294 | www.bcnepa.com/reform
Blue Cross of Northeastern Pennsylvania is uniquely
positioned to help you nd the answers you need and
the solutions you want so you can make more informed
decisions for your business. Whether your business is
large or small, we have a wide range of health plans
that work for your employees and your bottom line.
What does Health Care Reform
mean for your business?
Jersey Shore Steel
Jersey Shore, PA
All Major
Credit Cards
Accepted
Country Folks
Store Hours:
Mon.-Sat.
10 A.M.-5 P.M.
Sun.12 P.M.-5 P.M.
Watch our website for unadvertised sales & promotions
From Hazleton
take Route 93 N.
9 mi. from Laurel Mall.
Turn left at Nescopeck Twp.
Firehouse, watch for our signs.
From Berwick
take Rt. 93 S. 5 mi. from
Nescopeck. Turn right at
Nescopeck Twp. Firehouse
watch for our signs.
Directions
To Nescopeck
550 Zenith Rd.
Nescopeck, PA. 18635
(570) 379-3176
www.countryfolk-gifts.com
Fall Furniture Sale!
Sept. 12th - 24th
Its that time again to cozy up your home for the upcoming holidays.
Check out these Savings...
Save 25% on in-stock lighting and mirrors.
Save 25% - 50% on in - stock furniture, area rugs, beds, tables and chairs,
hutches, coffee, end tables and more!
Save 25% off custom orders on select brands, such as Capel,
American Heritage,Friendship upholstery, Homespice Decor,
and more!
Mark your Calenders!
Friday Sept 13th from 6pm - 9pm only;
our Halloween Event is back! Special discounts offered.
Free Furniture delivery within 25 mi. radius
Does not apply to prior purchases
Some restrictions apply
PAGE 4C Thursday, September 12, 2013 TV www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
THURSDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 12, 2013 LOCAL 6 PM 6:30 7 PM 7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30 WNEP (16) News 16 World News Newswatch Inside Ed. Shark Tank (TVPG) Wipeout (N) (TVPG) Rookie Blue (N) (TVPG) WNEP2 (16.2) Sanford Sanford Maude Maude The Nanny The Nanny Coaches Penn State Newswatch Inside Ed. WYOU (22) News at 6 News News Focus On BigBang Preview (N) Big Brother (N) (TVPG) Elementary (TV14) WBRE (28) News NBC News Wheel Jeopardy! MillSec Quiz (N) (TVPG) Hwood Game Night (TV14) Game Night (TVPG) WYLN (35) Garden Ghost Det. Topic A Legal Beaten Path Crime Strike The Storm Late Edition (TVG) WSWB (38) Met Mother Family Guy Simpsons Family Guy Vampire Diaries (TV14) Next Top Model (TVPG) '70s Show 30 Rock METV (38.2) Rifleman Rifleman M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Gilligan Gilligan HoganHero F Troop Rhoda Rhoda WVIA (44) PBS NewsHour (TVG) SOPA "Grey Towers" (TVG) Greatest Good (TVG) '60s Girl Grooves (My Music) (TVG) WQMY (53) The People's Court (TVPG) Law & Order: C.I. (TV14) White Collar (TV14) White Collar (TV14) Cold Case Files (TV14) WOLF (56) Two 1/2... Two 1/2... BigBang BigBang The X Factor "Auditions #2" (N) (TVPG) News at Ten Fox News WQPX (64) Trace "Manhunt" (TVPG) Trace "Lone Star" (TVPG) Criminal Minds (TV14) Criminal Minds (TV14) Criminal Minds "Distress" KYW (3) Eyewitness News Ent. Tonight OMG!Insider BigBang Preview (N) Big Brother (N) (TVPG) Elementary (TV14) WWOR (9) Dish Nation Met Mother Met Mother King-Queens White Collar (TV14) White Collar (TV14) Chasing Dish Nation WPXI (11) News NBC News Jeopardy! Wheel MillSec Quiz (N) (TVPG) Hwood Game Night (TV14) Game Night (TVPG) WPHL (17) Two 1/2... Two 1/2... BigBang BigBang White Collar (TV14) White Collar (TV14) News at 10 BigBang CABLE 6 PM 6:30 7 PM 7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30 A&E The First 48 (TV14) The First 48 (TV14) The First 48 (TV14) The First 48 (TV14) Panic 9-1-1 (N) (TV14) AMC (4:15) <The Mummy <++ The Mummy Returns (01, Adv) Brendan Fraser. (TV14) Owner's Owner's (N) BBCA Kitchen Nightmares (TVM) Kitchen "Seascape" (TV14) Kitchen "J Willy's" (TV14) Kitchen Nightmares (TV14) Kitchen "Michon's" (TV14) BRAVO (5:45) Beverly (:45) Tamra's OC Wedding (:45) Tamra's OC Wedding (:45) Million Listing (TV14) (:45) Listing Eat, Drink, Love (N) CNBC Mad Money (TVPG) The Kudlow Report American Greed: Scam American Greed (TVG) American Greed (TVG) CNN (5:) Sit.Room Crossfire OutFront A. Cooper 360 (TVG) Piers Morgan Live (TVG) AC360 Later (TVPG) COMC (:25) Tosh.O (:55) Colbert Report (TV14) (:25) Daily :55 Chappelle :25 Chappelle Sunny Sunny Tosh.O Tosh.O CSN SportsNite Pre-game MLB Baseball San Diego Padres vs. Philadelphia Phillies (L) (TVG) SportsNite (TVG) CTV Faith Cultur Teresa The Daily Mass (TVG) The World Over (L) (TVG) Goal Holy Rosary Life on the Rock (TVG) DISC Armored Car (TVPG) The Gatekeepers "The World's Toughest Job" (TV14) The Gatekeepers "A Powerful Fraternity" (N) (TV14) DISN GoodLuck Jessie Austin/ Ally Austin/ Ally <Teen Beach Movie (13, Fam) (TVPG) (:45) Wander Austin/ Ally Austin/ Ally E! The Kardashians (TV14) E! News (TVG) Hello Ross The Soup Total Divas (TV14) Divas "A Leg Up" (TV14) ESPN SportsCenter (TVG) C. Football NCAA Football TCU vs. Texas Tech (L) (TVPG) SportsCenter ESPN2 Horn (N) Interrupt (N) NASCAR Now (L) (TVG) FIBA Basketball (TVG) Baseball Tonight (L) (TVG) FAM Home Videos (TVPG) <+++ Richie Rich (94, Com) Macaulay Culkin. (TVPG) <++ 17 Again (09, Com/Dra) Zac Efron. (TVPG) FNC Special Report (TVG) FOX Report (TVG) The O'Reilly Factor (TVG) Hannity On the Record FOOD Chopped (TVG) Chopped (TVG) Cutthroat Kitchen (TVG) Chopped (TVG) Chef Wanted (N) (TVG) FS1 Fox Football Daily (L) Fox College NCAA Football Tulane vs. Louisiana Tech (L) (TVPG) FX Met Mother Met Mother Two 1/2... Two 1/2... Anger M. Anger M. Anger M. Anger M. (N) <++ Machete (TVMA) FXM Movie (:50) FXM <++ Dragonball Evolution (TVPG) (:45) FXM <++ Dragonball Evolution (TVPG) (:45) FXM HALL Little House Prairie (TVG) Little House Prairie (TVG) <Accidentally in Love (11, Dra) Jennie Garth. (TVPG) Frasier Frasier HGTV My Place My Place House House Hunt. Renovation (TVPG) Flip or Flop Flip or Flop HouseH (N) House (N) HIST Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars LIFE Wife Swap (TVPG) Wife Swap (TVPG) Project Runway (TV14) Project Runway "Let's Do Brunch" (TV14) Super (N) MTV Friendzone Friendzone Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous NGEO Taboo Tourette's Yukon Gold (N) (TVPG) Drugs, Inc. (TV14) Drugs, Inc. (TV14) Let It Ride (N) (TV14) NICK SpongeBob SpongeBob Hathaway SpongeBob SpongeBob (TVY) Full House Full House The Nanny The Nanny OVA (5:30) <++ Pollock (01, Bio) Ed Harris. (14+) <++++ The Young Victoria (09, Bio) (TVPG) <A River Runs Through It SPIKE Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Impact Wrestling (N) (TV14) SYFY 5: <Friday the 13th, Par... <++ Friday the 13th, Part 6: Jason Lives (TVM) <++ Friday the 13th, Part 7: The New Blood (TVM) TBS Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Family Guy Family Guy BigBang BigBang BigBang BigBang TCM (5:30) <Out of the Past (:15) MGM Parade Show <+++ Picnic (55, Rom) William Holden. (TVPG) <++++ Pal Joey (TVPG) TLC Toddlers & Tiaras (TVPG) Say Yes to Say Yes to Say Yes to Say Yes to Four Weddings (N) (TVPG) Four Weddings (N) (TVPG) TNT Castle (TVPG) Castle (TVPG) Castle (TVPG) Hawaii Five-0 (TV14) Hawaii Five-0 (TV14) TOON Regular Regular Chima (N) StarWars NinjaGo TeenTita King of Hill King of Hill American D. American D. TRAV Foods "Mongolia" (TVPG) Man v. Food Man v. Food Mystery Museum (TVPG) Museum (N) (TVPG) Mystery Museum (TVPG) TVL (5:50) Boston Legal (TVPG) A. Griffith A. Griffith A. Griffith A. Griffith Loves Ray Loves Ray Loves Ray Loves Ray USA Burn Notice (TV14) Burn Notice (TV14) Burn "Sea Change" (TV14) Burn Notice (F) (N) (TV14) Graceland (N) (TV14) VH1 Marrying Marrying <++ Two Can Play That Game (01, Com) (TVMA) <++ Malibu's Most Wanted (03, Com) (TVPG) WE Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Tamar "It's a Herbert" Tamar and Vince (N) Tamar and Vince YOUTOO Say Yes TV Say Yes TV LOL Pets! LOL Pets! Garage Garage Garage Garage Koldcast Koldcast PREMIUM 6 PM 6:30 7 PM 7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30 HBO (:15) <The Big Year (11, Com) Owen Wilson. (TVPG) The Newsroom (TVMA) <++++ Safe House (12, Act) (TV14) HBO2 Movie (:45) <+++ Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy (11, Thril) (TVMA) <Argo (12, Thril) Ben Affleck. (TVMA) MAX 5:20 <Grosse Pointe Bla... (:15) <+++ Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter (TV14) Strike Back (TV14) <+++ Outbreak (TVMA) MMAX Movie (:45) <+++ Die Hard: With a Vengeance (95, Act) (TVM) <++++ The Dark Knight Rises (12, Act) (TVPG) SHOW (5:15) <Gone (TV14) Fame High (TVPG) (:45) <++ Step Up Revolution (12, Dra) (TVPG) ALL ACCESS STARZ (4:40) <+++ The Patriot (TVMA) <++ Zoom (06, Fam) Tim Allen. (TVPG) <+++ The Amazing Spider-Man (12, Act) (TV14)
THURSDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 12, 2013
LOCAL 6 PM 6:30 7 PM 7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30
WNEP (16) News 16 World News Newswatch Inside Ed. Shark Tank (TVPG) Wipeout (N) (TVPG) Rookie Blue (N) (TVPG)
WNEP2 (16.2) Sanford Sanford Maude Maude The Nanny The Nanny Coaches Penn State Newswatch Inside Ed.
WYOU (22) News at 6 News News Focus On BigBang Preview (N) Big Brother (N) (TVPG) Elementary (TV14)
WBRE (28) News NBC News Wheel Jeopardy! MillSec Quiz (N) (TVPG) Hwood Game Night (TV14) Game Night (TVPG)
WYLN (35) Garden Ghost Det. Topic A Legal Beaten Path Crime Strike The Storm Late Edition (TVG)
WSWB (38) Met Mother Family Guy Simpsons Family Guy Vampire Diaries (TV14) Next Top Model (TVPG) '70s Show 30 Rock
METV (38.2) Rifleman Rifleman M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Gilligan Gilligan HoganHero F Troop Rhoda Rhoda
WVIA (44) PBS NewsHour (TVG) SOPA "Grey Towers" (TVG) Greatest Good (TVG) '60s Girl Grooves (My Music) (TVG)
WQMY (53) The People's Court (TVPG) Law & Order: C.I. (TV14) White Collar (TV14) White Collar (TV14) Cold Case Files (TV14)
WOLF (56) Two 1/2... Two 1/2... BigBang BigBang The X Factor "Auditions #2" (N) (TVPG) News at Ten Fox News
WQPX (64) Trace "Manhunt" (TVPG) Trace "Lone Star" (TVPG) Criminal Minds (TV14) Criminal Minds (TV14) Criminal Minds "Distress"
KYW (3) Eyewitness News Ent. Tonight OMG!Insider BigBang Preview (N) Big Brother (N) (TVPG) Elementary (TV14)
WWOR (9) Dish Nation Met Mother Met Mother King-Queens White Collar (TV14) White Collar (TV14) Chasing Dish Nation
WPXI (11) News NBC News Jeopardy! Wheel MillSec Quiz (N) (TVPG) Hwood Game Night (TV14) Game Night (TVPG)
WPHL (17) Two 1/2... Two 1/2... BigBang BigBang White Collar (TV14) White Collar (TV14) News at 10 BigBang
CABLE 6 PM 6:30 7 PM 7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30
A&E The First 48 (TV14) The First 48 (TV14) The First 48 (TV14) The First 48 (TV14) Panic 9-1-1 (N) (TV14)
AMC (4:15) <The Mummy <++ The Mummy Returns (01, Adv) Brendan Fraser. (TV14) Owner's Owner's (N)
BBCA Kitchen Nightmares (TVM) Kitchen "Seascape" (TV14) Kitchen "J Willy's" (TV14) Kitchen Nightmares (TV14) Kitchen "Michon's" (TV14)
BRAVO (5:45) Beverly (:45) Tamra's OC Wedding (:45) Tamra's OC Wedding (:45) Million Listing (TV14) (:45) Listing Eat, Drink, Love (N)
CNBC Mad Money (TVPG) The Kudlow Report American Greed: Scam American Greed (TVG) American Greed (TVG)
CNN (5:) Sit.Room Crossfire OutFront A. Cooper 360 (TVG) Piers Morgan Live (TVG) AC360 Later (TVPG)
COMC (:25) Tosh.O (:55) Colbert Report (TV14) (:25) Daily :55 Chappelle :25 Chappelle Sunny Sunny Tosh.O Tosh.O
CSN SportsNite Pre-game MLB Baseball San Diego Padres vs. Philadelphia Phillies (L) (TVG) SportsNite (TVG)
CTV Faith Cultur Teresa The Daily Mass (TVG) The World Over (L) (TVG) Goal Holy Rosary Life on the Rock (TVG)
DISC Armored Car (TVPG) The Gatekeepers "The World's Toughest Job" (TV14) The Gatekeepers "A Powerful Fraternity" (N) (TV14)
DISN GoodLuck Jessie Austin/ Ally Austin/ Ally <Teen Beach Movie (13, Fam) (TVPG) (:45) Wander Austin/ Ally Austin/ Ally
E! The Kardashians (TV14) E! News (TVG) Hello Ross The Soup Total Divas (TV14) Divas "A Leg Up" (TV14)
ESPN SportsCenter (TVG) C. Football NCAA Football TCU vs. Texas Tech (L) (TVPG) SportsCenter
ESPN2 Horn (N) Interrupt (N) NASCAR Now (L) (TVG) FIBA Basketball (TVG) Baseball Tonight (L) (TVG)
FAM Home Videos (TVPG) <+++ Richie Rich (94, Com) Macaulay Culkin. (TVPG) <++ 17 Again (09, Com/Dra) Zac Efron. (TVPG)
FNC Special Report (TVG) FOX Report (TVG) The O'Reilly Factor (TVG) Hannity On the Record
FOOD Chopped (TVG) Chopped (TVG) Cutthroat Kitchen (TVG) Chopped (TVG) Chef Wanted (N) (TVG)
FS1 Fox Football Daily (L) Fox College NCAA Football Tulane vs. Louisiana Tech (L) (TVPG)
FX Met Mother Met Mother Two 1/2... Two 1/2... Anger M. Anger M. Anger M. Anger M. (N) <++ Machete (TVMA)
FXM Movie (:50) FXM <++ Dragonball Evolution (TVPG) (:45) FXM <++ Dragonball Evolution (TVPG) (:45) FXM
HALL Little House Prairie (TVG) Little House Prairie (TVG) <Accidentally in Love (11, Dra) Jennie Garth. (TVPG) Frasier Frasier
HGTV My Place My Place House House Hunt. Renovation (TVPG) Flip or Flop Flip or Flop HouseH (N) House (N)
HIST Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars
LIFE Wife Swap (TVPG) Wife Swap (TVPG) Project Runway (TV14) Project Runway "Let's Do Brunch" (TV14) Super (N)
MTV Friendzone Friendzone Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous
NGEO Taboo Tourette's Yukon Gold (N) (TVPG) Drugs, Inc. (TV14) Drugs, Inc. (TV14) Let It Ride (N) (TV14)
NICK SpongeBob SpongeBob Hathaway SpongeBob SpongeBob (TVY) Full House Full House The Nanny The Nanny
OVA (5:30) <++ Pollock (01, Bio) Ed Harris. (14+) <++++ The Young Victoria (09, Bio) (TVPG) <A River Runs Through It
SPIKE Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Impact Wrestling (N) (TV14)
SYFY 5: <Friday the 13th, Par... <++ Friday the 13th, Part 6: Jason Lives (TVM) <++ Friday the 13th, Part 7: The New Blood (TVM)
TBS Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Family Guy Family Guy BigBang BigBang BigBang BigBang
TCM (5:30) <Out of the Past (:15) MGM Parade Show <+++ Picnic (55, Rom) William Holden. (TVPG) <++++ Pal Joey (TVPG)
TLC Toddlers & Tiaras (TVPG) Say Yes to Say Yes to Say Yes to Say Yes to Four Weddings (N) (TVPG) Four Weddings (N) (TVPG)
TNT Castle (TVPG) Castle (TVPG) Castle (TVPG) Hawaii Five-0 (TV14) Hawaii Five-0 (TV14)
TOON Regular Regular Chima (N) StarWars NinjaGo TeenTita King of Hill King of Hill American D. American D.
TRAV Foods "Mongolia" (TVPG) Man v. Food Man v. Food Mystery Museum (TVPG) Museum (N) (TVPG) Mystery Museum (TVPG)
TVL (5:50) Boston Legal (TVPG) A. Griffith A. Griffith A. Griffith A. Griffith Loves Ray Loves Ray Loves Ray Loves Ray
USA Burn Notice (TV14) Burn Notice (TV14) Burn "Sea Change" (TV14) Burn Notice (F) (N) (TV14) Graceland (N) (TV14)
VH1 Marrying Marrying <++ Two Can Play That Game (01, Com) (TVMA) <++ Malibu's Most Wanted (03, Com) (TVPG)
WE Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Tamar "It's a Herbert" Tamar and Vince (N) Tamar and Vince
YOUTOO Say Yes TV Say Yes TV LOL Pets! LOL Pets! Garage Garage Garage Garage Koldcast Koldcast
PREMIUM 6 PM 6:30 7 PM 7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30
HBO (:15) <The Big Year (11, Com) Owen Wilson. (TVPG) The Newsroom (TVMA) <++++ Safe House (12, Act) (TV14)
HBO2 Movie (:45) <+++ Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy (11, Thril) (TVMA) <Argo (12, Thril) Ben Affleck. (TVMA)
MAX 5:20 <Grosse Pointe Bla... (:15) <+++ Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter (TV14) Strike Back (TV14) <+++ Outbreak (TVMA)
MMAX Movie (:45) <+++ Die Hard: With a Vengeance (95, Act) (TVM) <++++ The Dark Knight Rises (12, Act) (TVPG)
SHOW (5:15) <Gone (TV14) Fame High (TVPG) (:45) <++ Step Up Revolution (12, Dra) (TVPG) ALL ACCESS
STARZ (4:40) <+++ The Patriot (TVMA) <++ Zoom (06, Fam) Tim Allen. (TVPG) <+++ The Amazing Spider-Man (12, Act) (TV14)
The networks go nuts for fall
The operative word
for the fall TV season is
crazy. We even have
a comedy with crazy
in the title, which oddly
enough isnt crazy at all.
With cable taking
more and more viewers,
the broadcast networks
(except rock-solid CBS)
dont feel inclined to play
it entirely safe. So they
continue to go out on
limbs that could break
under them. Some of
these risky ventures are
among the most inter-
esting new shows of the
year.
Here, ranked from best
to worst, are the network
series debuting for fall
2013. Four stars means
perfect and three and a
half almost perfect, and
no show achieved those.
Three stars means very
good, with lots of prom-
ise. Two and a half stars
is better than average,
and two stars is average.
Below two stars means
dont waste your time.
SLEEPY HOLLOW,
FOX, 9 P.M. MONDAYS
(SEPT. 16) 3 STARS
My favorite new drama
is crazy, scary and crazy-
scary, but it also brings
us the best new buddy
relationship of the sea-
son. Tom Mison is
Ichabod Crane, but the
Washington Irving char-
acter is reimagined as a
British redcoat, buried
since the Revolutionary
War. Now hes awake and
understandably confused.
Nicole Beharie is the cop
whos the only one to
believe him, even after an
also-awakened Headless
Horseman begins dealing
out decapitations.
Brooklyn Nine-
Nine, Fox, 8:30 p.m.
Tuesdays (Sept. 17) 3
stars
The best new comedy
of the season is smart
and just silly enough.
Andy Samberg is a detec-
tive who relaxes with
crazy pranks, especially
directed at his main
rival, played by Melissa
Fumero. But theyre both
excellent cops, which
wins Sambergs character
a margin of slack from his
new boss, played straight-
faced by Andre Braugher.
Marvels Agents of
S.H.I.E.L.D., ABC, 8
p.m. Tuesdays (Sept.
24) 3 stars
No matter what you
might or might not know
about the Marvel universe
and The Avengers, this
action-fantasy- dramedy
from Joss Whedons
company is a lot of fun.
Rather than superheroes,
the protagonists form a
team dedicated to saving
the world from mysteri-
ous threats.
The Blacklist, NBC,
10 p.m. Mondays (Sept.
23) 3 stars
Strange and yet com-
pelling, this thriller with
Silence of the Lambs
(and thus Hannibal)
overtones stars James
Spader as a creepy super-
criminal who promises to
help the FBI catch other
bad guys, but only if he
can work with a brand-
new FBI agent played by
Megan Boone.
Almost Human,
Fox, 8 p.m. Mondays
(Nov. 4) 2 1/2 stars
Karl Urban is a future
cop coming back from a
catastrophic injury, and
Michael Ealy is his sym-
pathetic android partner
in a slick-looking sci-
drama from J.H. Wyman
(Fringe).
The Michael J. Fox
Show, NBC, 9:30 p.m.
Thursdays (two epi-
sodes air at 9 p.m.
Thursday, Sept. 26) 2
1/2 stars
We love Michael J. Fox;
we love the fact that hes
feeling up to series TV
again and that hes willing
to poke fun at himself and
his Parkinsons disease.
And even though most
of us wont love the show
based on the pilot, well
cut it some slack.
Lucky 7, ABC, 10
p.m. Tuesdays (Sept.
24) 2 1/2 stars
In a drama based on a
British series, service-
station employees nally
hit the lottery jackpot,
resulting in a lot of life
changes. Matt Long and
Isiah Whitlock Jr. are the
most familiar faces. The
pilot stupidly starts in
the middle of the action,
but once it settles down,
Lucky 7 shows promise.
The Crazy Ones,
CBS, 9 p.m. Thursdays
(Sept. 26) 2 1/2 stars
Robin Williams returns
to series TV as an eccen-
tric ad man who works
with his two kids, strait-
laced daughter Sarah
Michelle Gellar and
charming son James
Wolk. Williams reins in
his zany humor enough
to keep the show from
imploding.
The Millers, CBS,
8:30 p.m. Thursdays
(Oct. 3) 2 1/2 stars
Will Arnett as a newly
divorced guy plays
straight man to his par-
ents (Margo Martindale
and Beau Bridges) in a
sitcom from Greg Garcia.
One of the funniest of
the new seasons com-
edies, The Millers is
also unfortunately heavy
on body-function humor,
largely at Martindales
expense.
Trophy Wife, ABC,
9:30 p.m. Tuesdays
(Sept. 24) 2 stars
Hate the title; kind
of like the show. Malin
Akerman is the third wife
of Bradley Whitford, who
with marriage inherited
not just his kids but his
rst two exes, played by
Michaela Watkins and
Marcia Gay Harden. Its
a modern kind of family,
and it could work.
Betrayal, ABC, 10
p.m. Sundays (Sept. 29)
2 stars
Two pretty people mar-
ried to two other pretty
people fall hard, cheat
and then things get
messy. This soapy drama,
starring Stuart Townsend
and Hannah Ware,
would like to be the next
Revenge, or better yet,
Scandal.
The Goldbergs,
ABC, 9 p.m. Tuesdays
(Sept. 24) 2 stars
Adam Goldberg was a
nerdy, lm-obsessed kid
who turned his 1980s
family into a home-
grown sitcom. Now hes
turned that true story
into an actual sitcom,
with Jeff Garlin and
Wendi McLendon-Covey
as the parents of three
(Goldberg has turned
one brother into a sister)
and George Segal as the
slightly daft grandpa.
Hostages, CBS, 10
p.m. Mondays (Sept.
23) 2 stars
Dylan McDermott
wants doctor Toni
Collette to kill the presi-
dent in this grim, convo-
luted thriller, intended for
a limited run (but with a
second season possible).
GAIL PENNINGTON
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
BEL L ES
C O N S TRUC TIO N C O . IN C .
PA012959
824- 7220
NATIO NAL AW ARD
W INNING C O M PANY
FREE ES TIM ATES
S IDING ,W INDO W S
& C ARPENTRY
THE BES T RO O FING ,
Like our prices
Love our quality
Cover up
because you
want to...
...not because
you feel you
have to.
You may be interested in learning about a clinical research study of an
investigational study medication for symptoms associated with
plaque psoriasis.
The purpose of this clinical research study is to determine the safety and
efectiveness of an investigational study medication for the symptoms
associated with plaque psoriasis.
You may qualify if you:
Are 18 years of age or older
Have been diagnosed with moderate-tosevere plaque psoriasis
for at least 6 months
have not previously taken etanercept (Enbrel

)
In order to qualify, there are other requirements that must be met.
Qualifed participants will receive all study-related medical care
and study medication at no charge
All appointments will be at a clinical research center near you.
570-582-7180
80025548
RIDDICK(XD) (R) NEW
MOVIE 1:30PM 4:25PM
7:25PM 10:10PM
You must be 17 with ID or accompanied by a parent to attend R rated features.
Children under 6 may not attend R rated features after 6pm
**Note**: Showtimes marked with a \\ indicate reserved seating. 8
0
0
2
4
6
4
9
2 GUNS (DIgItal) (R)
4:20PM 10:20PM
BLUE JASMINE (DIgItal) (Pg-13)
1:40PM 4:45PM 7:15PM 9:45PM
CLOSED CIRCUIT (DIgItal) (R)
12:05PM 2:30PM 4:55PM 8:00PM
10:15PM
CONJURING, THE (DIgItal) (R)
1:55PM 4:35PM 7:50PM 10:35PM
ELYSIUM (DIgItal) (R)
12:45PM 3:20PM 6:20PM 9:55PM
GETAWAY, THE (DIgItal) (Pg-13)
12:15PM 2:30PM 4:45PM 7:00PM
9:15PM
JOBS (DIgItal) (Pg-13) 1:20PM
7:20PM
KICK-ASS 2 (DIgItal) (R) 9:20PM
LEE DANIELS BUTLER, THE
(DIgItal) (Pg-13)12:30PM 3:40PM
7:05PM 10:05PM
MORTAL INSTRUMENTS
(DIgItal) (Pg-13) 12:25PM 3:45PM
6:45PM 9:45PM
ONE DIRECTION: THIS IS US (3D)
(Pg) 11:55aM 2:20PM 3:25PM 4:40PM
7:10PM 8:25PM 9:40PM
ONE DIRECTION: THIS IS US (Pg)
12:55PM 5:55PM
PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF
MONSTERS (3D) (Pg) 1:25PM
PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF
MONSTERS (DIgItal) (Pg) 4:05PM
PLANES (3D) (Pg) 2:30PM 7:10PM
PLANES (DIgItal) (Pg) 12:10PM
4:50PM 9:35PM
SMURFS 2 (3D) (Pg) 4:00PM
SMURFS 2 (DIgItal) (Pg) 12:50PM
6:50PM
THIS IS THE END NEWMOVIE
(DIgItal) (R) 12:00PM 2:35PM
5:10PM 7:40PM 10:15PM
ULTIMATE LIFE, THE NEWMOVIE
(DIgItal)
(Pg) 11:50aM 2:25PM 5:00PM 7:35PM
10:10PM
WERE THE MILLERS (DIgItal) (R)
2:05PM 4:50PM 7:35PM 10:25PM
WORLDS END, THE (DIgItal)
(R) 12:00PM 2:35PM 5:10PM 7:45PM
10:20PM
YOURE NEXT (DIgItal)
(R) 12:40PM 3:05PM 5:30PM 7:55PM
10:30PM
RIDDICK NEWMOVIE (DIgItal) (R)
12:20PM 3:10PM 6:05PM 8:50PM
BACK MOUNTAIN BOWL
Memorial Hwy Dallas 675-5026
Eat in and Take Out!
