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OregOn Observer

The
Thursday, September 19, 2013 Vol. 129, No. 11 Oregon, WI ConnectOregonWI.com $1
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DOT grant puts rail
line on the right track
Oregon-Madison line
getting activated for
Lycon
BiLL Livick
Unifed Newspaper Group
Commercial rail service
between the Village of Ore-
gon and Madison is expect-
ed to begin next spring for
the first time since 1997
because of a $2.3 million
grant from the Wisconsin
Department of Transporta-
tion.
The Wi s c ons i n a nd
Southern Railroad Com-
pany announced the grant
last week. The rail compa-
ny plans to reactivate about
10 miles of track for Lycon
Inc.s Ready Mix Concrete
production facility in the
Alpine Business Park.
Lycon will have three to
five slow-moving trains per
week hauling inbound ship-
ments of sand and gravel to
its facility in the business
park, said Ken Lucht, com-
munications director with
Wisconsin and Southern
Railroad.
The $2.3 million grant
will be used to install new
ties, build new crossings
and rebuild about seven
bridges between Madison
and Oregon, Lucht told the
Observer. The project lim-
its are from McCoy Road
in Fitchburg to West Neth-
erwood Road in Oregon, he
said. The Village of Oregon
and the City of Fitchburg
own the tracks from Butts
Corners Road, just north of
Evansville, to McCoy Road
in Fitchburg.
The project qualifies for
the DOT grant because the
line is publicly owned by
the two municipalities.
Were pretty excited
about this, Lucht said.
This project has been in
the planning stages for over
a decade.
Thats when the village,
in concert with Lycon Inc.,
began to develop the busi-
ness park on the north side
of Oregon.
Unfort unat el y, t here
were a couple parcels in the
park that were sold to non-
rail users, but fortunately
we have a very strong rail
user there now (Lycon) and
they are building, Lucht
said. Theyre going gang-
busters and they cant open
that facility unless they get
shipments of rail, so the
long-term feasibility of
that operation in Oregon is
strictly dependent on the
rail line.
He said Wisconsin and
Southern has already begun
developing requests for
bids for construction work
on the line between Madi-
son and Oregon.
We hope to have a com-
pany chosen by the end of
fall and be working during
the winter, he said. We
hope to have the line in ser-
vice by the spring of 2014.
Al t hough t he proj ect
encompasses only the line
from Madison to Oregon,
Wisconsin and Southern
has a Certificate of Opera-
tion to use the line all the
way to Evansville. Lucht
said the company does not
plan to reactivate that part
of the line because there is
no demand for it.
He said if rail service
Photo by Bill Livick
Because trains have not run on the tracks near the Alpine Business Park since 1997, it is difficult to see the rail line that will be reactivated
next year because of a $2.3 million grant awarded to Wisconsin and Southern Railroad
Oregon pastor could
become bishop
victOria vLisides
Unifed Newspaper Group
An Oregon pastor is
among 11 nominees to
become a bishop.
St . J ohn s Lut he r -
an Church pastor Paul
Markquart has accepted
a nomination to poten-
tially become bishop of
the Evangelical Luther-
an Church in Americas
south-central synod of
Wisconsin.
If nomi nat ed, Mark-
quart, will succeed Bruce
Bur nsi de, t he f or mer
ELCA bishop now facing
serious criminal charges.
Markquart , who has
been with St. Johns since
2006, was nominated by
Karen Julesburg of All
Saints Lutheran in Fitch-
burg. He will be part of
an election process at the
Synod Assembly on Sept.
27-28.
Markquart said he was
approached by several
peopl e who want ed t o
nominate him, as taking
part of an election requires
acceptance by the nomi-
nee. He accepted in July.
The process is not like
a pol i t i cal campai gn,
h e s a i d .
Instead, he
said he and
other nomi-
nees have
b e c o m e
k n o w n
t h r o u g h
p u b l i c
forums last
we e k i n
Janesville and Madison,
as well as the forums at
the upcoming assembly,
where a nominee will be
elected.
If elected, he said the
bulk of his work would
be in the areas of guiding
Village of Oregon
Lot fixes begin
Sept. 30
Warning siren move
will make room for
more parking
BiLL Livick
Unifed Newspaper Group
After months of discus-
sion, work on the Jeffer-
son Street parking lot in
downtown Oregon will
begin Sept. 30. The project
is expected to take about a
month to complete, and
while it wont add much
parking, it will beautify a
rundown spot downtown.
The lot has not been
resurfaced or significantly
improved since 1977, pub-
lic works director Mark
Below told the Observer
t hi s week. Downt own
business owners and vil-
lage officials have want-
ed to refurbish the lot
ever since the rest of the
downtown was updated
in 2008 with new curb,
gutter, sidewalk, street,
st r eet scape and ot her
infrastructure improve-
ments.
Two weeks ago, the vil-
lage awarded a construc-
tion contract to Payne and
Dolan to resurface and
restripe the lot at a cost
of $74,000. The work will
be overseen by the engi-
neering firm MSA Pro-
fessional Services, which
designed the lots changes.
MSA also was hired to
create and place wayfind-
ing signs in the downtown
area and produce a parking
brochure of the area. The
total MSA contract was a
maximum of $3,750.
The Vi l l age Boar d
also decided to create a
Dumpster corral in the
southwest corner of the lot
and install a fence on its
western boundary.
Because its on village
property, the users will
Turn to Lot/Page 7
Turn to Bishop/Page 13
Markquart
Turn to Rail/Page 16
Were pretty
excited about
this. This project
has been in the
planning stages for
over a decade.
Ken Lucht,
communications
director with Wisconsin
and Southern Railroad.
Village of Brooklyn
Another
Badger
South
victory
Page 9
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September 19, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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to share, download and order prints
of your favorite photos from
local community and sports events.
All orders will be mailed
directly to you!
Photos by Scott De Laruelle
Lots of lefse
In preparation for the Oct. 3 St. Johns Lutheran Church Smorgasbord, church volunteers were busy
making lefse Friday morning, one of three lefse-making sessions planned.
Clockwise from upper left: Pam and Peterson and Fern Binger are busy rolling dough; Bud Bailie
moves some lefse around; Sheila Andersen and Norma Jenkins pat down some dough; Karen Kreul
(left) shows volunteers how its done.
September 19, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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Board approves Walgreens settlement
salary increase for
some employees,
village attorney
BiLL Livick
Unifed Newspaper Group
The Village Board Mon-
day approved a settlement
of a property tax dispute
between the Village of Ore-
gon and Walgreens Com-
pany.
The company had sued
the village for what it felt
were excessively high prop-
erty assessments in 2011-
13.
The company and the vil-
lage reached an agreement
in early September in which
t he vi l l age wi l l refund
t he company a t ot al of
$26,833 for tax years 2011
and 2012. The village also
agreed to lower its assess-
ment this year from $3.6
million to $2.7 million, said
village administrator Mike
Gracz.
He said the village will
refund Walgreens for all the
taxing bodies in Oregons
jurisdiction such as the
school district and county
and then receive a charge-
back from the other taxing
bodies.
That means t he vi l -
lages portion of the refund
amounts to $13,415.
We settled on $3 mil-
lion (as a property assess-
ment) for the first two years
of the settlement and then
$2.7 million for this year,
Gracz said. They were
being assessed for over
$3 million, which is why
theres a refund as part of
the settlement.
The companys prop-
erty at 704 N. Main St.
was initially assessed at
$3,645,300, higher than in
other Dane County munici-
palities, with the exception
of Mount Horeb.
Mt. Horebs assessment
came in at $3.7 million in
2012.
Gracz said a few years
ago the village created a
chargeback account, and
therefore the payment to
Walgreens has already been
budgeted.
In other business Mon-
day:
Retroactive pay raise
The board approved an
amendment to the villages
salary schedule for non-rep-
resented employees with an
additional 1 percent across-
the-board pay increase.
The non- r epr esent ed
empl oyees had al ready
r e c e i ve d a 1 pe r c e nt
increase at the start of the
year; the additional pay will
be retroactive to Jan. 1. The
change was approved for all
non-unionized employees
except for library employ-
ees and the village admin-
istrator. It does not apply to
library employees because
their salaries are determined
by the Library Board.
Admi ni s t r a t or Mi ke
Gracz was not included in
the adjustment because it
was his idea to increase the
salaries. His salary could be
adjusted by the board at its
next meeting.
Gracz told the board he
suggested the increase to
keep their raises in line
with the villages repre-
sented employees. He said
the total cost to the village
would be less than $30,000.
T h e i n c r e a s e wa s
approved by a 5-1-1 vote,
wi t h Vi l l age Presi dent
Steve Staton and Trust-
ees Dar l ene Gr oeni er ,
Jerry Bollig, Jeanne Car-
penter and David Dono-
van voting in favor. Phil
Harms voted against the
increase, and Eric Poole
abstained because his wife
is employed by the village.
Harms said he opposed
the motion because he felt
employees lower on the pay
scale deserved more con-
sideration than higher-paid
employees. Its not that
I dont think the depart-
ment heads are doing a
good job, he said, but the
increase means less to the
lower-paid employees who
may be out in the field. Its
simple arithmetic.
Attorney gets raise
The board unanimous-
ly approved a small rate
increase in 2014 for village
attorney services.
Attorney Matt Dregne,
of St af f or dRosenbaum
LLP, noted his firm had
not increased rates for the
past five years. Gracz told
the board he supported the
increase and noted it was
very small. The firm is
increasing Dregnes hourly
rate for municipal law ser-
vices from $170 per hour to
$180 per hour.
Prior to voting, Trustee
David Donovan asked when
the last time was that the
village had reviewed its
legal representation. Gracz
said it had been at least 10
years, and Donovan sug-
gested it would be a good
idea to check the rates of
other firms providing the
same services.
Photo by Linda Trecek
The Village Board Monday approved a settlement of a property tax dispute between the Village of Oregon and Walgreens Company. The
company had sued the village for what it felt were excessively high property assessments in 2011-13. Walgreens is located in Oregon at
704 N. Main St.
OPL reading program numbers increase
kiMBerLy WethaL
Observer correspondent
This years summer read-
ing program at the Oregon
Publ i c Li brary showed
positive results with an
increase in both the number
of hours read and overall
participation.
According to Youth Ser-
vices Director Kelly Allen,
the reading program went
above and beyond t he
librarys expectations.
There were a total of
1,275 children and teens
involved in the reading pro-
gram, with 1,114 children
and 161 teens.
Thats a five-percent
increase in participation,
Allen said.
Adults had around a total
of 300 participants, bring-
ing the number of participa-
tion close to 1,600.
Boske believes the jump
in the summer reading pro-
grams participation is due
to the prize packs that the
kids had a chance of win-
ning.
We had 10 prize packs,
Allen said. They had mul-
tiple themes like Legos,
superheroes and art. The
art prize pack was by far
the most popular with the
kids.
According to Allen, the
summer reading program
has continued to grow in
numbers each year for the
children, while more public
relations are being done to
spread the word about the
newer teen and adult pro-
grams that are offered.
The program is sponsored
by the Friends of the Ore-
gon Library, who do all the
fundraising that allow the
library to offer programs
through their fundraising
efforts like the growing
reading program that con-
tinues to get stronger every
year.
Village of Oregon
DPI gives Oregon good grades
The Oregon School Dis-
trict received a 75.8 score in
the Wisconsin Department of
Public Instructions 2012-13
report cards released Tues-
day, meaning the district
exceeds expectations.
The district scored above
state-average in all four pri-
ority areas: Student Achieve-
ment, Student Growth, Clos-
ing Gaps and On-Track and
Postsecondary Readiness.
The Student Achievement
rating was more than 12
points above the states aver-
age.
This was the first year the
report cards were released for
school districts, while indi-
vidual schools also received
ratings last year. The DPI
uses statewide reading and
mathematics assessments for
the achievement and growth
areas, while also adding
graduation within student
subgroups for Closing Gaps.
For postsecondary readiness,
the department uses sev-
eral measures as predictors
of college and career readi-
ness, according to a news
release.
All six of the districts
schools rated in the Exceeds
Expectations category, with
Rome Corners Intermediate
School receiving the highest
score at 81.4. Oregon Mid-
dle School received a 73.0,
the lowest score among the
six schools.
Scott Girard
Scores
Netherwood Knoll: 78.5
Prairie View: 77.3
Brooklyn Elementary:
77.1
Rome Corners
Intermediate: 81.4
Oregon Middle: 73.0
Oregon High: 75.3
(All schools get an
Exceed Expecations)
4
September 19, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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Oregon Observer
Stoughton Courier Hub Verona Press
USPS No. 411-300
Periodical Postage Paid, Oregon, WI and additional offices.
Published weekly on Thursday by the Unified Newspaper Group,
A Division of Woodward Communications, Inc.
POSTMASTER: Send Address Corrections to
The Oregon Observer, 125 N. Main St., Oregon WI 53575.
Phone: 608-835-6677
FAX: 608-835-0130
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This newspaper is printed on recycled paper.
Thursday, September 19, 2013 Vol. 129, No. 11
Unified Newspaper Group, a division of
WoodWard CommuniCations,inC.
A dynamic, employee-owned media company
Good People. Real Solutions. Shared Results.
Opinion
General manager
David Enstad
david.enstad@wcinet.com
Advertising
Linda Trecek
oregonsales@wcinet.com
Classifieds
Kathy Woods
ungclassified@wcinet.com
Circulation
Carolyn Schultz
ungcirculation@wcinet.com
News
Jim Ferolie
ungeditor@wcinet.com
Sports
Jeremy Jones
ungsportseditor@wcinet.com
Website
Victoria Vlisides
communityreporter@wcinet.com
Reporters
Scott Girard, Bill Livick, Anthony Iozzo,
Mark Ignatowski, Scott De Laruelle
L
ast week wrapped up a
seven-year run for me as
a reporter at the Oregon
Observer. As Ive informed
people in recent weeks that Id
be leaving this job, a lot of them
have slapped me on the back
and joked, Hey, no more school
board meetings!
Its a fair
point. Since
2006, my pri-
mary beat at
this paper and
its sister publi-
cation in Vero-
na has been
school news.
Ive probably
averaged more
than 40 school
board meetings a year, almost all
on Monday nights.
But to be honest and I cant
believe Im saying this Im
actually going to miss those
meetings.
No, its not Monday Night
Football. But at its most basic
level, consider what it is: Seven
people elected by you, paid
next to nothing gather for hours
to debate what is best for the kids
in their community.
Thats actually a hell of a thing
to watch.
The local school board could
be described as a bit of a mess
right now, as members are argu-
ing a lot. But thats an unfair
characterization of people who
basically volunteer enormous
amounts of time to help make
Oregon a better place.
While I might disagree with
their tactics at times, I can count
on one hand the number of times
Ive doubted the good intentions
of a school board member, a
teacher or an administrator, even
when their groups are at odds.
Thats not a particularly insight-
ful observation, but its worth
remembering.
Ill also remember the patience
people exercised when I asked
dumb questions or needed them
to explain, for the umpteenth
time, how the funding formula
for public schools in Wisconsin
works (Im looking at you, Andy
Weiland).
Because this is a small-town
newspaper with a tiny staff, Ive
reported on all aspects of local
news, not just schools. In that
role, Ive interviewed cops and
business owners, teenage novel-
ists and triathletes, as well as
residents who opened up to me
about their child, spouse or par-
ents tragic death so I could write
something that went beyond the
simple facts of a police report.
Its been a pleasure to be
allowed entry into peoples
homes and lives.
I think of interview subjects
like the now-deceased Joan
Gefke, who invited me into her
Town of Dunn home office to
gossip about Oregon and discuss
her favorite topic, local history.
