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Debate Fields of Events Cross-Examination (Policy) Debate Like other forms of debate, CrossExamination Debate focuses on the core

e elements of a controversial issue. Cross-Examination Debate develops important skills, such as critical thinking, listening, argument construction, research, note-taking and advocacy skills. Cross-Examination Debate is distinct from other formats (with the exception of two team Parliamentary Debate) in is use of a two person team, along with an emphasis on cross-examination between constructive speeches. While specific practices vary, Cross Examination Debate typically rewards intensive use of evidence and is more focused on content than delivery. Speech Events Limited Preparation Events (i) Impromptu Speaking In Impromptu Speaking, students learn to prepare and deliver an original speech immediately and without preparation. Impromptu Speaking topics range from the meaning of proverbs and abstract words to the significance of events and quotations by famous speakers. (ii) Extemporaneous Speaking In Extemporaneous Speaking, students must prepare and deliver an original speech on a current event, with a limited amount of preparation time. Extemporaneous topics are presented in the form of questions and contestants are expected to take a position on the question as well as to justify their stance. Platform Speaking Events (i) Informative Speaking In Informative Speaking, students prepare and deliver an original speech whose primary purpose is to inform or educate the audience. The speech should describe, clarify, illustrate or define an object, idea, concept or process. (ii) Persuasive Speaking/Original Oratory In Persuasive Speaking/Original Oratory, students prepare and deliver an original speech designed to inspire, reinforce or change the beliefs, attitudes, values or actions of the audience. Interpretative Events (i) Prose Interpretation In Prose Interpretation, students must select, analyze and share a cutting from literature (other than verse or plays) through the art of reading aloud. Prose Interpretation expresses thought through language recorded in sentences and paragraphs. Prose Interpretation includes fiction (short stories, novels) and non-fiction (articles, essays, journals, biographies). An effective Prose

Interpretation consists of a selection or selections of materials with literary merit. (ii) Poetry Interpretation In Poetry Interpretation, students must find, analyze and share a cutting or rhyme through the art of reading aloud. Poetry selections express ideas, experiences or emotions through the creative arrangement of words according to their sound, rhythm and meaning. An effective Poetry Interpretation consists of a selection or selections of material with literary merit. (iii) Dramatic Interpretation In Dramatic Interpretation, a student must select, analyze and share a cutting from a play through the art of reading aloud. A Dramatic Interpretation consists of a selection or selections of literary merit that may be drawn from more than one source. (iv) Duo Dramatic Interpretation In Duo Dramatic Interpretation, two students must find, analyze and share a cutting from a play through the art of reading aloud. A Duo Dramatic Interpretation can be either humorous or serious. The cutting should represent the portrayal of one or more characters presented by the two individuals. (v) Programmed Oral Interpretation In Programmed Oral Interpretation students must find, analyze and share a program of thematically linked selections through the art of reading aloud. The selections should be of literary merit, and must be chosen from at least two of the three recognized genres (prose/poetry/drama). 'Different genres' here means that the material must appear in separate pieces of literature and that, for example, a poem included in a short story that appears only in that short story does not constitute a poetry genre. ------------------------------------