Sicilian Pizza Wings
Hoagies and More!
$
5,950
00
All Wood Cabinets with the upgraded
features listed below.
Upgraded Glazed or Paint Finish
Upgraded Full Overlay Doors With A Detached Design
Upgraded Full Extended Soft Close Drawer System
RIDDICK (XD) (R) 1:30PM
INSIDIOUS DOUBLE
FEATURE (XD) (R)
NEWMOVIE 7:00PM
You must be 17 with ID or accompanied by a parent to attend R rated features.
Children under 6 may not attend R rated features after 6pm
**Note**: Showtimes marked with a \\ indicate reserved seating. 8
0
0
2
4
6
4
9
2 GUNS (DIgItal) (R)
12:35PM 3:55PM 6:55PM 9:30PM
BLUE JASMINE (DIgItal) (Pg-13)
1:40PM 4:45PM 7:15PM 9:45PM
CLOSED CIRCUIT (DIgItal) (R)
12:05PM 2:30PM 4:55PM 8:00PM
10:15PM
CONJURING, THE (DIgItal) (R)
1:55PM
ELYSIUM (DIgItal) (R)
12:45PM 3:20PM
GETAWAY, THE (DIgItal) (Pg-13)
12:15PM 2:30PM 4:45PM 7:00PM
9:15PM
JOBS (DIgItal) (Pg-13) 1:20PM
4:20PM 7:20PM 10:20PM
KICK-ASS 2 (DIgItal) (R) 9:20PM
LEE DANIELS BUTLER, THE
(DIgItal) (Pg-13)12:30PM 3:40PM
7:05PM 10:05PM
MORTAL INSTRUMENTS
(DIgItal) (Pg-13) 12:25PM 3:45PM
6:45PM 9:45PM
ONE DIRECTION: THIS IS US (3D)
(Pg) 11:55aM 2:20PM 3:25PM 4:40PM
7:10PM 8:25PM 9:40PM
ONE DIRECTION: THIS IS US
(DIgItal) (Pg) 12:55PM 5:55PM
PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF
MONSTERS (3D) (Pg) 1:25PM 6:55PM
PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF
MONSTERS (DIgItal) (Pg) 4:05PM
9:50PM
PLANES (3D) (Pg) 2:30PM 7:10PM
PLANES (DIgItal) (Pg) 12:10PM
4:50PM 9:35PM
RIDDICK NEWMOVIE (DIgItal) (R)
4:25PM 7:25PM 10:10PM
RIFFTRAX LIVE: STARSHIP
TROOPERS ENCORE NEWMOVIE
(DIgItal) (R) 7:30PM
SMURFS 2 (3D) (Pg) 4:00PM
SMURFS 2 (DIgItal) (Pg) 12:50PM
6:50PM
THIS IS THE END (DIgItal) (R)
12:00PM 2:35PM 5:10PM 7:40PM
10:15PM
ULTIMATE LIFE, THE NEWMOVIE
(DIgItal) (Pg) 11:50aM 2:25PM
5:00PM 7:35PM 10:10PM
WERE THE MILLERS (DIgItal) (R)
2:05PM 4:50PM 7:35PM 10:25PM
WORLDS END, THE (DIgItal)
(R) 12:00PM 2:35PM 5:10PM 7:45PM
10:20PM
YOURE NEXT (DIgItal)
(R) 12:40PM 3:05PM 5:30PM 7:55PM
10:30PM
JACK CROSSIN
Real Estate Inc.
570-288-0770
kingston
Jay Crossin, Broker
jcross224@aol.com
Selling Your Home?
CALL Us FiRst!
Our team is dedicated to giving you
THE BEST POSSIBLE SERVICE
at the LOWEST COST TO YOU!
Real Estate Sales
Appraisals/Insurance
Visit our Website: www.jackcrossinagency.com
Get The Benefts
You Deserve!
Over 30 Years Experience
Social Security
Disability
Claimants represented by
attorneys are more
successful in obtaining
benefts. Call me for a
FREE CONSULTATION.
I can help.
Member of the National
Organization of Social Security
Claimants Representatives
Janet A. Conser
Attorney At Law
1575 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort
570-283-1200
Dont just watch a movie, experience it!
All Stadium Seating and Dolby Surround Sound
ALL FEATURES NOW PRESENTED IN DIGITAL FORMAT
825.4444 rctheatres.com
3 Hrs. Free Parking At Participating Park & Locks with Theatre Validation
(Parenthesis Denotes Bargain Matinees)
All Showtimes Include Pre-Feature Content
Avoid the lines: Advance tickets available from Fandango.com
Rating Policy Parents and/or Guardians (Age 21 and older) must
accompany all children under 17 to an R Rated feature
*No passes accepted to these features.
**No restricted discount tickets or passes accepted to these features.
***3D features are the regular admission price plus a surcharge of $2.50
D-Box Motion Seats are the admission price plus an $8.00 surcharge
First Matinee $5.50 for all features (plus surcharge for 3D features).
Man Of Steel in RealD 3D/DBox
Motion Code Seating - PG13 - 150 min -
(12:15), (3:55), 7:10, 10:10
**Man Of Steel in RealD 3D - PG13
- 150 min - (12:15), (3:55), 7:10, 10:10
*Man Of Steel 2D - PG13 - (12:00), (1:45),
(3:40), (5:00), 7:00, 8:30, 10:00
*This Is The End - R - 110 min - (1:30),
(4:00), 7:15, 9:40
The Internship PG13 125 min
(1:00), (1:45), (3:35), (4:20), 7:00, 7:40, 9:35,
10:15
The Purge R 95 min
(12:40), (2:45), (4:50), 7:30, 9:45
Now You See Me PG13 120 min
(1:30), (4:15), 7:05, 9:35
After Earth PG13 105 min
(2:00), (4:20), 7:25, 9:45
Fast & Furious 6 PG13 135 min
(12:50), (1:30), (3:40), (4:20), 7:00, 7:25,
9:50, 10:10
Epic PG 110 min
(12:30), (3:00), 7:15, 9:40
The Hangover 3 R 105 min
(12:45), (3:00), (5:15), 7:40, 9:55
*Star Trek Into Darkness RealD 3D
PG13 140 min
(1:15), (4:15), 7:30, 10:20
Special Events
World War Z & World War Z RealD 3D -
8pm on Thursday, June 20th
Monsters University & Monsters University in RealD 3D -
8pm on Thursday, June 20th
Friday September 6th - Thursday September 12th
Advance Ticketing Available Nowfor :
The One: Mayweather vs. Canelo Sat, Sep. 14
Clean Guys of Comedy Thu, Sep. 19
UNSTOPPABLE A Live Event with Kirk Cameron
Tue, Sep. 24
The 2013-2014 Metropolitan Opera Series
Riddick in DBox Motion Code Reserved
Seating R, 1 hr 59 min - 1:50p 4:25p 7:20p
10:05p
One Direction: This Is Us 3D PG, 1 hr 32 min
2:00p 3:00p 4:00p 5:00p 5:55p 7:00p 8:00p
9:00p 10:00p
Getaway PG13, 1 hr 30 min - 2:40p 5:00p
7:15p 9:25p
The Worlds End R, 1 hr 49 min - 1:45p 4:20p
7:15p 9:50p
Youre Next R, 1 hr 34 min - 2:10p 4:30p
7:20p 9:40p
The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones
PG-13, 2 hr 10 min - 1:40p 4:20p 7:00p 9:50p
Lee Daniels The Butler PG-13, 2 hr 12 min
1:55p 4:30p 7:10p 9:50p
Planes PG, 1 hr 32 min - 2:15p 4:25p 7:10p
9:30p
Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters PG, 1 hr 46
min - 2:05p 1:20p 4:30p 3:50p 7:05p 9:30p
Were the Millers R, 1 hr 50 min - 1:40p
4:15p 7:15p 9:45p
This Is The End R, 1 hr 47 min - 2:20p 4:40p
7:25p 9:45p
The Conjuring R, 1 hr 51 min - 7:05p 9:35p
Grown Ups 2 PG-13, 1 hr 40 min - 7:40p
10:10p
Despicable Me 2 PG, 1 hr 38 min - 2:00p
4:15p
The Smurfs 2 PG, 1 hr 45 min - 1:40p1:40p
4:10p
SUMMIT PEAK
Roofing INC.
Call Toll Free
1-855-768-7325
www.summitpeakroofing.com
Roof Repairs Chimney Repairs Shingles
Siding Rubber Roofing And So Much More!
Summer Special
10% Off with this ad
FREE
ESTIMATES
SPR INC.
"We're on top of it"
Licensed & Insured
570-878-6388
Fall Special
Pick your own Tomatoes
HAYRIDES starting Sept 28
groups by reservation
Open Daily 8am - 5pm
DYMONDS FARM
Brace Rd., Orange, PA
675-1696 333-501180070117
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER PUZZLES Thursday, September 12, 2013 PAGE 5C
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
MINUTE MAZE
W I T H O M A R S H A R I F & T A N N A H H I R S C H
CRYPTOQUOTE
GOREN BRIDGE
B Y M I C H E A L A R G I R I O N & J E F F K N U R E K
JUMBLE
B Y H O L I D A Y M A T H I S
HOROSCOPE
CROSSWORD
PREVIOUS DAYS SOLUTION
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Ange-
les, CA 90069
For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com
O N T H E W E B
Dear Abby: I have
four siblings. We get
along fine as long as
were apart.
During Moms
and Dads funerals, I
was dismayed at the
degree of tension and
bickering among us. I am now deal-
ing with an incurable illness that will
shorten my life considerably. I have
no desire to put my husband through
a funeral hosting a family who never
liked him. I prefer to be cremated,
and a handwritten letter be sent to
each of my siblings after the fact.
Is this selfish? I dont want people
saying things they dont sincerely
mean. My letter will not be accusato-
ry, nor will it rake up long-ago hurts. I
just want them to know that my hus-
band has carried out my wishes and
they should not blame him for doing
so. Any thoughts?
Keeping It Simple
Dear Keeping It Simple: I dont
think your wishes are selfish. Youre
entitled to exit the stage of life in
the manner you choose. Because you
prefer to bid your siblings goodbye
in handwritten letters, go ahead and
do it.
If I have any advice to offer it is
that your husband should continue
to maintain a healthy distance from
your siblings after your death. Its not
unusual for survivors to react with
anger after a death, and your hus-
band should not take it personally if
they do.
Dear Abby: My daughter rents a
second-floor apartment with her two
little girls. The tenant on the first
floor is on oxygen and smokes ciga-
rettes. I am concerned about the risk
of an explosion that could injure my
family upstairs.
My daughter would like to move,
but her lease wont be up until Janu-
ary. What should we do? I dont be-
lieve she can afford a lawyer unless
legal aid is available to her. I find the
situation scary.
Worried in Ohio
Dear Worried: I find it scary, too. Has
your daughter discussed this with
the manager of the building? If she
hasnt, she should, and the conversa-
tion should be documented. An explo-
sion could harm more neighbors than
just her and her children.
If the manager cant compel the
smoker to stop, then your daughter
should move because the tenant
downstairs is a ticking time bomb.
Dear Abby: My aunt Stacey has
what they call salt-and-pepper-colored
hair. We have suggested many times
that she dye it, but she doesnt want
to have to keep up with it. Recently,
someone asked her 14-year-old daugh-
ter if that was her grandmother!
Aunt Stacey will be coming for a
visit soon and we want to surprise
her with a hair dye. How should we
go about it?
Kristy in New Jersey
Dear Kristy: Dont do it, or the peo-
ple who get surprised could be you
and whoever else has concocted this
hair-brained scheme. Not all women
want to color their hair. Some would
prefer to avoid the expense, and oth-
ers become allergic to the hair dye.
My advice is to appreciate your aunt
for the person she is and forget about
trying to change her image.
DEAR ABBY
A D V I C E
Familys feuding complicates terminally ill womans plans for funeral
To receive a collection of Abbys most
memorable and most frequently re-
quested poems and essays, send a busi-
ness-sized, self-addressed envelope, plus
check or money order for $3.95 ($4.50 in
Canada) to: Dear Abbys Keepers, P.O. Box
447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage
is included.)
ARIES (March 21-April 19).
Everything has its time. The
object that is coveted, revered
and utterly reflective of this
moment will lose value after this
moment has passed.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Your
cells regenerate, and your spirit
restores. Its like youre becoming
younger with every hour today,
and you dont have to make any
kind of effort to do so. Youre
naturally optimistic.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). People
who arent sure whether they
can help you or not will be
reserved until they determine
exactly how they can be of ser-
vice. Make it easy. Talk about
what will move you forward.
CANCER (June 22-July 22). Your
weaknesses are offset by your
considerable strengths. But just
think about what you could do in
a partnership with someone who
is strong in the areas where you
are weak. Seek collaboration.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Giving is not
always a sacrifice. Being gener-
ous has a way of exhilarating
you, especially when you see the
difference your contributions
make in the lives of others.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Strip
away some of what you were
taught. Its not that the lessons
were wrong or inferior; its just
that they were given to you from
someone elses experience.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). No one
can give you more time, but peo-
ple can sure help you waste the
time you have. Actively guard
against distractions. Anticipate
what could happen to knock you
off your game, and prepare a
defense.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Youll
be working by yourself. This
scenario makes it challenging to
know how you compare to oth-
ers in the marketplace. Ask both
insiders and outsiders their opin-
ion. Get another point of view.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). If
you follow your whimsy, it might
be considered lollygagging. It
might also lead to enormous joy.
If you have fun with what youre
doing, youll find success.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). You
dont want to put your signature
on your work; you want your
work to be your signature. When
people can tell its your work
by the work itself, youll have
reached the level of originality
you desire.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). Love
is a bit of an obstacle course
these days, and you may find
yourself tunneling under or scal-
ing over enormous barriers to
emotional intimacy.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). Lie
detectors are designed on the
premise that dishonesty causes
bodily stress. Youll take some of
the pressure off by getting rid
of the expectation or rule that is
keeping people from telling the
truth.
TODAYS BIRTHDAY (Sept. 12).
You bring self-care to a new
level this year, and this favorably
affects everyone. An investment
will pay in five weeks. October
shakes up relationships and
sets you on a more pleasurable
course. Make the most of educa-
tional opportunities in November
and July. Capricorn and Virgo
people adore you. Your lucky
numbers are: 44, 2, 14, 38 and 5.
PAGE6C Thursday, September 12, 2013 COMMUNITY NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
IN BRIEF
N A N T I C O K E :
Luzerne County Com-
munity College will hold
the fth annual Fire
Police Training Weekend
for re police, re ght-
ers, and EMS personnel
from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on
Sept. 21 and Sept. 22 at
the colleges Regional
Public Safety Training
Center and Educational
Conference Center.
Courses to be offered
include Basic Fire
Police, Legal Concepts,
C o m m u n i c a t i o n s
and Public Relations,
Emergency Response
for Fire Police and
Emergency Responders,
Advanced Fire Police,
Conned Space Rescue,
CPR, and other related
topics.
For more information,
or to register, call LCCC
at 740-0521 or 800-377-
LCCC ext. 7521, or email
jschecter@luzerne.edu.
PLAINS TWP.: The
administration, faculty
and staff at Solomon/
Plains Jr. High School,
43 Abbott St., invites
parents, guardians and
students of seventh and
eighth grade to attend
the annual meet-and-greet
open house to be held on
Wednesday.
The event begins at 6
p.m. and attendees are
asked to enter through
the gym entrance. All
participants will have the
opportunity to meet fac-
ulty, staff and administra-
tion of Solomon/Plains
Jr. High School and learn
about all areas of the
school environment.
Attendees will also
hear about school policies
and procedures, student
events and activities and
student athletics.
The event is scheduled
to conclude by 8 p.m. and
a tour of the facility will
be available. Light refresh-
ments will be served.
For more infor-
mation, contact the
school at 826-7224.
Caroline Jones, 17, the daughter of Janet and Bill Jones, Mountain
Top, recently wrote, illustrated and published a childrens book,
One More Book Please to encourage young children to read. Jones
plans to donate the proceeds from her book to provide books and
educational materials for young children through charitable orga-
nizations and to bring awareness to the importance of childhood
literacy. She will be reading her book to children ages 2-6 at 6
p.m. on Tuesday at the Marian Sutherland Kirby Library, Mountain
Top. Copies of the book will be available for purchase and will be
signed by the author. Parents are encouraged to attend and hear
about Jones Read to Succeed! project that she created to promote
the importance of childhood literacy. As part of this project, she
organized over 5,000 books and delivered them to children and
parents at numerous community-based agencies and developed
several presentations and book distributions. Michelle Muro, youth
services library assistant, will also read additional stories and
conduct a craft project. Registration is required and can be done
by visiting the library at 35 Kirby Ave., or by calling 570-474-9313.
From left, are Jones and Muro.
Teen author to read at library
Misericordia University is holding an open house program for
high school students and their parents on Sept. 28. The program
offers an informative tour of the campus, meetings with students,
faculty and coaches and information sessions with admissions
and financial aid counselors. The program begins with registration
at 9 a.m. in the Anderson Sports and Health Center at the North
Gate of the upper campus. A special Meet the Coaches session
will be held from 9-10 a.m. The open house program will run from
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The schedule includes refreshments and a faculty
session and lunch. A session will also be held on the universitys
Alternative Learners Project for students with learning disabili-
ties. For more information, or to register, contact the Admissions
Office at 570-675-4449, 1-866-262-6363, or email admiss@miseri-
cordia.edu. Students can also visit Misericordia University online
at www.admissions.misericorida.edu. Misericordia University stu-
dent ambassadors, from left, first row: Alyssa Leonard, Bethlehem;
Bridet Guarnieri, Pittston; Leila Comerford, Moscow; and Cheyne
Kulessa, Seaside Heights, N.J.. Second row: Jeff Smith, Lake Ariel,
and Andrea Carr, Dallas.
Misericordia hosts open house
Four members of The University of Scrantons Class of 2013 recent-
ly began their medical school careers at Penn State College of
Medicine in Hershey. They are among more than 60 alumni begin-
ning their post-baccalaureate studies in medicine at schools that
include TCMC, Dartmouth College, Thomas Jefferson University,
Georgetown University and The University of Pittsburgh. The uni-
versitys overall acceptance rate to schools of medicine for 2013 is
85 percent. Medical students, from left: James Bresnahan, Exeter;
Edward Stredny, Dallas; Maria Durdach, Dalton; and Alexander
Skojec, Sherrill, N.Y.
Scranton grads enter medical school
601 Market St., Kingston, PA 288-9311
NASHVILLE
November 11
th
14
th
$959 pp
Includes: Roundtrip bus to Newark, non stop fights
to Nashville, Airport Transfers, 3 Nights at GAYLORDS
OPRYLAND RESORT, Tax & Resort Fees, 3 Breakfasts, 6
Hour Nashville City Tour, The Hermitage House Smorgasbord
Lunch, GRAND OLE OPRY SHOW, Shuttle service from
resort to downtown
8
0
0
7
0
1
0
2
MARKETPLACE
570. 829. 7130
800. 273. 7130
PLACE YOUR AD 24/7 AT TIMESLEADER.COM
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Thursday, September 12, 2013 PAGE 1D
LEGALS
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing of the West
Pittston Zoning Hearing Board will be held on THURSDAY,
SEPTEMBER 26, 2013, AT 6:00 P.M. at the West Pittston Bor-
ough Building, 555 Exeter Avenue, West Pittston, PA 18643,
for the purpose of considering applications for Variance from
the Flood Plain Management provisions of the West Pittston
Borough Zoning Ordinance, as enacted and effective as of
September, 2011. The applications to be considered are set
forth below:
1. Ms. Patricia A. Evans for a property located at 3 Mont-
gomery Avenue;
2. Mr. Richard Foglia for a property located at 8 Philadelphia
Avenue;
3. Mr. Richard Foglia for a property located at 10-12 Phil-
adelphia Avenue;
4. Mr. & Mrs. James Golden for a property located at 1012
Susquehanna Avenue;
5. Gospel Tabernacle of the Christian's Missionary Alliance
Church of West Pittston for a property located at 307 Race
Street;
6. Grace Bible Church for a property located at 317 Race
Street;
7. Mr. & Mrs. Richard Hazzouri for a property located at 1200
Susquehanna Avenue;
8. Mr. Charles Herron for a property located at 800 Susque-
hanna Avenue;
9. Mr. Charles Herron for a property located at 3 Exeter Aven-
ue Rear;
10. Mr. & Mrs. William Holweg for a property located at 22 Phil-
adelphia Avenue;
11. Ms. Stephanie Irace for a property located at 327 Race
Street;
12. Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Lawrence for a property located at 902
Susquehanna Avenue;
13. Ms. Anita Limongelli for a property located at 1324 Susque-
hanna Avenue;
14. Mr. Jeffrey Meade and Ms. Sherry Knecht for a property
located at 6 Luzerne Avenue;
15. Mr. Clifford Melberger for a property located at 704 Susque-
hanna Avenue;
16. Frank J. Mulhall, Esquire for a property located at 806
Susquehanna Avenue;
17. P.C. Landholders LP for a property located at 5 Luzerne
Avenue; and
18. Mr. & Mrs. Louis Pagnotti for a property located at 220
Wyoming Avenue.
A copy of the Zoning Permit Application is on file and available
for public inspection at the Borough Secretary's Office, 555 Ex-
eter Avenue, West Pittston, PA 18643.
Any person with a disability requiring special accommodation to
attend this hearing should notify the Borough Secretary's Of-
fice at 570-655-7782 as early as possible prior to this meeting.
All interested parties wishing to present testimony are encour-
aged to attend this hearing.
Issued by: Joseph D. Burke, Esquire, Solicitor
West Pittston Zoning Hearing Board
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
ADVERTISEMENT FOR REBID
WEST PITTSTON BOROUGH
2013-2014 Fuel Supply
Sealed bids will be received at the West Pittston Borough (the
Borough) Municipal Building, Borough Managers Office, loc-
ated at 555 Exeter Avenue, West Pittston, Luzerne County,
Pennsylvania, 18643 until 3:45 p.m. prevailing time, on Septem-
ber 24, 2013 and then publicly opened and read aloud in West
Pittston Borough Council meeting room at 6:30 p.m. on Septem-
ber 24, 2013. The Bid will be awarded at the regular monthly
meeting of the West Pittston Borough Council on October 1,
2013 at 6:30 p.m.
Briefly, bids are invited for furnishing and delivery of diesel fuel
and unleaded gasoline to the Borough. The Borough has no fuel
storage facility so delivery must be made to a local dealer.
Contract documents and technical specifications are on file and
may be obtained at the office of the Borough Manager between
the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.
Prospective bidders are urged to familiarize themselves with the
specifications and contract documents. Any contractor who does
not do so and submits a bid does so at his own risk.
Bid proposals must be on the forms provided by the Borough.
Bid security in an amount equal to ten percent (10%) of the total
bid shall be submitted with each bid in accordance with the in-
structions to bidders.
The Borough reserves the right to reject any or all bids or portion
thereof or to waive informalities in the bidding.
The Borough does not discriminate on the basis of race, color,
national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, or familial status in
the provision of services.
The Borough is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employ-
er.
Bids may be held by the Borough for a period not to exceed Sixty
(60) days from the date of opening of the bids for the purpose of
reviewing the bids prior to awarding the contract. In this period of
time, no bidder may withdraw their bid.
By: Mark W. Bufalino, Esquire
Solicitor, West Pittston Borough
39 Public Square, Suite 1000
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that Glenn O. Hawbaker, Inc. has made
application to the Department of Environmental Protection for re-
newing its existing Surface Mining Permit #40930102, known as
Lat t i mer Basi n Mi ne, and t he rel at ed NPDES permi t
(40930102GP104). The permit was originally issued on March
18, 1994, and will expire on March 18, 2014. This renewal does
not contain revisions to the existing operation. The permit area
is 688 acres. The operation is located in Hazle and Butler Town-
ships, Luzerne County, with the center of the site located 1 mile
northeast of the intersection of S.R. 309 and Louis Schiavo
Drive. The center of the operation is located approximately 22.25
inches north and 12.25 inches west from the bottom right corner
of the Hazleton, PA U.S.G.S. 7.5 minute topographic map. The
discharge for this operation enters the Jeddo Tunnel Mine Pool
System. Copies of this renewal application are available for pub-
lic review at the Hazle Township Municipal Building, 101 West
27
th
Street, Hazle Township, PA 18202; and at the Butler Town-
ship Municipal Building, 415 West Butler Drive, Drums, PA
18222.
Written comments, objections, or requests for public hearings or
informal conferences relative to the transfer of this permit may be
submitted to:
Mike Menghini, District Mining Manager
Department of Environmental Protection
5 West Laurel Boulevard
Pottsville, PA 17901-2454
up to and including October 26, 2013.
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
ADVERTISEMENTS FOR BIDS
The F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts will receive bids
for the Mechanical Upgrades to the Center consisting of three (3)
contracts, until 2:00 P.M. (local time) on Wednesday, October 2,
2013 at the Box Office of the F.M. Kirby Center, 71 Public
Square, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 18701 to the attention of
Marilyn Santarelli. Box Office hours are Mon.-Fri. 10:00 AM- 5:00
PM.
The Contracts are as follows:
Contract No. 1 HVAC Construction
Contract No. 2 Automatic Temperature Control Construction
Contract No. 3 Plumbing Construction
Bids will be publicly opened and read aloud beginning at 2:15
P.M. that same day in the Main Lobby F.M. Kirby Center.
A pre-bid conference will be held on September 23rd @ 3:00
P.M. in the Main Lobby of the F.M. Kirby Center.
Online Contracting Documents: Documents may be obtained on
or after September 11, 2013 by contacting the Office of A+E
Group, Inc. Onl i ne access wi ll be provi ded through the
Engi neer' s FTP si te.
Printed Contracting Documents: Documents may be obtained on
or after September 11, 2013 by contacting the Office of A+E
Group, inc., 140 Maffet Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18705, phone
570-822-8500, and payment of a $50.00 non-refundable fee to
A+E Group, Inc.
Each Bid when submitted must be accompanied by a Bid Secur-
ity which shall not be less than ten (10%) percent of the amount
of the Total Base Bid; a non-Collusion Affidavit and Statement of
Bidders Qualification; and Representations. The successful Bid-
der will be required to furnish and pay for a satisfactory perform-
ance Bond and a Labor and Material Payment Bond.
Refer to other bidding requirements described in Instruction to
Bidders. Bidders must submit their bid on the Bid Form provided.
Bidders shall not alter this form in any way.All Bidders must be
registered on the A+E Group, Inc.'s Bidders List. A Bidder must
obtain Contracting Documents from A+E Group, Inc. or instruct
A+E Group, Inc. in writing to register the Bidder on the Bidders
List.
Attention is called to the provisions for Equal Employment Op-
portunity and the payment of not less than the minimum salaries
and wages as set forth in the Non-Technical Specifications must
be paid on the Project.
Project is funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Com-
monwealth of Financing Authority.
The Contractor must ensure that employee and applicants for the
employment are not discriminated against because of their race,
age, color, religion, sex, national origin, handicap or family
status. The contractor shall to the greatest extent feasible utilize
businesses located in or owned in substantial part by project
area residents.