Or driving to Deerfield to see
the high school marching band
go through its grueling summer
rehearsals. Or catching up on
Town of Oregon news with Phil
Van Kampen over his morning
coffee at the Firefly.
Im leaving this job to try my
hand freelancing for various pub-
lications in the area, something
Ive wanted to do for a while
now. Ill still contribute from
time to time to the Observer, so I
wont be completely out of touch.
But Ill miss this job, mostly
because of the access it afforded
me to the people here.
Ill also miss sweating those
Tuesday deadlines with my co-
workers. Bill Livick has been at
the Observer longer than I have
and has been a model for how to
write fair, accurate stories well.
Jim Ferolie, our managing editor,
works harder and more diligently
than anyone Ive ever met. My
replacement in Oregon, Scott De
Laruelle, is already fitting right
in.
In their hands, the paper will
do just fine without me.
Seth Jovaag covered education
for the Verona Press and Oregon
Observer, along with a variety
of other beats for the past seven
years. His contributions will be
sorely missed.
Oregon gave me a
lot of things Ill miss
Jovaag
Staff editorial
Oregon speaks
Solidarity singers
The Walker Administration is losing patience with the daily sing-
alongs at the capitol, but the Solidarity Singers say they shouldnt
be fined $200 dollars for demonstrating against the government.
Which side do you believe is right?
Scott Mikkelson
Veronica Matt
Ray Tushoski
Jon Temte
Doreen McDonald
Its trivial to get a permit.
Theyre doing it to egg on the
administration.
Scott Mikkelson
We are in a democracy, with
the right to protest in a public
venue.
Jon Temte
I dont disagree, people have
a right to protest, but enough is
enough. I think I have to side
with Scott Walker.
Veronica Matt
Against Walker. I have lots
of teachers in my family, and I
was up there for the recall.
Doreen McDonald
I think theyre both acting
childish, to be honest. I know
they have their rights, but
enough is enough.
Ray Tushoski
The Solidarity side. They
shouldnt be fined for freedom
of speech. Thats crazy.
Karen Maher
Karen Maher
Corrections
See something wrong?
The Oregon Observer does not sweep errors under the rug. If you see something you know or even
think is in error, please contact editor Jim Ferolie at 845-9559 or at ungeditor@wcinet.com so we can get
it right.
The Oregon Observer encourages citizens to engage in discussion through letters to the editor. We take
submissions online, on email and by hard copy. All letters should be signed and include addresses and
phone numbers for verification. Anonymous letters will not be printed.
Special rules apply during election season or other times of high letter volume, and the editorial staff
reserves the right not to print any letter, including those with libelous or obscene content. We can accept
multiple submissions from local authors, but other letters will take priority over submissions from recent-
ly printed authors. Please keep submissions under 400 words.
Deadline is noon Monday the week of publication. For questions on our editorial policy, call editor Jim
Ferolie at 845-9559 or email ungeditor@wcinet.com.
Submit a letter
September 19, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
5
Te Brooklyn
Community UMC
at 201 Church St. would
like to invite you to join
in Open Worship Sunday
and a Sunday School
Enrollment Event September 15
and 22 for anyone looking for a
warm and welcoming worship
experience and exciting Sunday
School programs. Sunday School is
at 8:30 a.m. with worship at 9:30 a.m.
Call 608-558-8700
Blessings to all;
Pastor Dave Pluss
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Snow Dogg Western
The Boss Salt Dogg
Double D Services in Verona will be having an
Open House
for you to come see what is available in snowplows
and accessories. Please feel free to stop by
Double D Services anytime
From Noon until 7:00pm
Wednesday, September 25, 2013
There will also be door prizes, food, and refreshments.
2737 Gust Road, Verona, WI 53593
Phone: (608) 845-3800 Fax (608) 845-3801
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Linda Wick and
the late Robert
Wick are proud
to announce the
engagement of
Tamara Lynn
Wick to Greg
Mckeown, son
of Judy Mckeown and the late Phil
Mckeown. Te wedding will take
place October 26, 2013 at 3 p.m. at
the Methodist Church in Stoughton.
Te couple will reside near Stoughton.
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Ace gets grand champion honor at State Fair
Among t hree honors,
Brooke Ace, 13, won Grand
Champi on (t he hi ghest
placing you can receive), at
the 2013 Wisconsin State
4-H Horse Expo in Milwau-
kee last week.
Thi s i s Aces second
year showing at state fair.
Along with the grand cham-
pion award for grade 7, she
also took home Reserve
Champion and a Top 10
award. Around 800 youth
participated in the expo.
She also showed sheep,
swine and horses at the
Dane County Fair which
was in July.
The expo, which was held
Sept. 12 -15 at the Wis-
consin State Fair grounds
is the state fair competi-
tion held for horses and is
at a different time than the
regular state fair. The com-
petition cannot be held until
all the counties in the state
have held their county fair.
Brooke Ace, 13, current-
ly attends Oregon Middle
School, is a member of the
Oregon Headl i ners 4-H
Club, and is the daughter of
Wayne and Dee Ace.
Photo submitted
Brooke Ace won several honors, including Grand Champion Western Showmanship, Grade 7, last week
at the State 4-H Horse Expo. Her horse Valentinos Bucky is an 11-year-old appendix quarter horse.
Photo submitted
We have a winner!
Tia Waterbury, age 7, is the final winner of the Oregon Area
Historical Society Museum's summer scavenger hunt and quiz. She
received a gift certificate from the Capital Creamery and a Wisconsin
map.
Photos submitted
New pet
This pot belly pig was found in Oregon and adopted by a local family, who named him Willbur. The family said that the pig, who gets along with the family dogs and lived in their house for a while, now has
its own place outside on their s. The pig was found last spring in the middle of the road.
4
September 19, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
NATIONAL NEWSPAPER
ASSOCIATION
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
One Year in Dane Co. & Rock Co. . . . . . . . $37
One Year Elsewhere . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $45
Oregon Observer
Stoughton Courier Hub Verona Press
USPS No. 411-300
Periodical Postage Paid, Oregon, WI and additional offices.
Published weekly on Thursday by the Unified Newspaper Group,
A Division of Woodward Communications, Inc.
POSTMASTER: Send Address Corrections to
The Oregon Observer, 125 N. Main St., Oregon WI 53575.
Phone: 608-835-6677
FAX: 608-835-0130
e-mail: oregonobserver@wcinet.com
ConnectOregonWI.com
This newspaper is printed on recycled paper.
Thursday, September 19, 2013 Vol. 129, No. 11
Unified Newspaper Group, a division of
WoodWard CommuniCations,inC.
A dynamic, employee-owned media company
Good People. Real Solutions. Shared Results.
Opinion
General manager
David Enstad
david.enstad@wcinet.com
Advertising
Linda Trecek
oregonsales@wcinet.com
Classifieds
Kathy Woods
ungclassified@wcinet.com
Circulation
Carolyn Schultz
ungcirculation@wcinet.com
News
Jim Ferolie
ungeditor@wcinet.com
Sports
Jeremy Jones
ungsportseditor@wcinet.com
Website
Victoria Vlisides
communityreporter@wcinet.com
Reporters
Scott Girard, Bill Livick, Anthony Iozzo,
Mark Ignatowski, Scott De Laruelle
L
ast week wrapped up a
seven-year run for me as
a reporter at the Oregon
Observer. As Ive informed
people in recent weeks that Id
be leaving this job, a lot of them
have slapped me on the back
and joked, Hey, no more school
board meetings!
Its a fair
point. Since
2006, my pri-
mary beat at
this paper and
its sister publi-
cation in Vero-
na has been
school news.
Ive probably
averaged more
than 40 school
board meetings a year, almost all
on Monday nights.
But to be honest and I cant
believe Im saying this Im
actually going to miss those
meetings.
No, its not Monday Night
Football. But at its most basic
level, consider what it is: Seven
people elected by you, paid
next to nothing gather for hours
to debate what is best for the kids
in their community.
Thats actually a hell of a thing
to watch.
The local school board could
be described as a bit of a mess
right now, as members are argu-
ing a lot. But thats an unfair
characterization of people who
basically volunteer enormous
amounts of time to help make
Oregon a better place.
While I might disagree with
their tactics at times, I can count
on one hand the number of times
Ive doubted the good intentions
of a school board member, a
teacher or an administrator, even
when their groups are at odds.
Thats not a particularly insight-
ful observation, but its worth
remembering.
Ill also remember the patience
people exercised when I asked
dumb questions or needed them
to explain, for the umpteenth
time, how the funding formula
for public schools in Wisconsin
works (Im looking at you, Andy
Weiland).
Because this is a small-town
newspaper with a tiny staff, Ive
reported on all aspects of local
news, not just schools. In that
role, Ive interviewed cops and
business owners, teenage novel-
ists and triathletes, as well as
residents who opened up to me
about their child, spouse or par-
ents tragic death so I could write
something that went beyond the
simple facts of a police report.
Its been a pleasure to be
allowed entry into peoples
homes and lives.
I think of interview subjects
like the now-deceased Joan
Gefke, who invited me into her
Town of Dunn home office to
gossip about Oregon and discuss
her favorite topic, local history.
Or driving to Deerfield to see
the high school marching band
go through its grueling summer
rehearsals. Or catching up on
Town of Oregon news with Phil
Van Kampen over his morning
coffee at the Firefly.
Im leaving this job to try my
hand freelancing for various pub-
lications in the area, something
Ive wanted to do for a while
now. Ill still contribute from
time to time to the Observer, so I
wont be completely out of touch.
But Ill miss this job, mostly
because of the access it afforded
me to the people here.
Ill also miss sweating those
Tuesday deadlines with my co-
workers. Bill Livick has been at
the Observer longer than I have
and has been a model for how to
write fair, accurate stories well.
Jim Ferolie, our managing editor,
works harder and more diligently
than anyone Ive ever met. My
replacement in Oregon, Scott De
Laruelle, is already fitting right
in.
In their hands, the paper will
do just fine without me.
Seth Jovaag covered education
for the Verona Press and Oregon
Observer, along with a variety
of other beats for the past seven
years. His contributions will be
sorely missed.
Oregon gave me a
lot of things Ill miss
Jovaag
Staff editorial
Oregon speaks
Solidarity singers
The Walker Administration is losing patience with the daily sing-
alongs at the capitol, but the Solidarity Singers say they shouldnt
be fined $200 dollars for demonstrating against the government.
Which side do you believe is right?
Scott Mikkelson
Veronica Matt
Ray Tushoski
Jon Temte
Doreen McDonald
Its trivial to get a permit.
Theyre doing it to egg on the
administration.
Scott Mikkelson
We are in a democracy, with
the right to protest in a public
venue.
Jon Temte
I dont disagree, people have
a right to protest, but enough is
enough. I think I have to side
with Scott Walker.
Veronica Matt
Against Walker. I have lots
of teachers in my family, and I
was up there for the recall.
Doreen McDonald
I think theyre both acting
childish, to be honest. I know
they have their rights, but
enough is enough.
Ray Tushoski
The Solidarity side. They
shouldnt be fined for freedom
of speech. Thats crazy.
Karen Maher
Karen Maher
Corrections
See something wrong?
The Oregon Observer does not sweep errors under the rug. If you see something you know or even
think is in error, please contact editor Jim Ferolie at 845-9559 or at ungeditor@wcinet.com so we can get
it right.
The Oregon Observer encourages citizens to engage in discussion through letters to the editor. We take
submissions online, on email and by hard copy. All letters should be signed and include addresses and
phone numbers for verification. Anonymous letters will not be printed.
Special rules apply during election season or other times of high letter volume, and the editorial staff
reserves the right not to print any letter, including those with libelous or obscene content. We can accept
multiple submissions from local authors, but other letters will take priority over submissions from recent-
ly printed authors. Please keep submissions under 400 words.
Deadline is noon Monday the week of publication. For questions on our editorial policy, call editor Jim
Ferolie at 845-9559 or email ungeditor@wcinet.com.
Submit a letter
September 19, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
5
Te Brooklyn
Community UMC
at 201 Church St. would
like to invite you to join
in Open Worship Sunday
and a Sunday School
Enrollment Event September 15
and 22 for anyone looking for a
warm and welcoming worship
experience and exciting Sunday
School programs. Sunday School is
at 8:30 a.m. with worship at 9:30 a.m.
Call 608-558-8700
Blessings to all;
Pastor Dave Pluss
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Snow Dogg Western
The Boss Salt Dogg
Double D Services in Verona will be having an
Open House
for you to come see what is available in snowplows
and accessories. Please feel free to stop by
Double D Services anytime
From Noon until 7:00pm
Wednesday, September 25, 2013
There will also be door prizes, food, and refreshments.
2737 Gust Road, Verona, WI 53593
Phone: (608) 845-3800 Fax (608) 845-3801
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Linda Wick and
the late Robert
Wick are proud
to announce the
engagement of
Tamara Lynn
Wick to Greg
Mckeown, son
of Judy Mckeown and the late Phil
Mckeown. Te wedding will take
place October 26, 2013 at 3 p.m. at
the Methodist Church in Stoughton.
Te couple will reside near Stoughton.
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Ace gets grand champion honor at State Fair
Among t hree honors,
Brooke Ace, 13, won Grand
Champi on (t he hi ghest
placing you can receive), at
the 2013 Wisconsin State
4-H Horse Expo in Milwau-
kee last week.
Thi s i s Aces second
year showing at state fair.
Along with the grand cham-
pion award for grade 7, she
also took home Reserve
Champion and a Top 10
award. Around 800 youth
participated in the expo.
She also showed sheep,
swine and horses at the
Dane County Fair which
was in July.
The expo, which was held
Sept. 12 -15 at the Wis-
consin State Fair grounds
is the state fair competi-
tion held for horses and is
at a different time than the
regular state fair. The com-
petition cannot be held until
all the counties in the state
have held their county fair.
Brooke Ace, 13, current-
ly attends Oregon Middle
School, is a member of the
Oregon Headl i ners 4-H
Club, and is the daughter of
Wayne and Dee Ace.
Photo submitted
Brooke Ace won several honors, including Grand Champion Western Showmanship, Grade 7, last week
at the State 4-H Horse Expo. Her horse Valentinos Bucky is an 11-year-old appendix quarter horse.
Photo submitted
We have a winner!
Tia Waterbury, age 7, is the final winner of the Oregon Area
Historical Society Museum's summer scavenger hunt and quiz. She
received a gift certificate from the Capital Creamery and a Wisconsin
map.
Photos submitted
New pet
This pot belly pig was found in Oregon and adopted by a local family, who named him Willbur. The family said that the pig, who gets along with the family dogs and lived in their house for a while, now has
its own place outside on their s. The pig was found last spring in the middle of the road.
6
September 19, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Church Listings
BROOKLYN LUTHERAN CHURCH
101 Second Street, Brooklyn
(608) 455-3852
Pastor Rebecca Ninke
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Holy Communion
10 a.m. Fellowship
COMMUNITY OF LIFE
LUTHERAN CHURCH
PO Box 233, Oregon, 53575
(608) 286-3121
offce@communityofife.us
Pastor Eric Wenger
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Worship at 1111 S. Perry
Parkway, Oregon
COMMUNITY UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
Brooklyn
(608) 455-3344
Pastor Gail Brown
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Worship
FAITH EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN
CHURCH
143 Washington Street, Oregon
(608) 835-3554
Pastor Karl Hermanson
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Worship
Holy Communion 2nd & last
Sundays
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
408 N. Bergamont Blvd. (north of CC)
Oregon, WI 53575
608-835-3082
fpcoregon.org
Pastor Le Anne Clausen de Montes
SUNDAY:
9:30 a.m. Blended Worship
10:30 a.m. Coffee Bar/Fellowship
11 a.m. All-ages activity

