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BUSINESS, 1D
NEWS
Local 3A
Nation &World 5A
Obituaries 10A
INSIDE
Weather 14A
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CLASSIFIED: 1E
WILKES-BARRE Everyone
was all smiles in November
2009, when Wyoming Valley
Habitat for Humanity turned a
renovated doctors ofce build-
ing on Stanton Street over to its
new owners, John and Tawana
Simpson.
Less than four years later,
the Simpsons American Dream
has taken a turn for the worse,
leaving neighbors questioning
whether the home is being used
for the purpose for which it was
intended.
John Simpson is serving a one-
to-two year Luzerne County pris-
on sentence in connection with
drug charges, according to court
records. And neighbors believe
Tawana Simpson may now be liv-
ing somewhere else and renting
out the property at 171 Stanton
St.
Habitat ofcials say they can-
not discuss individual cases, but
acknowledge that their policy
prohibits homeowners from leas-
ing Habitat homes while they are
paying off their mortgages.
Our biggest concern now is
that the family has moved out
and is now renting the house out
to multiple people, said Eric
Schaffer, who lives across the
street. I know this because the
one older man staying there told
us this.
A Times Leader reporter vis-
ited the property three times
in the past three weeks. The
Simpsons names were still listed
on the mailbox, along with two
separate pieces of paper bearing
the names of people with two
other last names.
A man who answered the
back door during the rst visit
declined to speak with a report-
er. A written message left for
Tawana Simpson later was not
returned.
Habitat home may not be sosweet
ROGER DUPUIS
rdupuis@civitasmedia.com
Bill Tarutis File Photo | For The Times Leader
Former Wyoming Valley Habitat for Humanity Board President
David Doty, second from right, presents John Simpson the keys to
his new home on Stanton Street in Wilkes-Barre in 2009. Looking
on is the Rev. Marcella Dotson, center, and Habitat Executive
Director Karen Evans Kaufer, far right.
W-B probing claims owners are not
living there and are renting it out
See HABITAT | 7A
Photo courtesy of the Luzerne County Historical Society
Local Civil War veterans came together for this photo taken about
a century ago.
TOM MOONEY
Times Leader Correspondent
When Civil War veteran
Peter M. Austin of Luzerne
died in 1928, the ag that
he had defended went with
him to the grave, a silken
stars and stripes forever to
envelop him.
Austin, who lived to
84, was the last man in
the small borough to have
served in the war. The
gesture of interring the
ag with him at the Forty
Fort Cemetery, rather than
removing it before burial,
was the communitys way
of saying goodbye to a
heroic generation.
It was a gesture that
was repeated in spirit
many times over as the
men whod fought the
1861-1865 war the
150th anniversary of
which is being commemo-
rated at events this year
in Gettysburg and beyond
grew old and America
moved into the 20th cen-
tury.
About 2,500 men from
the Wyoming Valley served
in uniform during the Civil
War, with an estimated
one-fourth of them killed
or wounded. Soon after
the war the local veterans
formed Conyngham Post
97 of the Grand Army of
the Republic (GAR), part
of a national veterans orga-
nization. By 1889, with
more than 1,100 members,
the local chapter was meet-
ing in a castle-like building
on Wilkes-Barres South
Main Street the GAR
Hall.
Like their fellows all
over America, the local
veterans, who continued
to wear uniforms, marched
in parades, campaigned for
a national veterans pen-
sion and supported mili-
tary preparedness. Some
from the Conyngham Post
helped to organize the 9th
Infantry Regiment, which
later became the 109th
Field Artillery of the Army
National Guard.
Though busy as busi-
nessmen, workingmen and
farmers (Peter M. Austin
was a carpenter with the
Haddock Mining Co.), they
kept their patriotic spir-
its alive through regional,
state and national meet-
ings known as encamp-
ments, often traveling to
the sites of their long-ago
battles.
By the 20th century,
even the youngest Civil
War veterans were nearing
their 60s. They were still
familiar sights at public
events, but their numbers
were shrinking. Before
long, local communities
Long ago answering their taps, Civil War vets forged a mark on area
The men who returned home frombattle found a life
of respect waiting. Until time caught up with them.
See CIVIL WAR | 7A
Editors note: This is one
in an occasional series by
The Associated Press about
the impact of the Afordable
Care Acts health insurance
exchanges. Open enrollment
for these exchanges, or
marketplaces, begins Oct. 1.
Health costs may rise
for the self-employed
Yet implementation
of Afordable Care
Act could embolden
many would-be
entrepreneurs to act
AP photo
Aaron Brethorst, seen with his dog,
Moxie, is a self-employed Seattle
resident who says he doesnt have
a problem with President Obamas
health care reforms.