The Kirby Center reserves the right to accept or reject any or all
Bids and to waive any informalities, irregularities, defects, errors
or omissions in the bidding.
No bid shall be withdrawn for a period of sixty (60) days sub-
sequent to the opening of the Bids, without consent of the Kirby
Center.
F.M. Center for the Performing Arts
Marilyn Santarelli
Executive Director
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
INVITATION FOR BIDS
Kingston Township will receive Bids for the SR 0309 South Me-
morial Highway Pavement Marking Project generally comprised
of pavement marking installation, and all incidental work related
thereto until 2:30 PM on Wednesday, the 2nd day of October at
the Kingston Township Municipal Building located at 180 East
Center Street, Shavertown, PA 18708. The Bids will be publicly
opened and read aloud at the Kingston Township Public Work
Session, to be held at the above location on October 7, 2013 at
7:00 PM. The project to be awarded on October 9, 2013 at 7:30
PM at the Kingston Township Supervisors Meeting to be held at
the above location.
The project generally consists of removal of existing pavement
marking legends as necessary; placement of new pavement
markings including lane lines, stop bars, legends, and cross-
walks; installation of maintenance and protection of traffic dur-
ing construction activities as shown on the Contract Drawings
and as described in the Contract Documents.
CONTRACT DOCUMENTS, i ncl udi ng DRAWINGS and
PROJECT MANUAL, may be examined and obtained at Borton-
Lawson Engineering, Inc., 613 Baltimore Drive, Suite 300,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702-7903.
PROJECT MANUAL is in one binding and DRAWINGS are
bound separately. Bidders may secure DRAWINGS and a
PROJECT MANUAL upon payment of thirty-five dollars
($35.00). (Please add $10.00 for U.S. Mail delivery or $20.00
for FedEx delivery without a FedEx account.) All construction
work is included in one Prime Contract.
Checks shall be made payable to Borton-Lawson, and will not
be refunded. Bidders and Sub-Bidders, such as Sub-Contract-
ors and Materialmen, may secure additional CONTRACT DOC-
UMENTS upon payment of twenty-five dollars ($25.00) per
PROJECT MANUAL and two dollars ($2.00) for each DRAW-
ING.
Each BID, when submitted, must be accompanied by a "Bid Se-
curity" which shall not be less than ten percent (10%) of the
amount of the BID.
Bidders attention is called to the fact that not less than the min-
imum wages and salaries in accordance with the provisions of
the Pennsylvania Prevailing Wage Act 442 and contained in the
CONTRACT DOCUMENTS, must be paid throughout the dura-
tion of this project.
Kingston Township is an Equal Employment Opportunity Em-
ployer.
Kingston Township does not discriminate on the basis of race,
color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, or family
status in employment of the provision of services.
The successful Bidder will be required to furnish and pay for a
satisfactory Performance Bond and a Labor and Material Pay-
ment Bond.
Kingston Township reserves the right to reject any or all Bids
and to waive informalities in the Bidding.
BIDS may be held by OWNER for a period of not to exceed
sixty days (60) from the date of the opening of BIDS for the pur-
pose of reviewing the BIDS and investigating the qualifications
of Bidders, prior to awarding of the CONTRACT
FOR THE TOWNSHIP OF KINGSTON:
Kathleen J. Sebastian, Township Manager
Special Notices
ADOPT:
A teacher hopes to adopt a
baby! I promise to provide a
lifetime of unconditional
love & opportunities.
Expenses paid.
1-866-408-1543
www.AdeleAdopts.info
CRAFTERS
WANTED
For Pittston Marching Patriots
Craft Fair Sat., Nov. 23.
Fair is 9am to 4pm.
For info & contract Call Kristen
570-499-4957 or email
marchingpatriotscraftshow
@gmail.com
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS!
CA$H PAID
FAST, FREE
PICK UP
570-301-3602
Nature inspired accents on
invitations are a new trend in
bridal stationary. Also theyre
perfect for the fall!
bridezella.net
Pearl of wisdomfresh
oysters are extremely rich in
protein!
oysterrestaurant.com
570-820-0990
Adopt-Loving couple will
cherish your baby, offering
security, endless love
and opportunities.
Expenses Paid.
Lori & Jeff
1-888-642-9650
NOVENA TO THE
SACRED HEART
Dear heart of Jesus in the past
I have asked for many favors,
this time I ask you this special
one Mention the Favor Take
i t dear heart of Jesus and
place it within your heart where
your father sees it. Then in his
merciful eyes it will become
YOUR favor not mine. Amen. 3
times for 3 days then publish &
your favor wi l l be granted.
Grateful thanks for granting
miracles. C.D.
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that, on Monday, October 7,
2013, at 7:30 a.m., the Coun-
cil of the Township of
Wilkes-Barre shall act on an
Ordinance amending the Rules
and Regulations of the Civil
Service Commission of the
Township of Wilkes-Barre. A
complete copy of the
Ordinance is available for
review at the Wilkes-Barre
Township Municipal Building,
Watson Street, Wilkes-Barre
Township, Luzerne County,
Pennsylvania, Monday through
Friday, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.,
prevailing time.
Renee Faust
Council Secretary
Township of Wilkes-Barre
ESTATE NOTICE
Notice is given that Letters of
Administration granted to Glor-
ia Hockenbury, 3411 Olympic
Drive, Green Cove Springs, Fl
for the Estate of Dolores M.
Ebert, county of Luzerne, Pa,
who died on Jan 11 2013 are
requested to make payment or
demands of payment to said
Executrix.
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
LEGAL
NOTICES
DEADLINES
Saturday
2:30 pm on Friday
Sunday
2:30 pm on Friday
Monday
2:30 pm on Friday
Tuesday
3:30 pm on Monday
Wednesday
3:30 pm on Tuesday
Thursday
3:30 pm on Wednesday
Friday
3:30 pm on Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
Larger notices
please call 570-829-7130
You may email your
notices to
classifieds@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or ques-
tions regarding legal
notices you may call
or 570-829-7130
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that Letters of Administration
have been issued to Elizabeth
Christine Baldassari of Pitt-
ston, Pennsylvania, and Re-
gina Baldassari of Covington
Township, Pennsylvania, Co-
Administratrices of the Estate
of Christine M. Baldassari, De-
ceased, who died on August 5,
2013, late of Avoca, Luzerne
County, Pennsyl vani a. Al l
credi tors are requested to
present their claims and all
persons indebted to the de-
cedent will make payment to
the aforementioned Co-Admin-
istratrices or their attorney.
ROSENN, JENKINS & GRE-
ENWALD, LLP
15 South Franklin Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0075
LEGAL NOTICE
On July 22, 2013, the PA State
Registration Board for Profes-
sional Engineers, Land Sur-
veyors and Geologists, Levied
a civil penalty of $1,000, and
suspended until completion of
eight hours of coursework in
professional ethics, the li-
cense of Howard A. Bellas, li-
cense number SU028828E, of
Ki ngston, Luzerne County,
Based upon hi s fel ony
conviction.
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that Letters Testamentary have
been granted to George R.
Gwilliam, Laura G. Gover and
Deborah G. Kloetzer, Co-Ex-
ecutors in the Estate of Nancy
R. Gwilliam, late of Harveys
Lak e, Luz er ne Count y ,
Pennsylvania, who died on Au-
gust 22, 2013. All persons in-
debted to said Estate are re-
quested to make payment and
those having claims or de-
mands to present the same
without delay to George R.
Gwilliam, Laura G. Gover and
Deborah G. Kloetzer, Co-Ex-
ecutors c/o Benjamin R. Jones
III, Esquire, 345 Pierce Street,
Ki ngst on, Pennsyl vani a,
18704.
Lost & Found
FOUND. White binder, con-
t e n t s s e e m i mp o r t a n t .
Tunkhannock Ave, Exeter. on
8.5.13. Call 332-2786
LOST CAMERA: Wyoming
County Fair, pocket/video/still
camera. Sentimental photos.
REWARD 607-625-3276
Notices
$ BUYING$
JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
Vito & Ginos Free Pick Up
570-288-8995
Wanted
LOKUTA'S GARAGE CORP.
818 Suscon Road
Pittston, PA 18640
570-655-3488
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR
JUNK CARS!
Authorized to tow
abandoned vehicles
Attorney
BANKRUPTCY
Free Consult-Payment Plan!
Atty Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
BANKRUPTCY
DUI-ARD
Social Security-Disability
Free Consultation
Attorney
Joseph M. Blazosek
570-655-4410 or 570-822-9556
blazoseklaw.com
FREE Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans. Carol Baltimore
570-283-1626
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty.
Sherry Dalessandro
570-823-9006
Child / Elderly Care
CAREGIVER
Experi enced 24 hour mal e
caregi ver. Speaks Sl ovak.
$800 monthly with 2 days off.
570-814-9880
Travel Entertainment
Black Lake, NY
Come relax & enjoy great fish-
ing & tranquility at its finest.
Housekeeping
cottages on the water with all
the amenities of home.
Need A Vacation? Call Now!
(315) 375-8962
daveroll@blacklakemarine.com
www.blacklake4fish.com
GET ALL THE
ADVERTISING INSERTS
WITH THE LATEST SALES.
Call 829-5000 to start your home delivery.
PAGE 2D Thursday, September 12, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Administrative / Professional
Wilkes-Barre Area School District
is now accepting applications for
FULL TIME ADMINISTRATOR
OFFICE OF HUMAN RESOURCES
Requirements: Minimum Bachelors Degree in HR or related
fields, with at least three (3) years HR experience or at least
eight (8) years HR experience in a related field.
Knowledge of the Pennsylvania School Code, certification,
employment and education law, labor law, labor relations and
HR management. Salary to commensurate with experience.
Send letter of interest, resume and credentials by 4:00 PM,
September 18, 2013 to:
Dr. Bernard S. Prevuznak,
Superintendent
Wilkes-Barre Area School District
730 S. Main Street,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
An equal opportunity employer
M/FH/V
Building / Construction / Skilled
eStImatOr
Local Commercial General Contractor is seeking an
experienced Full Time Estimator. Candidate will work with
management & be responsible for attending pre-bid meetings,
entire bid process including blue print take offs, solicitation of
pricing, job site visits & pictures. Marketing experience is a
plus. Salary based upon experience. Company has been in
business for over 25 years and offers competitive wages, paid
vacation and holiday time off, health benefits and 401 (k) profit
sharing plan. Please forward your resume in confidence to:
Human Resource Dept.
Champion Builders, Inc.
239 Pringle Street, Kingston, PA 18704
www.championbuildersinc.com
Education
HEAD START CURRENTLY HIRING
We are looking for DEDICATED individuals to join the HEAD START TEAM!
Full Time TEACHERS and Part Time ASSISTANT TEACHER positions
available in Wilkes-Barre, Edwardsville, Plymouth, Nanticoke and Hazleton
Centers; Classroom Substitutes needed for all locations. Visit our website at
www.lchs.hsweb.org for details and additional employment opportunities.
Extensive Fringe Benefit package includes Paid Holidays/Sick time/Training
and more; FT positions are eligible for health insurance or cash out option.
Submit/Fax resume/cover letter/copy of degree and transcripts and 3
Written Letters of Reference to:
LCHS, ATTN: Human Resources, PO Box 540, Wilkes-Barre, PA
18703-0540. Fax: #570-829-6580; Email: lchshumanresources@hsweb.org
Applicants must possess current ACT 34 State Police Clearance and ACT
151 Child Abuse Clearance/FBI Fingerprints (via DPW) as conditions of
employment. Due to the volume of responses anticipated, only qualified
candidates will be contacted. E.O.E. M/F/V/H. NO PHONE CALLS.
Medical/Health
Full Time- Community
Support Worker
Seeking a gentleman for a full-time position working with an
adult in a community oriented, developmental disabilities, day
program setting. The position requires a valid PA drivers
license and a high school diploma or equivalent. The ideal
candidate will be creative, energetic, and flexible.
Previous experience is a preferred.
Hours are 7:30 to 3:30,
M-F. Benefit package included.
Step By Step, Inc. Cross Valley Commons
744 Kidder St. Wilkes-Barre, Pa 18702
www.stepbystepusa.com
skauffman@stepbystepusa.com
(570) 829-3477 EXT. 605 EOE
Medical/Health
The Institute for Human
Resources and Services, Inc. is seeking candidates for
the following position:
residential program Worker
The primary responsibility is to assist adults with intellectual
disabilities in their homes. Applicants must be available to work
evenings and every other weekend and must possess a valid
PA drivers license and a high school diploma or
equivalency. The base rate is $9.20/hr.
during the training period and $10.00/hr. after the
completion of the training period.
Apply in person or email
resume to adeeds@ihrser.com
The Institute for Human
Resources and Services, Inc.
250 Pierce Street, Suite 301
Kingston, PA 18704
(Fax) 570-288-9112 EOE
Sales / Business Development
Keystone Automotive
Operations, Inc.
44 Tunkhannock Ave
Exeter, Pa 18643
Inside Sales Representative RV Parts & Accessories
Looking for candidates with customer service/ sales back-
ground. Automotive/ RV experience preferred but not
necessary. Interested candidates should have good
communication skills, be able to meet deadlines, be organized,
detail oriented and have experience in building
customer relationships.
Position will be located in our Exeter, Pa location, and we offer
attractive benefits including medical, 401 k, holidays
and vacation time.
Resumes can be submitted:
in person at 44 Tunkhannock Ave, Exeter Pa
or emailed to Jamie.panusky@key-stone.com EOE
Sales / Business Development
SALES
CAREER OPPORTUNITY
EXPERIENCED COMMISSION
SALES PERSONS
WANTED TO SERVICE NEW AND EXISTING
ACCOUNTS. COMPANY BENEFITS,
VACATION AND PAID TRAINING.
IF YOU WANT A CAREER AND NOT A JOB
CALL RICK AT 675-3283
TO SCHEDULE AN INTERVIEW MON-FRI
OR VISIT WWW.CMSEAST.COM
Real Estate Auction
Exeter, PAPublic Estate Auction on Saturday, October 5th
Open HOuSe: Sat., Sept. 21St frOm 9am tO nOOn!
12 Noon Real Estate: Nice Well Maintained 3 bedroom ranch w/full basement located at
108 Washington Street, Exeter, PA
Real Estate Terms: $7,500 cash or certifed check. Balance in 45 days
Personal Property @ 10am: 2006 Jeep Grand Cherokee (32,551 miles)
& 2009 Honda Accord (27,372 miles), plus antiques & collectibles.
Bring your chairs and enjoy an Estate Auction!!!
Personal Property Terms: 10% Buyers Premium. Cash or Pre-Approved Check.
Hartzells auction Gallery Inc.
521 Richmond Road, Bangor, PA18013
610/588/5831 1-800-724-6808 www.hartzellsauction.com
PA# AU 000395-L AH - 1919 EST. 1943
80103219
Travel Entertainment
BROADWAY
SHOW
BUS TRIPS
KInKY BOOtS
WeD. nOV. 6tH
$165. (mID meZZ SeatS)
CInDereLLa
WeD., nOV 6tH
$159 (OrCHeStra SeatS)
JerSeY BOYS
WeD., OCt 16tH
$129 (frOnt meZZ
SeatS)
raDIO CItY
CHrIStmaS SHOW
mOn DeC. 2nD
$99 (Orchestra Seats)
a CHrIStmaS StOrY
Sat., DeC. 14tH
$165 (frOnt meSS SeatS)
Pick Ups from Pittston &
Wilkes-Barre Park & Rides
CALL ROSEANN @ 655-4247
To Reserve Your Seats
fun GetaWaYS!
Giants/eagles 10/6
Yankees vs
Sf Giants 9/22
Broadway:
"newsies" 9/14
matilda 9/14
Salem & Boston
Halloween, Oct. 18-21
1-800-432-8069
NEW
NONSTOP
FLIGHTS
philadelphia to
puerto Vallarta
Jan. 25 to Jan. 31, 2014
From only $1378.00
per person
All Inclusive Package
CALL
tenenBaumS
traVeL
tODaY!
Other dates and rates
available, call for details
Phone: 570-288-8747
All rates are per person,
subject to Change and
Money To Lend
We can erase your bad credit -
100% GUARANTEED. Attorneys
for the Federal Trade Commission
say theyve never seen a legitim-
ate credit repair operation. No one
can legally remove accurate and
timely information from your credit
report. Its a process that starts with
you and involves time and a con-
scious effort to pay your debts.
Learn about managing credit and
debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message
from The Times Leader and the
FTC.
Business / Strategic Management
Full-Time
Service Manager
needed for growing company
in Ashley. Commonwealth
Equipment offers competitive
pay and benefits including
health, dental, vision and
prescription coverage and
IRA plan. Successful
candidate will be a confident,
seasoned manager with
proven success in super-
vising and scheduling remote
employees in an industrial en-
vironment, will possess strong
leadership skills and profi-
ciency in Windows environ-
ment, and an ability to man-
age ever-changing priorities
and demanding situations.
This is a very rewarding
opportunity for the right can-
didate. For full job description
and more information, email
Rob Lent at
staffing@commonwealth
equipment.com
No phone calls please.
GENERAL MANAGER
PRIVATE GOLF CLUB
Back Mountain Club seeks
General Manager with a min-
imum of five years experience
in private club management,
with a strong emphasis on
restaurant operations. Golf
club experience preferred.
Salary commensurate with
experience. Full benefit
package. Reply to:
Huntsville Golf Club,
P.O. Box 13, Lehman, PA
18627-0013.
Child/Elderly Care
FAMILIES
URGENTLY NEEDED
More children than ever
before can no longer live in
their own homes. You can
help by becoming a foster
parent. Call FCCY at
1-800-747-3807. EOE
Education
CHILDCARE
TEACHERS
NEEDED AT OUR
Wilkes-Barre, Dallas and
Mountain Top Locations.
CALL 570.905.3322
Ask for Lake Gemzik
or email resume to
lgemzik@buildingblocks
learningcenter.com
Electrical / Plumbing
ELECTRICIANS
Experienced electricians
wanted. Minimum 5 years
commercial construction
experience.
Fax/email resume to
570- 639-5383
jthomas813@excite.com
Help Wanted General
HOMELESS CASE
MANAGER
Local agency looking to hire
individual for client intake and
assessment, goal setting,
coordination and linkage with
community resources, and
establishment of client/work-
er relationship. Bachelors
Degree in related subject,
good interpersonal commu-
nication and organizational
skills are required. Position
requires local travel and a full
time work schedule including
some evening hours. Com-
petitive Salary. Send cover
letter and resume to:
Human Resources,
PO Box 2115, Wilkes-Barre,
PA 18703 or e-mail to:
cmat@epix.net
Equal Opportunity Employer.
Help Wanted General
TAX
PREPARER
Free Tax School. Earn extra
income after taking course.
Flexible schedules. Small fee
for books & supplies.
LIBERTY TAX
Edwardsville & West Pittston
570-288-4007
Pittston & Plains
570-883-7829
Dallas 570-675-2240
Wilkes-Barre & Hanover Twp
570-208-1096
Installation / Maintenace / Repair
OutDOOr
pOWer
eQuIpment
(Ope)
teCHnICIan/
meCHanIC
Minimum 5 years experience
diagnosing / repairing small
engi ne power equi pment ,
plows, tractors, mowers, etc.
Will have OPE factory training
on motors, transmissions, hy-
draulics, electrical, pneumat-
ics or other components. Must
have your own tools. Call Bri-
an at Harvis HR Service 570-
542-5330 or send resume to:
hilbertsequipment.jobs
@gmail.com
IT/Software Development
SYSTEM/NETWORK
ADMINISTRATOR
Local non-profit organization
is currently seeking a quali-
fied individual to fill the
position of System/Network
Administrator. Duties include
the administration and
support of a relational data-
base in a multi-location envir-
onment; and providing train-
ing, support and troubleshoot-
ing/technical assistance.
Interested candidates should
have knowledge of Windows
network environment,
intranet/internet technologies,
database management, and
experience in report writing.
B.S. in Information Techno-
logy, Computer Science, or a
related field plus 1 2 years
experience is required. Full-
Time Position - Competitive
Salary plus excellent benefit
package. Send resume and
letter of interest to:
Human Resources,
PO Box 2115,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703 or
e-mail to cmat@epix.net
Equal Opportunity Employer.
Logistics/Transportation
DRIVERS
NEEDED
CDL CLASS A
Full time. Home Daily.
Monday-Friday, night work.
Must have clean MVR & back-
ground with minimum of 1 year
experience. Must have doubles
endorsement. Benefits
available. Call Todd
570-991-0316
CLASS A CDL
DRIVER
Small trucking company
looking for qualified drivers to
run Regional and OTR. Must
be at least 24 yrs of age & a
minimum of 2 yrs experience,
with clean driving record.
Average over $1,000 a week.
Interested drivers can call
Howard at 570-417-4722
WATER TRUCK
DRIVER
Full Time, Part Time, Days,
Nights and Weekends. Class
A or B with tanker. Experi-
ence preferred. Must have
clean MVR. Pay based on
experience. Serious inquires
only. Call: 570-899-0336
Maintenance / Domestic
MAINTENANCE
PERSON
PRM, Inc. located at 102 N.
Main St., Old Forge, is look-
ing for a part time mainten-
ance person to handle main-
tenance in and around our
7,500 sq. ft. building. Can-
didate must have reliable
transportation and be willing
to work a flexible on-call
schedule as an independent
contractor. Please contact
Sherry @570-457-7020 for
more details and to set up
an interview. Wage is $10
per hour. 1099 issued at
year end.
Medical/Health
CAREGIVERS
Looking for compassionate
people to assist the elderly in
their homes. Personal care
and transportation required.
All shifts and flexible hours
available. Call 338-2681
or visit homeinstead.com/494
to apply.
MEDICAID SPECIAL FIELD
REPRESENTATIVE
ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A
CHALLENGING POSITION?
Healthcare Receivable Spe-
cialists, Inc. (HRSI) is looking
for a unique individual who
works well independently and
lives in the Wilkes-Barre area.
This is an extremely reward-
ing position and requires that
you work in a local hospital or
at a patients home, interview-
ing and assisting patients in
the Medicaid/Medical Assist-
ance application process. You
must have a current drivers
license and a reliable vehicle.
We offer competitive
salary/benefits package and
expenses.
If this sounds like the job for
you, please fax your resume
to HR at 215-928-0382 or
email: pschimpf@hrsi1.com
MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
Part time 20-24 hours per
week. Computer ski l l s a
must. Send resume to:
POSITION # 4510
c/o Times Leader
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 1871
MEDICAL
RECEPTIONIST
Full time Medical
Receptionist for Mountain
Top office. Send resume:
The Times Leader
Position #4520
15 N. main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
PART TIME
RN OR LPN
for busy surgical office. Prior
experiece preferred.
Send resume to:
Surgical Specialists Care of
Office Manager,
200 South River Street,
Plains, Pa 18705 or fax to:
570-821-1108
Village at Greenbriar
Assisted Living
personal Care aides
2nd and 3rd shifts
Good Starting Wages!
Will Train!!
APPLY WITHIN:
4244 Memorial Highway
Dallas, PA 18612
Technical Trades
Experienced Heavy
Equipment Mechanic
Class B CDL required. Must
have 3 years experience &
own tools. Working on
engines, electrical, hydraulics,
power train, welding.
Machine Shop experience a
plus. Apply in person:
703 S Township Blvd, Pitt-
ston, PA 18640
Cemetery Plots
DENNISON CEMETARY
Forty Fort
5 lots, good location
along road.
$2,000 for all.
717-695-9740
Commercial
DALLAS TWP.
Convenient location for your
business in high traffic area.
MLS 13 645
$169,900
Jennifer Atherholt
903-5107
718-4959
Looking for a Place
to do Business?
A place to start Fresh?
This Could Be Your Answer!
Two homes, sideby-side; In-
cludes a 3 bedroom home to
live in, a store to work out of,
an income generating apart-
ment to rent, a two car gar-
age, a product-prep area,
and four walk-in coolers/
freezers to maintain product.
Perfect for any small busi-
ness where refrigeration is
required. Quiet residential
area in Hanover
Section of Nanticoke.
Priced Right! 301-642-3838
& ask for Russ.
LUZERNE
95 Kelly Street
Business Opportunity for this
5000 sq.ft. professional build-
ing in high traffic area.
Unlimited potential. Includes
offices and plenty of show
room space. Ample Parking.
Call Joe 570-574-5956
SWOYERSVILLE
Great i nvestment property. On
corner lot. Close to all major high-
ways & conveniences. Bring all of-
fers. 1 unit needs to be updated &
you are all done. MLS #13-1983.
$155,900
Call Pat Doty at
570-394-6901 or 696-2468
Commercial
BEST $1 SQ. FT.
LEASES
YOULL EVER SEE!
WILKES-BARRE
Warehouse, light manufactur-
ing distribution. Gas heat,
sprinklers, overhead doors,
parking. We have 27,000
sq.ft., and 32,000 sq. ft.
There is nothing this good!
Sale or Lease
Call Larry @ 570-696-4000
or 570-430-1565
For Sale By Owner
EXETER
39 Memorial Street
Great location near schools,
nice yard, 10 rooms, 4 bed-
rooms, 2 bath, gas heat,
private driveway. Detached
2 car garage. Walk-up attic,
f ul l basement . As I s.
$69, 900. 570- 474- 0340
SHAVERTOWN
4 Marilyn Drive
Well-maintained 2,450 sq. ft.
home with 4 bedrooms, 1.75
baths, attached 2 car garage on
1.09 acre. Finished basement with
laundry room. Hardwood floors
and carpeting. New roof, Guardi-
an backup generator, large
wrap-around deck. Located on a
quiet cul-de-sac with
wooded surroundings.
PRICED REDUCED!
Asking $230,000
Call 570-357-8126
Houses For Sale
S. WILKES-BARRE
REDUCED $89,900
43 Richmont Ave.
Near Riverside Park. Motiv-
ated seller, make reasonable
offer. 3 bedroom, 2 bath Cape
Cod, central air, hardwood
f l oor, above ground pool ,
f enced yard.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-789
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
FORTY FORT
30 Bedford Street
Duplex, 1st floor, 2 bedroom
1 bath. 2nd floor, 3 bedroom
& 1 bath. Two car off street
parking. $68,000
570-406-2333
Houses For Sale
ASHLEY
8-10 E. Hartford Street
Well cared for home/invest-
ment property. Move in
ready. 2 spacious bedrooms
on each side with additional
3rd floor living/storage space.
Full basement, large back-
yard. Quiet area on
dead end street.
Pre-qualified Buyers
/Principal Only
$56,500
Call 570-287-2073
BEAR CREEK
Spaciously satisfying from the
open kitchen/eating area, im-
pressive. Fireplace in great
room to an expanded family
room, you will enjoy life more
in this picturesque 4 bedroom
in Laurel Brook Estates.
MLS 13 1587
$372,000
Arlene Warunek
570-714-6112
570-696-1195
HARDING
Country living at its finest, yet
close to everything. Custom
built with Master BR on 1st
floor, full finished walk out
basement. 4/5 bedrooms of-
fer plenty of space. Open
floor plan that is great for en-
tertaining that flows out into
the huge deck overlooking an
in-ground pool with fireplace
& Tiki bar. Plenty of room for
play on 1.5 acres. 3 car gar-
age - A Must See!
MLS# 13-2854
$450,000
Call Terry Eckert
760-6007
DALLAS/LEHMAN
2 bedroom, 1 bath, New
Windows, Roof, porches and
siding. Remodeled kitchen.
5 Acres. $159,000 NEG.
570-675-0498
timesleader.com
Get news when
it happens.
Get all the
advertising
inserts
with the
latest sales.
Call 829-5000
to start your
home delivery.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Thursday, September 12, 2013 PAGE 3D
Other
Other
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
Would you like to deliver newspapers
as an Independent Contractor
under an agreement with
THE TIMES LEADER?
Call Terry to make an appointment
at 570-829-7138
KINGSTON
SWOYERSVILLE
WILKES-BARRE
LEE PARK
PLYMOUTH
WAPWALLOPEN
SWEET HUNLOCK CREEK
TRUCKSVILLE
Call Jim McCabe to make an appointment
at 570-970-7450
Trucksville
Shavertown
Lehman/Harveys Lake
Lee Park
Hilldale
Wyoming
Glen Lyon
South Wilkes-Barre
Houses For Sale
COURTDALE
Corby Road
NEWON THE MARKET!