FITCHBURG MEMORIAL UCC
5705 Lacy Road, Fitchburg
(608) 273-1008
www.memorialucc.org
Pastor: Phil Haslanger
Associate Pastor Twink Jan-
McMahon
SUNDAY
8:15 and 10 a.m. Worship
GOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN
CHURCH ELCA
Central Campus: Raymond Road and
Whitney Way
SATURDAY
5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY
8:15, 9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship
West Campus: Corner of Hwy. PD
and Nine Mound Road, Verona
SUNDAY
9 & 10:15 a.m., 6 p.m. Worship
(608) 271-6633
HILLCREST BIBLE CHURCH
752 E. Netherwood, Oregon
Eric Vander Ploeg, Lead Pastor
(608) 835-7972
www.hbclife.com
SUNDAY
8:30 am & 10:15 am Worship service
at Oregon High School PAC
Quest for grades 1-6 during 10:15
service
HOLY MOTHER OF CONSOLATION
CATHOLIC CHURCH
651 N. Main Street, Oregon
Pastor: Fr. Gary Wankerl
(608) 835-5763
holymotherchurch.41pi.com
SATURDAY: 5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY: 8 and 10:15 a.m. Worship
PEOPLES UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
103 North Alpine Parkway, Oregon
Pastor Jason Mahnke
(608) 835-3755
www.peoplesumc.org
Communion is the 1st & 3rd
weekend
SATURDAY
5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY
9 and 10:30 a.m. Worship
ST. JOHNS LUTHERAN CHURCH
625 E. Netherwood, Oregon
Pastor Paul Markquart and Pastor
Emily Tveite
(608) 835-3154
5 p.m. Saturday evening Worship
8 a.m. Traditional Sunday Worship
9:15 a.m. Sunday School & Coffee
Fellowship
10:30 a.m. New Community Worship
(9:30 a.m. Summer)
VINEYARD COMMUNITY CHURCH
Oregon Community Bank & Trust, 105 S.
Alpine Parkway, Oregon
Bob Groth, Pastor
(608) 835-9639
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Worship
ZWINGLI UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST - Paoli
At the Intersection of Hwy. 69 & PB
Rev. Sara Thiessen
(608) 845-5641
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Family Worship
7 p.m. Alcoholics
Anonymous meeting
at First Presbyterian
Church, every Monday
and Friday
7 p.m., Alcoholics
Anonymous closed
meeting, Peoples United
Methodist Church, every
Tuesday
6:30-7:30 p.m.,
Diabetes Support Group
meeting, Evansville
Senior Center, 320 Fair
St. Call 882-0407 for
information. Second
Tuesday of each month
6:30-8 p.m., Parents
Supporting Parents,
LakeView Church,
Stoughton. Third
Tuesday of every month
Relationship & Divorce
Support Group. State
Bank of Cross Plains.
Every other Monday
night at 6:30 p.m.
Support groups
Call 835-6677 to advertise on the
Oregon Observer Church Page
Coming up
Sunday, Sept. 22
1 p.m., Sunday Matinee at the Oregon Senior
Center (219 Park St.) , featuring The Jackie
Robinson Story.
Sunday, Sept. 22
8:30 a.m., Sunday school enrollment and open
worship at Brooklyn Community UMC, 210 Church
St., Brooklyn
Monday, Sept. 23
6:30 p.m., Oregon School Board annual meeting
Monday, Sept. 23
10:45 a.m., Wooden shoe art carving demonstra-
tion by Luke Traver, Oregon Senior Center, 291
Park St.
Monday, Sept. 23
6:30 p.m., Puppet play - with short stories, songs
and activities for children, Oregon Public Library,
256 Brook St.
Thursday, Sept. 26
2 p.m., Lux Radio Theater play reading of Little
Women at the Oregon Senior Center, 219 Park St.
Tuesday, Sept. 24
7 p.m., Oregon Community Band rehearsals begin
at the Oregon Middle School band room. The 33rd
annual program runs every Tuesday night through
Nov. 12.
Sunday, Sept. 29
1 p.m., Tribute to Our Heroes at the Oregon
Public Library. Plenty of food, crafts and activities.
Community calendar
Thursday, Sept. 19
Oregon Village Board
Meeting (of Sep. 16)
Friday, Sept. 20
Oregon Chamber of
Commerce Meeting (Sep. 19)
Saturday, Sept. 21
Movie: On the Waterfront
(1954)
Sunday, Sept. 22
Worship: Holy Mother of
Consolation Catholic Church
Monday, Sept. 23
Movie: Charlie Chaplin
Tuesday, Sept. 24
Wooden Shoe Carving @
Oregon Senior Center (Sep.
23)
Wednesday, Sept. 25
5 p.m.--LIVE--Dane County
Cities-Village Meeting @
Oregon
Thursday, Sept. 26
Dane County Cities-Villages
Meeting (of Sep. 25)
WOW 98 & 983
Monday, Sept. 23
AMReflexology
9:00 CLUB
9:00 Wii Bowling
10:45 WOODEN SHOE
CARVING DEMO
1:00 Get Fit
1:00 RSVP Sewing
1:30 Bridge
4:30 T.O.P.S. Weight Loss
Tuesday, Sept. 24
8:30 Zumba Gold
9:15 Stretch & Strengthen
9:30 Bingo
12:30 Sheepshead
12:30 Stoughton Shopping
1:00 Sing along
1:15 Cont. Piano Class
2:15 Beg. Piano Class
Wednesday, Sept. 25
AMFoot Care
9:00 CLUB
11:00 Exploring Tablets &
iPads Class
1:00 Euchre
1:00 Get Fit
2:00 Knit/Crochet Group
Thursday, Sept. 26
AMChair Massage
8:30 Zumba Gold
9:00 Pool Players
9:15 Stretch & Strengthen
12:30 Shopping at Bills
1:00 Cribbage
1:00 Country Line Dancing
2:00 Play Reading
Friday, Sept. 27
9:00 CLUB
9:00 Wii Bowling
Monday, Sept. 23
Sweet & Sour Chicken,
Rice, Oriental Mix, Pear
Slices, W.W. Bread Pudding
w/Topping
VO- Soy Casserole
Tuesday, Sept. 24
Sloppy Joe on Bun, Potato
Salad, Broccoli Flowerets,
Banana
VO-Soy BBQ
Wednesday, Sept. 25
Spaghetti with Meat Balls,
Mixed Greens, Peach Slices,
Garlic Bread
VO-Soy Meat Sauce
Thursday, Sept. 26
Brat on Bun, Baked Beans,
Copper Pennies Salad, Fresh
Fruit
VO-Veggie Dogs
SOVeggie Sesame
Chicken Salad
Friday, Sept. 27
Shrimp Pasta Salad,
Cucumbers & Onions,
Fruit Cup, W.W. Bread,
Strawberry Ice Cream
V0-Pasta Salad w/Cheese
ORE 95 & 984
Thursday, Sept. 19
Bubble Wonders @
Oregon Library (of June 10)
Friday, Sept. 20
OHS Girls Varsity Volleyball
vs Stoughton (of Sep. 19)
Saturday, Sept. 21
1987 OHS Homecoming
Pep Rally (of Oct. 87)
Sunday, Sept. 22
OHS Boys Varsity Football
vs Milton (of Sep. 20)
Monday, Sept. 23
OHS Boys Varsity Soccer vs
Belleville (Sep. 20) 6:30 pm-
-LIVE--Oregon School Board
Tuesday, Sept. 24
1988 OHS Homecoming
Pep Rally (of Oct. 88)
Wednesday, Sept. 25
OHS Boys Varsity Soccer vs
Monroe (of Sep. 24)
Thursday, Sept. 26
Oregon School Board
Meeting (of Sep. 23)
Village of Oregon Cable Access TV program times same for all channels. A
new program begins daily at 1 p.m. and repeats at 4, 7 and 10 p.m. and at 1, 4, 7
and 10 a.m. 900 Market St., Oregon. Phone: 291-0148;
email: oregoncableaccess@charter.net, or visit www.OCAmedia.com.
Community cable listings Senior center
God Is One But Man Is Many
If God is one, why are there so many different religions and
denominations? Perhaps because man is not one, and is born
of strife and is indeed strife incarnate. In comparing the Acts
of the Apostles and the Quoran, one is struck by a particular
similarity. Both say that they are not rejecting their religious
predecessors. The seventh chapter of Acts virtually retells the
story of the Hebrew Bible in recounting the preaching of Stephen,
until Stephen lashes out at his hearers for not accepting the
Christian message: You stiff-necked people, uncircumcised in
heart and ears, you always resist the Holy Spirit (Acts 7: 51).
In the first section of the Quoran we find a similar summarizing
of the Hebrew and the Christian Bible, ending with these words:
The Jews say the Christians are misguided, and the Christians
say it is the Jews who are misguided. Yet they both read the
Scriptures. A little later the Quoran has what is almost an ecu-
menical profession of faith: We believe in God and that which is
revealed to us; in what was revealed to Abraham, Ishmael, Isaac,
Jacob, and the tribes; to Moses and Jesus and the other proph-
ets by their Lord. We make no distinction among any of them,
and to God we have surrendered ourselves. We should read the
scriptures with an eye for how they unite us rather than divide us
from our fellow believers.
Christopher Simon for Metro News Service
Make every effort to keep the unity of the Spirit through the
bond of peace.
Ephesians 4:3
Want to get your community event or calendar item in the Observer?
Send an email with the information to:

