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Glossary

Chabana: the simple, understated style of Ikebana flower arranging for the Japanese tea ceremony Chiko: a school of Ikebana known for including non-floral elements such as fruit or ornamental folk items Hana: flower(s) Hanaire: a container, vase, bowl, jar or tube for flower arrangement Hanbasami: Ikebana flower scissors, also called hasami Hasami: shears, clippers or scissors used for cutting floral and plant materials for Ikebana Heika: an Ikebana arrangement in a tall, cylindrical vase with a narrow opening Hikae: the shortest stem of the three main stems in an arrangement Ichirinzashi: an arrangement using stems, flowers and leaves from a single plant Ichiyo: a school of Ikebana featuring arrangements intended to arouse the senses and give the viewer a profound experience with nature Iemoto: the headmaster of an Ikebana school Ikebana: the Japanese art of flower arrangement, also knows as the way of flowers Ikenobo: the oldest school of Ikebana inJapan, founded in the 15th century by the Buddhist monk Ikenob Senno. Jika-dome: direct fixing of plant materials against the inner wall and rim of a vase Jumonji-dome: a cross-bar fixture intended to direct and support plant materials Jushi: plant matter used as supportive material to the main stems in an Ikebana arrangement, giving it depth and mass Kabin or Kafin: a tall, narrow-mouthed vase or container typically used in nageire- style Ikebana

Kabu-a-ke: two groups of arranged stems characterized by the water between Kado: the way of flowers, ka meaning flower and do meaning way Kago: a basket container, typically used for summertime Ikebana arrangements Kakei: one and one, an arrangement using only two main stems Kakeiho: various styles for combining three main stems Kaki: a container used for ikebana. Kenzan: a device used for fixing flower stems in place, also called a spiky frog, literally sword mountain because of its upright needles Komi: crossbars Mizugiri: a preservation technique consisting of cutting the base of a stem under water to prevent air from entering it and blocking water uptake, also known as mizukiri Mizukiri: a method of encouraging water absorption, consisting of cutting the base of a stem under water to prevent air from entering it and blocking water uptake, also known as mizugiri Moribana: piled-up flowers, the most basic of Ikebana arrangements which features the use of a shallow basin-like vase or suiban and kenzan Nageire: thrown in, an Ikebana arrangement using a tall, narrow-mouthed vase and without kenzan Ohara: a school of Ikebana emphasizing seasonal qualities and natural elements Rikka: the first formal style of Ikebana, developed in the early part of the 15th century, and adhering to strict rules of floral arrangement Seika: also known as Shoka style, a traditional Ikebana arrangement, originating in the 18th century, featuring a tight bundle of stems that form a triangular three-branch, asymmetrical structure Shoka: also known as Seika, a style of traditional Ikebana arrangement, featuring a tight bundle of stems that form a triangular three-branch, asymmetrical structure Sensei: a master or teacher of Ikebana, literally a person born before another, used as a form of respect Sesshu: a school of Ikebana founded by Sesshu Ken who introduced eight new ryu, forms diverging from the original Ikebana lines

Shikibana: an Ikebana arrangement without container Shin: the longest main stem (formal) Shushi: a combination of three main stems So: casual Soe: the second longest main stem Sogetsu: a school of Ikebana, founded by Sofu Teshigahara (1900-1979) in 1927, featuring a philosophy combining Japanese tradition with modern imagination and materials Suiban: a basin-like, wide, shallow Ikebana container Tate-no-Soegi-dome: a vertical fixture Tokonoma: an alcove in a traditional Japanese-style room, set aside for the display of beautiful objects, including Ikebana arrangements