TRANQUILITY!
Scenic wooded lot with beautiful
view in the Fall & Winter. Private
and secluded great for building
your dream, camping and has ac-
cess for hunting .Seller Negoti-
able.
MLS#13-3739
$ 15,000
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Please call Michele Hopkins
570-540-6046
DALLAS
VIEWMONT ACRES
All this 2.8+ acre lot needs is
your vision for your dream
home. Located i n a qui et
country setting, this partially
cleared lot has a great view of
t he mount ai ns. Sept i c i s
already on site and ready for
building.
MLS #13-1705
Only $65,000
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
570-696-3801
DALLAS
Newberry Estate
The Greens
OPEN HOUSE
Sun., August 18, 1-4
4,000 sq. ft. condo with view
of ponds & golf course. Three
bedrooms on 2 floors. 5 1/2
baths, 2 car garage & more.
New Price $399,000.
MLS# 12-1480
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
DALLAS
If you are looking for privacy
yet close to everything this is
the house. Situated on .93
acres the home has a newly
remodeled kitchen and bath
with granite counter tops. 24
hour notice to show owner oc-
cupied.
MLS #13-3407
$184,900
Call Brenda Pugh
760-7999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
288-1444
EXETER
13 Thomas Street
Handicap accessible. 2 bedroom
rancher with vinyl siding. Modern
kitchen and walk-in shower. Cent-
ral air conditioning. One car gar-
age. 3 season porch. Nice fenced
rear yard. MLS # 13-2428.
$87,500
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty, Inc.
570-822-5126.
Houses For Sale
DALLAS
NEW LISTING!
40 CLAUDE ST.
5 year young ranch home in
the Dallas Sch. Dist. Conveni-
ent 1-floor living includes
large modern kitchen with tile
floor & countertops, dining
area, LR, 3BRs & 2 full BAs.
For additional living space,
the LL is finished with a fam-
ily room & space for a gym,
playroom hobby room, etc. An
attached deck & a large level
yard provides ample space
for outdoor cooking & activit-
ies. OSP. For more details &
to view the photos online go
to: www.prudentialrealestate.com
and enter PRU9Y5P8 in the
Home Search. This home is
also for rent. #13-3371.
$199,900
Mary Ellen or Walter
Belchick
696-6566
696-2600
DALLAS
NEW LISTING!
45 OLD GRANDVIEW AVE.
Make your new home a me-
ticulously maintained bi-level
in the Dallas Sch. Dist. This
property offers 3BRS, 2 mod-
ern baths, modern kitchen,
LR, and formal DR. For relax-
ation and entertaining there is
a 3-season room off the kit-
chen and a large FR in the LL
wi th Berber carpet and a
wood-burning fireplace. All
appliances and window treat-
ments remain, so it is truly
move-in ready. Call today
for your private showing.or
more details and to view the
phot os onl i ne, go t o:
www.prudenti al real estate.com
and enter PRU3J2D2 in the
Home Search.
MLS #13-3552
$196,500
Walter or Mary Ellen
Belchick
696-6566
696-2600
DALLAS
Beautifully decorated, open
floor plan, excellent location,
this home features gorgeous
Amish wood floors, tile floors
in kitchen & baths, huge fam-
ily room built for entertaining,
inviting deck & yard.
MLS #13-3665
$299,000
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
Houses For Sale
DALLAS
Cozy, comfortable home with
3 bedrooms, living room with
cathedral ceiling & fireplace,
formal dining room, eat-in kit-
chen, screened in porch &
laundry room. Includes lovely
studio apartment with deck,
perfect for family member. 2
car garage.
$239,900
Call RUTH K. SMITH
570-696-5411
570-696-1195
DALLAS TWP.
Convenient location for your
business in high traffic area.
MLS 13 645
$169,900
Jennifer Atherholt
903-5107
718-4959
DALLAS
20 Westminster Drive
Attractive brick ranch in good
location, close to schools and
shopping. 9 rooms, 4 bed-
rooms and 2 baths, 3 season
porch overlooking large level
rear yard. Hardwood and wall
to wall carpeting. Gas heat.
Two car garage. New roof.
MLS#13-3473
$179,000
Call Sandra Gorman
570-696-5408
570-696-1195
DRUMS
Bright, sunny raised ranch with
beautifully landscaped yard. Cul-
de-sac location. Large oak kitchen
with skylights and beamed ceiling
in dining area. Wood burning fire-
place in the living room. Large Mas-
ter bedroom suite. Family room,
hobby room, huge garage and
deck.
MLS#13-1638
$164,900
Call Mary Ann Desiderio
570-715-7733
Mountain Top
570-474-6307
Houses For Sale
DUPONT
Very nice 2 story, move in con-
di t i on. Ori gi nal woodwork,
stained glass windows, hard-
wood under carpet, fenced
yard on corner lot.
MLS#13-2310
$95,000
Arlene Warunek
714-6112
696-1195
DUPONT
7 Sky Top Drive
$234,900
Immaculate condition & move
in ready! 3 bedroom, 1 3/4
bath, raised ranch. In ground
pool. Modern kitchen, tile &
hardwood floors, 2 gas fire-
places, security system, cent-
ral air.
www.atlasrealty.com
MLS 13 3437
Call Brian Harashinski
570-237-0689
KINGSTON
$139,900
129 S. Dawes Ave.
Three bedroom, 2 bath cape cod
wi th central ai r, new wi ndows,
doors, carpets and tile floor. Full
concrete basement with 9' ceilings.
Walking distance to Wilkes Barre.
Electric and Oil heat. MLS #12-
3283. For more information and
photos visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
Houses For Sale
DURYEA
$73,500
Commercial/Residential
Wonderful opportunity to live
and have your business on the
same property! Many uses for
t h i s s t o r e f r o n t / w a r e
h o u s e / s h o p / g a r a g e .
Call Christine Kutz
(570)332-8832
for more information.
570-613-9080
DURYEA
New Price!!!
$58,900
Commercial or Residential
Great opportunity to live and
work in the same building, or
keep current tenant and use
the storefront for your busi-
ness. Former storefront fea-
tures open concept w/original
wood floors. Spacious resid-
ence features 3 bedrooms,
back porch and yard.
Call Christine
for a showing!
(570)332-88832
570-613-9080
LAFLIN
20 OLD MILL ROAD
Spacious Modern Tri-Level,
4 bedroom with 3.5 bath,
Large Kitchen, family room
with fireplace, dining room
and living room. Attached 3
car garage, gas heat, cent-
ral air, central vac-system.
Closet and Storage Space.
Second lot included. Minutes
from I-81 and Pennsylvania
Turn pike. $374,900.
570-237-0101
Houses For Sale
DURYEA
REDUCED
$79,900
226 Church St.
Large 2 story with 3 bedrooms and
2 full baths. Extra large room sizes,
stained glass and natural woodo-
work. Not flooded in 2011. MLS
#13-190. For more information and
photos visit atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Charlie
EXETER
206 Cedar Street
$88,900
Neat & tidy low maintenance
home with three bedrooms,
large unfinished basement,
rear carport. No grass to cut.
MLS #13-1914
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
FORTY FORT
REDUCED 10K!
56 Oak Street
A Lovely Single family house
with hardwood floors,
throughout. 3 season side
porch, large closets in all 3
bedrooms. Walk-up attic for
additional storage space, and
so much more. Check it out!
MLS# 13-3149. $135,000
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
Houses For Sale
FORTY FORT
1426 Wyoming Ave.
REDUCED $189,900
You will fall in love with the grand
Victorian with magnificent entry
foyer, modern kitchen with new
counter tops, enclosed 3 season
side and rear porch. Renovated
large front porch, off street park-
ing and so much more! Property
could also be Professional office
in home use.
MUST SEE. MLS 12-3604
Jay A. Crossin
Extension 23
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
FORTY FORT
75 Filbert Street.
Wonderfully maintained 3
bedroom Cape Cod
with a modern eat-in kitchen.
First floor bedroom, bath and
family room, Large master
bedroom (15x16) with lots of
closet space. Aluminum sid-
ing. Replacement windows.
Fenced rear yard. Gas heat.
Corner lot. MLS # 13-3247.
$117,500
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty, Inc.
570-822-5126.
FORTY FORT
52 Ransom Street
Recently renovated and up-
dated this double block is cur-
rently 100% occupied. Little
exterior maintenance or yard-
work for landlord. Current
rents $700 and $750 per
month plus utilities. Corner
lot. Off street parking for each
tenant. Granite kitchens,
hardwood floors, Living
Room, Dining Room, 3 Bed-
rooms and bath in each unit.
MLS# 13-809.
$114,900
Call Kevin Smith
696-5420
timesleader.com
Get news
when it
happens.
timesleaderautos.com
Find Your Next
Vehicle Online.
PAGE 4D Thursday, September 12, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Commercial
THE OFFICE CENTERS
5 Kingston Locations
Full Service Leases Custom Design Renovation Various Size Suites Available
Medical, Legal, Commercial Utilities Parking Janitorial
Full Time Maintenance Staff Available
For Rental Information call 570-287-1161
Apartments /Townhouses
Immediate efficiency occupancy
Located near shopping & transportation. Temple Apartments
offers efficiencies & one bedroom apartments for income quali-
fied individuals ages 62 or older and/or needing the features of
a mobility impaired unit.
Apartment amenities include:
Accessible features-fully equipped kitchen-Wall to wall carpet-
ing-Ceramic tiled baths-On-site management-On-site mainten-
ance with 24-hour emergency response-On-site laundry-Inter-
com entry system-Social services coordinator on-site
Leasing office located at:
5 Heisz Street- Edwardsville, PA 18704
T: 570-283-2275-TDD 1.800.545.1833 x646
PENNROSE
Apartments /Townhouses
IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE
1 BEDROOM APARTMENTS AVAILABLE
Martin D. Popky Apartments
61 E. Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
Affordable Senior Apartments
Income Eligibility Required
Utilities Included! Low cable rates;
New appliances; Laundry on site;
Activities! Curbside Public Transportation
Please call 570-825-8594
D/TTY 800-654-5984
Apartments /Townhouses
EAST
MOUNTAIN
APARTMENTS
The good life...
close at hand
Regions Best
Address
1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.
822-4444
www.EastMountainApt.com
1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.
288-6300
www.GatewayManorApt.com
ApArtments
Gateway
Houses For Sale
GLEN LYON
70 W Enterprise
Large 5 bdrm, 2-1/2 bath
move-in condition home with
Home Warranty included. 3rd
floor has separate heat, small
kitchen and can greatly en-
hance home as bonus area or
rental income. Zoning is R-2.
MLS# 13-2241
$59,900
Call Dana Distasio
474-9801
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
PRICE
REDUCED!
3 Prince St.,
Hanover Green
Great Location, near schools,
Industrial Park, I-81.
Quality-Construction
3 BR, 2+ Bath, Ranch Home.
Immaculate, Move in immedi-
ately. Freshly-Painted Interi-
or & Exterior. Features:
Large Eat-In Kitchen with
New Flooring, plenty of stor-
age, Plaster Walls, Hard-
wood Floors, Refurbished
Tile Baths. Newer Roof, Gut-
ters, Windows, Doors.
Covered Patio, Finished
Basement with Laundry
Room, Workshop & Outside
Entrance. Plenty Off street
parking Lot 100' X 150' Level
& Fenced with Stucco Shed.
Economical 2-Zone Gas
Heat, inc. all gas appliances.
Reasonable Taxes.
One owner,
Selling to settle estate.
Reduced for quick sale:
$143,300Call/Text for
details 570-466-9843.
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
$269,900
Meticulously maintained 4 bed-
room, 2 story, vinyl sided, 5
year old home situated on a
generous lot. Large, modern
kitchen, 3 baths, 1st floor fam-
ily room, 2 car garage, deck
and soooo much mor e!
MLS#11- 2429
Call Florence Keplinger @
715-7737
CENTURY 21
Smith Hourigan Group
570-474-6307
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
5 Highland Drive
(Hanover Hills)
$128,000
Spotless 3 bedroom -1 bath in
Quiet neighborhood. Newer
roof, freshly painted interior
with neutral colors, new floor-
ing in kitchen & dining room,
new carpeting in living room
and lower level family room. 1
car garage with plenty of stor-
age. back yard is fenced in
with a 2 tier deck overlooking
a 24ft above ground pool.
property backs up to the
woods. all appliances stay!
Call for a showing
570-779-3747.
Please leave message.
NANTICOKE
Rear 395 E.
Washington St.
Double Block Home,
Each Side:
Large Living Rm., Kitchen, 2
Bedrooms, 1 Bath, Vinyl Sid-
ing, Brand New Roof New:
Berber Carpets, Paint, Floor-
ing, With Backyard Deck
length of House Have In-
come Tomorrow or Live for
Free! Appraised at $65,000
listing at $47,950 or
BEST OFFER!!!
570-916-2043
Houses For Sale
HANOVER TWP
Newer construction offers open
concept between ultra-modern
kitchen, eat-in area w/sliders &
FR; light & bright throughout!
Formal LR & office or den. 2nd
fl r l ends to MBR w/WIC &
MBA, 3 additional BRs & 2nd
fl r bath. Rear deck, huge
fenced yard, gas FWA & cent-
ral A/C, 2 car garage. Con-
venient to shopping, bus stop,
walking path, restaurants.
MLS# 13-3541
$260,000
Call Lynda Rowinski
262-1196
696-1195
HANOVER TWP.
PRICE REDUCED
227 Red Coat Lane
Liberty Hills
An absolutely wonderful, must
see, home with many desirable
features. Lower level remodeled in
2009 is A-1 grade including family
room with fantastic gas fireplace,
wet bar, 3/4 bath & additional 4th
bedroom. Home also includes
new on demand tank less water
heater, securi ty system & i n
ground lawn sprinkler. Owners
have enjoyed this home for many
years, now it's your turn. Come &
take a look!
MLS# 13-2335
$259,900
Call Jim Banos
Call or text 570-991-1883
For appointment
jim.banos@
coldwellbanker.com
Town & Country
Real Estate
570-474-2340
HANOVER TWP.
Very neat & clean 2 story
single family home with 3
bedrooms, 1st floor bath, eat-
in kitchen, pantry, & formal
DR. Fenced yard. Gas
f orced ai r heat .
$59,900
Call RUTH K. SMITH
570-696-5411
570-696-1195
BERWICK
Lovely 2-Story Home in Nice
Residential Neighborhood!
Features Living Room, Din-
ing Room, Kitchen/Adjacent
Family Room, 3 Bedrooms,
2.5 Baths with Gas Heat &
Central Air + 2-Car Attached
Garage.
MLS 20 52633
Price: $210,000
Call Patsy @ 570-204-0983
Strausser
Real Estate
570-759-3300
NANTICOKE
393 E. Noble St.
Check out this 4 bedroom, 1.5 bath
home with 1 car detached garage.
This home features a Jacuzzi tub,
newer roof, furnace, hot water heat-
er, replacement windows, fenced
yard and large covered deck.
MLS 13-613
$77,900
Call John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
Houses For Sale
HUNTINGTON TWP.
Looking for that country living
while your still close to town?
Only 25 minutes from town.
Come live in this cozy 2 story
Cape Cod nestled in a coun-
try setting on a .99 acre lot.
Very well maintained, move in
condition, with lots of closet
space, a 11' x 21' deck and a
Florida room with a knotty
pine ceiling. Don't worry about
losing power, home comes
w/a portable generator w/its
own transfer box.
MLS 13 3364
$149,000
Call Michael Nocera
696-5412
696-1195
KINGSTON
Beautifully maintained home
which features 4 bedrooms,
2.5 baths, family room and re-
cently remodeled kitchen with
cherry cabinets and granite
countertops. Tile floor in foyer
and kitchen, master bedroom
and master bath with a whirl-
pool tub. The home has Pella
windows throughout.
MLS#13-3309
$189,000
Everett Davis
417-8733
696-2600
KINGSTON
283 REYNOLDS ST.
Spacious four bedroom home
with plenty of charm. Hard-
wood floors, leaded windows,
accent fireplace and built-in
bookshelves. First floor laun-
dry/power room, three-sea-
son porch and a 16x32 in-
ground pool. Move-in condi-
tion with newer roof, siding
and windows, ductless air, all
appliances and alarm system.
#13-3406
$189,900
Carole Poggi
283-9100 x19
KINGSTON
Roomy, bright & cheery de-
scribes this 3 story home with
traditional charm. 5 BR, 2.5
BA, 2 stairways , wood fire-
place, solid wood doors, 3rd
fl. would make a great in-law
suite. One Year Home War-
ranty Included!
MLS 13-3669
$229,000
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
Houses For Sale
KINGSTON TWP.
Bodle Road
2 story older home with up-
graded kitchen & bath, Large
l i vi ng room, formal di ni ng
room, lower level family room.
Hot water heat, garage & car-
port. 1.1 acre lot.
MLS #13-2320
$150,000
Besecker Realty
675-3611
KINGSTON
REDUCED!
80 James St.
This stately 4 bedroom, 1.5
bath Kingston home has the
WOW factor! Meti culousl y
well cared for with old world
touches throughout. Like a
stained glass window, built
ins and tiled fireplace in living
room. Kitchen is modern eat
in with washer/dryer closet for
conveni ence. Large f ront
porch, rear deck and de-
tached garage.
MLS 13-1761
$268,500
Jay A. Crossin
Extension #23
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
LAFLIN
130 HAVERFORD DRIVE
SELLER SAYS SELL!
Come take a look at this 3
bedroom, 1.5 bath townhome.
It has been freshly painted
and carpet, sports a new kit-
chen gas range. The lower
level is finished. Great rear
deck for entertaining, nicely
landscaped.
GREAT BUY! PRICE HAS
BEEN REDUCED!
MLS#12-2801
$92,000
Pat Silvi 283-9100 ext. 21
283-9100
LAFLIN
130 HAVERFORD DRIVE
SELLER SAYS SELL!
Come take a look at this 3
bedroom, 1.5 bath townhome.
It has been freshly painted
and carpet, sports a new kit-
chen gas range. The lower
level is finished. Great rear
deck for entertaining, nicely
landscaped.
GREAT BUY!
PRICE REDUCED!
MLS#12-2801
$89,900
Pat Silvi 283-9100 ext. 21
283-9100
NANTICOKE
38 E. Union Street
Nice single, 3 bedrooms, gas
heat, large yard. Central location.
REDUCED TO $49,500
TOWNE & COUNTRY
REAL ESTATE
Call 570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
PLYMOUTH
28 E. Railroad Street
Single home, fenced yard. Oil
baseboard, aluminum siding.
Asking $29,000, negotiable.
570-574-8957
Houses For Sale
LAFLIN
New Price
$119,900
111 Laflin Road
Nice 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath Split
Level home with hardwood
fl oors, 1 car garage, l arge
yard and covered patio in very
convenient location. Great curb
appeal and plenty of off street
parking. Rt. 315 to light @
Laflin Rd. Turn west onto Laflin
Rd. Home is on left.
For more info and photos
visit: www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-3229
Keri Best
570-885-5082
SWEET VALLEY
Lake Lehman Schools
2 Story on 4 Acres. 4
bedrooms with wrap around
porch and large deck.
Call Joe Humphrey
Century 21 Mertz & Assoc.
Cell 570-259-7547,
Office 570-275-2121
LARKSVILLE
$145,900
511 E. State St.
Everythi ng you need i s i n thi s
house. 4 bedrooms, lower level
family room, den open, living/din-
ing room, nice yard with above
ground pool and covered patio, ex-
tra parking. 1 car garage. Very well
maintained home. Move right in!
MLS 13-2432
CALL COLLEEN
570-237-0415
LARKSVILLE
MOTIVATED SELLER
$54,900
Three bedroom, 1 bath, 6
rooms, plus laundry room on
first floor, new pool & shed.
New tilt out windows, gas fur-
nace 6 years old, new screen
doors 7 doors, newer roof
MLS#13-2900
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom
570-262-7716
LEHMAN TWP
Don't miss out on this 2 story
country home situated on 2.15
acres w/above ground pool
that has 2 decks attached &
fl ower beds al l around the
grounds. Mod. kitchen and
open floor plan. 24 hour notice
required. Owner occupied.
MLS#13-3343
$184,900
Call Brenda Pugh
760-7999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
288-1444
Houses For Sale
PITTSTON
MLS 13-3293
$79.900
This cozy and quaint home
awaits you! Quiet neighbor-
hood, yet walking distance to
the revitalized downtown. Adja-
cent property (fixer-upper) also
available. Can be purchased
together.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Call Jullio Caprari
570 592 3966
MOUNTAIN TOP
A 1.17 acre serene setting &
a l arge pi cni c grove wi th
stream makes this move in
ready 3 BR bi level a must
see property! Theres an eat
in kitchen with breakfast bar,
a formal DR with sliders to a
private deck, ample LR with
picture window, Master BR
suite, 25 LL Rec Room with
bath, oversized 2 car gar-
age with large paved drive.
MLS 13 3516
$259,000
Call Pat today @
570-287-1196
570-287-1196
MOUNTAIN TOP
Well cared for 2 story on quiet
street. Eat in kitchen, dining
room, living room along with
sun room comprise the first
floor. 2 generous bedrooms w/
closets and full bath on 2nd
floor. Walk up attic provides
easy storage. Hardwood floors
and beautiful wood. 2 addition-
al buildings on lot offer many
possibilities and Storage! 1
year Home Warranty to buyer.
MLS 13 2817
$124,900
Linda Gavio
474-2231, ext 19
TOWN & COUNTRY
PROPERTIES
474-2340
Penn Lake
Lakefront Cottage
(pennlake.org).
3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom,
large living room, large en-
closed heated porch, eat-in
kitchen, laundry room, at-
tached shed, wood burning
stove, electric baseboard
heat, 1300 sq. feet, public
sewer. Beautiful views and
wonderful lake community.
Some furniture negotiable.
No realtors please.
Call 856-217-9531
or 610-357-3338
or email preedys@aol.com
Houses For Sale
NANTICOKE
Premier property in the city of
Nanti coke. Corner Lot--E.
Nobl e and Col l ege. Very
large, well kept home. Nice
yard. Detached garage. Large
rooms wi th mother-i n-l aw
sui te...separate uti l i ti es.
MLS#13-614
$154,900
Call Charles Boyek
430-8487
675-5100
NANTICOKE
PRICE REDUCED!!
1472 S. HANOVER ST.
Well maintained bi-level, re-
centl y pai nted & move-i n
r eady. Thi s 2BR, 1 and
3/4BA gem is a great starter
home or a convenient downs-
ize with most living space on
one floor. The modern kit-
chen has an eat-in area plus
an addition off the kitchen
currently used as a large DR.
This could be a den, play-
room or office with its own en-
trance. Finished basement
with free-standing propane
stove and a walk-out to the 3-
season room. 1-car garage,
l evel l ot & storage shed.
Make your dream of home
ownership a reality! For more
details and to view the pho-
t o s o n l i n e , g o t o .
www.prudenti al real estate.
com & enter PRU7R4L5 in
the Home Search.
MLS #13-3363
$139,900
Walter or Mary Ellen
Belchick 696-6566
696-2600
PENN LAKE
1529 Lakeview Drive
Cozy 2 bedroom cottage on
the lake! Open living area, 3/4
bath, large deck facing lake.
Double patio doors from kit-
chen and l i vi ng area al l ow
great lake views! Move in and
relax!
MLS#13-2286
Linda Gavio
474-2231, ext 19
TOWN & COUNTRY
PROPERTIES
474-2340
WARRIOR RUN
2 story, 2 bedroom with fenced in
yard, all appliances included.
REDUCED TO $46,000. Call Ed
Appnel. 570-817-2500
WALSH REAL ESTATE
570-654-1490
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Thursday, September 12, 2013 PAGE 5D
Sponsored by
GARAGE & YARD
PLACE YOUR
GARAGE SALE
AD
CALL 829-7130
TODAY
Get all the
advertising
inserts
with the
latest sales.
Call
829-5000
to start your
home delivery.
Estate Sales
DALLAS
MULTI FAMILY YARD SALE
340 Ransom Road
Fri & Sat., Sept. 13 & 14, 8-1
Quality baby & kid's items,
kitchenware, linens
& much more!
WILKES-BARRE
FLEA MARKET
37 E. Thomas Street
Old St. John's Ch.
Sun., Sept 15th, 9-2
Ethnic Foods & A Large
Variety of Gently Used Items
Yard Sale
ASHLEY
James Street
Fri. & Sat. 9/13 & 9/14, 9-4
Our yearly sale is back! Dont
miss this one. All kinds of stuff!
Worth the trip
BEAR CREEK VILLAGE
MOVING SALE
99 Lewis Drive
Sat, Sept 14th, 9-2
Something for Everyone!
Bear Creek/Buck Twp.
LIONS CLUB
Township Municipal
Building
Sat., Sept. 14, 8-3
Vendors Welcome!
$10 per table, bring your own!
Rain or Shine!
BEAR CREEK TWP.
4230 Bear Creek Blvd.
Sat., Sept. 14, 9-2
Furniture, household items
and much more!
CHASE
1/4 mile from Chase Corners,
on Chase Road
Sat, Sept 14th
& Sun., Sept 15th
Custom drapes & valances,
wicker set, table & chairs, sew-
ing machine, new & old tools,
ladder, lamps, clothing, house-
hold items & much more .
Quality items. Priced to sell.
DALLAS
210 EMILY LANE
SAT., 9/14th 9am-1pm
Baby gear - basinette, boun-
cers, swings, high chairs, toys,
clothes, double jogging stroller,
misc household items.
Yard Sale
DALLAS
MOVING SALE
18 Pear Tree Lane
Fri., Sept. 13th, 9-2
Sat., Sept. 14th, 9-2
Household items, crafts, craft
supplies, toys, clothes, ac-
cessori es, beddi ng, l i nens,
di shes, el ect roni cs, smal l
pieces of furniture (large fur-
niture by appointment).
DALLAS
420 Main Street
Rummage & Bake Sale
Prince of Peach
Episcopal Church
Friday, Sept. 12, 9-2
Sat., Sept. 13, 9-12 BAG DAY!
EXETER
Multi-Family Yard Sale
1 Troback Drive
Sat., Sept. 14, 9-3
Everything Must Go!!!
Exercise equipment, DVDs,
crafting items, outdoor items,
holiday decorations, books and
Much More!
EXETER
70 EAST FIRST ST.
SAT., 9/14 8AM-2PM
RAINDATE; SEPT. 15
Househol d i tems, women' s
cl othi ng & shoes.
EXETER
YARD SALE
9 West Packer Avenue
Sat., Sept 14th, 8-2
Excellent Variety of Items!
Great Prices!
FORTY-FORT Yard Sale
1096 Murray Street
Sat., Sept. 14, 8:30-?
Household items, exercise
bike, digital cameras and much
more! Something for everyone!
Forty Fort Huge Sale!
81 Bidlack Street
Fri. & Sat., 7-1
Lots of Mickey Mouse Items,
including phones and lamps, 7
foot Oak dining table, copper
items, sports cards, clothes,
furniture, exercise equipment,
universal gym, Lazy boy Chair
Lift, Collectibles, household
and Much More!
MOUNTAIN TOP
97 GREYSTONE DRIVE
SAT., 9/14, 7:30 am - noon
Furniture, chairs, wicker, tools,
girls clothing size 10-14, bed-
ding, & more.
Yard Sale
HARDING
MULTI-FAMILY SALE
608 Wilson Ave.
Sat., Sept. 14, 9-2
Travel system Stroller, car
seats, dolphin Wizard of Oz
and other collectibles, PS2 and
PS3 games, books, magazines
and DVDs, a quad power
wheel and clothing.
HARVEYS LAKE
MULTI FAMILY
YARD SALE
SAT., SEPT. 14 8AM-3PM
CARPENTER ROAD
from Harvey's Lake turn right
before boathouse bar. Sale on
left side before Sgarlat Lake
Toys, children's clothes, glass-
ware, furniture, baseball cards
& much more!
JENKINS TOWNSHIP
Susquehanna Estates
Community Yard Sale
Over 7 homes
Saturday 9/14, 8-3
Incredible bargains!
Tools, antiques, furniture,
electronics, clothing, etc;
Everything priced to sell!