ungcalendar@wcinet.com
Sunday movie
The Jackie Robinson Story will
be the Sunday matinee movie at 1
p.m., Sept. 22 at the Oregon Senior
Center, 219 Park St.
In 1946, Branch Rickey put him-
self at the forefront of history when
he signed Jackie Robinson to the leg-
endary Brooklyn Dodgers, breaking
Major League Baseballs infamous
color line.
The film is rated PG-13 and is 128
minutes in length.
Open Worship/Sunday School
enrollment
Brooklyn Community UMC at 201
Church St. is inviting people to join
in on an open worship Sunday and a
Sunday school enrollment event Sun-
day, Sept. 22, for anyone looking for
warm and welcoming worship experi-
ence and exciting Sunday School pro-
grams.
Sunday School is at 8:30 a.m. with
worship at 9:30 a.m. Call 558-8700
for more information.
Wooden Shoe Carving
Luke Traver can hand carve a wear-
able wooden shoe from a log section
using three traditional tools: a side ax,
block knife and spoon auger.
He also includes presentations with
stories, humor and tap dancing, Appa-
lachian clogging in wooden shoes,
interesting artifacts, and ice harvest-
ing stories. Luke has studied the art of
wooden shoe carving from Bob Sie-
gel, or Sieg, the last master wooden
shoe carver in America.
You can find out all about it at a
wooden shoe carving demonstration
at 10:45 a.m., Monday, Sept. 23 at the
Oregon Senior Center, 219 Park St.
Call Anne to sign up for this program
at 835-5801.
Puppet play
The whole family is welcome at the
Oregon Public Library for a puppet
play along with short stories, songs,
and activities from 6:30-7 p.m., Mon-
day, Sept. 23.
Lux Radio Theater Play
Reading: Little Women
Get ready to be transported back
in time at 2 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 26
at the Oregon Senior Center. Back in
the day before TV, people sometimes
entertained themselves by reading a
play.
Join us at the Oregon Senior Cen-
ter for an old-fashioned play reading.
There are plenty of roles for any one
who wants to join in.
To sign up, call 835-5801.
Oregon Community Band
rehearsals
Rehearsals are held in the Oregon
Middle School band room. They
begin at 7 p.m. and run until 8:30 p.m.
on every Tuesday from Sept. 24 until
Nov. 12.
Contact Jim Baxter, Director to
participate at 835-9066 or email
baxter4822@hotmail.com.
Tribute to Our Heroes
From 1-4 p.m., Sunday, Sept. 29 at
the Oregon Public Library, there will
be custard, music and crafts, and kids
are encouraged to wear their favorite
hero costume as the library celebrates
real heroes and superheroes in Ore-
gon, including the men and women
who provide service to the commu-
nity.
Special guests are Captain Eithun
from the Oregon Fire Department,
Officer Neubert from the Oregon
Police Department and Star Wars
characters from the 501st Legion-
Wisconsin Garrison.
September 19, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
7
Wednesday, October 9, 2013
9:00 am-Noon - Expo
Noon-2:30 pm - Lunch, Entertainment & Bingo
FREE Admission - Open to the Public
Call 845-9559
for more information
Stoughton Wellness and Athletic Center
2300 US Highway 51-138, Stoughton, WI
5th Annual
N
eed A
B
ooth?
C
all us!
Tinas Home
Cleaning, LLC
Specializing in Residential Cleaning
Insured 11 Years Experience
Reliable Free Estimates
835-0339 513-3638
tinashomecleaning@gmail.com
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have to pay for access to the
Dumpsters, Below said.
Busi ness owners who
use the Dumpsters will be
required to lease them, but
details have yet to be deter-
mined.
The newly designed lot
will contain 32 parking
stalls, four of which will
be designated as handicap
stalls.
Another change is that the
countys emergency warn-
ing siren will be removed
from the lot and a new siren
will be erected near the
intersection of South Main
St reet and Sout h Perry
Parkway, at a cost of about
$25,000. Next year, a third
siren will be installed in the
village, near the Bergamont
development, with Dane
County picking up the siren
cost.
Vi l l age admi ni st rat or
Mike Gracz said the new
siren would be installed at
the same time the old one is
removed in October.
On Monday, the board
decided to remove a grease
barrel from village prop-
erty in the lot that has been
used by t wo downt own
businesses the Main Tap
and DeBrouxs Diner. The
board opted not to include a
requirement that barrels the
businesses use in the future
be kept inside a building,
but by a 5-2 vote passed a
motion prohibiting the stor-
age of grease on village
property. Village President
Steve Staton along with
Trustees David Donovan,
Darlene Groenier, Jerry
Bollig and Jeanne Carpen-
ter voted in favor of the
idea, while Phil Harms and
Eric Poole opposed it.
Im not interested in
regulating grease, Carpen-
ter said, prior to making the
motion. But I dont want
it on village property. Let
the business owners figure
it out.
Harms suggested that the
board approve a $500 grant
for one of the business
owners to install a grease
container in the basement
of his building, but the idea
lacked support from the rest
of the board.
You cant offer a $500
grant to one business with-
out offering it to every-
body, Trustee David Don-
ovan said.
Bollig agreed: I dont
see why they cant take
care of this grease problem
themselves.
After a lengthy discus-
si on about whet her t o
require grease barrels to
be kept indoors, the board
agreed with village attorney
Matt Dregne, who said, If
youre requiring it be kept
on private property, that
might go some distance to
address some of the prob-
lem.
The restriction will go
into effect Sept. 30.
Lot: The newly designed lot will contain 32 parking stalls, warning siren will move
Continued from page 1
Photo by Linda Trecek
The Pellitteri Dumpsters in the Jefferson Street parking lot will be moved and placed in a corral near the back of the lot when its redone next month. Left is an aerial shot of the lot.
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September 19, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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Oregon Sportsmans Club
fundraiser tops last years
Event raises nearly
50 percent more
than 2012
The Oregon Sportsmans
Club hosted its 43rd annual
Steak Feed and fundraising
raffle Saturday, Sept. 9. The
event featured steak dinners
and an array of raffle items.
Over al l at t endance
exceeded 400. After din-
ners were served, the night
culminated with the excite-
ment of more than 75 can
raffles where prizes includ-
ed Browning Tactical Series
Gun Safe & Gear and a
$1,000 archery package.
The St eak Feed and
Raffle is the Clubs biggest
fundraising opportunity for
the year. Funds raised are to
support improvements.
Si ngl e member shi ps
received a free steak din-
ner, family memberships,
two free steak dinners.
This year, the Club, located
at 1726 Sand Hill Road,
served 320 steak dinner
meals, up 42 percent from
2012 (which was up 15 per-
cent from 2011).
This was the second year
the members were able to
enjoy the new outside patio
and picnic seating (finished
July of 2012).
Goal s of t he recent
improvements are to make
the clubhouse, archery cen-
ter and trap range more
handicapped accessible
as well as expanding the
clubs family-use appeal by
adding a large outdoor patio
area, designed to expand
the use of the club for mem-
bers use for family gath-
erings, reunions, wedding
receptions, etc.
For more information
about the Oregon Sports-
man Club, please visit ore-
gonsportsmans.com.
Article submitted
Photos by Dave Wood
The Oregon Sportsmans Club hosted their 43rd annual Steak Feed and fundraising raffle Saturday,
Sept. 9. The event featured steak dinners and an array of raffle items. Above, Julie Wood helps with
the raffle tickets.
Dave
Liddicoat
was the
winner of
a popcorn
maker
from the
raffle.
Boys launch robotic underwater vehicle
By Scott Girard
Unifed Newspaper Group
A team of three local
middle and high school
boys recently found suc-
cess pi l ot i ng a robot i c
underwater vehicle as part
of a U.S. Navy program.
The program, SeaPerch,
originated at MIT and is
designed to promote an
i nt erest i n sci ence and
mathematics among youth
and has been a national
program for five years.
Brenda Anderson, the
mother of two of the partic-
ipants, Kyle and Luke, said
they learned about the pro-
gram from a child in their
homeschool group whose
grandfather is president of
the Madison Navy League
and wanted to generate
interest in the program.
The team received the
kit in early May, accord-
ing to Anderson, and spent
the summer meeting every
couple of weeks to build
the device.
Ul t i mat el y, t he group
of three boys successfully
launched their vehicle Aug.
25 at the Oregon pool, after
testing it in a garbage can
filled with water at home
the day before.
I thought it would prob-
abl y work, but t heres
al ways t he chance i t
wont, said Luke Ander-
son, who is in ninth grade.
Brenda Anderson said
she hopes the program will
grow in the area into the
schools, creating the pos-
sibility for local competi-
tions, in addition to the
regional and national ones
sponsored by the program.
Both Anderson boys said
they would do it again,
with Kyle, a seventh grad-
er, summing up his interest
simply.
I kind of like robots, he
said.
Photo submitted
Jeffrey Thomas (front), Kyle Anderson, Luke Anderson, Mitchell Compton and Noah Kostuch watch
while Mitchell learns to maneuver the SeaPerch. Thomas and the two Andersons built the vehicle.
Oregon men hurt in crash
Two 36-year-old men
from the Oregon area were
hurt in a crash in Mon-
roe County last weekend,
according to a report on
Channel3000.com
The website said Wis-
c o n s i n St a t e Pa t r o l
responded to a crash on
westbound Interstate 94
near Warren, just north
of Tomah. Witnesses told
state troopers a tire blew
on the pickup truck and it
began to fishtail.
The driver lost control
and the pickup truck went
through the median and
into the eastbound lanes,
where it rolled over and
came to rest on its roof,
according to the website.
The driver was ejected
and the passenger was
extricated by passers-by.
After the crash the truck
started on fire, but was
extinguished by respond-
ing EMS units, according
to the report.
The driver and passen-
ger were taken to Gunder-
sen Lut heran Hospi t al
with non-life-threatening
injuries.
In Business
The Oregon Observer
runs a business section
on the second week of
each month, highlighting
local business topics and
news bits.
To submit an item for
this page, e-mail edi-
tor Mark Ignatwoski at
ungeditorial@wcinet.
com.
To i nqui r e a bout
advertising on this page,
e-mai l oregonsal es@
wcinet. com. Or call
845-9559.
SportS
Jeremy Jones, sports editor
845-9559 x226 ungsportseditor@wcinet.com