DONNA GORDON
BLANKINSHIP
Associated Press
SEATTLE President
Obamas health care reforms
will be a huge boost to the
working poor but are likely to
make life more expensive for
Aaron Brethorst and others
like him.
The Seattle software devel-
oper and consultant doesnt
have a problem with that
because he gures hell be able
to afford quality insurance. He
says his annual income is in the
low six-gures, and he expects
to receive better coverage once
the Affordable Care Act kicks
in.
The 31-year-old says the abil-
ity to buy his own health insur-
ance, because he is relatively
young and healthy, has given
him the creative freedom to
start his own companies and
explore new ideas.
He spends a little more than
$300 a month on catastrophic
coverage with a high deduct-
ible. He recently got an email
from his health insurance com-
pany informing him that the
plan he bought on the indi-
vidual market is going to be
cancelled.
Brethorst said he does not
know whether he will buy his
next policy from the same
company a local version of
Blue Cross or through the
state insurance exchange, the
Washington HealthPlan nder.
He does expect to add a better
dental and vision plan in the
new year, however.
Im not worried about it,
quite frankly, Brethorst said.
My income today is more than
enough to pay for health insur-
ance.
That outlook is not likely to
be universal among those who
are self-employed.
The income threshold for a
government subsidy offered on
the state exchanges varies based
on a number of factors, but gen-
erally tops out at $46,000 a year
for an individual.
Depending on their health,
age, family circumstances
and income, the cost of insur-
ance could become a burden
for those who make too much
money for government subsi-
dies but not enough to be con-
sidered well-off.
Insurance companies say the
cost of their polices will have
to reect the new government
See SELF-EMPLOYED | 14A
JON OCONNELL
joconnell@timesleader.com
DALLAS TWP. The shipment of
grapes was late to arrive Saturday, but
no one seemed annoyed. If the amateur
winemakers of G & F Vintners grape-
crushing session know anything about
making wine, its that no step should be
hurried.
Making their award-winning bot-
tles of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot
and Petite Sirah takes time, and after
20 years of making wine, Richard
Gumbravich and his cohorts have
learned to be patient.
G & F Vintners is a collaboration of
wine making started 17 years ago by
Bill Tarutis photos | For The Times Leader
Bruce Cummings, of Kingston, opens 36-pound crates of Merlot grapes on Saturday morning as amateur winemakers gathered in the Back Mountain
to practice their craft.
Winemaker Richard Gumbravich, of Dallas, shows
off his award-winning wines.
Grape expectations realized
Back Mountain vintners labor with fruit
pays of with award-winning taste
See WINEMAKERS | 14A
JERRYLYNOTT
jlynott@timesleader.com
NANTICOKE Luzerne
County Community College dedi-
cated the Francis S. and Mary Gill
Carrozza, R.N. Health Sciences
Center on Saturday.
Francis Carrozza, of Pittston,
recently donated a naming gift
for his wife Mary, who died in
February. In addition, the schools
nursing and health sciences pro-
grams were named for her.
She had been the head nurse and
director of the surgical recovery unit
at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital
prior to her retirement. She was a
1951 graduate of Hughestown High
School and a 1954 graduate of the
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital
School of Nursing.
Her husband saw this an oppor-
tunity to honor her, said attorney
Patrick J. Aregood, of Hanover
Township. She always had a pas-
sion for nursing and always had a
passion to lend a helping hand to
people, Aregood said.
The donated funds will be put
toward scholarships for students
in the colleges nursing and health
sciences programs and for future
program development.
Classes began at the facility for
the 2011 fall semester. Areas of
study in the health sciences pro-
grams include nursing, respiratory
therapy, surgical technology, dental
assisting, dental hygiene and emer-
gency medical services.
The expansion of the school and
its programs is part of the master
plan, said Thomas P. Leary, presi-
dent of LCCC. He welcomed guests
to the dedication of the building at
38 E. Main St.
Mr. Carrozzas nancial support
provides us with both the scholar-
ship funds to help our students
afford their education as well as the
ability to explore future program
development in the health sciences
eld for many years, Leary said.
Attorney Barry H. Williams,
chair of the community colleges
board of trustees, thanked Francis
Carrozza for the donation. We
appreciate Mr. Carrozzas willing-
ness to partner with us as we con-
tinue to educate our students to
help meet the regions health care
needs, he said.
The center recently received
the 2013 Pride of Place Award for
Environmental Enhancement from
the Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber
of Commerce.