Directions: To Susquehan-
nock Dr. off W. Saylor Ave in
Jenkins Twp between River Rd
& N. Main St, near Ricks Auto
Body, 1/4 mile south of 8th
Street Bridge.
SWOYERSVILLE
205 WATKINS ST.
Fri. & Sat 9/13 & 9/14
7:30 am - 3 pm
HH items, clothing, TVs, fan,
Chevy Nova car parts includ-
ing hubcaps, indoor/outdoor
furniture, knick-knacks, dishes,
glassware & more!
KINGSTON
32 W. Walnut St.
Sat., Sept. 14, 8 to 1
Everything reasonably priced,
most items under $1.
Rain Date, Sat., Sept. 21.
KINGSTON
57 S. GOODWIN AVE
SAT., 9/14 9AM-12PM
WESTMOOR CHURCH
OF CHRIST
1/2 PRICE
FLEA MARKET
Yard Sale
KINGSTON
FLEA MARKET
Holy Trinity Lutheran Church
813 Wyoming Avenue
Sat., Sept 14th, 8am - 2 pm
38 Outside Vendors,
Food & Book Sale!
KINGSTON Yard Sale
664 Charles Ave.
Sat., Sept. 14, 7-3
Ladies' brand label clothes/size
S&M some L, shoes, PJs, coffee
maker, Misc. Come See!
MOUNTAIN TOP SALE
16 Summit View Dr.
Sat. & Sun., 8-2
Furniture, Household,
Sporting, Knick-Knacks,
Fishing/Hunting and MORE!
MOUNTAIN TOP
26 BRANDYWYN DRIVE
WALDEN PARK
SAT., 9/14, 8AM TO 1PM
MOVING SALE
8 pc DR set, 4 pc XL twin BR
set, household items, NICE
baby girl clothes, HUGE
Rooster collection, Toys, toys,
toys! FREE STUFF TOO!
MOUNTAIN TOP YARD SALE
FAIVIEW HEIGHTS
Summit & Forest Rds.
Sat., Sept 14th, 8:30-12
Car buffer, spray painter, col-
lectible canes, CD's, make up
mirror, wall plaques, vases,
CLOCKS & MUCH MORE!
MOUNTAIN TOP
Bow Creek
Multi-Family Garage Sale
109 Blue Elder Drive
Sat., Sept. 14, 8-1
Something for everyone!
MOUNTAINTOP
YARD SALE
26 Powell Street
Sat., Sept. 14, 8-1
Cl othes, toys, col l ecti bl es,
housewares, 12" TV & more!
MOUNTAIN TOP
Multi-Family Yard Sale
131 Catalpa Ave.
Sat., Sept. 14, 8-7
Juicer, Bike, Leggos, Tupper-
ware, Clothes, Home School-
ing Materials, and Much More!
No Early Birds, Please!
Yard Sale
NANTICOKE
YARD SALE
136 Robert Street
Sat., Sept 14, 9-3
Sport i ng equi pment , pat i o
chai rs, l adi es, men' s, ki d' s
cl othes, toys, dol l s, tool s,
aphgans, jewelry, tool box.
NANTICOKE YARD SALE
687 Pulaski Street
Sat, Sept 14th, 8:30- 2
Bedroom suite, wooden kit-
chen chai rs, sports cards,
clothes, living room chairs.
PITTSTON TWP.
2 FAMILY YARD SALE
1002 Sunrise Drive
Sat., Sept 14, 8-4
Cl o t h i n g , d e c o r a t i o n s
(Holiday), household items,
toys, children's items & much
more. All must go!
PLAINS Birchwood Hills
10 Spruce Avenue
Sat., Sept. 14, 8-1
2 TVs, exercise equipment,
furniture, twin bedding,
perfume, jewelry, designer
clothes, sewing machine
and pictures.
SHAVERTOWN
214 BEECH STREET
FRI. & SAT., 8AM-NOON
Power washer , Skeet er
vacumn, air beds, new men's
Isotoner goves, purses, Pump-
kin soap & candles, mineral &
skin care products, fashion
earrings, women's shoes, used
& new clothes, much more!
SWOYERSVILLE
SIDEWALK SALE
130 Owens street
Sat., Sept 14, 9-1
Clothing, new household
items, lamps, VHS tapes, cas-
settes, holiday & more.
No Early Birds!
WILKES-BARRE
NORTH
807 N. WASHINGTON ST.
Sat., 9/14, 9am-2pm
Kitchenware, small appliances,
Pfaltzgraff, holiday decora-
tions, lamps, luggage, DVDs,
games, women's trail bike,
women's, men's & children's
clothing, kitchen table & assor-
ted furniture & much more!
Yard Sale
THROOP
ESTATE SALE
35 Line Street
Sat., September 14, 2013
9:00-4:30
Directions: 81 N. to Throop
Exit. Turn R onto 347-Go Half
Mile to Line St.
Entire Contents of House.
Including furniture, Mahogany
and Maple Bedroom furniture,
Curio Cabinet, Depression
Glass, Kitchenware, Glass-
ware, Vintage Games, Lots of
Vintage Hunting and Fishing
Magazines, Vintage Sewing
Books and Patterns, Wringer
Washer, Lawn and Garden,
Basement items and Much
More!
SALE BY COOK & COOK
ESTATE LIQUIDATORS
WWW.COOKAND-
COOKESTATE
LIQUIDATORS.COM
WEST PITTSTON
ESTATE SALE
8 Erie Street
Sat., September 14, 2013
8:00-4:00
Directions: Off Wyoming
Avenue
Entire Contents of
House.
Including nice sofas and
other living room furniture,
marble top tables, Retro
Maple Cabinets, Commercial
Sewing Machine and Sewing
Items, glassware and
kitchenware, linens, nice
lamps including Crystal &
Capo-Di-Monte, Religious
Items, holiday, Vintage ladies
coats, basement items and
Much More!
Credit Cards Accepted!
SALE BY COOK & COOK
ESTATE LIQUIDATORS
WWW.COOKAND-
COOKESTATE
LIQUIDATORS.COM
WILKES-BARRE
1345 North Washington St.
Sat., Sept. 14, 8-3
Toys, household, electronics
and clothes $2 a bag.
Yard Sale
WILKES-BARRE
147 LAIRD ST.
SAT. 9/14, 8AM-1PM
CLEANI NG HOUSE. Ki ds
name brand clothes, poker ta-
ble, toys & home decor.
WILKES-BARRE
INDOOR HOUSE SALE
251 GILLIGAN STREET
Sat., Sept. 14th. 8-2
Furniture, household items,
glassware, tools, & more!
WILKES-BARRE
YARD & GIFT SALE
37/41 Wyoming Street
Sat., Sept 14th, 10-4
Sewing machine & cabinet,
handmade home decor items,
computer accessories & more!
WYOMING
565 Monument Ave.
Sat., 8-3 & Sun., 8-12
Tools, household, kids toys a
wide variety of other items!
WYOMING
Crafter and Library Close Out
190 5th Street
Sat., Sept. 14, 9-5
Furniture, books, clothing, craft
supplies, kitchen wares, toys and
numerous other items!
Houses For Sale
PITTSTON
47 Wine St.
Calling all investors and
handy-people! Endless poten-
tial. Great neighborhood. Ad-
jacent property also available.
Call Julio Caprari
MLS#13-3287
570-592-3966
$24,900
PITTSTON
80 Rear Parsonage Street
Move right into this 3 bed-
room, 1 bathroom home with
Pergo floors. New plumbing,
new wiring & new replace-
ment wi ndows. di recti ons:
Main St, Pittston to parson-
age St; left on Miller St; right
on Rear Parsonage St.; home
is on the right.
For more info and photos
visit: www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-3689
$47,900
Keri Best
570-885-5082
Houses For Sale
PITTSTON
76 Rear Parsonage Street
Nice 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom
home with large yard. Direc-
tions: Main St, Pittston to Par-
sonage St.; left on Miller St;
r i ght on Rear par sonage
St reet ; home i s on ri ght .
MLS 13-3690
$37,900
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Keri Best
570-885-5082
PITTSTON
REDUCED $99,900
25 Swallow St.
Grand 2 story home with Vic-
torial features, large eat in kit-
chen with laundry, 3/4 bath on
first floor, 2nd bath with claw
foot tub, lots of closet space.
Move in ready, off street park-
ing in rear. MLS 12-3926
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PLAINS
REDUCED
$189,900
4 Spruce Ave.
BIRCHWOOD HILLS
3 bedrooms, 3 baths. Hardwood
floors, central air. Finished base-
ment with fireplace, great yard, su-
per location. MLS 13-1251
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
Houses For Sale
PLAINS
''Busy People Compatible''.
Enjoy the daily convenience of
living in the vicinity of what's
happeni ng ' ' Woodcrest Es-
tates''. Move in ready, finished
lower level, relax on rear deck
with view of Mohegan Sun.
MLS 13 1110
$115,000
Arlene Warunek
570-714-6112
570-696-1195
PLAINS TOWNSHIP
75 Main St.
Nice 2 story. Family room
with brick fireplace. Modern
eat-in kitchen with tile floor.
Modern baths. Natural wood
work with French doors. Re-
placement windows and new-
er roof. Gas heat and central
air, Fully insulated. Double
deck. Level rear yard. Fire-
place is gas with triple wall
pipe that can be used for
wood, coal or pellets.
MLS#13-3378
$125,000
Call Sandra Gorman
570-696-5408
Smith Hourigan Group
570-696-1195
WILKES-BARRE
HOUSE FOR SALE.
Wyoming St.
6 rooms, off street parking,
fenced in yard.
$65,000
Call 570-487-4377
Houses For Sale
PLYMOUTH
$49,900
65 Girard Ave
Neat and clean. Move right in-
to this freshly painted 3 bed-
room, 1 bathroom home with
new flooring in the kitchen and
bathroom.
MLS 13 3555
Call Keri Best
(570)885-5082
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Directions: Rt 11 South Main
Street Plymouth; right onto
Girard Ave; home is on the left.
PLYMOUTH
Classic 3 story brick home of-
fers spacious living on 3 floors.
Many areas nicely detailed
w/HW floors. Professional use
possible as separate entrance
leads to FR which could be an
office. New roof & soffets done
in 2011. 4 ductless heat/air
uni ts i mprove effi ci ency of
house. 2nd floor bedroom con-
verted to large laundry - easily
converted back. Large WI attic.
MLS 13 893
$125,000
Call Lynda Rowinski
262-1196
696-1195
Houses For Sale
PLYMOUTH
PRICE REDUCED!
Large home with many pos-
sibilities. 3 bedrooms, 1 full
bath and laundry room on first
floor.
MLS #13-2814
New Price $45,000
Christine Pieczynski
696-6569
696-2600
PLYMOUTH
433 FAIRVIEW ST
PRICE REDUCED!
Seller says make me a good
offer and youll be moving in
before the holidays! Motiv-
ated seller-relocating. This is
a great home in a nice neigh-
borhood, well out of the flood
zone. Watch the fall colors
unfold as you look over the
valley from the front porch.
Modern kitchen with vaulted
ceiling, modern bath, LR, DR
and 2 generous BRs. Many
updates including new roof,
windows, front door, lighting,
w-to-w carpeting, interior/ex-
terior painting, security sys-
tem, etc. OSP and large level
yard with mature trees and
flowering bushes. For more
details and to view the pho-
t o s o n l i n e , g o t o :
www.prudenti al real estate.
com and enter PRU5B4G9 in
the Homes Search.
MLS #13-2080
$77,000
Mary Ellen and Walter
Belchick
696-6566
696-2600
Houses For Sale
PLYMOUTH
Ready to move in 2 story.
Very nice neutral dcor, new
flooring, new roof, all appli-
ances are included, private
driveway. Neat as a pin!
MLS #13-3086
$69,000
Call Tracy Zarola
696-0723
SHAVERTOWN
2103 Hillside Road
Recently renovated two story
on large lot features modern
kitchen with granite counters,
Living room and Dining room
with hardwood floors, large
treated deck overlooking level
yard. 3 Bedrooms, one on
first floor. Master Bedroom
upstairs with full master bath.
Oversized Detached 2 car
garage. Gas heat. Well water
and public sewers.
Great opportunity.
MLS#13-27
$157,500
Call Kevin Smith
696-5420
WEST PITTSTON
Great value in this totally ren-
ovated 2 story, spacious living
room with brick fireplace and
hardwood floors. Beautiful kit-
chen and very nice size dining
room. Pl enty of storage i n
wal k-up atti c.
MLS# 13-2116
REDUCED TO $90,000
Arlene Warunek
714-6112
696-1195
Houses For Sale
SUGAR NOTCH
113 Hemlock Street
Move right in! Spacious
rooms. Kitchen features
breakfast counter and tile
floors. Deck off Kitchen. Ceil-
ing fans throughout the home.
Modern Baths. Off street park-
ing in the rear of this corner
lot. Two gas heat wall units.
MLS#13-2630. $72,772
Call Vieve
570-474-6307 ex. 2772
SWOYERSVILLE
221 Kossack St.
Beautifully kept 2 story in a
very nice neighborhood. This
home features 3 bedrooms, 1
3/4 baths w/Jacuzzi tub and a
modern kitchen with ceramic
tile & under cabinet heating
vents. Many recent upgrades
throughout!! An over sized,
fully heated & insulated 2 car
garage, on a LARGE 50 x
188 lot. Take a look today.
MLS#13-3088
$141,500
Debbie McGuire
852-3220
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCED!
$99,900
Spacious brick ranch home boasts
3 large bedrooms, 1.5 baths. New
car- pet in bedrooms & living room.
New flooring in kitchen. Large deck
with above ground pool. Recently
installed new roof, furnace & water
heater.
MLS# 13-1887
Christine Pieczynski
696-6569
696-2600
Get all the advertising inserts
with the latest sales.
Call 829-5000 to start
your home delivery.
timesleader.com
Get news
when it
happens.
PAGE 6D Thursday, September 12, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
1,000
500
250
136
500
1,000
500
196
FORDREBATE...................................1000
FORD BONUS REBATE...................1000
FORD CREDIT REBATE...................500
OFF LEASE REBATE.....................500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP........286
149
$
16,999
FORDREBATE...................................1500
FORD CREDIT REBATE.............,.....500
OFF LEASE REBATE.....................500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.......96
50
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including Off Lease Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 5/31/13.
WAS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32, 155
FORD REBATE................................... 2,000
OFF LEASE REBATE............................. 500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP. ............. 656
2013 NEW 2013 FORD 2013
EXPLORER 4X4
$
28 999
$
28 999
$
28 999
$
269
$
269
24
Mos.
Lease
For
All Wheel Drive, 3.5L Engine, MyFord
Display, PM, Auto. Climate,17 Steel Wheels,
CD, Keyless Entry, 3rd Row Seat,
MyKey, Cruise Control, PW
23 23
MPG MPG
OO
V V
E E
RR 10
10 10
TO TO
CHOOSE CHOOSE
FROM FROM
299
$
29,999
FORDREBATE...................................1000
OFF LEASE REBATE.....................500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.......486
985
50
FORD REBATE...................................500
FORD BONUS REBATE...................1000
FORD CREDIT REBATE..................1000
OFF LEASE REBATE.....................500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP........716
FORDREBATE...................................1000
FORD LEASE REBATE.....................500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.......496
60
FORDREBATE...................................1750
FORD CREDIT REBATE..................1000
OFF TRADE-IN REBATE.....................1500
OFF LEASE REBATE.............................500
FORD REGIONAL DISCOUNT...........750
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.......1001
60
0
$
500
$
1000
$
1500
$
2000
0
$
1750
9/30/13.
9/30/13.
9/30/13.
9/30/13.
9/30/13. 9/30/13.
9/30/13. 9/30/13. 9/30/13.
30
FORDREBATE...................................1000
FORD CREDIT REBATE..................500
OFF LEASE REBATE.....................500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.......186
FORD REBATE..................................1500
FORD CREDIT REBATE.................1000
OFF LEASE REBATE.....................500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.......196
2014
2014
$
19,499
139
PRICE INCLUDES 2YR/30,000 MILE LIMITED MAINTENANCE PLAN
189
199
2000
80017551
Support
Your
CountrY
20
$
14,999
80
0
179
0
2014
2014
33
MPG
$
20,999
20
0
$
23,999
5
$
23,999
2013 2013 NEW FORDEDGE AWD
219
$
25,999
FORDREBATE...................................1500
FORD BONUS REBATE...................1250
FORD CREDIT REBATE...................500
OFF LEASE REBATE.....................500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP........991
All Wheel Drive, Pwr. Windows, PDL.,
Air, Advance Trac w/Roll Stability Control,
Remote Keyless Entry w/Keypad, MyFord,
Convenience Group, CD, Auto, Headlamps,
Reverse Sensing Sys.
2.0L HYBRID Engine, Auto. Headlamps, CD, 18 Sport Wheels,
Tilt, Safety Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd Air Curtains,
Anti-Tef Sys., Sirius Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry with Keypad,
Pwr. Drivers Seat, SYNC, Appearance Pkg, Rear Spoiler
$
25,999
FORD BONUS REBATE...................1000
OFF LEASE REBATE.....................500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.......1146
$
1500
0
$
25,499
FORDREBATE...............................................2250
FORD CREDIT REBATE.............................1000
OFF LEASE REBATE.................................500
FORDBONUS REBATE....................................1000
FORD REGIONAL DISCOUNT OFF MSRP 1250
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP...................1301
$
27,499
9/30/13. 9/30/13.
www.cocciacars.com
259
STX, V6, Auto., CD, 17 Alum. Wheels,
Cloth Seats, Air Decor Pkg., Cruise,
ABS, Pwr. Equipment Group
WAS........................$20,285
WAS........................$23,595
WAS........................$30,740
WAS........................$34,800
WAS........................$32,000
WAS........................$28,980
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Thursday, September 12, 2013 PAGE 7D
Autos For Sale
MATT BURNE Honda PRE-OWNED CENTER
Open Monday - Thursday 9-9
Friday & Saturday 9-5
1110 Wyoming Ave,
Scranton, PA
1-800-NEXT-Honda
570-341-1400
MATT BURNE Honda
MATT BURNE Honda MATT BURNE Honda
Call: 1-800-NEXTHonda View Prices at www.mattburnehonda.com
08 PILOT EX Gray, 48K ......................................NOW $18,532
09PILOTTOURINGBlack,48K.............................NOW$25,170
11 PILOT EXL Red, 44K .....................................NOW $25,581
11PILOTEXL Silver, 23K......................................NOW$27,309
PILOT 4WD
09 CRV LX TITANIUM, 44K.................................NOW $16,896
08 CRV EX Silver, 56K......................................NOW $16,969
11 CRV LX WHITE, 37K......................................NOW $17,682
10CRVEX Titanium, 56K......................................NOW$17,738
10 CRV LX GREEN, 24K ......................................NOW $18,289
10 CRV EX SILVER, 40K ......................................NOW $18,319
11 CRV SE titanium, 31K....................................NOW $18,793
10 CRV EXLBLACK, 38K............................................... NOW$19,499
11 CRV EX Silver, 29K.........................................NOW $19,533
10 CRV EXL Red, 43K ........................................NOW $19,993
11CRVEXTitanium, 35K......................................NOW$20,564
10CRVEXL Black, 23K........................................NOW$20,677
11 CRV EXL Gray, 28K.........................................NOW$21,965
12 CRVEX Gray, 17K...........................................NOW$22,932
CRV 4WD
08ACCORDEX SDNGrey,53K..............................NOW$14,221
09ACCORDEXSDNBlack,64K..............................NOW$14,749
09 ACCORD EX SDN Red, 53K ...........................NOW $14,982
10 ACCORD LXP SDN Black, 35K......................NOW $16,528
11 ACCORD LX SDNGray, 30K ...........................NOW $16,717
12ACCORDLXSDNBlack,36K..............................NOW$16,728
12ACCORDLXPSDNBlack,20K............................NOW$17,871
10 ACCORD EX SDN Black, 21K .........................NOW $18,168
10 ACCORD EXL V6 SDN Silver, 21K..................NOW $18,989
12 ACCORD EX SDN Gray, 9K............................NOW $19,720
ACCORDS
10 ODYSSEY EX Blue, 47K ...............................NOW $19,477
10 ODYSSEY TOURING NAV-DVD Gray, 42K...NOW $25,978
11ODYSSEY EXL Black, 36K ...............................NOW$25,779
ODYSSEY
08 CIVIC LX 5SPD SDNBLACK, 78K......................NOW $9,789
11 CIVIC LX SDN Silver, 25K ..............................NOW $14,461
11 CIVIC LX SDN BLUE, 36K .............................NOW $14,490
10 CIVIC LX SDNWhite, 33K ..............................NOW$14,584
10 CIVIC LX SDN Blue, 9K ..............................NOW $15,364
12CIVICLXSDNTitanium,20K..............................NOW$15,870
12 CIVIC EX-NAVI Crimson, 31K...................NOW $17,932
12 CIVIC EXL-NAVI SDNWhite, 10K...................NOW$18,804
CIVICS
Call : 1-800-NextHo Nda View: www.mattburnehonda.com
10INSIGHTEXGray, 38K....................................NOW$13,487
INSIGHT
$5,260
04 TOYOTA COROLLAS SDN
NOW
Gray, 132K
Was
$7,250
$19,862
NOW
07 CHEVY TAHOE LT 4WD
Navy, 95K
Was
$20,950
$13,594
10 JEEP PATRIOT 4WD
NOW
Gray, 51 K
Was
$13,950
NOW
$23,925
10 NISSAN PATHFINDER SL 4WD
Red, 42K,
Was
$25,950
$22,227
NOW
09 BUICK ENCLAVE
AWD
Brown, 57K
$19,191
09 HONDA RIDGELINE TRL 4WD
NOW
Gray, 63K
Was
$19,950
$3,999
01 DODGE NEON SE SDN
AS TRADED
Burgundy, 88K
NOW
$15,247
07 HONDA PILOT LX 4WD
White, 61K
Was
$16,950
NOW
$15,641
07 FORD EDGE AWD
Cream, 54K,
Was
$16,950
$16,300
NOW
06 TOYOTA
HIGHLANDER LTD 4WD
Navy, 33K
Was
$17,950
$14,535
08 NISSAN XTERRA S 4WD
NOW
Red, 53K
Was
$15,750
$7,590
01 HONDA CRV SE 4WD
NOW
Silver, 101K
$8,715
NOW
10 CHEVY AVEO
LT SEDAN
Blue, 56K
Was
$9,950
$7,438
04 TOTYOTA CAMRY LE SDN
NOW
Gold, 114K
Was
$8,350
$9,271
02 HONDA CRV EX 4WD
NOW
Navy, 76K
Was
$9,750
$10,456
06 PONTIAC G6 GTP CPE
NOW
V6, Black, 64K
Was
$11,500
$10,796
07 SUBARU IMPREZA AWD
NOW
Silver, 67K
Was
$12,500
$14,567
10 FORD FUSION SE SDN
NOW
Black, 9K
Was
$16,950
15,801
09 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY TOURING R-DVD
NOW
red, 57K
07 HONDA ODYSSEY
EXL NAV/DVD, SLATE 54K $16,872
EXL DVD, BLUE, 26K $18,478
Due to the success of our , we are extending i t one more week!
WHAT YOU SEE
IS WHAT YOU PAY!
WHITE, 89K
03 JEEP LIBERTY LIMITED
4WD
$7,795
NOW
12 FIT SPORT Silver, 2K .....................................NOW$17,288
FIT
HONDA ACCORD SEDAN
05 EX, GOLD, 89K $9,746
04 EXL V6, RED, 81K $9,898
08 MERCURY MILAN
PREMIER
$12,666
NAVY, 48K
NOW
Was
$12,950
04 PONTIAC VIBE
$8,308
SILVER, 70K
NOW
Was
$8,950
09 TOYOTA COROLLA LE
SEDAN
$12,438
BEIGE, 68K
NOW
Was
$12,950
06 HONDA CIVIC EX SDN
NOW
Silver, 54K
$12,867
Was
$13,250
11 TOYOTA COROLLA
LE SEDAN
NOW
Silver, 9K
$13,759
Was
$15,750
07 LX, BLUE, 61K $11,011
07 EX, CARBON, 27K $14,582
$9,999
NOW
07 NISSAN SENTRA S
SEDAN
Brown, 58K
Was
$10,950
07 JEEP COMPASS AWD
$10,492
Blue, 46K
NOW
Was
$11,950
$10,970
NOW
08 HYUNDAI TIBURON
CPE 5SP
Silver, 44K
Was
$11,950
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
Qui et area, covered rear
deck, family room could be
bedroom #3. Modern eat-in
kitchen w/DW, carpeted, in-
sulated windows, slate foyer
w/guest closet, pull down at-
tic-floored & insulated, large
basement f ami l y r oom
w/ bui l t - i n bar .
MLS# 13-1733
New Price $82,000
Carl Georinger
696-5429
696-1195
WEST WYOMING
Delightful 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath
Cape Cod in charming neigh-
borhood i s yours for onl y
$115,000. Offers oversized
living room, modern kitchen
with breakfast room, and 1st
floor den/office.
Don't miss this one!
MLS #13-2722
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
570-696-3801
Houses For Sale
WAPWALLOPEN
895 Hobbie Road
Wonderful Country Living de-
scribes the location of this
Well-Maintained 2-Story
Home. Features Remodeled
Kicthen, LR/DR Combo,
Den/Office, 3 Bdrms., 1.75
Baths, Enclosed Sunroom +
4-Car Detached Garage.
MLS# 13-2816.
$149,900.
Patsy Bowers
570-204-0983
Strausser
Real Estate
570-759-3300
WEST PITTSTON
PRICE REDUCED!
Mt. Zion Road. Single family
two story - a place for kids!
Four bedrooms & bath up-
stairs. 1st floor has formal din-
ing room, living room, family
room & laundry room. Master
bedroom & bath added to the
1st floor. Good sized kitchen.
2,126 sq. ft. total on 1 acre.
Wyoming Area School Dis-
trict.
$115,000
Call Ruth K. Smith
570-696-5411
570-696-1195
Houses For Sale
WHITE HAVEN
178 West Woodhaven Drive
Relax on deck watching sun
rise over Woodheaven Lake -
- Home has 4 bedroom, 2 1/2
baths, living room with fire-
place, dining room with split
system wall A/C. And spiral
stair to 4th bedroom or office
& walk-in huge attic, family
room great stone fireplace
leads to patio, pool
room/game room features
split system in wall AC, Over-
size garage, with workshop,
matching shed, double lot 1/2
acre, Two paved driveways
one on each side of home.
Basketball court (26x40)
paved with Lights and ad-
justable basket, shared Dock,
and small helicopter pad
presently covered by double
swing facing lake. Appoint-
ment only.
MLS#13-3189
$314,000
Call Vieve Zaroda
570-715-7742.
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCED
$49,900
735 N. Washington Street
Spacious 2 story, 3 bedrooms with
2 car detached garage, good
starter home, needs TLC. MLS
#12-3887. For more information
and photos visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
37 Flick Street
Nice 2 possibly 3 bedroom home
with a large driveway and garage.
This home has a newer kitchen
and a full bath with laundry area
on the 1st floor. There is a nice
yard and deck for your outside en-
joyment. There is a newer fur-
nace and roof. This unit is tenant
occupied for you investors out
there. Come and check it out.
MLS# 13-2103
$33,900
John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
WILKES-BARRE
This is a great investment op-
p o r t u n i t y . . . s e p a r a t e
utilities...very motivated seller.
MLS #13-1473
$75,000
Call Maria Huggler
570-586-3575
TOWN & COUNTRY
PROPERTIES
570-586-9636
WILKES-BARRE
Two story home with 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths & modern eat-
in kitchen. Double lot with
fenced in yard with flowers &
off street parking for 3-5 cars.
Gas heat. Near bus stops,
churches & schools. Small
12 X 16 house in rear with 2
picnic tables for entertaining.
$69,900
Call RUTH K. SMITH
570-696-5411
570-696-1195
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
83 Lawrence Street
Looking for your new home at
a good price? Move-in condi-
tion and priced to sell! 4 bed-
room home in a quiet South
Wilkes-Barre neighborhood.
Open floor plan with large liv-
ing & dining rooms. Newer
appl i ances and gas heat.
Nice level backyard and off-
st reet parki ng. Mot i vat ed
sel l er!