Thursday, September 19, 2013
Anthony Iozzo, assistant sports editor
845-9559 x237 sportsreporter@wcinet.com
Fax: 845-9550
For more sports coverage, visit:
ConnectOregonWI.com
The Oregon Observer
9
Weinholtz saves the streak
Panthers edge Vikings 1-0
to remain undefeated in
conference since 2008
Anthony Iozzo
Assistant sports editor
There were several shots fired
from the corners and from the top
of the penalty box for Stoughton,
but the Oregon boys soccer team
and senior goalie Bradlee Wien-
holtz held their ground Tuesday.
In the end though, one pen-
alty kick by junior forward Nick
Steidemann was all the offense
the Panthers needed in a 1-0 win
Oregons 26th straight within
the Badger South Conference.
But besi des t he goal , t here
were several saves by Wienholtz
t hat proved j ust as i mport ant
as the offense, Stoughton head
coach Dave Wermuth said in a
phone interview.
Stoughtons Andrew Beszhak
put a floater toward the net, but
Weinholtz, who finished with
three saves, poked the ball over
the net.
The Vikings Endre Krumholz
and Devin Keating also had shots
that Weinholtz had to make dif-
ficult stops on, and all the balls
toward the net led to 10 corner
kicks for Stoughton.
But nothing got past Wein-
hol t z , a nd t ha t l e d t o t he
offenses big break in the 56th
minute.
Steidemann broke free on a
breakaway, and Dylan Wenker
came to challenge him and close
down the passing/shooting lanes.
But the two ended up tangled and
knocked each other down, and
the field judge awarded Oregon a
penalty.
Steidemann scored on PK, and
the Vikings dropped its second
straight game to Oregon with just
one PK as the difference.
It is just one of those things
that happen, and I absolutely
dont blame Dylan, Wermuth
sai d. He was pl ayi ng t ough
defense all night.
Oregon (5-3-1 overal l , 2-0
conference) is an honorable men-
tion after knocking Milton from
the top five last week. Stough-
ton (4-6-1, 1-2) was coming off
Boys soccer
Photo by Joe Koshollek
Oregons Nate McWilliams (5) battles Stoughtons Devin Wermuth (13) for a first-half ball Tuesday at Stoughton in a Badger
South Conference match. Oregon won 1-0 on the strength of a penalty kick by junior forward Nick Steidemann.
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
Senior libero Madi Klonsinski struggles to cope with the result after the final point
Thursday, Sept. 12, after Oregon fell 3-1 (20-25, 25-21, 15-25, 22-25) at Madison
Edgewood.
Volleyball
Panthers spiked at Edgewood
Anthony Iozzo
Assistant sports editor
It didnt take long for the Ore-
gon girls volleyball team to real-
ize that Madison Edgewood is
still the team to beat in the Bad-
ger South Conference.
The Crusaders, ranked No. 4
in Division 2, handed Oregon its
first conference set loss of the
season to start the match.
But it was a 13-1 run in the
middle of game three that really
hurt Oregons chances in a 3-1
(20-25, 25-21, 15-25, 23-25) loss.
We were scrappy. Edgewood
was scrappy. It was a lot of fun to
watch, but Edgewood just want-
ed it more than we did, head
coach Kristen Kluck said. This
was our big match for the season,
and it was one we really, really
wanted. It is a tough loss for our
seniors.
The Panthers (11-3 overall,
2-1 conference) led 8-7 in game
three before the run, and they
never recovered. And it contin-
ued in game four for Edgewood
(13-4, 2-0) as it held off a strong
Oregon start again.
The Panthers jumped out to a
7-4 lead in game four, but time
and time again, it was senior out-
side hitters Sam Foti and Kae-
lyn Kessel providing all sorts of
problems with strong hits that left
Oregon scrambling for digs.
But senior libero Madi Klon-
sinski, senior outside hitter Regan
Pauls, senior setter Dani Loomis,
senior setter Jamie Wood and
senior outside hitter Maddy Gits
did what they could, collecting
54 digs as a unit.
Klonsinski led with 14, while
Pauls had 11. Loomis and Wood
each had 10, and Gits finished
Girls tennis
Panthers
remain
undefeated
with two wins
Jeremy Jones
Sports editor
Or egon gi r l s t enni s
improved its standing to 4-0
within the Badger South Con-
ference with a pair of wins
over the past week.
With the victories Oregon
setup a showdown with fellow
undefeated conference rival
Madison Edgewood at 4:15
p.m. Thursday.
Following Edgewood, the
Panthers travel to Waunakee
to participate in the Warrior
Invitational starting at 2 p.m.
Friday.
Oregon 6, Fort Atk. 1
Oregon played well enough
to sweep all three doubles
matches and took three of four
on the singles side Tuesday to
cruise past Fort Atkinson 6-1.
Sophomores Jess Bartelt
and Madeline Bjerke took
their No. 3 doubles match
with ease, cruising 6-1, 6-0,
while freshmen Katie Pliner
and Renee Lawandowski add-
ed a 6-4, 6-1 win at 2 doubles
and juniors Cassandre Krier
and Kaci Bausch took their
No. 1 doubles match 6-4, 6-3.
Senior Michelle Peter-
son and junior Kenzie Torpy
rolled 6-3, 6-2 and 6-2, 6-4,
respectively, while Leah
Koopman survived a close
second set to take her No. 1
singles match 6-3, 7-5.
Co-head coach Eric Gavin-
ski said the two matches that
really stood out to him were
No. 1 doubles and Koopman
at 1 singles.
One doubles played an
amazing match and got back
on the winning track, he
said. They have continued
to improve every match they
play.
Leah on the other hand
was down 0-3 in the first
set and came back to win in
straight sets.
Badger South
Team W-L
Stoughton 2-0
Madison Edgewood 2-0
Oregon 2-1
Milton 2-1
Monona Grove 1-1
Fort Atkinson 0-3
Monroe 0-3
Turn to Soccer/Page 12 Turn to Tennis/Page 10
Turn to Volleyball/Page 12
10
September 19, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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Girls golf Girls swimming
Relay highlights slew of
second places at McFarland
Jeremy Jones
Sports editor
J u n i o r
A b b y
S c h m i t t
and sopho-
more Wil-
low Kugel
each had a
pair of sec-
ond- pl ace
f i n i s h e s
Tuesday at
McFarland.
Schmitt finished runner-
up in both the 100- meter
butterfly (1:16) and 100
backstroke (1:18), while
Kugel matched the feat in
the 50 (29.2) and 100 free-
style (1:04.6).
Schmitt also went on to
take second as a member
of Oregons 200 free relay
team of freshmen Kelsey
Kipp and Grace Przybyl
and sophomore Hannah
Rau.
In the end though the
Panthers simply didnt
have the depth to hang
with another of the top
Division 2 teams in the
state, falling 123-47.
Though we came just
short of winning, they put
on a phenomenal race,
whi ch was one of t he
highlights of the meet,
Kruszewski said. Over-
all, every girl stepped up
and raced tonight against
a very strong McFarland
team, Kruszewski said.
The Panthers JV team
hung with McFarland for
much of the meet, losing
75-54.
Im very happy with
how the girls performed
and the effort they put
out, Kruszewski said.
They went out there and
raced these fast girls and
werent afraid to do so.
Im also very proud of our
JV girls.
Oregon hosts Monroe
at 6 p.m. next Tuesday
before traveling to Madi-
son Edgewood at the same
time on Tuesday, Oct. 1.
We are still working
on the little things, but
are making great strides
in improvement, Krusze-
wski said. Once we have
a fully healthy team I think
t he t eam wi l l surpri se
themselves with their times
and overall team points.
Oregon goes 1-1 last week
Anthony Iozzo
Assistant sports editor
The Oregon girls golf
team traveled to Monona
Golf Course Tuesday to
finish the Badger South
Conference season against
Monona Grove.
The Panthers were able
to stay consistent and win
184-199 to finish 2-3 in the
regular season.
S e n i o r M o r g a n
McCorkle was the leader
with a 39, while freshman
Taylor McCorkle followed
with a 43.
Sophomore Jenny John-
son was next with a 49, and
junior Ashley Brechlin fin-
ished the scoring with a 53.
Oregon traveled to Lake
Wisconsin Country Club
Wednesday to play in the
Badger Chal l enge, but
the event didnt meet the
Observers Tuesday dead-
line.
Look for results in next
weeks paper.
The conference meet is
also at Lake Wisconsin. It
is set for 9 a.m. Wednes-
day, Sept. 25.
Stoughton (5-0), Madi-
son Edgewood (4-1) and
Milton 3-2 are ahead of
Oregon.
Monona Grove (1-4) and
Fort Atkinson (0-5) round
Oregon 4, Monroe 3
Torpy is best known for her
exploits on the ice rink, win-
ning the Jessie Vetter Award,
given annually to the states
top goaltender, a year ago.
A newcomer to the tennis
courts though, Torpy helped
the host Panthers slip by the
Cheesemakers 4-3 and remain
undefeated in the Badger
South Conference last Thurs-
day.
With the match knotted
at 3-all, Torpy continued to
prove she is not simply a
one-sport standout, fighting
back to take her No. 3 singles
match 5-7, 6-2, 7-6 (4) over
sophomore Eva Priewe.
Koopman and Pet er -
son opened the dual meet
with 6-2, 6-4 and 6-0, 6-3
wins at No. 1 and 2 singles,
respectively.
This match was a big win
for us, and it came down to
the last two matches so it was
a nail biter, co-head coach
Jamie White said.
Oregons lone loss at sin-
gles was by Claire Massy,
who dropped a grueling match
7-6 (7), 4-6, 10-2 at No. 4
singles to sophomore Lauren
Demianiuk.
Massey lost the first set
and won the second and then
since it was so late and get-
ting dark it was decided they
could just play a tiebreak for
the third since it was no lon-
ger a decision maker for
the match winner, White
said.
Ba r t e l t a n d Bj e r k e
earned the Panthers sole
vi ct ory on t he doubl es
side, defeating Alisa Fager
and Amber Jenson 6-2, 6-1
at 3 dubs.
File photo by Anthony Iozzo
Sophomore Jenny Johnson shot a 47 in a Badger South Conference
dual against Madison Edgewood Monday, but the Panthers fell
162-188.
File photos by Jeremy Jones
Kaci Bausch (left) and Cassandre Krier took one of their two matches over the past week, defeating
Fort Atkinson 6-4, 6-3 at No. 1 doubles on Tuesday. Oregon won that dual 6-1; (below) junior Kenzie
Torpy kept rolling at No. 3 singles, picking up two more victories against Monroe and Fort Atkinson.
Tennis: Oregon set to battle Edgewood
Continued from page 9
Turn to Golf/Page 11
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to share, download and order prints
of your favorite photos from
local community and sports events.
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Photo submitted
Made of iron
Quinn Schroeder, 8, of
Oregon earned a spot in the
Hy-Vee Ironkids National
Triathlon Championships
after placing in the Top 10 at
Ironkids Madison.
The event was held in Des
Moines, Iowa on Aug. 31.
Quinn participated in the Kids
Triathlon Training through The
Zone Fitness and Training,
led by USAT coach and local
triathlete, Miranda Bush.
Schmitt
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Cross country
Panthers overcome challenges at Madison West Invite
Jeremy Jones
Sports editor
Sophomore Chris Cutter didnt
have the most enjoyable race of his
young prep cross country career last
Thursday at the Madison West Invi-
tational.
Already with bruises on his feet
from breaking in a new pair of
spikes, things only got worse at the
Yahara Hills Running Course for
Cutter.
Though he developed several
new blisters on his feet over the 5K
race, he still managed to move up
the ranks and finish as the Panthers
second runner 32nd overall in 17
minutes, 40 seconds.
The first mile was quick, but I
really started to feel it the second
mile going up the hills, Cutter said.
There was nothing else you could
really think about.
Oregon went on to finish seventh
out of the 10 teams competing with a
score of 175.
Junior Josh Christensen led the
Panthers with a 19th-place finish in
17:13.
Juniors Ryan Barry (17:41) and
Ben Vogt (17:57) took 35th and 41st
place, respectively.
Oregon finished the day with four
runners in the 17s.
I think we ran a great race over-
all as a team, Cutter said. My goal
for this race was to catch up to Ryan,
who I think broke 17:40, which is
amazing for a guy coming out his
first year.
Senior Daniel Rau (18:25) round-
ed out the top-five varsity scorers in
48th place.
Junior James Skiles and sopho-
more Ben Janes also competed on
varsity.
I think we made some great
improvements over the offseason,
Cutter said. Josh went out to Colo-
rado to train and I can tell is helping
him a lot with those hills.
Ben had an off race, but I think
hell bounce back. Me, Ryan and
him will all probably be around the
same time at the end of the year.
Oregon traveled to the Badger
Challenge in Fort Atkinson on Tues-
day.
Girls
The Lady Panthers decided to
forego the Madison West Invitation-
al on Thursday in place of the Luther
All-American Invitational in Deco-
rah, Iowa on Saturday where they
finished 11th out of the 17 schools
competing with a team score of 232.
The lone upperclassmen scorer for
the Panthers, senior Valerie Jones
paced the pack taking 19th place in
16:22.
Sophomore Emma Hughes, who
was within three seconds of Jones
last week, finished well off the pace
Saturday despite managing to break
17 minutes for the first time this sea-
son. She took 37th place in 16:52.
Underclassmen Maddie Lebrun,
Carolyn Vogt and Connie Hansen
rounded out Oregons top five, sepa-
rated by 16 seconds.
Lebrun, now a sophomore, fin-
ished as the teams third runner in
55th place with her time of 17:17.5
one second ahead of the freshman
Vogt in 56th place. Hansen (17:33.3)
finished 65th in the sophomores first
varsity race.
The entire team really raced
well, head coach Doug Debroux
said. We had some great packs
working together and nearly every-
one had PRs.
Both Valerie and Emma are in
the 16s and Jen, Maddie, and Caro-
lyn will be there soon.
Senior Katie Boehnen and sopho-
more Emily Zernick also competed
on varsity.
Decorah (76) won the invite over
Dubuque Hempstead (93). La Crosse
Central was the top Wisconsin team,
finishing third overall with a 123.
Sophomore Jen Brien finished
ninth overall on the JV side in her
first action since an injury earlier
this season. Her 17:13.4 would have
been good enough to finish as the
teams third runner on varsity.
Connie was our No. 5 scorer with
another great race and along with
Jen in the junior varsity race, which
was an unbelievable performance
from where she was 1 weeks ago,
Debroux said.
Senior Ruby Carpenter hadnt
raced since last years state meet and
busted a 17:42, also earning a medal
in the girls junior varsity race.
It was a great day and a lot of
girls walked away with smiles on
their faces and proud of what they
accomplished, Debroux said.
Oregon traveled to the Badger
Challenge in Fort Atkinson on Tues-
day.
Photos by Jeremy Jones
Sophomores Chris Cutter runs past the mile marker Thursday at the Madison West Invitational. Cutter finished 32nd overall
in 17 minutes, 40 seconds; (below) senior Daniel Rau leads the Panthers pack as the gun fires.
Golf: Oregon finishes Badger South Conference dual season 2-3
File photo by Anthony Iozzo
Senior Morgan McCorkle shot a 44 in a Badger South dual against
Madison Edgewood at Foxboro Golf Course Monday.
out the Badger South.
The r esul t s wi l l not
make the deadline for the
Observer that week, but
check @OregonObserver1
for tweets from the tour-
nament and ConnectOre-
gonWi.com for a story and
photos.
Edgewood 162,
Oregon 188
The Panthers hosted No.
3 Madison Edgewood at
Foxboro Golf Course Mon-
day and fell 162-188.
Morgan McCorkle led
Oregon with a 44, while
Taylor McCorkle shot a
46.
Jenni fer Johnson was
next with a 47, and Ashley
Brechlin finished the scor-
ing with a 51.
Edgewood was led by
Tess Hackworthy with a
36, while Caroline Lake
shot a 38.
Claire Parker was next
with a 41, and Maddy Mor-
rison finished the scoring
with a 47.
Continued from page 10
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September 19, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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Fall planting season is here!
Trees, Shrubs, Perennials and lawns love
cool evenings and the rains of fall.
a shut out over Madison Edgewood.
Oregon head coach Kevin May
could not be reached for comment.
The Panthers host Belleville in
a non-conference game at 7 p.m.
Friday, and they host Monroe in a
Badger South game at 7 p.m. Tues-
day.
Hartland Arrowhead
tournament
The Panthers traveled to No. 3
Hartland Arrowhead for a tour-
nament last Friday and Saturday,
and it fell in the championship to
Arrowhead Saturday 3-1.
Shaw Storey started the game
off well for Oregon with a goal in
the fourth minute, but Arrowhead
scored three unanswered, including
two by Fernando Colon Jr. in the
second half.
Senior goalie Jere Bauer finished
with nine saves for Oregon. Mitch
Sutrick had four for Arrowhead.
Fridays game was the opposite
with Oregon scoring three unan-
swered goals to defeat New Berlin
West 3-1.
Junior forward Mitch Morhoff
scored the first two goals, with
junior forward Nick Steidemann
picking up the assist on the second.
Steidemann then added the final
goal in the 76th minute unassisted.
Bauer had t hree saves, whi l e
Alex Sibley had nine for New Ber-
lin West.
with nine.
Maddy K and Regan can
pass nails, Kluck said. If
I can have two people back
there passing with serves
received, it would be Regan
and Maddy K. Both of them,
if they make one mistake,
they are really good at shak-
ing it off and moving on to
the next play.
It shows how much they
have grown and hard they are
working in their senior year.
But in the end, the Pan-
thers needed a miracle, trail-
ing 18-12 in the final game.
It almost came as the Pan-
thers crawled back to tie the
match with a 10-4 run capped
by a kill by Gits and a block
by junior middle hitter Kena
Hinker.
Hinker also added a block
a few seconds later to stave
off defeat as Oregon trailed
24-23, but Edgewood was
able to finish the Panthers on
the next point.
Oregon had a similar
comeback in game one after
trailing by six points late in
the set. The Panthers crawled
back to within two points,
until Edgewood scored the
final three.
Oregons only set win
came in game two after
jumping out to a seven-point
lead and holding off an Edge-
wood rally that cut the lead to
just one point.
Gits led Oregon with 24
kills and was the catalyst
to many of the comebacks
and Panther runs, which is
something Kluck said she has
come to expect.
She is definitely our lead-
er, Kluck said. When we
need a big play, she steps up
and she swings that ball or
gets a big dig like she did in
the bleachers earlier tonight.
She has a war worn on her
shin to show from it.
Wood picked up 25 assists.
Hinker had three blocks, and
Klonsinski collected three
aces.
Junior outside hitter Riley
Rosemeyer and Pauls added
eight and six kills, respec-
tively.
With the new Badger
South Conference volleyball
tournament, the Panthers
will not have a second match
against Edgewood in the reg-
ular season.
But the two teams might
meet again in the tournament,
which will determine the
conference champion.
It is fun to play against
teams that swing at you and
dig everything, and we will
hopefully have one more
chance at them and can learn
from our mistakes and keep
fighting, Kluck said.
Oregon hosts Stoughton at
7 p.m. Thursday, and it trav-
els to Middleton at 8 a.m.
Saturday for the Cardinal
Invitational.
Football
Panthers cut out big plays, still make mistakes in loss
Jeremy Jones
Sports editor
Oregon watched Waunakee build
a 28-0 lead through three quar-
ters en route to a 35-9 loss Friday
against the Warriors in a Badger
Conference crossover game.
Biggest thing that came out of
the game was we got better, Pan-
thers head coach Dan Kissling said.
We moved the ball pretty good
against them but we made some
mistakes that cost us.
Oregon scored to make it 14-7
only to have the touchdown called
back because of a clipping penalty.
Instead the Warriors took a three-
touchdown lead into halftime before
scoring again. Oregon finally got on
the board when Waunakee quarter-
back Alex Helt was called for inten-
tional grounding in the end zone,
resulting in a safety for the first two
points of the game for the Panthers.
Though t he Pant hers werent
plagued by the big plays that cost
them in the first three games this
season, Waunakee junior running
back Troy Laufenberg racked up
128 yards and three touchdowns
on 19 carries. Laufenberg scored
touchdown runs of 3, 13 and 2
yards.
We had some other opportuni-
ties to make it a game, but we just
made some mistakes that killed us
and they took advantage of them,
Kissling said. Defensively we got
better, we made them drive the dis-
tance of the field instead of giving
them big plays and it gave us some
confidence on the defensive side.
A 34-yard touchdown run by Cole
Hooker capped the Warrior victory.
Oregon junior Peter Kissling scored
the Panthers lone touchdown late
in the fourth quarter from 1-yard
out.
Waunakee rushed for 211 yards
on 29 carries, while tacking on 147
more yards through the air.
The Panthers meanwhile com-
piled a total of 255 yards, including
a game-high 98 yards rushing from
Matt Sampson. John Hermus caught
two balls for 40 yards to lead Ore-
gons receivers.
Running BJ Buckner was out and
Josh Sromovsky played but went
out early with an ankle sprain. The
Panthers were also out two O-line
starters.
The Panthers fell to 1-3 overall
with the loss, while Waunakee (2-2)
evened its overall record with the
win.
Oregon travels to Milton at 7 p.m.
this Friday.
Soccer: Oregon is now 2-0 in the Badger South
Continued from page 9
Volleyball: Gits has 24 kills
Continued from page 9
Photo by Joe Koshollek
Oregon senior goalie Bradlee Wienholtz tips a first half shot away from the goal Tuesday
night in Stoughton. He had four saves.
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
Junior middle hitter Riley Rosemeyer attempts a block Thursday,
Sept. 12, at Madison Edgewood.
Get Connected
Find updates and
links right away.
Search for us on
Facebook as
Oregon Observer
and then
LIKE us.
Badger South
Team W-L
Monona Grove 2-0
Fort Atkinson 2-0
Madison Edgewood 2-0
Oregon 0-1
Milton 0-1
Monroe 0-1
Stoughton 0-2
Badger South
Team W-L
Oregon 2-0
Fort Atkinson 1-0
Madison Edgewood 1-1
Stoughton 1-2
Milton 1-2
Monroe 1-1
Monona Grove 0-1
September 19, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
13