MLS #13 2980
$62,000
Carol Holton
814-2116
283-9100
WILKES-BARRE
276 High Street
Very Affordable property lov-
ingly cared for and ready for
you to move in! Heat-a-lator
fireplace provides cozy win-
ters and you can enjoy the
patio in the summer. Newer
kitchen, replacement win-
dows, new 200 amp electric
and low taxes. MLS#13-3212
$38,500
Call Connie
EILEEN R.
MELONE REAL ESTATE
570-821-7022
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
NORTH RIVER ST.
Modern 1 or 2 bedroom
home. Locat ed cl ose t o
Luzerne County Courthouse
and Kings College. Great
rental property potential New
carpeti ng throughout. 2nd
floor bath with laundry area.
Freshly painted. Walk-out to
backyard. Call to set-up an
appointment!
MLS #13- 2849
$39,900
Craig Yarrish
696-6554
696-2600
WILKES-BARRE
Located on Madison St.
between Linden & Maple.
This Stately & Well Main-
tained home has a detached
3 CAR GARAGE with Full
Concrete basement Long
spacious driveway. Home has
3 Bedrooms 2.5 Baths. Enter-
taining Finished Basement
has Knotty Pine Walls. Walk-
up Attic. CENTRAL AIR, Gas
& Electric Heat. New Deck,
Lots of Closets. A Must See.
MLS# 13-2431
REDUCED TO $84,900
Call Nancy Palumbo
570-714-9240 direct
Houses For Sale
PLYMOUTH
308 Stephanie Drive
Attractive Brick Front Ranch
with 3 Bedrooms, gas heat,
Sunroom (heated), attached
garage, large yard, 8x10
shed. Hardwood floors under
rugs. Great location. Most
windows on main floor are
Newer Triple Pane & double
pane in basement. Basement
can easily be finished (some
areas already sheet rocked &
electric installed)
Well-Maintained. $115,000.
MLS#12-1911
call Nancy Palumbo
570-714-9240 direct
WILKES-BARRE
486 Main Street N.
Nice, spacious 3 bedroom
with large walk-up attic. One
full and one half bath, large
bedrooms with closets, gas
heat, central air on first floor,
nice fenced yard,
3 season porch.
MLS#13-3324
$49,000
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-228-1444 Be Inspired!
Look for it every
Saturday in
Read The Times Leader's "AT HOME"
section every Saturday for ideas.
Subscribe today. 829-5000.
Indulge your senses with
stories dedicated to the home
and garden at their very best:
At Home With, home and
homeowners histories
Do-it-yourself projects
Home Renovations, before &
after stories with photos
Sandra Snyders column
Alan J. Heavens, Q&A
timesleader.com
Get news
when it
happens.
timesleader.com
Get news
when it
happens.
PAGE 8D Thursday, September 12, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
589 Franklin Street N.
Nice residential home across
from Wilkes-Barre General
emergency room. Quiet zone.
Two parking permits. 3 bed-
rooms, 1 1/2 baths, good
room sizes, fenced yard,
North End. of Wilkes-Barre.
MLS# 13-3115.
$49,900
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-228-1444
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCTION
Charming 1,000+ sq. ft. 2 bed-
room, 1/1/2 bath with separate
driveway on a quiet street .
Lower level was finished for
former business - has separ-
ate entrance, 1/2 bath & elec-
tric baseboard heat (not in-
cluded in total sq. ft).
MLS #13-1592 $49,000
Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
NANTICOKE
NEW LISTING
Don't like yard work? Then
consider this home. Large liv-
ing room area w/ductless wall
a/c unit. Gas heat.
MLS #13-3775
$34,900
Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
WYOMING
This charming 3 bedroom of-
fers Hardwood floors in the
dining room, an eat in kitchen,
gas heat & an enclosed front
porch. Nicely landscaped &
conveniently located.
PRICED TO SELL $51,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-288-6654 Office
570-760-6769 Cell
WYOMING/FRANKLIN TWP.
PRICE REDUCED!
1705 W. 8TH ST.
This charming home in the
Dallas Sch. Dist. is waiting for
new owners to settle in and
celebrate the upcoming holi-
days with family and friends.
Relax on the deck and watch
t he l eaves change col or
around your large country lot.
Plan for great times next sum-
mer in your 40x20 heated in-
ground pool. This well main-
tai ned 2-story has 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 modern baths, a
modern kitchen with break-
fast nook, formal DR, large
LR and an added FR with
vaulted ceiling and fireplace.
2-car detached garage. De-
t a i l s a n d p h o t o s a t :
www.pruentialrealestate.com.
Ent er PRU7W7A3 i n t he
SEARCH f i el d.
MLS#13-2539
$227,900
Walter or Mary Ellen
Belchick
696-6566
696-2600
Houses For Sale
WYOMING
Room for your business & 2
incomes from the apartments
upstairs. first floor commer-
cial space is updated beauti-
ful l y wi th 4-5 offi ces, ki t-
chenette & lower level confer-
ence room. Plenty of parking.
MLS #13-3565
$135.900
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
WYOMING
Completely redone 3 bed-
room Cape Cod in lovely
neighborhood. Beautiful
woodwork throughout. Cent-
ral air, new windows,new car-
pet with hardwood floors un-
derneath, new electrical, new
hot water heater, the list goes
on! Nothing to do but
move in and enjoy.
$135,000
Call Christine
(570) 332-8832
570-613-9080
YATESVILLE
$159,900
12 Reid St.
Spacious Bi-level home in semi
private location with private back
yard, 3 season room, gas fireplace
in lower level family room. Re-
cently updated kitchen, 4 bed-
r ooms, 1 3/ 4 bat hs, gar age.
www. at l asr eal t yi nc. com
MLS 13-1949
Call Charlie
Land (Acreage)
DALLAS TOWNSHIP
63 acres with about 5,000
roadf ront on 2 roads. Al l
Wooded. $385, 000. Cal l
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
Earth Conservancy
Land For Sale
Price Reduction
61 +/- Acres Nuangola
$88,000
46 +/- Acres Hanover Twp.
$69,000
Highway Commercial KOZ
Hanover Twp. 3+/-
Acres 11 +/- Acres
Wilkes-Barre Twp. Acreage
Zoned R-3
Sugar Notch Lot $11,800
See Additional Land for Sale
at:
www.earthconservancy.org
Call: 570-823-3445
HUNLOCK CREEK
297 MIZDAIL Road
6 ACRES
Septic, well, electric, 2 story
barn, carport & shed. $60,000.
570-506-5986
LAKE
NUANGOLA LAND
FOR SALE
(#3 Summit Street and
2 adjacent lots):
Half acre of ideally located
mountaintop corner lots w/
lake views and shared dock.
Asking $74.9k;
no reasonable offer refused.
Call Jennifer at
570-760-1622
for serious offers only.
NEWPORT TWP.
LOTS - LOTS-LOTS
1 mile south of L.C.C.C. Estab-
lished development with under-
ground utilities including gas.
Cleared lot. 100 frontage x
158. $30,500.
Lot 210 frontage 158 deep on
hill with great view $30,500.
Call 570-736-6881
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Seneca Drive
Central water, Prime Loca-
tion. 100 Feet of Lake Front!
Great view!
MLS# 11-1269
$159,900
Call Dale Williams
Five Mountains Realty
570-256-3343
Land (Acreage)
WHITE HAVEN
Middleburg Road
Fabulous 5 acre flat wooded
lot. Public sewer. Old rock
wall along south property line.
Zoned rural agriculture.
MLS#12-3503. $57,900
Call Dana Distasio
474-9801
Lots
EAGLE ROCK RESORT/
NEAR CHOCTAW LAKE
99 Chestnut Drive
Wooded level buildable lot in
Four Seasons resort. All amen-
ities are transferred with deed.
Amenities include, golf, eques-
trian, etc. Within walking dis-
tance of Choctow Lake. An
amazing quick sale price of
$11,500. MLS#13-1426.
Call Vieve
570-474-6307 Ext. 2772
HANOVER TWP
Slope St.
Nice building lot with utilities
available. Ideal home site. Af-
fordable at $10,900
TOWNE & COUNTRY
REAL ESTATE CO.
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
Lot For Sale
PLAINS TWP.
(Behind VA Hospital) Iroquois
Ave. 80-150 Cleared Lot,
Ready to Build. Asking
24,900. Assessed at $26,000
570-472-7243
Apartments /Townhouses
ASHLEY
Modern 2 bedroom, 2nd floor
apartment. Appl i ances, off
street parking. Close to I81.
$575 + utilities. 1st, last & se-
curity. No pets. Available
9/1/13. Water & sewer i n-
cl uded.
TRADEMARK
REALTY GROUP
570-954-1992
ASHLEY
2 bedroom. Water included.
$550 + utilities,
security & lease. No pets.
570-472-9494
DALLAS
2nd floor, 1 bedroom. Includes
heat, water & garbage. Off street
parki ng. No pets/no smoki ng.
$600/month + 1 month security.
570-690-1591
DALLAS
MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
220 Lake St.
Housing for the elderly &
mobility impaired; all utilities
included. Federally subsid-
ized program. Extremely low
i ncome persons encour-
aged to apply. Income less
than $12,450. 570-675-6936
TDD 800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Handicap Accessible
DUPONT
4 room apartment for rent.
$450+utilities, No Pets. Refer-
ences required. Available Oct. 1.
570-241-6038
EDWARDSVILLE
2 Bedroom, recently
remodeled, hardwood floors
throughout, microwave, dish-
washer, washer, dryer, stove,
refrigerator. Water included.
No Pets. $550/month.
570-709-5178. Bit Keller LLC
FORTY FORT
Newly renovated. Great neigh-
borhood. Non-smoking. Oak
composite floors, new wall to
wall carpeting in bedrooms,
new windows. 3 paddle fans,
bath with shower. Stove, refri-
gerator, dishwasher. OSP.
Coin-op laundry. $600/mo. +
gas, electric & water. Refer-
ences required. No pets.
Available Oct. 1st!
570-779-4609
570-407-3991
FORTY FORT
Very nice 2
nd
floor 2 bdrm, 5
room apt. on River St. In-
cludes stove, frig, washer/dry-
er hook-up in basement, off-
street parking. $595/mo + util-
ities. 1 mo security deposit re-
quired. No Pets. Non-
smoking. 1 year lease.
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
FORTY FORT
1 bedroom, 1 bath, 2nd floor +
attic, new stove & refrigerator,
wash/dryer hook-up, off-street
parking. Water & heat in-
cluded. No pets. No Smoking.
1 year lease, $485/mo + secur-
ity, credit & background check.
570-947-8097
FORTY FORT
All utilities included. Clean, 4
room, 2nd floor. Appliances.
Covered parking. Non
smoking, cat considered,
starting at $700/month.
570-714-2017
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
Immaculate, 1st and 2nd floor
efficiency apartments. 1 bed-
room, living room, kitchen, tile
bath and laundry room. New
wall to wall carpet. appliances
include stove, refrigerator,
washer/ dryer. No Smoking.
No Pets. Security, Reference
and Lease. $550/month, ten-
ant pays electric and gas.
570-313-9955
LARKSVILLE
1 bedroom end unit apt. Wash-
er/dryer hookup. No pets. Se-
curity & lease required $450
month. 570-288-7753
Apartments /Townhouses
Hanover Township
West End Road
One bedr oom. Heat , wat er ,
garbage sewer & appliances in-
cluded. Off street parking. No pets,
non smoking, not Section 8 ap-
proved. References, security, 1st &
last. $550/month. 570-852-0252
HANOVER TWP.
3029 South Main st.
2nd floor very large 3 bed-
rooms, wall to wall carpeting
central air, eat in kitchen with
appliances. Off street parking.
Washer & dryer hookup. Heat
& cooking gas included. Ten-
ant pays electric & water. $695
plus security. No Pets.
570-814-1356
HANOVER TWP.
LEE PARK
3 bedroom, 2nd floor, appli-
ances & washer/dryer hook-up
in kitchen, new carpeting, no
pets. $575/month + utilities.
1st, last & security. Available
Now! Garbage & sewer in-
cluded.
TRADEMARK
REALTY GROUP
570-954-1992
HARVEYS LAKE
1 & 2 bedroom , wall to wall
carpet, appliances, Lake rights.
Off street parking. No pets.
Lease, security and refer-
ences. 570-639-5920
HUGHESTOWN
Immaculate 4 room, 2 bed-
room, 1 bath 1st floor apart-
ment overlooking park. Wash-
er/dryer hook-up. Stove &
fridge included. No pets. Non
smoking. $575/ month +
utilities & security. Call
(570) 457-2227
KINGSTON
Pierce Street
3rd floor, 1-2 bedroom, 1 bath.
Newly remodeled building, off
street parking, all appliances,
including washer/dryer. $575 +
utilities. No pets, no smoking.
570-814-3281
KINGSTON
Spacious 2nd floor, 2 bed-
room. 1 bath. Newly re-
modeled building, Living room,
Dining room, eat-in Kitchen,
private front balcony, off street
parking, all appliances, includ-
ing washer/dryer. Available
now. $675+ utilities. No pets,
no smoking. 570-814-3281
KINGSTON
287 Pierce Street
Corner of Pierce & Warren
1 bedroom, ki tchen, l i vi ng
room, bath, cl oset storage
area. Refrigerator & stove in-
cluded, off street parking. Ref-
erences, no pets. $400/month
+ security. Call 570-655-6743
KINGSTON
565 Rutter Ave.
SAT., 9/14 9AM-2PM
Antique school desk,
microwave, odds & ends.
Clothes, clothes, clothes.
KINGSTON
Deluxe, quiet, airy
3 bedroom, 2nd floor, 1.5
baths & office. All appliances,
washer/dryer in unit. Wall-to-
wall, C/A, garage, attic,
no pets/no smoking, lease.
570-287-1733
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 3rd floor,
2 bedrooms, elevator,
carpeted, entry system.
Garage. Extra storage &
cable TV included. Laundry
facilities. Air Conditioned.
Fine neighborhood. Con-
venient to bus & stores. No
pets. References. Security.
Lease. No smokers please.
$785 + utilities.
Call 570-287-0900
KINGSTON HOUSE
Nice, clean furnished room, starting at
$340. Efficiency at $450 month fur-
nished with all utilities included. Off
street parking. 570-718-0331
KINGSTON
Prime location, Poplar Street,
near Nesbitt Hospital. Modern
2nd floor, 1 bedroom/den,
open design. Dishwasher,
washer/dryer. No Pets. No
Smoking. References.
$650+utilities. 570-709-4360
KINGSTON
69 Price St.
Nice and cozy 3rd floor. 1
bedroom living room and kit-
chen. lots of closets, and 2
enclosed porches. Includes
heat, hot water, stove, fridge
and off street parking. no
pets, non smoker. $495/mo
security deposit. 1 year lease.
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
KINGSTON
69 Price St.
Nice and cozy 3rd floor. 1
bedroom living room and kit-
chen. lots of closets, and 2
enclosed porches. Includes
heat, hot water, stove, fridge
and off street parking. no
pets, non smoker. $495/mo
security deposit. 1 year lease.
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
KINGSTON
SDK GREEN
ACRES HOMES
11 Holiday Drive
A Place To Call Home
Spacious 1, 2 & 3
Bedroom Apts.
Gas heat included
FREE
24 hr. on-site Gym
Community Room
Swimming Pool
Maintenance FREE
Controlled Access
Patio/Balcony
and much more...
570-288-9019
www.sdkgreen acres.com
Call today for
move-in specials.
KINGSTON
Newly Remodeled 2 bed-
room. Living & dining rooms.
Off street parking. Gas heat.
All new appliances. Water &
sewer included. $570
+ utilities, security &
references. No pets.
Call 570-239-7770
Apartments /Townhouses
KINGSTON TOWNSHIP
1605 West 8th Street
1 bedroom over a garage, kit-
chen, living room, bathroom,
closed in porch. Stove, refri-
gerator, washer/dryer in-
cluded. Newly Remodeled.
$525 + Security. No Pets.
570-333-4005
Kingston
West Bennett St.
Twinkle in Kingstons Eye, 2nd
floor, 1000 sq. ft. 2 bed, Cent-
ral Air, washer/dryer and
appliances. No pets. Non-
smoking. 1 car off street park-
ing. $750/month + gas, elec-
tric, 1 year lease & security.
570-814-1356
LUZERNE COUNTY
RENTALS
Available Now!
2 bed and 3 bed
$550, $650, $675 and $850.
Call 570-901-1020
MINERSMILLS
2 bedroom, 1st floor, $550/
month plus $550 security. Pay
your own utilities. Gas heat.
Fridge & stove. background &
credit check. NO PETS.
570-825-2306
MOUNTAIN TOP
1 bedroom apartments with
media rooms, recently ren-
ovated, New carpeting & ap-
pliances From $550 & up.
570-854-8785
MOUNTAIN TOP
IMMEDIATELY
AVAILABLE 2ND
FLOOR UNIT!
1 bedroom apartments for elderly,
disabled. Rents based on 30% of
ADJ gross income.
Handicap Accessible.
Equal Housing Opportunity.
TTY711
or 570-474-5010
This institution is an equal
opportunity provider & employer.
MOUNTAIN TOP
OAK RIDGE
IMMEDIATELY AVAILABLE
2ND FLOOR UNIT! 1 bed-
room apartments for elderly,
disabled. Rents based on 30%
of ADJ gross income. Handi-
cap Accessible. Equal Hous-
ing Opportunity. TTY711 or
570-474-5010 This institution
is an equal opportunity pro-
vider & employer.
NANTICOKE
S. Hanover Street
1.5 bedrooms, 2nd floor, no
pets, washer/dryer hook-ups,
attic. $469 mo. 2 Car Garage,
$159 mo. INCLUDES HEAT,
WATER. 570-824-8786
NANTICOKE
2 bedroom, washer/dryer hook
up. No pets. $475/month + se-
curity & utilities. 822-7657
NANTICOKE
2 males looking for 3rd room-
mat e t o share 3 bedroom
apartment. $85/week. Call
570-578-2644.
NANTICOKE
EFFICIENCY
1 bedroom. $325 month.
Tenant pays electric.
570-735-2516
NANTICOKE
Large 1 bedroom. Hardwood
floors, full kitchen, large dining
room. No pets, no smoking.
$465. Water, sewer & trash in-
cluded. 570-262-5399
NANTICOKE
LEXINGTON
VILLAGE
2 bedroom, 1 bath apartments.
Refrigerator, stove,
dishwasher &washer/dryer
provided.
Attached garage.
Pet friendly.
Water, sewer &
trash included.
59 Agostina Drive
570-735-3500
NANTICOKE
Nice 2 bedroom Eat-in kitchen,
living room, full bath, stove
/fridge, washer/dryer, $500. +
utilities. No Pets. 570-760-
3637 or 570-477-3839
NANTICOKE
Nice, clean 1 bedroom. heat,
hot water, electricity, fridge,
st ove, ai r condi t i oni ng,
washer/dryer availability all in-
cluded. Close to town. No pets
o r s mo k i n g . S e c u r i t y
$525/month. 570-542-5610
NANTICOKE
Quiet east side neighborhood.
Large kitchen, pantry, modern
bath, bedroom, large sitting
room, wall to wall carpeting,
st ove, ref ri gerat or, wat er,
garbage, sewer. References,
credit check, one year lease.
No pets. $430 + security.
570-735-6241
PITTSTON
1 bedroom, 2nd floor. Stove,
refrigerator, washer/dryer hook
up 1 year lease. $385 + utilit-
ies. 570-237-0968.
PITTSTON
1st floor, large 1 bedroom
apartment. Newly renovated,
off street parking, washer/
dryer hook up. $700 heat, wa-
ter and sewer included.
570-443-0770
PITTSTON
2 bedroom apartment, 1st
floor, eat-in kitchen. Tenant
pays electric, heat, propane for
cooking & water. Includes
sewer, trash, washer/dryer
hook up & exterior mainten-
ance.
Call Bernie
655-4815
Rothstein Realtors
888-244-2714
WEST PITTSTON
1 bedroom efficiency apart-
ment. No pets. $325 + utilities
& security deposit. Call
570-333-5499
Apartments /Townhouses
PITTSTON
3 room apartment, 2nd floor,
wall to wall carpet, off street
parking. Enclosed porch.
$450/month + electric heat &
security. No pets.
570-655-1222
PITTSTON
3RD FLOOR
Available Now! 3 bedroom.
$600 + security. Sewer &
garbage included. 574-4380
PITTSTON
Brand new 2 bedroom, 2 bath
apartment on 2nd floor. Over-
size bay windows, hardwood
floors, granite counters, stain-
less appliances. All tile &
stone showers. Central air,
gas heat. Washer & dryer.
Water & garbage included. No
dogs. $1,250/month.
570-760-7326
PLAINS
Modern 2 bedroom, 1 bath,
2nd floor apartment. Kitchen
with appliances. New carpet.
Conveni ent l y l ocat ed. No
smoki ng - no pet s.
$600 PER MONTH.
Call Rae
570-899-1209
LEWITH & FREEMAN
288-9371
PLYMOUTH
Clean & inviting 2nd floor, 2
bedroom apartment. Recently
renovated with new, modern
kitchen & bath, carpeting &
windows. Features bright liv-
ing room, small fenced back
yard & shed. $500/month +
utilities & security. Call Lynda
at 262-1196
PLYMOUTH
CLEAN LIVING
SPACE APT
3 bedroom, 1 bath....tenant
pays utilities..very affordable.. ,
new appliances, off street
parking & sewer included. No
smoking inddoors. CLOSE TO
WYOMING VALLEY WEST
HIGH SCHOOL. AVAILABLE
SEPT 1. 570-855-3329.
PLYMOUTH
Cozy 3 bedroom on 2 floors.
$650/mo. 570-760-0511
SUGAR NOTCH
2nd floor contains 1,215 sq. ft.
of very spacious & sprawling
living space. 6 rooms. Numer-
ous closets. Bathroom is a
generous 10' x 11'. Gas heat,
water, sewer bill & cooking gas
- all included. Has washer/dry-
er hook ups. Only 2 miles to
Wilkes-Barre & close to I-81 &
Wyoming Valley Mall. Lease.
Credit & background checked.
$685 monthly .
570-650-3803
WARRIOR RUN
Close to Hanover Ind. Park.
Remodeled 1 bedroom, fridge,
stove, eat in kitchen. Sewer,
water & garbage paid, electric
by tenant. $425/mo + lease &
security. 570-301-8200
WEST PITTSTON
GARDEN
VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
221 Fremont St., Housing for
the elderly & mobility im-
paired; all utilities included.
Federally subsidized pro-
gram. Extremely
low income persons encour-
aged to apply. Income less
than $12,450.
570-655-6555
TDD 800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm
Monday-Friday.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Handicap Accessible
WEST PITTSTON
1 or 2 bedrooms, washer/dry-
er hookup. Air conditioning.
Heat, water & sani tary i n-
cl uded.
570-430-3095
WEST PITTSTON
$595 a month. Heat, Water
and Sewer included. 1 bed-
room, living room, dining
room, wall to wall carpeting,
washer/dryer, refrigerator and
stove. Modern kitchen and
bath. 2nd floor. 1 month se-
curity with 1 year lease. Ref-
erences required, No Pets.
570-446-7682
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
1, 2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright open
floor plans
- All major appliances
included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term leases
available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflowercrossing.com
Certain Restrictions Apply*
WILKES-BARRE
LAFAYETTE
GARDENS
SAVE MONEY THIS YEAR!
113 Edison Street
Quiet neighborhood. 2 bedroom
apartments available for immediate
occupancy. Heat & hot water in-
cluded.
1 Bedroom $550.
2 Bedroom $650.
Call Jazmin 570-822-7944
WILKES-BARRE
ROOM
FOR RENT
1 room. Back ground check.
$350 month plus security de-
posit. 347-693-4156
Apartments /Townhouses
WILKES-BARRE
WILKES UNIV
CAMPUS
1, 2, 3, or 4 bedrooms. Wood
floors, no pets, starting $450.
all utilities included.
570-826-1934
WILKES-BARRE
-1 bedroom
water included
-2 bedroom
water included
-3 bedroom,
single
HANOVER
-1 bedroom
LUZERNE
-1 bedroom,
water included.
PITTSTON
-Large 1 bed
room water
included
OLD FORGE
-2 bedroom,
water included
PLAINS
-1 bedroom,
water included
McDermott & McDermott
Real Estate Inc. Property
Management
570-675-4025
(direct line)
Mon-Fri. 8-7pm
Sat. 8-noon
WILKES-BARRE
/KINGSTON
Efficiency 1 & 2 bedrooms. In-
cludes all utilities, parking, laundry.
No pets. From $390 to $675.
Lease, securi ty & references.
570-970-0847
Wilkes-Barre
2 bedroom townhouse, end
unit. Near VA, 1.5 baths, all
appliances, sewer, water &
garbage included. $800/
month + security.
570-817-4475
WILKES-BARRE
2 BEDROOMS
Heat & hot water included,
$625./month + Security re-
quired. 973-879-4730
WILKES-BARRE
425 S. Franklin St.
APTS FOR RENT!
For lease. Available immedi-
ately, washer/dryer on
premises, no pets. We have
studio, 1 & 2 bedroom apart-
ments. On site parking. Fridge
& stove provided. 24/7 secur-
ity camera presence & all
doors electronically locked.
1 bedroom - $450. 2 bedroom
- $550. Water & sewer paid 1
month security deposit. Email
obscuroknows@hotmail.com
or Call 570-208-9301
after 9:00 a.m. to schedule an
appointment
WILKES-BARRE
447 S. Franklin St.
1 bedroom with study, off street
parking, laundry facility. Includes
heat and hot water, hardwood
floors, appliances, Trash removal.
$580/month. Call (570) 821-5599
WILKES-BARRE
72. W. River St.
Newly refurbished, large &
very charmi ng 3 bedroom
dwelling in Historic Mansion in
a beaut i f ul nei ghborhood.
Central Air & Heat. Off-street
parking, Hardwood floors, new
kitchen & appliances. Hot wa-
ter included. $1,240 + security.
570-991-1619
WILKES-BARRE
BEAUTIFUL 6 ROOM
1st floor, 1-2 bedrooms, living
room with wall to wall carpet
thru-out, modern bath & kit-
chen with electric stove, laun-
dry room with gas or electric
dryer hookups, private porch,
off street parking, no pets, no
smokers, lease, security de-
posi t, references, credi t &
background check, utilities by
tenant. $595/month.
570-824-4884
WILKES-BARRE
Duplex, 2nd floor apartment. 1
bedroom. Heat & hot water in-
cluded. No smoking. No pets.
$500 + security.
Call 570-823-6829
WILKES-BARRE
Large 3 bedroom apartment on
two floors IN GOOD CONDI-
TION.Section 8 welcome. No
pets. $525 + utilities & security.
606-9917
WILKES-BARRE
HISTORIC WHEELMAN
439 S. Franklin St.
Two apartments available.
(1) 1 bedroom, hardwood floors,
A/C, marble bath. security system,
laundry, off street parking. $675
(1) Unique studio. Sun porch, hard-
wood floor, security system and
laundry. Off street parking. $550
570-821-5599
WILKES-BARRE
Near Kings, 2 BR heat & wa-
ter included. $650/month. No
pets. 570-693-0285
WILKES-BARRE
North Main Street
Wi l kes-Barre near General
Hospital. Freshly painted 3
room apartment. Spacious eat-
in kitchen includes stove and
refrigerator. Bedroom fea-
tures 2 full size closets. Large
13 x 21 living room. Water
and sewer included. Electri-
city by tenant. Washer and
dryer available in laundry area.
Off street parking in private lot.
No pets. Security, application,
lease required. $485.00 per
month. Call 814-9574.
WILKES-BARRE
SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom apartments
Starting at $440 and up. Ref-
erences required. Section 8
OK. 570-357-0712
WILKES-BARRE
STUDIO-Short Term Available
Excellent Wilkes University
neighborhood, wood floors, park-
ing. $425, all utilities included.
570-826-1934
WYOMING
BLANDINA APARTMENTS
Deluxe 2 bedroom. Wall to wall
carpet. Some utilities by ten-
ant. No pets. Non-smoking.
El derl y Communi ty. Qui et ,
safe. Off street parki ng.
570-693-2850
timesleader.com
Get news
when it
happens.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Thursday, September 12, 2013 PAGE 9D
Apartments /Townhouses
Saint John Apartments
419 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre
Stress free living in a
secured building for seniors
age 62 and older.
Now you have it all! A lovely
3 room apartment that
includes all utilities and full
size appliances.
Personal storage room area.
No need to worry about rain
or snow, parking is included
in our indoor spacious
underground garage.
Laundry room/24 Hour
Emergency Maintenance.
570-970-6694
Handicap Accessible/Equal
Housing Opportunity
Income limits apply.
WILKES-BARRE
EXCELLENT
DOWNTOWN
LOCATION!!!
STUDIO, 1 & 2
BEDROOMS
Equipped Kitchen
Free Cable
Wall to Wall Carpeting
570-823-2776
Monday - Friday,
9 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Wilkeswood
Apartments
1 & 2 BR
Apts
2 & 3 BR
Townhomes
www.liveatwilkeswood.com
570-822-2711
WILKES-BARRE
Remodeled single home. 3
bedroom, hardwood floors.
No pets. 215-932-5690
WYOMING
2 bedrooms, 2nd floor, very
clean, recently remodeled.
Washer & dryer hookup. Off
st r eet par ki ng. No pet s.
$550/mo. includes water &
sewer. 570-714-7272
Commercial
PLAZA 315
ROUTE 315 - PLAINS
1,750 SQ. FT. & 2,400 SQ.FT
OFFICE/RETAIL, 2,000 FT.
With Cubicles.
570-829-1206
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Route 315 1,200 Sq. Ft.
Up to 10,000 sq. ft.
Will build to suite
Call 570-829-1206
EDWARDSVILLE
35-37 Rice Ave.
Double block in very good
condition. Live in one side
and let the other side pay the
mortgage. Newer roof and
furnace, 3 years old. Very
clean and in move-in
condition. A Must See!
MLS#13-2618. $79,000
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
PITTSTON TWP.
$1,750/MONTH
3002 N. Twp Blvd.
Medical office for rent on the
Pittston By-Pass. Highly vis-
i bl e l ocati on wi th pl enty of
parking. $1,800 sq. ft. of beau-
tifully finished space can be
used for any type office use.
$1,750/ mo. plus utilities.
MLS 13-098
Call Charlie
PITTSTON
COOPERS CO-OP
Lease Space Available.
Light manufacturing, ware-
house, office, includes all
utilities with free parking.
I will save you money!
ATLAS REALTY
829-6200
AMERICA REALTY
RENTALS
1 Month Free Rent
(Qualified Applicant)
FORTY FORT RETAIL
(GLASS FRONT) STORE.
WYOMING AVE. $850. month.
2 YEARS SAME RENT.
A MONTH FREE RENT
(QUALIFIED) APPLICATION
REQUIRED. DETAILS CALL
570-288-1422
WEST PITTSTON
1 CAR
GARAGE/STORAGE
FOR RENT
$55/month. Call Natalie
570-357-1138
Condominiums
DALLAS
Private Senior Community,
1st floor, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths,
attached garage, window treat-
ments & appliances included.
C/A, deck, snow removal &
lawn care included. No pets.
References. $1,200 + utilities &
security. 570-371-8666
Houses For Rent
BEAR CREEK
2 bedroom ranch, hardwood
floors, great sun room, 1,400
sq. ft. fireplace & wood burner,
grat deck. county setting. 2
car attached garage. No pets.
Al l ut i l i t i es by t enant .
$970/ mont h 760- 5095
DALLAS/LEHMAN TWP.
Lovely 2 bedroom, one bath
house in the country. Spa-
cious kitchen/living/dining room
combination. No smoking, no
exceptions. One small pet
considered. References, se-
curity deposit & credit check
required. $1,250/month + utilit-
ies. 570-889-8432
FORTY FORT
AMERICA REALTY
RENTALS
1ST MONTH FREE RENT
(Qualified Applicants)
EXCELLENT INVENTORY -
CALL 570-288-1422
NO PETS, EMPLOYMENT
VERIFICATION,. APPLICA-
TION, FREE FIRST MONTH
(QUALIFY) HOME $900/mo +
utilities. Edwardsville/Kingston
APT $500 month + utilities.
Plains/W-B
Call for details, others.
HUNLOCK CREEK
3 bedroom, 2 bath, $1,000
month. Month to month lease.
Not section 8 approved. Non
smokers. No pets. 2 car gar-
age. Outdoor woodburner for
heat & hot water.
570-506-5986
KINGSTON
1/2 DOUBLE
63 North Thomas Ave.
3 bedrooms, 1 bath, new car-
peting, all appliances, includ-
ing washer and dryer, fenced
in yard, attic, basement and
storage. Cats and dogs OK.
$750+security and utilities.
570-639-5777
LARKSVILLE
Pace Street
5 room single family home with
2 + b e d r o o ms , 1 b a t h,
washer/dryer, deck & yard.
$700/month + utilities.
Call Barbara Mark
570-696-5414
696-1195
LEHMAN
3 bedrooms, 2 full baths,
$800/month.
570-477-3827
LEHMAN
IDETOWN ROAD
2 bedrooms, laundry facilities
on site. No pets. $900 month.
1st month & security required.
Available now. 570-639-0967
or 570-574-6974
LUZERNE
392 Bennett St.
2 BEDROOM
HOUSE
Gas heat. Washer/ dryer hook-
up, dish-washer, stove & refri-
gerator. Fenced in yard, par-
tially new carpet. Off-street
parking, yard. $680 + utilities.
(570) 288-3438
MOUNTAIN TOP
Mobile home
2 bedroom, 2 full baths, eat in
kitchen, living room, walk in
cl oset, deck, washer/dryer,
di shwasher & ref ri gerat or,
cent r al ai r on 2 acr es.
$600/month. + 1 & 1/2 month
security & 1st month rent.
570-592-5764/ 973-271-0261
NANTICOKE
6 room house for rent call for
details.(570)735-2236
PITTSTON
Available Oct. 1st. very nice
2 bedroom, 1.5 bath. Move in
condition. Gas range, fridge,
dishwasher, washer &dryer
included. Large yard. Beauti-
ful front porch. Corner lot with
2 car driveway parking. Nice
neighborhood. No pets. No
Smoking. $800/mo plus utilit-
ies, security & references.
570-655-4950
PITTSTON
AVAILABLE NOW
80 River Street
Newly remodeled two story,
2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
refrigerator, stove & dryer,
washer hookup, two car
driveway, fenced yard, no
pets. $775/month + utilities.
1st, last & security.
Call 570-417-9781
To view house go to
www.wilkesbarredjs.com/
789PhotoAlbum
PITTSTON
Single home sale or rent. 3
bedrooms, 1 bath, move in
condition, nice yard.
570-540-0198
PLAINS
Single Home
Nice Yard, off-street parking,
plus garage. 3 bedrooms plus
small office, 1.5 bath,
washer/dryer hookup, gas
heat, air conditioning. Newly
renovated. No Pets.
$1,100+utilities. 570-655-4915
SHAVERTOWN
Immaculate, 2 bedroom Cape
Cod with eat-in kitchen, hard-
wood floors, gas heat and de-
tached garage. $950/
month+utilities and security
deposit. 570-675-3178
Houses For Rent
WILKES-BARRE
40 Dexter Street
3 bedroom, 2 bath single
home. $600 + utilities & se-
curity. Section 8 Approved.
Call
357-2809 or 826-1795
WILKES-BARRE
Clean, 2 bedroom, duplex.
Stove, hookups, parking, yard.
No pets/no smoking. $475 +
utilities. 570-868-4444
WILKES-BARRE
Wyoming Street
Unfurnished house for rent.
$750 + utilities,
security required
570-961-3162
Storage
FORTY FORT
GARAGE FOR RENT
11ft. 6"x 23 ft. Cinder block
walls, interior walls, steel studs
with sheet rock. Concrete floor,
Steel overhead door with lock,
overhead lighting. $110/month.
1 year lease and security.
570-655-0530
Half Doubles
FORTY FORT
4BR, 1 BA, fridge & stove,
washer/dryer hook up. Shared
yard. Non smokers. $950 +
utilities, security, references &
credit check. Available 10/1/13.
570-751-1600
GLEN LYON
15 minutes from Power Plant
or W-B. 2 bedroom, appli-
ances, washer/dryer hook up,
electric heat, new paint & car-
pet, non smoker. $625/month
+ security, references & 1 year
lease. Pet on approval.
570-218-2320
GLEN LYON
3 BR RENOVATED
1/2 double, off street park-
ing, 2 porches, oil / electric
heat. NO DOGS. Refer-
ences & application re-
quired. $500 month +
security. 570-714-1296
HANOVER
LYNDWOOD AREA
1/2 double, very spacious, 3
bedrooms, 1.5 baths with all
neutral decor, large eat-in kit-
chen with oak cabinets, new
countertop & all appliances,
ample closets, full walk out
basement f or st orage, of f
street parking, spacious back
yard deck. $750/mo + utilities,
security & lease. NO PETS.
570-793-6294
KINGSTON
SPRAGUE AVE. 2 bedroom, 1
bath, 1st floor duplex. New car-
peting & hardwood floors. Con-
veni ent t o Wyomi ng Ave.
B a s e m e n t s t o r a g e .
Washer/dryer hookup. $525
month + uti l i ti es, securi ty,
l ease. NO PETS.
EAST BENNET ST. Charm-
i ng 3 bedroom, hardwood
floors, new carpeting in bed-
rooms, laundry room off spa-
cious kitchen, stained glass
windows, off street parking,
convenient to Cross Valley.
$650. + ut i l i t i es, securi t y,
l ease. NO PETS.
570-793-6294
KINGSTON
59 North Welles Ave.
Eat-in kitchen with refrigerat-
or and stove, 3 bedrooms, 1
bath, off-street parking. No
Smoking, No Pets. $650+
utilities & security.
570-639-1796
KINGSTON
PROPERTIES
Currently Available
LARGE 1/2 DOUBLE
Completely renovated, full
kitchen, living room,
formal dining room & study.
4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths.
****************
1/2 DOUBLE
Completely remodeled older
charm, stained glass win-
dows, front & rear porches,
Living /dining room combo,
eat-in kitchen with laundry
alcove, 3 bedrooms,
1.5 baths
****************
Quiet residential neighbor-
hoods, utilities & heat by ten-
ant, no pets, no smoking. 1
month security, 1 year lease.
Call Rosewood Realty
570-287-6822
WILKES-BARRE/
PARSONS
3 b e d r o o m, 1 . 5 b a t h ,
$700/month, security, utilities &
lease. No Pets. 570-288-7753
LARKSVILLE
2 BR, refrigerator, stove &
dishwasher, washer/dryer hook
up. Private driveway. No pets,
$650 + utilities & security.
570-954-5903
LARKSVILLE
Very clean, fenced in yard,
washer/dryer & stove. Utilities
by tenant. Has gas heat & wa-
ter. Off street parking, nice
nei ghborhood. 2 l arge & 1
small bedroom. $700/month +
security. No pets.
570-287-1421
NANTICOKE
185 W. Church St,
3 bedrooms, 1 bath, oil heat,
washer/dryer hookup. Small
yard. $550 + utilities & secur-
ity. No pets. Available 10/1/13.
570-270-3139
NANTICOKE
2 bedroom, washer/dryer hook
up, air conditioning, new bath.
$525/month. Security &
references required.
570-954-7919
PITTSTON
1 bedroom, stove & refrigerat-
or, washer/dryer hook up. heat
& water included. $575/month
+ security. 570-906-7614
PLAINS
HALF-DOUBLE
2 bedrooms, all gas. No dogs.
$495/month. 570-417-5441
Half Doubles
PITTSTON
ELIZABETH STREET
1 bedroom with neutral decor,
t i l e bat h, ampl e cl oset s,
screened in porch and private
yard. $350 month + utilities,
security, lease. NO PETS.
570-793-6294
PLAINS
Spacious, modern, 4 bdrm,
wall to wall carpeting. 1.5 bath,
living room, kitchen w/all appli-
ances, off street parking. $800
+ utilities, 1st & last months
rent + security. Absolutely NO
Pets or Smoking.
570-823-4116
570-417-7745
570-417-2737
PLAINS
Spaci ous, hi gh cei l i ngs, 4
bdrm, wall to wall carpeting.
1. 5 bat h, har dwood f l oor s
downstairs, large living room
with fireplace, large kitchen
with stove, microwave, refriger-
ator, dishwasher, washer &
dryer. Full attic, off-street park-
ing, yard. Absolutely NO pets
or smoking. Utilities paid by
tenants. $800+security and last
months rent.
Call:570-823-4116 or
570-417-7745
SHAVERTOWN
3 BEDROOMS
Gas heat, Living room, dining
room, off-street parking.
Security and Lease. No Pets.
$700 a month.
Includes Sewer and Trash.
570-675-4424
TRUCKSVILLE
1/2 RANCH
2 bedrooms, living & dining
rooms, kitchen, washer/dry-
er, basement, yard, Security,
references & lease. No Pets.
$700/month. Sewer & trash in-
cluded.
Call 570-474-9321
or 570-690-4877
WEST WYOMING
3 bedroom, 1.5 baths, quiet
area, off street parking. ABSO-
LUTELY NO PETS. $650/mo +
security and references. Utilit-
ies by tenant. 570-430-3851
leave message.
Sales
DALLAS
1995 Redman Trailer, 56'x14',
Located in park. 4 rooms,
2 bedrooms, 1.5 bath.
Screened in porch. $13,000.
Very Good Condition
570-706-5201
Horses
HORSE BOARDING
Full care or Field board, Lay-
ups, rehab, retirement, local
transport. Springdale Farms
925-5323 or 441-2288
Redrock Area
Pets
BEAGLE PUPPIES
AKC registered. Males and
Females, Tri-color, shots,
wormed and vet checked.
$250 each. 570-467-3683
Huskies, Poms,
Yorkies, Chihuahuas,
German Shephards & More.
Bloomsburg 389-7877
Hazleton 453-6900
Hanover 829-1922
KITTENS free Persian mix, 8
weeks old, 2 females, 1 male
All eating kitten chow, litter
trained, ready to go. 855-1232
Autos Under $5000
CHEVY '99
PRISM LSI
137,000 HYW miles, adult
owned, green/grey. Clean,
very good condition, depend-
able, excellent mileage. 4
speed automatic, A/C, all
power, rear window defroster,
tachometer, tilt steering wheel,
cruise control, am/fm/CD ste-
reo, air bags, ABS brakes, al-
loy wheels. $2,200. OBO 570-
417-7671 or 570-474-9828.
DODGE '03
GRAND
CARAVAN
AWD, $1,500. 570-262-1996
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
DODGE '95 RAM 1500
X-CAB 4X4
GOOD WORK TRUCK!
$1,295
Call for details 570-696-4377
MERCURY SABLE 2002'
150K. $700
215-932-5690
Autos For Sale
1553 Main Street, Peckville, PA 18452
Prestige
One AutO
WE BUY
VEHICLES!
Call Dan Lane @ 570-489-0000
*Tax, tags & license fees not included.
2004 VENTURE LS Ext. MiniVan 90840 ..................................................... $4,500
2004 CORVETTE 17167 .................................................................................. $26,986
2006 COBALT 68286........................................................................................... $6,900
2005 CROSS FIRE SRT-6 59014.................................................................. $17,999
2005 RAM 1500 QUAD 79407.................................................................... $16,999
2005 MUSTANG GT Convertible 32500 ................................................. $18,999
2007 E350 Passenger 56256....................................................................... $13,999
2007 MUSTANG GT Coupe 32569.............................................................. $17,495
2008 Ford KingRanch CREW 50457 .......................................................... $28,896
2010 MUSTANG V6 Convertible 40332................................................... $17,999
2009 CR-V EX SUV 42978.............................................................................. $17,990
2011 CRZ EX 6M Coupe 5870...................................................................... $15,999
2006 Hummer H3 50591 ............................................................................... $20,989
2011 SONATA SE 51600................................................................................. $15,999
2011 Mazda3 SPORT gt 49212................................................................... $16,990
2007 Mini COOPER S k 46153.................................................................. $13,999
2006 Nissan 350Z Convertible 22128 ..................................................... $20,980
2009 Nissan 370Z SPORT PKG 11575..................................................... $26,789
2003 Porsche BOXTER S 26998 ................................................................. $23,999
2004 Subaru WRX STI 60325...................................................................... $18,799
2010 Subaru Outbac SPORT 25683.......................................................... $19,890
2012 Subaru IMPREZA AWD 33059......................................................... $17,980
2009 Suzuki AWD SUV 30482 ..................................................................... $12,999
2006 RAV 4Limited SUV 123109 ................................................................. $11,990
2010 Toyota RAV4 I4 SUV 34739............................................................... $16,999
2007 TOYOYA FJ CRUZER 65231................................................................. $21,990
2010 Volkswagen SE SUV 22065................................................................ $17,499
2012 Volkswagen SE Sedan 32392............................................................ $14,999
2012 Volkswagen 2.5L Hatchback 30751 ............................................... $14,999
8
0
0
0
2
1
1
6
2002 Z06 Coupe 13295 ........................................$27,778
2003 BMW Z43.0i ConvertiBle 53232 ...............$13,999
2003 SilverADo XCAB 4X4 lt eXt. 46582 ..............$15,999
2004 S2000 roADSt ConvertiBle 87617 ..........$16,495
2004 venture lS eXt. 97840 ............................$4,500
2004 Corvette Coupe 17167 .............................$26,986
2005 MuSt Gt ConvertiBle 32500 ...................$18,999
2005 tACoMA 4X4 CreW 87132 ........................$18,898
2006 F150XCAB 4X4 Xl 62084 .........................$15,999
2006 HuMMer H3 Suv 50591 ...........................$18,999
2006 350Z tourinG ConvertiBle 22128 ...........$19,495
2007 MuSt Gt Coupe 32569 ........................$16,999
2007 GXp v8 SeDAn 82306 ...............................$11,495
2007 MerC C350 SeDAn 59231 ........................$16,990
2007 HArley 883 SportSter 5353 ......................$6,000
2007 F350 XCAB 4X4 lAriAt 91235 .................$21,999
2008 MuSt Gt Coupe 3012 ..........................$23,898
2008 F150 KinG rAnCH CreW 50457 ..................$27,980
2008 SilverrADo lt2 74414 ..............................$18,999
2009 Cr-v eX Suv 42978 .................................$16,990
2009 HonDA Si SeDAn 45585 .............................$17,495
2010 MuSt v6 ConvertiBle 40332 .................$15,999
2010 tiGuAn Se Suv 22065 ...........................$17,499
2011 ForD FuSion i4 Se 82321 .........................$10,989
2011 MitSu outlAnDer 4X4 Se Suv ...................18124
2012 vW Gti 4 Door 12199 ...........................$21,999
2012 JettA Se SeDAn 32392 ............................$14,999
2012 Beetle 2.5l 30751 ...................................$14,999
2012 iMpreZA SeDAn 33059 .............................$17,495
2012 SCion tC 7.0 21125 ................................$19,898
We Buy CArS
Autos For Sale
ACME
AUTO
SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD CREDIT,
NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
AUTOS
11 AUDI S5 CONVERTIBLE
SPRINT blue/ black / brown
leather interior, navigation,
7 spd auto turbo, AWD
10 CHEVY IMPALA LT silver
59k miles
08 NISSAN AKTIMA SL
grey, grey leather, sunroof
07 BUICK LUCERNE CXL silver,
grey leather
06 CADILLAC DTS silver, black
leather, chrome alloys
06 VW JETTA GLS blue, auto,
sunroof
06 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS grey,
auto, 4 cyl
05 CHEVY MONTE CARLO LT
white V6
05 CHEVY MONTE CARLO LS
gold
02 CADILLAC SEDAN DEVILLE
Brown tan leather, 85k miles
02 VW BEETLE GLS lime green
5 speed, 4 cylinder
01 HONDA CIVIC green 5 speed
73 PORSCHE 914 green & black,
5 speed, 62k miles.
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4s
08 CHRYSLER T&C TOURING
Blue, entertainment center
7 passenger mini van
08 JEEP COMMANDER SPORT
dark grey, 3rd seat, 4x4
08 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT black,
4 cylinder, 5 speed 4x4
08 FORD EDGE SE white V6 AWD
07 CHRYSLER ASPEN LTD
dark grey, 3rd seat, 4x4
07 DODGE CARAVAN SXT green,
07 GMC YUKON DENALI
electric blue, black leather,
navigation 4x4
06 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT
blue3, V6, 4x4
06 SUBARU FORESTER
silver, V6, 4x4
06 DODGE DAKOTA QUAD
CAB TRUCK
silver, 4 door, V6, 4x4
06 NISSAN MURANO SE
white AWD
06 MERCURY MARINER silver,
V6, AWD
06 HONDA PILOT EX silver, 3rd
seat, 4x4
06 CHEVY 1500 SILVERADO REG
CAB truck red, 4x4
06 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB
Black, V8, 4x4 truck
05 NISSAN PATHFINDER SE
off road, grey, 3rd seat, 4x4
05 BUICK RENZVOUS CXL
Light grey, tan leather AWD
05 NISSAN XTERRA
black, V6, 4x4
05 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER white,
V6, 4x4
05 CHEVY COLORADO CLUB
CAB grey 4x4 truck
05 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY TOURING blue,
7 passenger mini van
05 FORD ESCAPE XLT Red,
V6 4x4
05 HYUNDAI TUSCON LX green
auto, AWD
04 HYUNDAI SANTE FE GLS
Black, V6, 4x4
04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE GLS
Bluem V6, 4x4
04 CHEVY 1500 SILVERADO
CREW CAB white, 4 door,
4x4 truck
04 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT
QUAD CAB black
4 door 4x4 truyck
04 GMC ENVOY
black, V6, 4x4
04 FORD EXPLORER XLS
gold V6 4x4
04 CHEVY AVALANCHE LT
green, grey leather, 4 door
4x4 truck
03 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD
grey black leather sunroof 4x4
03 FORD EXPEDITION XLT silver,
3rd seat, 4x4
02 MITSUBISHI MONTERO XLS
Silver, V6, 3rd seat 4x4
02 FORD F150 SUPER CREW
red & tan 4 door. 4x4 truck
01 CHEVY TRACKER LT
white V6 4x4 54k miles
01 DODGE DAKOTA CLUB CAB
SPORT blue, V6, 4x4 truck
01 FORD EXPLORER SPORT
silver, 2 door, 4x4
98 DODGE RAM 1500
QUAD CAB
V8, 4x4 truck
99 FORD F 150 SUPER CAB
silver 4x4 truck
97 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD
4x4
BUICK '10 ENCLAVE
45k mi l es, si l ver/ l eat her,
captains seats, rear back up
camera, third row. $25,200.
570-814-0749
$ BUYING $
JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
Vito & Ginos Free Pickup
570-288-8995
CHEVY '00 MAILBU
Dark blue. Automatic, loaded,
power sun roof, V6, new tires.
Very good condition. 106k.
$3,200, OBO. 570-822-0832
Chevrolet Impala LT 13'
25K, USA
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
SATURN '07 ION
4 cylinder. 5 speed. REAL
SHARP CAR! $3,995.
570-696-4377
Autos For Sale
TOTOTA '11
CAMRY LE
4 door, auto, dark bl ue
metallic color. Original own-
er . Onl y 18, 900 mi l es!
Looks and drives like a new
car! ! ! Pri ce reduced t o
$14,400 for quick sale. Loc-
ated in the Back Mtn. Call
570-674-5673
to schedule an appointment.
TOYOTA
'12 SCION
TC COUPE
Dual sun roofs, 6 speed auto,
too many options to mention.
Asking $17,000. 570-472-1149
Volvo 98' V70 Wagon
Turbo, 4 Wheel drive, Leather
interior. Good condition in and
out! $5,000. 347-693-4156
Motorcycles
STRATUS 17'
Pleasure/
Fishing Boat
150HP Johnson motor, new
canopy Trolling motor, also.
Moving , Must Sell! $4,995.
570-498-9599
Trucks / SUVs / Vans
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
CHEVY '02 BLAZER
4X4. V6. BARGAIN PRICE
$3,995.
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
CHEVY '02
SILVERADO XCAB
4X4 Sharp, Sharp truck!
$6,995
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
CHEVY '06
TRAILBLAZER
4X4. V6. EXTRA SHARP!
$5,995.
570-696-4377
LEO'S AUTO
SALES
93 Butler Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
CHEVY '93 BLAZER
2 door, 6 cylinder auto, 4x4,
new tires, radiator, tune-up,
& oil change.
$1,450
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
DODGE '06 DAKOTA
CLUB CAB
6 speed. EXTRA SHARP!
$4495. 570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
FORD 00
WINDSTAR SEL
Leather, LIKE NEW! $2,495.
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
FORD '05 ESCAPE
4X4. Leather. Sunroof.
CLEAN SUV! $5,995.
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
GMC ENVOY 03
4X4, 3rd row Seat, SHARP
SUV!
$5,995. 570-696-4377
JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
Laredo 2005
PRICE REDUCED!
82,000 miles, Well main-
tained, excellent condition.
Beige in color, $10,500. 570-
654-7451 or 570-466-4669
Trucks / SUVs / Vans
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
MAZDA '03 TRIBUTE
Leather, sunroof, 4x4. Good
Miles! $4,995
570-696-4377
Auto Services
WANTED
Cars & Full Size Trucks.
For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto Parts 477-2562
Air Conditioners
AI R CONDI TI ONER 6000
BTUs EER 9. 9 $35.
570-574-6416
AIR CONDITIONERS, (1) Fri-
gidaire, 5450 BTU.
$50. 570-693-1454
Antiques & Collectibles
$ ANTIQUES $
$ BUYING $
Old Toys, Model Kits,
Bikes, Dolls, Guns,
Mining Items, Trains
& Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
BASEBALL/football cards '90
Fleer baseball $3. '91 Score
Baseball $3. '92 Topps base-
ball $5. '92 Pinnacle football
$3. '90 Fleer football $3. '90
pr oset f oot bal l $3. 570-
3135214 or 570-3123-3859
COCA COLA holiday caravan
truck $20. Linden hump back
clock Westminster chimes $75.
Hess '02 truck $20. Sight vise
for sighting guns USA $35.
Brown jug 2 gal. $30. Bolt cut-
ters $25. Humble toy gas truck
boxed $15. 571-735-1589
MATCH BOX models Yester
years 6 items $91. Days Gone
By 2 items $22. 571-287-6912
NASCAR variety 1.24 scale
cars 10 for $30. 15 trailers
$7.50 each. Bobby Labonte &
Rusty Wallace autographed
cars $75. each. Bud steins '93
- '03 $10. each. 570-239-2266
SUPER BOWL Memoriabilia
Jan. 6, 2003. Game seat cush-
ion, super bowl ticket, game
program, game duffle bag, vis-
itors guide all for $50. 2 night
st ands mahogany f i ni sh
24" wx20" h $100. bot h.
570-489-2675
Appliances
DISHWASHER Kenmore Model
665-13743K601 stainless steel, 3
years old, energy star $250.
570-868-6018
GAS FRYER, commerci al
heavy duty, like new, Cecil-
ware 43lb. Asking $400.
570-574-2967
HD TV (32" Sony Vega) in per-
fect condition - $50.00.
570-406-7607
REFRIGERATOR white, top
freezer G.E. 18.1 cu. ft. 6
months ol d $500. Hotpoi nt
electric dryer, white 6.8 cu. ft. 6
months old with little use $300.
570-675-0667
STOVE, gas Tappan, still us-
ing, white with black oven door
L o o k s & wo r k s g r e a t !
Nanticoke. $125. 831-5778
Building Materials
DECORATI VE STONE 6
boxes. Fl at s. $500.
570-709-5178
FLOORING 20 sq. ft. 3/4" pre-
finished red oak flooring, short
lengths, tongue & groove 4
sides, 3 1/4 wide Bruce Dun-
dee. $50. CARPET PADDING
14'x14' room $45. 570-403-
0494
LADDERS aluminum extension
ladders. 32' $25. 36' $50., 40' $60.
24' 25. Pressure Washer Sand
Blasting Kit $20. Set of aluminum
ladder jacks $20. Wood extension
ladder FREE. 570-510-2436
Clothing
COAT men' s wi nt er coat ,
Dockers XXL wool blend, char-
coal grey,plaid scarf, like new
$30. 570-287-6155
FUR JACKET, Tourmal i ne
Mink 3/4 Stroller, excellent
condition. 32 in length, w/65.
size 12, mink hat included.
selling for $300. 570-881-0569
Exercise Equipment
EXERCISE MACHINE. Pro-
Form PF 803030. Like new.