STEEL CO.
New Used Surplus
A Division of Anich
Lumber Co., Inc.
414 3rd Street
Palmyra
MULTI-METAL DISTRIBUTION CTR
PIPE-PLATE-CHANNEL
ANGLE-TUBE- REBAR-GRATING
PLATE-SHEET-LINTELS
B-DECKING- PIPE BOLLARDS
DECORATIVE IRON PARTS
STAINLESS STEEL & ALUMINUM
I&H BEAMS $3 & UP PER FOOT
LUMBER & BUILDING SUPPLIES
ROOFING & SIDING
NEW, USED & SECONDS
@ 43c SQ. FT. & UP
FABRICATION &
CRANE SERVICE
FR
EE
Stock Book 262-495-4453
fax 262-495-4100
P
a
l
www.palsteel.net
Book Festival
Saturday, Sept. 28, 2013
8:00 am - 6:00 pm, at Edgerton High School Campus
For full schedule: www.sterlingnorthbookfestival.com or festivals Facebook pg.
Edgertons 8th Annual
Sterling North
Special Guests:
Tom Kertscher (left)
Author of
Brett Favre: A Packer Fans Tribute
and Richard Schickel (right)
Author of
Biography of Clint Eastwood
plus Patch Adams and many others
140 Lost & Found
STOLEN 8/28: BOBCAT Skid Steer.
T-180, tracks worn, tooth bucket has one
tooth missing. Hook on top and side.
Schaller Rd. Verona. Return reward
$300. CC Salvage
Cary 608-333-1913
143 notices
FREE FIREWOOD cut your own. Evans-
ville area. Call 608-290-8994.
ROTARY MEMBERS have helped immu-
nize more than 2 billion children in 122
countries! Locate the nearest club at
www.rotary.org. This message provided
by PaperChain & your local community
paper. (wcan)
WCAN (Wisconsin Community Ad Net-
work) and/or the member publications
review ads to the best of their abil-
ity. Unfortunately, many unscrupulous
people are ready to take your money!
PLEASE BE CAREFUL ANSWERING
ANY AD THAT SOUNDS TOO GOOD
TO BE TRUE! For more information, or to
file a complaint regarding an ad, please
contact The Department of Trade, Agri-
culture & Consumer Protection 1-800-
422-7128 (wcan)
150 PLaces to Go
36TH ANNUAL AUTO PART SWAP
Meet & Car Show! Sept. 27-29.
Jefferson CTY Fairgrounds, Jefferson,
WI. Swap meet & car corral ALL THREE
DAYS! Show Cars Sat/Sun ONLY. Adm
$7. No pets. Fri 10-6, Sat/Sun 6-3. 608-
244-8416
madisonclassics.com (wcan)
GUN SHOW Sept. 27-29 SAUK COUN-
TY Fairgrounds, Baraboo, WI. Fri.
3-8:30pm Sat 9-5pm Sun 9-3pm. For
more information: 563-608-4401 or mar-
vkrauspromotions.net (wcan)
HERMANSON PUMPKIN Patch
Free Admission. Pumpkins, squash,
gourds, straw maze, wagon ride,
small animals to view. Opening
September 21. Open daily 9am until
6pm through Halloween. 127 Cty
Rd N, Edgerton, WI 608-884-8759.
hermansonpumpkinpatch.webs.
com Go 8 mi.southeast on Cty Rd. N
towards Edgerton
SPARTA GUN Show: Sept 20 & 21.
Colonial Banquet Center,
1415 W Wisconsin St.
Fri. noon-8pm, Sat. 8am-3pm.
Admission $5. Gun Buyer Shows, 608-
548-4867 (wcan)
340 autos
2001 MERCEDES BENZ C240, Black
on black, heated seats, sunroof, power
everything, BOSE sound system. 115K.
Asking $4995. Call Brian at 608-692-
2849
DONATE YOUR Car, Truck or Boat to
HERITAGE for the BLIND. Free 3-day
vacation. Tax deductible. Free towing.
All paperwork taken car of! 800-856-
5491 (wcan)
342 Boats & accessories
RENTALS WAVERUNNERS Pontoons
- Ski Boats - Fishing Boats Outboards -
Canoes - Kayaks. Daily or weekly. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports Fun Center,
Shawano 715-526-8740 (wcan)
SHOREMASTER DOCK & Lift Head-
quarters! New & Used. We do it all.
Delivery/Assembly/Install & Removals.
American Marine & Motorsports, Scha-
wano = SAVE 866-955-2628 (wcan)
DANE COUNTYS MARKETPLACE.
The Oregon Observer Classifieds. Call
845-9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
355 recreationaL VehicLes
4 MILLION Liquidation! 200 Pontoons &
Fiberglass must go! Buy it, Trade it, Store
it for FREE! Pay later! This sale will not
last! Finance 866-955-2628. american-
marine.com (wcan)
ATVS SCOOTERS & Go-Karts. Youth
ATV's & Scooters (80mpg) @ $49/mo.
Sport & 4x4 Atv's @ $69/mo. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports, Schawano
=Save= 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan)
357 snowmoBiLes
'00 SKI-DOO MXZ 600 snowmobile.
Excellent condition, newer carbides,
studded track. $1400/OBO 608-575-
0353
360 traiLers
TRAILERS @ LIQUIDATION Pricing.
Boat, ATV, Sled or Pontoons. 2 or 4
Place/Open or Enclosed. American
Marine, Shawano 866-955-2628 www.
americanmarina.com (wcan)
402 heLP wanted, GeneraL
AWNING INSTALLER: Must be
handy with tools and able to climb
ladders. Apply in person at:
Gallagher Tent & Awning Company.
809 Plaenert Dr, Madison 53713

BELLEVILLE ALL SHIFTS. Do you
have a heart for the elderly? Our 14
bed assisted living center needs you!
Personal cares, cooking/ baking. Call
Judy 608-290-7346

THEY SAY people dont read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didnt you?
Call now to place your ad, 845-9559,
873-6671 or 835-6677.
CAREGIVERS WANTED: Comfort Keep-
ers is seeking qualified, compassionate
individuals to help assist the elderly in
the Madison area. If you have experience
caring for those in need, give us a call.
CNA/personal care experience preferred.
Driver's License Required. 608-442-1898
EXPERIENCED CONCRETE Finisher
Must have valid drivers license. Com-
petitive wages. Health, dental available,
608-884-6205
MADISON AREA Road Maintenance
Company accepting applications for CDL
drivers and laborers. Full time beginning
now thru October. For more information
call 608-842-1676.
OREGON HOUSEHOLD HELP:
Need part-time help, 20 hours per week.
Monday-Friday, 2pm-6pm. $11. per
hour. Primary work is housecleaning
and watching two children after school.
Proven experience in housecleaning
and babysitting demonstrated by
references is necessary. E-mail:
householdhelpinoregon@gmail.com or
call 608-561-8636.
PAOLI CAFE & Grocery looking for
cooks, servers, customer service/sales.
Willing to train, email resume to paolilo-
calfoods@tds.net
SEWING MACHINE Operator:
Sewing medium weight fabrics on
Industrial Sewing Machine. Some
sewing experience necessary. Apply
in person: Gallagher Tent & Awning
Co. 809 Plaenert Dr. Madison 53713

CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Oregon Observer unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 845-
9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
434 heaLth care, human
serVices & chiLd care
CNA'S/NURSES NEEDED: For various
home care cases. INTERIM HEALTH-
CARE of WI is hiring compassionate,
dependable home healthcare workers
in Stoughton, Oregon, Verona, Belleville
and Cambridge! To join our team or for
more information contact: Laura Moench,
HR. 608-238-0268 lmoench@interim-
healthcare.com
440 hoteL, Food & BeVeraGe
KOFFEE KUP RESTAURANT LOOK-
ING FOR RESPONSIBLE COOKS,
DISHWASHERS AND WAITSTAFF. 355
E. MAIN, STOUGHTON
453 VoLunteer wanted
THE KEEP Wisconsin Warm/Cool Fund
is proud to host our 4th annual Charity
Corn Maze from September 18 - Novem-
ber 3. We need help staffing the maze!
Opportunities include running games both
inside and outside the maze, face paint-
ing, checking guests in and out, and
other tasks that come up. The Colonial
Club Senior Activity Center in Sun
Prairie needs volunteers to drive lunch
time meals to area seniors. Time frame is
10:45am-noon, days vary. Also lunch pro-
gram volunteers are needed to set up and
break down the congregate lunch. Peer
Support of Dane county connects older
adults with a Peer Support Team Member
to provide needed support through friend-
ly home visits. We need individuals who
have an interest in helping to keep older
adults in their own homes by providing
emotional support to promote wellness
and reduce social isolation. This is a flex-
ible opportunity for adults 55+ in their own
community, mental health or social work
experience is helpful bun not necessary.
Call the Volunteer Center at 608-246-
4380 or visit www.volunteeryourtime.org
to learn about these and other volunteer
opportunities.
508 chiLd care & nurseries
CHILDCARE PROFESSIONAL with
30 years of experience is opening new
family daycare in Stoughton. 3 openings
available in loving home for children
ages 6 weeks to 3 years.
For more information call
Julie at 873-1926.
516 cLeaninG serVices
WANT SOMEONE to clean your house?
Call DOROTHY'S SWEEP CLEAN. We
are Christian ladies that do quality work.
Dependable and have excellent refer-
ences. Call 608-838-0665 or 608-219-
2415. Insured.
532 FencinG
CRIST FENCING FREE ESTIMATES.
Residential, commercial, farm, horse.
608-574-1993 www.cristfencing.com
548 home imProVement
A&B ENTERPRISES
Light Construction/Remodeling
No job too small
608-835-7791
ALL THINGS BASEMENTY! Basement
Systems Inc. Call us for all your base-
ment needs! Waterproofing? Finishing?
Structural Repairs? Humidity and Mold
Control? Free Estimates! Call 888-929-
8307 (wcan)
HALLINAN-PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
**Great-Fall-Rates**
30 + Years Professional
European-Craftsmanship
Free-Estimates
References/Insured
Arthur Hallinan
608-455-3377
Legals
OREGON SCHOOL DISTRICT
ANNUAL MEETING
AGENDA 2013
ROME CORNERS
INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL
SEPTEMBER 23, 2013
6:30 P.M.
1. Call Meeting to Order: Courtney
Odorico
2. Elect Chairperson of the Meeting
3. Appointment of Parliamentarian
4. Adoption of Ground Rules
5. Minutes of the Last Annual Meet-
ing
6. Superintendents State of the Dis-
trict Report
7. Financial Report
8. Books have been audited by
Johnson Block & Co., Inc.
9. Presentation of the Proposed Ex-
penditure Budget $ 51,428,844
10. Adoption of the Tax Levy $
22,955.451
Irrepealable Debt Retirement Levy
$3,426,381
Current Operation and Other Fund
Levy $19,529,070
11. Establish salaries of Board Mem-
bers
Current salaries are:
President $ 1,350
Vice-President $ 1,000
Clerk $ 1,000
Treasurer $ 1,000
Member $ 900
Committee Work $ 500 (Human As-
sets, Policy Governance, Physical As-
sets, Financial Assets)
12. Old Business
13. New Business
A. Set the time and date of the next
annual meeting: Board recommends the
fourth Monday in September at 6:30 PM.
That would be September 22, 2014
14. Adjournment
Thank everyone for coming. Final
motion needed for adjournment.
Notice is hereby given that a major-
ity of the Oregon School Board is expect-
ed to be present at the Annual Meeting.
Published: September 12 and 19, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
OREGON SCHOOL DISTRICT
BOARD OF EDUCATION
DATE: MONDAY, SEPTEMBER
23, 2013
TIME: IMMEDIATELY
FOLLOWING THE ANNUAL
MEETING
PLACE: ROME CORNERS
INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL
Order of Business
Call to Order
Roll Call
Proof of Notice of Meeting and Ap-
proval of Agenda
AGENDA
A. CONSENT CALENDAR
NOTE: Items under the Consent Cal-
endar are considered routine and will be
enacted under one motion. There will be
no separate discussion of these items
prior to the time the Board votes unless
a Board Member requests an item be
removed from the calendar for separate
action.
1. Minutes of Previous Meeting
2. Approval of Payment
3. Staff Resignations/Retirements,
if any
4. Staff Assignments, if any
5. Field Trip Requests, if any
6. Acceptance of Donations, if any
7. Open Enrollment Exception Appli-
cations, if any
B. COMMUNICATION FROM PUBLIC
1. Public: Board Policy 180.04 has
established an opportunity for the pub-
lic to address the Board. In the event
community members wish to address
the Board, 15 minutes will be provided;
otherwise the agenda will proceed as
posted.
C. ACTION ITEMS
1. Reconsideration of Ms. Vogelers
Motion of August 26, 2013 , C2 Employee
Handbook, line #8, paragraph 3 of page 4
of the offcial School Board minutes.
D. DISCUSSION ITEMS: Student
Achievement none.
E. DISCUSSION ITEMS: Other Top-
ics none.
F. INFORMATION ITEMS
1. Schools of Hope Zoua Vang -
OMS
2. OEA President
G. CLOSING
1. Future Agenda
2. Check Out
H. ADJOURNMENT
Published: September 19, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
VILLAGE OF OREGON
2013 BUDGET TRANSFERS 2
General Capital
Fund Projects
Taxes
Special Assessments
Intergovernmental Aid
Licenses & Permits
Fines
Public Charges
Intergovernmental Charges
Miscellaneous
Transfer In -
Proceeds from Borrowing
Other Financing Sources
- -
General Government
Public Safety
Public Works
Health & Human Services 7,354
Culture & Recreation
Conservation & Development
Capital Outlay
Debt Service
Transfer Out
Other Financing Sources
Enterprise Operating Expenses
7,354 -
Detail budget transfers are available at village hall.
117 Spring Street, Oregon, WI 53575
Published: September 19, 2013
WNAXLP
Donald C. Sheldon
Donald C. Sheldon, age
82, of Oregon, passed away
on Monday, Sept. 16, 2013,
at his residence with his
family by his side.
He was born on Nov. 21,
1930, in Madison, the son
of Karl and Beulah (Eric-
son) Sheldon. Don married
Nancy Hess on Nov. 25,
1966, in Madison.
Don is survived by his
wife of 46 years, Nancy;
his children, Robin Sheldon
of Sheboygan and Michael
(Stephanie Ragsdale) of
Fitchburg; and sister-in-
law, Hazel Sheldon.
Funeral services will be
held at Gunderson East
Funeral Home, 5203 Mono-
na Drive, Madison, at 2
p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 21,
2013. Visitation will be
held from 11 a.m. until the
time of the service on Sat-
urday. Burial will be at
Roselawn Memorial Park.
Memorials may be made
to Agrace HospiceCare,
5395 East Cheryl Pkwy,
Fitchburg, 53711. Online
condolences may be made
at gundersonfh.com.
Gunderson East
Funeral & Cremation
Care
5203 Monona Dr.
221-5420
Alvina L. Frye
Alvina L. Frye, age 86,
of Oregon, passed away
peacefully at her home on
Sunday, Sept. 15, 2013, sur-
rounded by her family. She
was born on Feb. 18, 1927,
in Reedsburg, to Edward
and Gladys Frambs.
Alvina married Earl Frye
on Jan. 21, 1950, in Madi-
son. She and her husband
owned and operated the
Oregon Bowl from 1961
to 1995. Alvina enjoyed
bowling, gardening, shop-
ping, and most importantly,
spending time with her fam-
ily. She also was a bowling
instructor for youth bowl-
ing league.
Alvina is survived by her
three children, Deborah
Lewis, Gregory (Catherine)
Frye, and Kristie (William)
Knight; five grandchildren,
Bryan Lewis, Kellie Frye,
Jennifer Benrafa, Ashley
Pigo, and Kelsey Price;
four great-grandchildren,
Jacob, Paige, Omar, and
Mia; brother, Diehl Frambs;
and dog, Katie.
She was preceded i n
death by her husband, in
2008; parents; sisters, Flor-
ence Rogge and Evelyn
Colwill; and brother Duane
Frambs.
Funeral services will be
held at Gunderson Oregon
Funeral Home, 1150 Park
St., Oregon, at 1:00 p.m. on
Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013,
with the Rev. Paul Mark-
quart presiding. Burial will
follow at Town of Dunn
Burial Grounds. Visitation
will be held at the funer-
al home from 11:30 a.m.
until the time of service on
Thursday.
Memorials may be made
to Shriners Hospital for
Children or Agrace Hospi-
ceCare. Online condolences
may be made at gunderson-
fh.com.
Gunderson Oregon
Funeral & Cremation
Care
1150 Park St.
835-3515
Donald Sheldon
Obituaries
Alvina Frye
congregations and clergy in
the process of pastoral transi-
tion; ecumenical dialog; sup-
porting congregations as they
strive to live the Gospel more
fully in their context; provid-
ing training opportunities for
clergy and congregations to
strengthen their ministries
and to provide real encour-
agement and support of
clergy as they strive to serve
faithfully in their context.
But because of charges
Burnside is facing, including
drunken driving and being
involved in a fatal automo-
bile accident this spring, he
said whomever the new bish-
op is will have to start with a
healing process.
There will be some work
in healing to be done with
congregations and clergy
who were disillusioned and
hurt by the tragedy involv-
ing our former bishop,
Markquart told the Oregon
Observer in an email.
He went on to say he
was honored to be among
the nine other men and one
woman nominated.
There are 11 nominees,
all of whom bring wonderful
talents and abilities, he said.
The south-central syn-
od is a regional govern-
ing body that includes all
ELCA congregations in
Grant , Ri chl and, Sauk,
Columbia, Iowa, Lafayette,
Dane, Green, Dodge, Jef-
ferson, Rock and Walworth
counties, one congregation in
Adams County and one con-
gregation in Poplar Grove,
Ill.
Bishop: Markquart in running
Continued from page 1
There are 11
nominees, all
of whom bring
wonderful talents
and abilities.
Paul Markquart, pastor
at St. Johns Lutheran
Church
Send it in!
We like to send report-
ers to shoot photos, but we
cant be everywhere.
So if you have a photo of
an event or just a slice of
life you think the commu-
nity might be interested in,
send it to us and well use
it if we can. Please include
contact information, whats
happening in the photo and
the names of people pic-
tured.
Send your phot os t o
c o mmu n i t y r e p o r t e r @
wcinet.com.
14
September 19, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
NIELSEN'S
Home Improvements/
Repairs, LLC
Kitchens/Bathrooms
Wood & Tile Flooring
Decks/Clean Eaves
*Free Estimates* Insured*
*Senior Discounts*
Home 608-873-8716
Cell 608-576-7126
e-mail zipnputts@sbcglobal.net

RECOVER PAINTING offers all carpen-
try, drywall, deck restoration and all forms
of painting. Recover urges you to join in
the fight against cancer, as a portion of
every job is donated to cancer research.
Free estimates, fully insured, over 20
years of experience. Call 608-270-0440.
SENSIBLE PAINTING 20 years
experience. Great quality at a sensible
price. Free estimates, Insured, Polite,
Professional. 608-873-9623

TOMAS PAINTING
Professional, Interior,
Exterior, Repairs.
Free Estimates. Insured.
608-873-6160
550 insurance
SAVE MONEY On Auto InSurance from
the major names you trust. No forms. No
hassle. No obligation. Call READY FOR
MY QUOTE now!
888-708-0274 (wcan)
554 LandscaPinG, Lawn,
tree & Garden work
SHREDDED TOPSOIL
Shredded Garden Mix
Shredded Bark
Decorative Stone
Pick-up or Delivered
Limerock Delivery
Ag Lime Spreading
O'BRIEN TRUCKING
5995 Cty D, Oregon, WI
608-835-7255
www.obrientrucking.com
SNOWMARE ENTERPRISES
Property Maintenance
Bush Trimming
Powerwash Houses
Spring/Fall Clean-Up
Lawncare, Gutter Cleaning
608-219-1214
560 ProFessionaL serVices
APPLIANCE REPAIR
We fix it no matter where
you bought it from!
800-624-0719 (wcan)
MY COMPUTER WORKS - Computer
Problems? Viruses, Spyware, Email,
Printer Issues, Bad Internet Connec-
tions - FIX IT NOW! Professional, US
based technicians. $25 off service. Call
for immediate help. 888-885-7944 (wcan)
ONE CALL Does it All!
Fast and Reliable Electrical Repair
and Installations.
Call 800-757-0383 (wcan)
ONE CALL Does it All!
Fast and Reliable Plumbing Repairs
Call 800-981-0336 (wcan)
THEY SAY people dont read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didnt you?
Call now to place your ad, 845-9559, 873-
6671 or 835-6677.
586 tV, Vcr &
eLectronics rePair
REDUCE YOUR Cable Bill! Get whole-
home Satellite system installed at NO
COST and programming starting at
$19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade to
new callers, so call now. 888-544-0273
wcan
601 househoLd
NEW MATTRESS SETS from $89.
All sizes in stock! 9 styles. www.
PlymouthFurnitureWI.com
2133 Eastern Ave. Plymouth, WI Open 7
days a week (wcan)
602 antiques & coLLectiBLes
NEW STORE OPENING!
TREND.QUILITY
312 W Lakeside St, Madison
Tuesday-Thursday 11-6
Friday-Saturday 10-6
Revisited home decor and more.
One of a kind selections!

606 articLes For saLe
'00 SKI-DOO MXZ 600 snowmobile.
Excellent condition, newer carbides, stud-
ded track. $1400/OBO 608-575-0353
3 CUBIC Foot FRIGIDAIRE Freezer.
Purchased new in 2002. White.
$90. OBO 608-669-2243.
FOOSBALL TABLE - hardly used & in
great condition $75.00. Baker's Rack -
$40.00 Bar with 2 stools, top has remov-
able glass shelf & inside has 4 glass
shelves, this was used outside for 1 sum-
mer $65.00 Call 873-8106
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Oregon Observer unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 845-9559,
873-6671 or 835-6677.
646 FirePLaces, Furnaces/wood,
FueL
DRY OAK and Cherry Firewood For Sale.
Contact Dave at 608-445-6423 or Pete
608-712-3223
648 Food & drink
CANNING TOMATOES AVAILABLE.
Full bushel $25. Call Tom
608-279-2855

ENLOY 100% GUARANTEED delivered-
to-the-door Omaha Steaks! Save 74%
plus 4 free burgers - The Family Value
Combo Only $39.99. Order today. 1-888-
676-2750 Use Code: 48643XMT or www.
OmahaSteaks.com/mbff79 (wcan)
SHARI'S BERRIES: ORDER mouth-
watering gifts for any occasion. SAVE
20% on qualifying gifts over $29. Fresh
Dipped Berries starting at $19.99. Call
888-479-6008 or Visit www.berries.com/
happy (wcan)
650 Furniture
2-PC SECTIONAL Sofa from Slumber-
land! Medium brown fabric with 3 paisley
patterned pillows. Asking $150. 608-669-
2243
BEDROOM SET- 4 Piece set includes
Dresser, Chest of Drawers, Queen Head-
board & Night Stand. Solid and well built,
very good condition. $500. for more infor-
mation call or text 608-575-5984.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Oregon Observer unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 845-9559,
873-6671 or 835-6677.
CLASSIFIEDS, 845-9559, 873-6671 or
835-6677. It pays to read the fine print.
652 GaraGe saLes
MOVING/TAG SALE VERONA
401 Westlawn Ave.
Mary Lemanski.
Fri & Sat - Sept 20-21, 9am-4pm.
Furniture, Antiques, Household
and MORE!. Redwing crocks, curio
cabinets, Lane cedar bench, White
Clad icebox, grandfather clock,
pool table, wild Turkey decanters,
Packer memorabilia, Hats signed
by Ray Nitschke, assorted tools,
kitchen items, Daisy BB gun, records,
ladders, Dept 56 X-mas village, and
much more.
See HawleyAuctions.com for photos
& details. 608-437-4650

OREGON 2412 White Oak Tr. Sept.
19-21, 8-4. Tools, toys, traps, crafts,
books, quilts, sheets, dishes, holiday, fur-
niture, grill, smoker and tent.
OREGON 908 Harding St. Sept 19-3pm-
7pm, Sept 20-21, 7am-5pm. Clothes,
(wm's petite, small) shoes, beanie
babies, jewelry, vintage items: teacups,
chinaware, silver plated mirror, comb,
brush set, china tea service, decorative
glassware, Swedish linens, linen textiles,
collector's plates.
STOUGHTON- 1839 Hildebrandt St
Thursday 9/19 2pm-6pm. Friday 9/20
8am-5pm, Saturday 9/21 8am-Noon.
Knick-Knacks, household items, ladies
clothing, purses, kids accessories, Chevy
truck rails, lots of miscellaneous too much
to mention
STOUGHTON- 701 Pleasant View Dr 9/19
1pm-5pm, 9/20 8am-5pm, 9/21 9am-?
Multi-families
STOUGHTON- 737 Nottingham RD 9/22
9am-5pm. Toys, clothes, bric-a-brac
STOUGHTON- 916 Bristol Ct. Moving
Sale 9/19-9/21 9am-6pm. See Craigslist
STOUGHTON/OREGON 1972
Princess Dr ( Hwy 51N, left on
Schneider Dr, left on Hawkinson Rd
to Vic Anderson Rd. GREAT PRICES.
WORTH THE DRIVE! 9/21 8am-
4pm. 9/22 8am-12pm. Multi-Family.
Furniture, Freezer, handicap/scooter,
household items, misc
664 Lawn & Garden
3'-12' EVERGREEN & Shade Trees. Pick
up or Delivery! Planting Available! DET-
LOR TREE FARMS 715-335-4444 (wcan)
666 medicaL & heaLth suPPLies
ATTENTION SLEEP Apnea sufferers with
Medicare. Get FREE CPAP replacement
supplies at little or no cost. Plus Free
home delivery. Best of all, prevent red
skin sores & bacterial infection. 888-797-
4088 (wcan)
MEDICAL GUARDIAN Top-rated medi-
cal alarm and 24/7 monitoring. For a
limited time, get free equipment, no acti-
vation fees, no commitment, a 2nd water-
proof alert button for free and more. Only
$29.95 per month. 877-863-6622 (WCAN)
SAFE STEP WALK-IN TUB Alert for
Seniors. Bathrooms falls can be fatal.
Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Thera-
peutic Jets. Less than 4 inch step-in. Wide
door. Anti-slip floors. American made.
Installation included. Call 888-960-4522
for $750. off (wcan)
668 musicaL instruments
AMP: LINE 6 Spider IV 75 watt guitar
amp. Tons of built in effects, tuner, and
recording options. Like new, rarely used,
less than 2 years old. Asking $250 OBO.
call 608-575-5984
GUITAR: FENDER American made Stan-
dard Stratocaster guitar. Tobacco burst
finish, mint condition. Includes tremelo
bar, straplocks, and custom fitted Fender
hard-shell case. Asking $950 OBO. Call
608-575-5984
672 Pets
Cats and Kittens for adoption. Healthy,
friendly. 608-848-4174 www.AngelsWish.
org. Verona.
676 PLants & FLowers
PROFLOWERS ENJOY SEND FLOW-
ERS for any occasion! Take 20% off your
order over $29! Go to www.Proflowers.
com/ActNow or call 877-592-7090 (wcan)
688 sPortinG Goods
& recreationaL
WE BUY Boats/RV/Pontoons/ATV's &
Motorcycles! "Cash Paid" NOW. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports Super Center,
Shawno. 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan).
690 wanted
DONATE YOUR CAR-
FAST FREE TOWING
24 hr. Response - TaX Deduction
United Breast Cancer FOUNDATION
Providing Free Mammograms
& Breast Cancer Info.
866-343-6603 (wcan)
692 eLectronics
DIRECTV OVER 140 channels only
$29.99 a month. Call now! Triple Sav-
ings. $636.00 in Savings, Free upgrade
to Genie & 2013 NFL Sunday ticket free!
Start saving today. 800-320-2429 (wcan)
SAVE ON CABLE TV, Internet, Digital
Phone, Satellite. You've got a choice!
Options from ALL major service providers.
Call us to learn more! CALL Today. 888-
714-5772 (wcan)
696 wanted to Buy
TOP PRICES Any kind of scrap me al
Cars/Batteries/Farm Equipment Free
appliance pick-up Property Clean Out
Honest/Fully Insured/U Call-We Haul 608-
444-5496
WE BUY Junk Cars and Trucks.
We sell used parts.
Monday thru Friday 8am-5:30pm.
Newville Auto Salvage, 279 Hwy 59
Edgerton, 608-884-3114.
705 rentaLs
GREENWOOD APARTMENTS Apart-
ments for Seniors 55+, currently has 1
& 2 Bedroom Units available starting at
$695 per month, includes heat, water, and
sewer. 608-835-6717 Located at 139 Wolf
St., Oregon, WI 53575
STOUGHTON- 2 b/4 unit on dead end st.
One up, remodeled bath, kitchen, dish-
washer, micro-stove-ref. window blinds-
oak-floors storage coin laundry. Heat,
water/sewer included. $715/mo 1 month
deposit. One cat okay. 561-310-5551
VERONA 2 Bedroom Apartment $690 in
a small 24 unit building. Includes heat, hot
water, water & sewer, off-street parking,
fully carpeted, dishwasher and coin oper-
ated laundry and storage in basement.
Convenient to Madison's west side. Call
KC at 608-273-0228 to view your new
home.
720 aPartments
OREGON-2 BDRM, 1 bath. Available
spring/summer. Great central location, on-
site or in-unit laundry, patio, dishwasher
and A/C. $700-$715/month. Call Kelly at
608-255-7100 or visit www.stevebrown-
apts.com/oregon
OREGON DOWNTOWN LOCATION
1 Bed, 1 Bath, Appliances, A/C, Laundry,
Storage, $650./month. Heat included.
608-206-7596
ROSEWOOD APARTMENTS for Seniors
55+, has 1 & 2 bedroom units available
starting at $695 per month. Includes heat,
water and sewer. Professionally man-
aged. 608-877-9388 Located at 300 Sil-
verado Drive, Stoughton, WI 53589
750 storaGe sPaces For rent
ALL SEASONS SELF STORAGE
10X10 10X15 10X20 10X30
Security Lights-24/7 access
BRAND NEW
OREGON/BROOKLYN
Credit Cards Accepted
CALL (608)444-2900
C.N.R. STORAGE
Located behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Convenient Dry Secure
Lighted with access 24/7
Bank Cards Accepted
Off North Hwy 51 on
Oak Opening Dr. behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Call: 608-509-8904