Paid $650, selling for $350.
570-498-9599
GYM Impex Tech rod gym,
similar to Bow Flex. Great con-
dition $99. 570-829-4776
Furnances & Heaters
HEAT YOUR ENTIRE
HOME water, and more
wi t h a n OUTDOOR
WOOD FURNACE from
Central Boiler. B & C Out-
door Wood Furnace, LLC.
570-477-569
Furniture & Accessories
BED, Craftmatic, single, com-
plete, motor, lifts & vibrator.
Excellent condition. $275.
474-6947
BEDROOM SET 4 pc. by Bas-
sett, double bed, maple finish
$550. DINING ROOM table, 4
chairs, solid pine, very good
condition $200. LOVESEAT
$50. Pecan COFFEE TABLE
with matching end tables $150.
570-735-6527
BEDROOM SET sol i d oak,
Pi er wal l uni t wi t h mi rror,
queen size bed & 12 drawers,
cabi net has 2 encl osed
shelves. Excellent condition
$400. 570-675-0502
CHAIRS, 4 High back, wooden
kitchen, $25 for all 4. Call Bill
825-8256
PAGE 10D Thursday, September 12, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
CALL AN
E
X
P
E
R
T
To place an ad call
829-7130
Get all the
advertising
inserts
with the
latest sales.
Call
829-5000
to start your
home delivery.
Appliances
A.R.T.
APPLIANCE
REPAIR
We service all brands.
All repairs guaranteed
570-639-3001
EDKIN
APPLIANCE REPAIR
Serving NEPA
Credit Cards Accepted
Repairs Guaranteed
570-606-4323
Building & Remodeling
1ST. QUALITY
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding, gutters,
insulation, decks, additions,
windows, doors, masonry &
concrete. Ins. & Bonded. Sr.
Citizens Discount! State Lic.
# PA057320 570-606-8438
ALL OLDER HOMES SPECIALIST
570-825-4268.
Windows, Doors and Roof
Home Repair
HOME SHOW
March 7, 8 & 9
at the
New Mohegan Sun
Hotel and
Convention Center
At Pocono Downs
Call for Details and
Reservations.
Building Industry
Association Of NEPA
411 MAIN ST.,
KINGSTON, PA 18704
Contact:
Janet Campis
By E-mailing Office Manager:
officemanager@bianepa.com
Or Call:
570-287-3331
SHEDLARSKI
CONSTRUCTION
Home Improvement Specialist
Licensed, insured & PA
registered. Kitchens, baths,
vinyl siding & railings, replace-
ment windows & doors, addi-
tions, garages, all phases of
home renovations. Free Est.
570-287-4067
Chimney Service
A-1 ABLE CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair Chimneys. All
types of Masonry. Liners In-
stalled, Brick & Block, Roofs &
Gutters. Licensed & Insured
570-735-2257
CHIMNEY REPAIRS
Springhill Chimney Service
Parging, Brick Work, Stainless
Steel Chimney Liners,
Chimney Sweep.
New Location!
296 Main Street, Dupont.
570-471-3742
CHRIS MOLESKY
Chimney Specialist
New, repair, rebuild, liners installed.
Cleaning. Concrete & metal caps.
Small masonry jobs. 570-328-6257
Cleaning & Maintenance
CONNIE'S CLEANING
15 Years Experience
Bonded & Insured-Residential
Cleaning-Gift Certificates
Available-570-430-3743
Connie does the cleaning!
DEB & PATS
CLEANING SERVICE
We Are Bonded & Insured
Free Estimates
570-235-1840
570-793-4773
EcoHousekeeping
Residential & Commercial
All Natural Products Included
Experienced, Reliable, Insured
570-878-3188
Lacy Rice Owner/Operator
Concrete & Masonry
A STEP-UP MASONRY
Specializing in All Types of
Masonry. Stone, Concrete
Licensed & Insured Free
Estimates Senior Discount
PA094695-570-702-3225
D. PUGH CONCRETE
All phases of masonry &
concrete. Small jobs welcome.
Senior discount. Free est.
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
STESNEY CONCRETE
& MASONRY
Brick, Block, Stucco, Stone,
Steps, Sidewalks, Driveways,
Foundations, Floors, Chim-
neys etc. Lic. & Ins. Call 570-
328-1830 or 570-283-1245
Construction & Building
FLOORING
INSTALLATION
PROFESSIONALS
15 years experience. Carpet,
vinyl, tile, wood, laminate in-
stallation & repairs. If you walk
on it, we know how to install it!
All Work Guaranteed
Fully Insured. 574-8953
Kenzie Construction
Licensed & Insured. PA# 087026
Roof & Siding, Bathrooms,
Kitchens and Remodeling.
FREE ESTIMATES!
570-793-1391
Landlords, Realtors,
Homeowners
Do yourself a favor
call us first!
Construction Cost Cutters
570-709-4060
NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION
All Types Of Work
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-406-6044
Electrical
RNI ELECTRIC, LLC
Licensed & Insured
Retired Veteran. Panel upgrades.
New & old work.
25 Years Experience
570-814-8979
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes & Replacements.
Generator Installs.
570-868-4469
Gutter Repair & Cleaning
GUTTER CLEANING
Window Cleaning
Pressure Washing.
Insured. 570-288-6794
GUTTER
RESTORATION &
ROOF REPAIRS
Clean, Seal, Refinish
10 Year Warranty
570-417-1538
Handyman
DO IT ALL
HANDYMAN SERVICE
Licensed & Insured
570-704-8759
DAVE'S HANDY MAN
SERVICES
30 years experience
Full-Time-Affordable quality repairs,
Remodeling and Painting.
570-299-1127
Hauling & Trucking
ALL KINDS OF HAULING
& JUNK REMOVAL
TREE/SHRUB REMOVAL
Demolition - Estate Cleanout
Attics, Basements, Yards, etc.
Free Estimates 24 hour service
Small and large jobs!
570-823-1811 570-239-0484
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars, Garages.
Free Estimates, Same Day!
570-855-4588
AA CLEANING
A1 Always hauling, cleaning attics,
cellar, garage, one piece or whole
Estate, also available 10 & 20
yard dumpsters.
655-0695, 592-1813 or 287-8302
AAA CLEANING
A1 General Hauling
Cleaning attics, cellars, garages,
Demolitions, Roofing & Tree
Removal. Free Est. 779-0918 or
542-5821; 814-8299
BOB & RAY'S HAULING
We Haul Everything!
Cheap, fast, clean & respectful
Free Estimates.
570-655-7458
570-604-5224
$ BUYING $
JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
Vito & Ginos Free Pickup
570-288-8995
Mikes $5-Up
Hauling Junk & Trash from
Houses, Garages, Yards, Etc.
826-1883 704-8846
Hauling & Trucking
Will Haul Anything
Clean cellars, attics, yards & metal
removal. Call Jeff
570-735-3330 or 570-762-4438
Landscaping
Foltz Landscaping
Small Excavating New landscapes,
retaining walls/patios. Call:
570-760-4814
KELLER'S
LAWN CARE
Cleanups, landscaping, mow-
ing, mulching, trimming, plant-
ing. Commercial & Residential.
570-332-7016
PA Landscaping &
Lawn Service Inc.
Lawn Cutting
Shrub Trimming, Mulching
Landscaping Services
25+ Years Exp. 570-287-4780
palandscaping@verizon.net
Tough Brush & Tall Grass
Mowi ng, edgi ng, mul chi ng,
shrubs, hedge shaping. Tree
pruning. Fall cleanup. Weekly,
bi-weekly lawn care. Fully Ins.
Free Est. 570-829-3261
Miscellaneous
Painting & Wallpaper
A & N PAINTING
SUMMER SPECIAL
TIME IS RUNNING OUT TO
SCHEDULE YOUR
EXTERIOR WORK.
18 years exp. Exterior
Painting, Power Washing,
Deck Staining.
570-820-7832
MARTY'S INTERIOR
PAINTING
Top Quality Work
570-468-9079
Painting & Wallpaper
ATTENTION
Serra Painting
Book Now For Fall & Save.
All Work Guaranteed Satisfaction.
30 Yrs. Experience. Powerwash &
Paint Vinyl, Wood, Stucco
Aluminum. Free Estimates!
You Cant Lose! 570-822-3943
JACOBOSKY
PAINTING
We Are An Expert Building
Restoration Company.
High end painting, Power Washing
& Masonry. Please Call Only The
Best! 570-328-5083
JOHNS PAINTING
Reliable, Neat, Honest,
Working with Pride. Insured.
570-735-8101
M. PARALIS PAINTING
Int/ Ext. painting, Power
washing. Professional work at
affordable rates. Free estimates.
570-288-0733
Plumbing
D.M. PLUMBING & HEATING
Specializing in boilers,
furnaces & water heaters.
10% Sr. discount. Licensed,
insured & 24 hour service
570-793-1930
Pressure Washing
PJs Window Cleaning &
Janitorial Services
Windows, Gutters, Carpets,
Power washing and more.
INSURED/BONDED.
pjswindowcleaning.com
570-283-9840
Roofng & Siding
CORNERSTONE
CONSTRUCTION
Roofing Siding Carpentry
40 yrs. experience
Licensed & Insured
PA026102
Call Dan: 570-881-1131
JO Home Improvement
Roofing over the top, rip-off,
repairs, siding painting gut-
ters int & ext remodeling. Fully
Ins. Free Est. PA100512. 570-
829-3261 or 817-2548
Roofng & Siding
Jim Harden
570-288-6709
New Roofs & Repairs, Shingles,
Rubber, Slate, Gutters,
Chimney Repairs.
Credit Cards Accepted
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed-Insured
EMERGENCIES
SPRING ROOFING
McManus Construction
Licensed, Insured. Everyday
Low Prices. 3,000 satisfied
customers. 570-735-0846
Tree Service
APEX TREE AND EARTH
apextreeandearth.com
Serving Wyoming Valley,
Back Mountain &
Surrounding Areas.
570-550-4535
Furniture & Accessories
CHAIRS 4 highback kitchen
chairs $25. George Forman
grilling machine $10. Call Bill
570-825-8256
CHINA CABINET Ethan Allen,
lighted, very good condition.
$500. 570-690-6451
CHINA CABINET Ethan Allen,
lighted, glass doors & shelves,
2 drawers & 2 doors on bot-
tom, solid oak, excellent condi-
tion $500. 570-239-5363
CURIO CABINET: Excellent
condition beveled glass curio
cabinet. Size 43 inches wide,
17 inches deep, 78 inches
high. Five shelves and two
doors are beveled glass. Ask-
ing $400. Call 570-675-1012
DESK Broyhill wood student desk,
4-drawers, dark wood stain, $65
Padded wood desk chair $25. Both
pieces in Excellent Condition. $75
for both. BUNK BEDS twin over
twin $299. 570-696-6986 after 3pm
or leave message
DESK/COMPUTER & swivel
chair $50. Antique Cavalier ce-
dar chest $300. Used Compaq
computer, keyboard, speakers
$25. Accent table & matching
mirror $40. Oak coffee table
$50. Sony hand held Playsta-
tion $50. 570-829-2599
DESKS Sauder - desk with
hutch $25. Desk with side door
$15. Desk with drop leaf $15.
Desk wi t h 2 shel ves $15.
Bookcase $8. 570-654-2967
DINETTE SET Raymour &
Flanagan, drop leaf table, 4
upholstered chairs, like new
condition. Paid $660. sell for
$325. 570-287-6327
DI NI NG ROOM HUTCH
Cherry finish. Good condition.
78" tall by 32" wide. $125. for
details 570-868-5683
DINING ROOM SET table, 6
chai r s, br eakf r ont $150.
Double bed frame $50. Twin
bed frame $50. Microwavw
stand $25. 3 TVs 29" color
$25, 5 drawer oak dresser $35.
570-823-8442
DINING ROOM SET, dark
wood with 4 chairs & 2 exten-
sions, $60. Piano, Henry Miller
upright $250. 406-5661
DINING ROOM SUITE pecan,
lighted hutch, glass shelves &
doors, 4 door base with cut-
l ery drawers, oval tabe, 6
chairs $450. Vintage square
end table, 2 levels 30"h $30.
Bedsi de chrome commode,
like new $25. 570-287-1644
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
oak $40. Keyboard $25. pro-
jection TV $75. 570-824-0938
FUTON complete metal frame,
floral cover, excellent condi-
tion $200. 570-287-3056
LAMPS with shades, $30. Dry
sink, oak, $50. Dining room
oak, with hutch, $100. Book
case, 3 tier with bottom doors,
$25. 954-4715
LIFT CHAIR electric, good
condition, works gret, bl ue
$200. COUCH l i ght green,
sturdy, good condition $50.
570-823-9635
LIVING ROOM SET rattan, 2
sofas, 1 end table, 1 coffee ta-
ble with glass top $400, Rock-
er/recliner, dark green $50. Ex-
cellent condition.
570-654-4112
TABLE solid oak, high pub
style 60" round with 2 swivel
high oak chairs.paid $650. sell
$200 firm. Excellent condition.
570-262-6283
Furniture & Accessories
LOGAN HALL TREE, Ethan
Allen part of new country col-
l ect i on #339407 current l y
priced at $1,599. color cotton,
brand new, perfect condition
44.5"wx78"hx18.35"d, 2 stor-
age drawers & beveled mirror
$725. 570-387-8375
MATTRESS PAD magnetic,
Visco Medic, provides thera-
peutic benefts $1200. new sell
$200. 570-474-5643
RECLINERS 2 matching wing
back recliners, claw feet, cran-
berry color $50. for both. 1
mauve swivel rocker recliner
$35. 1 dark green recliner $35.
570-740-2892
SECTIONAL taupe l eather
double hideabed, recliner &
chai se l ounge. Measur es
14'wx11' like new $900 OBO,
West Bend muffin toaster, 4
wide slots + egg cooker, warm-
er $45. Belgique stainless steel
skiller 6 quart $30. 852-9029
SOFA & love seat, beige floral
colors, very good condition
$100. 570-674-9716
SOFA & love seat, dark green,
gold & ivory $100. Gold swivel
rocking chair $40. Small end
tables with glass tops, white
wash wood (3) $60. Custom
drapes tan with gold tassels &
tie backs $100. Microwave
$25. 570-819-4951
SOFA 97" Bernhardt wi t h
down & 4 pillow, made in USA,
medium sage khaki color, ex-
cellent condition, like new, can
help with delivery $750.
570-905-7427
SOFA BED queen, very good
condition. $500 OBO.
570-655-0103 10am-4pm
SOFA floral 81" $110. Sharp
audio system, 4 features re-
mote & speakers $55. Polar-
oi d retro 60' s camera $20.
Juicer veg & fruit Omega $30.
Wesl o treadmi l l heart rate
sensor, $135. 570-740-1392
STOVE, gas Hotpoint $250. Gas
Dryer, Maytag $150. 4 pc. bed-
room solid wood, $300 Sofa hide a
bed, matching Loveseat & 2 end
tables. $225. 570-905-6574
TV Flat Screen 19"50; Entertain-
ment Center $10; Pi nk Wi cker
Chest $20; Black area rug $20; Mi-
crowave $30; Tiled kitchen table
w/2 chairs $50; Bed 2/frame, dress-
er, night table and mirrored dress-
er $40; 2 small dressers $25 each;
Queen size futon/bed $150; Roper
Washer $135 570-709-7076.
WOW! Beautiful Sealy & Serta
Mattress box-spring sets
W/Warranty in plastic bags,
cost over $900 each sell for
only $75 for full, All Sizes avail-
able. Pillow tops just $25 extra,
We Deliver
570-614-3877
Landscaping & Gardening
WEED WACKER, gas, needs
primer $25. 570-693-1454
Miscellaneous
ANNUITY.COM
Guaranteed Income For Your
Retirement
Avoid market risk & get guar-
anteed income for retirement!
Call for FREE copy of our
SAFE MONEY GUIDE Plus
Annuity
Quotes from A-Rated
companies! 800-423-0676
AQUARI UM 35 gal . f i l t er,
hood, some accessories $50.
570-823-8157
Miscellaneous
BAR 5' entertainment bar, sol-
id wood $200. Washer/dryer
set good condition $300.
570-574-0028
BEVERAGE AIR BEER TAP,
good condi ti on. Runs wel l
$350. 570-696-1501
BIKE Vintage 1977 Schwinn
Varsity 10 speed, lime green,
excellent condition $265. 8'
fluorescent light fixture, 2 bulbs
& extra ballast $15. OBO.
Jake 570-829-7859
CANADA DRUGS:
Canada Drug Center is your
choice for safe and affordable
medications. Our licensed
Canadian mail order phar-
macy will provide you with sav-
ings of up to 75 percent on all
your medications needs. Call
today 1-800-341-2398 for
$10.00 off your first prescrip-
tion and free shipping.
CHAIR Queen Ann green $40.
Wooden snack bar stools $30.
End table with cane top $5.
Radio, under couter $20. TV
11" Not HD novelty $20. Other
misc items buy all for one price
$100. 570-881-0877
LINER REPLACEMENT KIT
complete for 15x35 above
ground pool. Includes full prin-
ted liner, foam underlay, sides,
ski mmer basket & gaskets
/ accessor i es. Pai d $800.
sel l i ng f or $350. OBO.
570-881-2311
CUB CADET, motor SRC621
propel , $100. BATHROOM
SINK, white porcelain, with
mirror and medicine cabinet,
still in box, $90. 570-331-8183
DISH:
DISH TV Retailer. Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.) &
High Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where avail-
able.) SAVE! Ask About
SAME DAY Installation! CALL
NOW! 1-800-734-5524
EXERCISE machine ski/rower,
$10. Barbie books with book
bag $10. Lil Bratz comforter
$8. Melanie's mall sets $10.
Sponge Bob basketball game
$10. Pink bunny chair $5. Jazz
shoes size 5 + 6.5 $10 each.
570-696-3368
FI LE CABI NET 5 drawer,
beige side to side file, worth
$700 sel l $250. Si x 40x80
wooden doors $50 ea. 28" col-
or TV, 2 remotes, old type $70
570-280-2472
FISH TANK 25 gal. with wood cab-
inet stand $50. Hamilton Beach
food processr FP03 Model 70212
$25. 570-868-6018
FLEA MARKET/Yard Sal e
items. Moving must go $50.
takes all 570-824-8586
OMAHA STEAKS:
ENJOY 100% guaranteed,
delivered-to-the-door
Omaha Steaks!
SAVE 74% PLUS 4 FREE
Burgers - The Family Value
Combo - Only $39.99.
ORDER Today
1-888-721-9573,
use code 48643XMD - or
www.OmahaSteaks.com/mbff6
9
MY COMPUTER WORKS:
My Computer Works
Computer problems? Viruses,
spyware, email, printer issues,
bad internet connections - FIX
IT NOW! Professional, U.S.-
based technicians.
$25 off service. Call for
immediate help.
1-888-781-3386
Miscellaneous
FREE AD
POLICY
The Times Leader will
accept ads for used private
party merchandise only for
items totaling $1,000 or
less, maximum 8 lines for
7 days. All items must be
priced and state how many
of each item. Your name,
address, email and phone
number must be included.
No ads for ticket sales ac-
cepted. Pet ads accepted if
FREE ad must state FREE.
You may place your ad
online at timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com
SORRY NO PHONE
CALLS.
GAZEBO 11x13 2 canvas
tops, decorative metal railing, 2
sets zippered mosquito netting
$70. 570-479-3707
GRILL George Forman holds 4
burgers $6. 2xl mens j ean
jacket $4. Purses 42. each.
VCR tapes $1. each. Box flea
market items $5.
570-735-0821
GRILLS (2) 1 with side burner
%50. 1 smoker $75, 24" moun-
tain bike $30. 570-239-2266
GYM LOCKER 7', 6 sections
each 18"Dx12"Hx10"W solid,
no dent s, $100. MOWER
Craf t sman sel f propel l ed,
needs simple minor repair $25.
40+ skeins of assorted colors,
weights & sizes, includes some
needles $35 for all. 735-5916
HANDHELD ORGANI ZER
Palm Pilot Vx with extras $29.
Cordless telephone, new bat-
tery $15. Call 570-283-2552
rick@wyomingvlley.net
INSULATION, 6x23, 4 rolls; $25
roll. Curio cabinet $75. Plastic chair
mat $30. Sofa, chair, & ottoman
$75. BF Goodrich tire, 215 /75/R14
$20. Stone laundry tub 445. Metal
tool box for truck$45. Oak coffee
table $75. Single bed complete
$20.. Mountain bike $40. 20" Flip
400 bicycle $50. 868-4444
J OGGI NG S T ROL L E R
Schwinn $90. Lawnmower self
propel l ed, Toro, si de di s-
charge runs good $80. Poulan
mower, side discharge, runs
good $60. After 3 pm call
570-655-3197
LAWN FURNI TURE round
glass table, 4 chairs, umbrella
$40. Ladies peacoat, black,
size L new $30. ladies long fox
coat, size L $200. 823-1732
LCI AB 2000 pro series laser
with tripod, ro & receiver. $500.
570-388-6812
SUITCASES Samsonite, cran-
berry color, garment bag & me-
dium bag, wheeled fldable lug-
gage cart $50. 693-1454
MAGAZINES, National Geo-
graphic, 200, up to 8/13 $25,
OBO. 474-6947
MEDICAL GUARDIAN:
Medical Alert for Seniors - 24/7
monitoring.
FREE Equipment. Free
Shipping. Nationwide Service.
$29.95/Month CALL Medical
Guardian Today
855-850-9105
PUNCH BOWL SET, Never
used, i n ori gi nal box. 18
pi eces, $10. 570-693-1454
Miscellaneous
MUFFLER '88 Chevy Berretta
$25. Tilted trailer handmade
49.5wx8'l, lights, new rims &
tires & spare $200. 740-1081
POTTY CHAIR boys $5. Adult
handicap walker $5. Mini robot
sweeper- sweeps & mops $20.
Dresser with mirror 4' long $20.
32x37 gold framed interior pic-
ture scene $15. 570-851-8500
PUNCH BOWL beaut i f ul l y
carved with 10 matching gob-
lets & ladle. Like new. $20.
570-332-3341
RADIATORS 3 cast iron &
hoods. Different sizes. $ 25-
$30 each. CANES & WALK-
ING STICKS 20 avai l abl e.
Made from Sl i ppery Mapl e
trees. Different sizes, shapes &
heights. $5 and $6. each.
570-735-2081.
READY FOR MY QUOTE
CABLE:
SAVE on Cable TV-Internet-
Digital Phone-Satellite. You've
Got A Choice! Options from
ALL major service providers.
Call us to learn more!
CALL TODAY.
888-929-9254
RECORD PLAYER Detrol a
combo record player, am/fm
radio, cassette player & DVD
player,like new asking $45.
Sauder light brown TV stand
47x28.5wx15deep $20.
570-287-1913
RIMS 4 16" alloy Toyota rims
$140. 570-945-2302
SEWING MACHINE Si nger
Vintage, cast iron, has cabinet,
works well $100.
570-862-2919
TIRES 2 Wi nterforce snow
tires, 175/70R/13 mounted on
'92 Geo Prizm rims, both rims
& tires like new $100. 570-825-
8438 after 6pm
TONNEAU COVER 1 tri-fold
for 2012-2013 pick up truk, 6.5
box $350. 570-735-4788
TOTE metal hitch tote expand-
able $50. Karaoke singing ma-
chine $50. White TV tray $10.
570-592-2549
XBOX 360 Rockband 1 & 2
games with drum set, 2 gui-
tars & microphone, $60. Sony
17" flat screen monitor LCD
1xDVI/1AGP port $25. HP
Photo Smart C4280 all in one
printer/scanner/copier, $25.
406-5661
Musical Instruments
SPEAKER CAB Mar shal l
1960A $399. AMPEG 412
speaker cabinet $249. Call
570-283-2552 ri ck@wyom-
i ngvl l ey.net
Photo Equipment
C A M C O R D E R C a n o n
mini/DVD recorder with ac-
cessories $79. Digital camera
Kodak 3x zoom with telephoto
wide angle & close up lenses
$59. Cal l 570- 283- 2552
r i ck@wyomi ngvl l ey. net
Pools & Spas
POOL 24' round compl ete
wedding cake steps, solar cov-
er hangars ,Hayward sand fil-
ter, 3 yrs old, 1 1/2 HP Hay-
ward pump power flo 1 yr old,
Hercules pool wall & liner heat-
er, lighthouse 100,000 BTUs 7
yrs old. $650. 570-574-6953
Sporting Goods
BICYCLE boys 20" orange X
Factor Rampage $40. Very
good condition 570-675-1277
BOW PSE Stinger compound
bow, 6 new arows, hard case
& extras. Valued over $500.
Used one season asking $300.
570-823-5063
GOLF CLUBS Pi ng G15
graphite iron set, 7 clubs new
$450. 2 Ti tl ei st 60 degree
wedges $20. each. 1 Adams
sandwedge $25. Call Frank
570-262-7318
MOTORCADDI E Model
EC1000 series, electric hand-
cart with portable battery char-
ger & caddy basket $250.
570-735-3886
POOL TABLE 8' oak Wind-
song, 2 pc. slate, ball return in-
cludes ping pong removable
top 2 pc. paid over $2,000. sell
for $475. 570-954-1882
ROLLER BLADES 1 pair mens
Europa mondel 1-221 size 12
$20. 1 pair women's Europa
size 8 $20. 570-735-1225
SLEEPING BAGS 2 person
$35. 1 person air mattress in-
sert $30. both $60. 6 gun cab-
inet $125. Books 3 boxes $15.
a box, queen sz $15 ea. or 2
for $25. Jr. girl hoodies med &
lg Victoria secrets 8 ea.
570-474-6028
Stereos /Accessories
SATELLITE RADIO, XM, (1)
Delphi SA 1001 Boombox with
remote. (1) AC Adapter (also
battery operated) (1) Delphi
Receiver. In Box. $100. Leave
a message, 570-693-1454
Televisions /Accessories
TV 65" Olivia LCD 5 years old;
$500. 570-256-3983
Tools
LADDER, Gorilla Fiberglass
professional 4 in. 1,300 lb.
working load, 3' to 6' exten-
sion, like new $100.00.
570-696-2008
SNOWBLOWER sel f pr o-
pelled, used once, has bent
blade Paid $529 asking $150.
Suwanee river G scale train in
orig. box asking $200.
570-824-1031
TAPPING HEAD ATTACH-
MENT reversible, $100. 40
used & resharpened end mills
$80. 40 new taps 6/32, to 1/2
$80. 570-899-1910
Toys & Games
BARBIE JEEP battery oper-
ated, pink, $175. 10" Dora bike
with training wheels $10. 2
Princess 3 wheel scooters $5.
ea. 12" Power Puff Schwinn
12" bike $15. 3 wheel Sponge
Bob scooter $5. 570-823-7176
Stereo /TV /Electronics
SONY TV 27" Wega Trinitron
flat screen $60. retailed for
$625. excellent condition.
570-819-4951
Want To Buy
WANTED TO BUY
Old car books, brochures,
catalogs & paint chip binders.
$$Cash Paid! 570-516-2914
timesleader.com
PLACE YOUR
GARAGE
SALE AD
TODAY
Your
Package
includes:
Garage Sales
Kit
Garage Sale
Signs
FREE Unsold
Merchandise
ad
Your sale
location
mapped FREE
online and on
our mobile
app
PLUS a FREE
BREAKFAST
from
McDonalds.
$15
1, 2, OR 3 DAYS
8 LINES
STARTING AT
WELL HELP YOU
MOVE
THAT
STUFF
CALL
800-273-7130
OR VISIT TIMESLEADER.COM
24/7 TO PLACE YOUR
CLASSIFIED AD
timesleader.com
Get news when
it happens.
F U N N I E S THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
SALLY FORTH
CLASSIC PEANUTS
STONE SOUP
BLONDIE
BEETLE BAILEY
THATABABY
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE
GET FUZZY
CLOSE TO HOME
ARGYLE SWEATER
B.C.
PICKLES
PARDON MY PLANET
MARMADUKE HERMAN
DRABBLE
GARFIELD
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
TUNDRA