DEER POINT STORAGE
Convenient location behind Stoughton
Lumber
Clean-Dry Units
24 HOUR LIGHTED ACCESS
5x10 thru 12x25
608-335-3337
FRENCHTOWN
SELF-STORAGE
Only 6 miles South of
Verona on Hwy PB.
Variety of sizes available now.
10x10=$50/month
10x15=$55/month
10x20=$70/month
10x25=$80/month
12x30=$105/month
Call 608-424-6530 or
1-888-878-4244
NORTH PARK STORAGE
10x10 through 10x40, plus
14x40 with 14' door for
RV & Boats.
Come & go as you please.
608-873-5088
RASCHEIN PROPERTY
STORAGE
6x10 thru 10x25
Market Street/Burr Oak Street
in Oregon
Call 608-206-2347
UNION ROAD STORAGE
10x10 - 10x15
10x20 - 12x30
24 / 7 Access
Security Lights & Cameras
Credit Cards Accepted
608-835-0082
1128 Union Road
Oregon, WI
Located on the corner of
Union Road & Lincoln Road
VERONA SELF-STORAGE
502 Commerce Pkwy.
10 X 5 - 10 X 30
24/7 Access/Security lit.
Short/long term leases
608-334-1191
801 oFFice sPace For rent
North Industrial Park has office space for
rent .Utilities included. High speed internet
available. Reasonable rent. Call 873-8170
NORTH INDUSTRIAL Park has office
space for rent. Utilities included; high-
speed Internet available. Reasonable
rent. Call 873-8170.
OREGON OFFICE SPACE for rent. 500
sq ft, 2 room suite with signage. Available
October 1.
120 Janesville St. Call 608-575-1128
Alice
Bill Newton, Ron Outhouse
835-5201 or 835-5970
We recommend septic
pumping every two years
B & R
PUMPING SERVICE
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Wagon Unloaders
and Corn Sorters
Days, Evenings and Weekends Available
Call OBriEn FArmS, inC.
552 Glenway road, Brooklyn, Wi 53521
(608) 835-3564 or (608) 455-6615
Help Wanted for Seed Corn Harvest
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Driveways
Floors
Patios
Sidewalks
Decorative Concrete
Phil Mountford 516-4130 (cell)
835-5129 (office)
Al Mittelstaedt 845-6960
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PAR Concrete, Inc.
Increase Your sales opportunities
reach over 1.2 million households!
Advertise in our
Wisconsin Advertising Network System.
For information call 845-9559 or 873-6671.
AUCTION
TURN YOUR EQUIPMENT INTO CASH: RITCHIE
BROS. UNRESERVED AUCTION October 3 Chicago,
IL. Hundreds of competing bidders, certainty of sale.
Call 1.877.722.7253 to consign. Rbauction.com
(CNOW)
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
ATTN: COMPUTER WORK. Work from anywhere
24/7. Up to $1,500 Part Time to $7,500/mo. Full Time.
Training provided. www.WorkServices7.com (CNOW)
HELP WANTED- MISCELLANEOUS
WANTED: 29 SERIOUS PEOPLE to Work From
Anywhere Using a Computer up to $1500-$5000 PT/FT
www.improveincomenow.com (CNOW)
HELP WANTED- SKILLED TRADES
Holtger Bros., INC., Utility Contractor, has Immediate
Opportunities in the Telephone Industry. Foremen, CDL
Laborers, Cable Plow/Bore Rig Operators, Ariel Techs.
Training Offered. Travel required for All positions. Call
920-664-6300. www.holtger.com EOE by AA (CNOW)
HELP WANTED- TRUCK DRIVER
OTR DRIVERS to run midwest to west coast. Late
model equipment. Scheduled hometime. Travel
allowance. Paid vacation. E-Logs. Call Chuck 800-645-
3748. (CNOW)
Drivers- CDL-A CDL Tractor/Trailer Drivers Wanted.
Competitive Pay, Frequent Home Time. Join the deBoer
team now! deBoer Transportation 800-825-8511 Apply
Online: www.drivedeboer.com (CNOW)
Get more home time on Transport Americas regional
runs. Great miles, equipment + extras. Enjoy Transport
Americas great driver experience! TAdrivers.com or
866-204-0648. (CNOW)
Drivers- CDL-A Train and work for us! Professional,
focused CDL training available. Choose Company
Driver, Owner Operator, Lease Operator or Lease
Trainer. (877) 369-7893 www.CentralTruckDrivingJobs.
com (CNOW)
Gordon Trucking- A better Carrier. A better Career.
CDL-A Truck Drivers Needed. Up to $5,000 Sign-on
Bonus! Starting Pay Up to $.44 cpm. Full Benefts,
Excellent Hometime, No East Coast. EOE Call 7 days/
wk! GordonTrucking.com 866-565-0569 (CNOW)
MISCELLANEOUS
THIS SPOT FOR SALE! Place a 25 word classifed ad
in 180 newspapers in Wisconsin for $300. Call 800-227-
7636 or this newspaper. Www.cnaads.com (CNOW)
REAL ESTATE
Prime retail for lease 1,160 SQ feet Ryan St (HWY10)
Brillion, WI next to McDonalds. For more info email
peeblescarwash@aol.com or call 414-466-7860
(CNOW)
September 19, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
15
VERONA- OFFICE/WAREHOUSE
1000 Sq Ft.$500 +Utilities.
608-575-2211 or
608-845-2052
820 misc. inVestment
ProPerty For saLe
FOR SALE: 27 Acres in Shawano County,
Mostly Wooded. Log Cabin & Out Build-
ings. Deer, Turkey & Waterfowl. Will Sep-
arate. 715-758-6241 leave msg (wcan)
FOR SALE BY OWNER: Near Copper
Harbor & Lake Medora, MI. 40 wooded
acres. $29,500 OBO. CFR taxes. Terms
available. More land available 715-478-
2085 (wcan)
FOR SALE BY OWNER: Near Copper
Harbor & Lake Medora, MI. 80 wooded
acres. $69,500 OBO. Montreal River runs
through land. CFR taxes. Terms available.
More land available 715-478-2085 (wcan)
840 condos &
townhouses For saLe
STOUGHTON 3-BEDROOM Townhome.
2.5 bathrooms, garage, full basement,
deck, large yard. All appliances. Cen-
tral air. Abundant storage. Utilities paid
by tenant. References. Pets considered.
Deposit is $1200. 608-772-0234 Available
October 1.
845 houses For saLe
MT. HOREB 3 Bedroom home, land
contract. $12,000 down.
608-335-6008
870 residentiaL Lots
ALPINE MEADOWS
Oregon Hwy CC.
Call for new price list and availability.
Choose your own builder!
608-215-5895
965 hay, straw & Pasture
PLANED WHEAT for sale. Bagged or
bulk. Call 608-290-8994.
990 Farm: serVice
& merchandise
RENT SKIDLOADERS
MINI-EXCAVATORS
TELE-HANDLER
and these attachments. Concrete
breaker, posthole auger, landscape rake,
concrete bucket, pallet forks, trencher,
rock hound, broom, teleboom, stump
grinder.
By the day, week, or month.
Carter & Gruenewald Co.
4417 Hwy 92
Brooklyn, WI, 608-455-2411
970 horses
WALMERS TACK SHOP
16379 W. Milbrandt Road
Evansville, WI
608-882-5725
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for The Oregon Observer unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 845-9559,
873-6671 or 835-6677.
905 auction saLe dates
SIGNS & Country Store AUCTION!
9/27 @ 1pm, 9/28 @ 9am.
100's of signs, clocks & much more!
3 miles W of Wautoma on Hwy 21
Info: wyoderauction.com
920-787-5549 (wcan)
THEY SAY people dont read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didnt you?
Call now to place your ad, 845-9559, 873-
6671 or 835-6677.
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ESTIMATOR
VP Buildings, a subsidiary of BlueScope Buildings North America, has an immediate opening for
an estimator at its Evansville, Wisconsin Service Center.
The successful candidate will be responsible for assisting the Builders and District Managers with
their quotes and supporting technical information. Will work to develop Value Engineering
alternative proposals for owner-developed designs, to increase the chance of VPs success
obtaining such projects. Will make recommendations on product usage and will provide data
required to suppliers to obtain prices on special purchase items. This individual will consult
with Engineering and Production on pricing, design, and production feasibility, assist Builders
and District Managers with the computer design process and work with the estimating team to
insure quote quality and accuracy. Must be capable of managing large workloads, comfortable
with multi-tasking and be willing to support our Safety Performance initiatives.
Candidate must have a Technical school degree in Construction Management or a design
discipline, including Mechanical or Civil Engineering course work, or have extensive training
in detailing, including building-related CAD experience. We desire a minimum of 5 years of
experience in detailing, estimating, or experience in a closely related feld.
Candidate must also possess good verbal and written communication skills.
If you qualify and are interested in exploring a career with a leader in the metal building industry,
email your resum and cover letter to:
WIHR@bluescopesteel.com
Or mail your resum to:
Human Resources Department
VP Buildings, Inc.
136 Walker Street
Evansville, WI 53536
Equal Opportunity Employer
M/F/D/V
Loaders
2nd and 3rd Shifts
We are looking for loaders to help collect, stage and load our products
on fatbed trailers to be shipped to our customers throughout the United
States and Canada.
The successful candidate will have high-capacity overhead crane
experience in an industrial or military setting. Experience operating heavy
duty material handling equipment is desired. Experience with equipment
such as mobile cranes, Lulls or high-capacity fork lifts helps qualify you
for this position. CDL desirable but not required. Must be willing and able
to work weekend overtime during busy times.
Candidates must have a good safety record, good attendance record and
verifable work references. Must pass a pre-employment drug test and
criminal background check. Starting base wage is $15.60 per hour, plus
an additional .45 cents for 2nd shift or an additional .50 cents per hour
for 3rd shift. Wage increases every six months until top base pay rate is
reached. Benefts include health and dental insurances, free life insurance,
immediate 401(k) participation with generous Company match, vacation
and paid holidays, gym membership and more.
If you are looking for a regular full-time position with variety and
responsibility, apply in person to complete the application materials.
BlueScope Buildings, N.A.
136 Walker St.
Evansville, WI
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Check out our Industry Leading Benets!
40% Proft Sharing 401k Program Cash Bonuses
Incentive Programs Vacation Pay Sick & Disability Pay
Medical/Dental/Vision Life Insurance Group Cancer &
Accident Policies Scholarship Program More!
NOW HIRING!
Oregon & Stoughton Stores
Guest Service Co-Workers
Full & Part Time 1st/2nd/3rd Shifts
$9.90 - $12.60 per hour (based on experience)
Shift Leader
$11.70 - $15.05 per hour (based on experience)
Assistant Food Service Leader
$10.60 - $13.70 per hour (based on experience)

Apply online: www.kwiktrip.com
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** DRIVERS **
FULL TIME DRIVERS FOR REGIONAL WORK
$1,500 SIGN-ON BONUS
$750 GUARANTEE WEEKLY
Tractor-trailer drivers needed for the Walgreens Private
Fleet Operation based in Windsor, WI. Drivers make hand
deliveries to Walgreens stores within a regional area (WI,
IL, IA, MN, ND, SD). Workweek is Tues.-Sat. All drivers
must be willing & able to unload freight.
* Earn $21.25/hour (OT after 8 hours) or $0.4650/mile
* Full Beneft Pkg includes Life, Dental, Disability, &
Health Insurance with Prescription Card
* 401k Pension Program with Company Contribution
* Paid Holidays & Vacation
* Home every day except for occasional layover
Drivers must be over 24 years old, have 18 months tractor
trailer exp or 6 months T/T exp with a certifcate from an
accredited driving school and meet all DOT requirements.
Send resume to b.kriel@callcpc.com
or call CPC Logistics at 1-800-914-3755
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Fabricators
Sub-Zero and Wolf Appliance, Inc., the
premier providers of quality appliances
is seeking Fabricators to join our 2nd
and 3rd shift manufacturing teams at our
Fitchburg facility. We offer a clean, climate
controlled environment.
Compensation up to $15.69 per hour, shift
differential and incentive pay. Benefts
offered: 401k, pension, medical, dental,
vision and life insurance. Qualifcation
testing, including blue print assessment
may be required. EOE
Please apply online at
www.subzero-wolf.com
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www.qpsemployment.com
LIGHT INDUSTRIAL
SKILLED TRADES
OFFICE - PROFESSIONAL
APPLY ONLINE TODAY AT:
Madison
608-819-4000
Monroe
608-325-4690
www.qpsemployment.com
LIGHT INDUSTRIAL
SKILLED TRADES
OFFICE - PROFESSIONAL
APPLY ONLINE TODAY AT:
Baraboo - Mauston
Sparta - Richland Center
608-647-8840
16
September 19, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
CARS608.com
Search For Local Cars.
For Results You Can Trust
Photo by Scott De Laruelle
Do a dance
It was time to learn a little line dancing this month at the Oregon Area Senior Center, where participants got the chance to kick up their heels and have some fun.
south of Oregon were needed in the
future, the company would invest
more capital funds into that line and
open it back up.
Lucht added that Wisconsin and
Southern does not plan to store
freight cars on the inactive part of
the line between Oregon and Evans-
ville. Both village and Town of Ore-
gon officials have expressed con-
cern about that possibility.
The company currently stores a
lot of cars from Olin Avenue in
Madison out to McCoy Road, Lucht
said.
They are center beam lumber
flats that when the construction
industry went down were no lon-
ger demanded in rail service, so we
needed a place out of sight to store
them, he explained.
Now, with opening up this line,
we have to find a place for those
cars. The good thing is a lot of those
cars were called back into service,
so we are not storing them right
now, nor would we have a short-
term need to store those cars.
Oregon Village President Steve
Staton said opening the rail line will
enhance economic development in
the business park and could ben-
efit the entire community. He said
Trachte Inc., which operates a facil-
ity in the business park, has talked
about possibly using the rail line in
the future.
In a news release last week, Sen.
Tim Cullen (D-Janesville) said he
has been working with officials in
Evansville, as well as Reps. Janis
Ringhand and Andy Jorgensen, to
explore restoring rail service from
Evansville to Oregon and on to
Madison.
Without the Oregon to Madison
line, there was not much interest in
rail service north from Evansville,
Cullen said. Now that we have the
line from Oregon to Madison, I look
forward to discussions that could
lead to new rail service from Evans-
ville into Madison.
Rail: Open rail line helps development
Continued from page 1
The Village
of Oregon
and the City
of Fitchburg
own the
railroad line
from McCoy
Road to
Butts Corner
Road north
of Evansville.
The line will
be improved
from
Madison to
Netherwood
Road in the
village.
Map courtesy
abandonedrails.
org/GoogleMaps