PAGE 2A Sunday, September 22, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
DETAILS
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Daily Number, Midday
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Tuesday: 9-6-5
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Friday: 0-9-8
Saturday: 3-1-8
Big Four, Midday
Sunday: 9-8-5-8
Monday: 9-9-1-0
Tuesday: 2-4-6-1
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Saturday: 0-5-3-5
Quinto, Midday
Sunday: 3-9-4-6-3
Monday: 7-3-5-2-5
Tuesday: 9-2-1-3-4
Wednesday: 4-5-7-3-9
Thursday: 7-7-4-3-9
Friday: 3-5-6-0-4
Saturday: 4-9-8-1-1
Treasure Hunt
Sunday: 02-10-11-15-23
Monday: 04-05-06-07-30
Tuesday: 01-03-04-21-24
Wednesday: 16-27-28-29-30
Thursday: 01-10-16-26-28
Friday: 05-13-23-26-27
Saturday: 03-09-22-25-27
Daily Number, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 1-1-1
Monday: 5-1-1
Tuesday: 0-0-8
Wednesday: 5-3-2
Thursday: 2-7-0
Friday: 0-6-2
Saturday: 9-3-2
Big Four, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 5-5-4-7
Monday: 4-7-3-8
Tuesday: 1-8-2-7
Wednesday: 8-1-3-1
Thursday: 8-1-4-8
Friday: 5-8-9-5
Saturday: 1-7-7-3
Quinto, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 6-3-9-8-2
Monday: 4-6-8-1-4
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Saturday: 9-0-5-9-7
Cash 5
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OBITUARIES
Bujnowski, Ellen
Cook, Donna
Dashnaw, Louise
Didgeon, Veronica
Engle, Thomas
Fudjak, Walter Jr.
Kasisky, Mary
Marcy, Michael Sr.
Pieczynski, Virginia
Savokinas, Michael
Swelgin, Ellen
Rincavage, Edward
Sr.
Page 10A
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BUILDING TRUST
The Times Leader strives to
correct errors, clarify stories
and update them promptly.
Corrections will appear in this
spot. If you have information to
help us correct an inaccuracy or
cover an issue more thoroughly,
call the newsroom at 829-7242.
THE TIMES LEADER ACIVITAS MEDIAcompany
JON OCONNELL
joconnell@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE Six
alleged drug dealers were arrest-
ed in different sections of the
city Friday, according to a press
release from city hall.
In the Heights neighborhood,
two men Lance Smith, 23,
no known address and Terrell
Watson, 24, of Philadelphia
were caught by investigators
who had posed as buyers, police
said.
Smith agreed to sell MDMA,
or Ecstasy, to undercover of-
cers near the Sherman Hills
apartment complex, police said.
Police say they captured him as
he tried to ee.
Watson was arrested near
Horton and Roosevelt streets,
where police say he agreed to sell
heroin to undercover ofcers.
Police allege Watson was in pos-
session of heroin and marijuana.
Three people were arrested in
a North Main Street apartment
that they allegedly used as a base
for selling heroin. The apartment
was subsequently shut down
under the citys new, one-strike
ordinance that orders any rental
unit used for illegal drug or vio-
lent activity to be shuttered for
six months.
Daryl Minor, 21, of North
Main Street, agreed to sell hero-
in to undercover police near the
apartment, police said. He and
an associate, Ahmed Hunt, 21, of
River Street, were arrested when
police arrived. Police searched
the apartment, where they found
Paul Olivio, 22, who tried to
escape, they said.
Police allegedly found about
$10,00o worth of raw and pack-
aged heroin and rearm ammu-
nition in the apartment.
Kaitlyn Cleary, 19, of Maple
Street, the sixth suspect, was
arrested on an outstanding
arrest warrant on felony drug
trafcking charges from a previ-
ous investigation, according to
police.
The arrests resulted from col-
laborated investigations by a
state police vice unit and the city
police drug task force. Mayor
Tom Leighton applauded the
teams for their efforts, in the
press release, and said he hopes
lawbreakers realize theyre not
welcome in Wilkes-Barre.
It sends a strong message not
only to those involved in drug
trafcking but also to our good
residents that we are commit-
ted to cleaning up our neighbor-
hoods, Leighton said.
Six arrested in city-wide drug sting
2013-265
Wilkes-Barre Publishing, LLL
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Regional Business Development
Director &General Manager
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Executive Editor
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Minor Cleary Smith Olivio Watson Hunt
Cancer survivors
celebrate faith
GERI GIBBONS
Times Leader Correspondent
WILKES-BARRE
Participants at the 21st
annual Cancer Survivors
Celebration celebrated the
strength of a circle on
Saturday afternoon as 50
survivors, caretakers and
medical professionals gath-
ered to share their stories.
Attendees, hand in
hand, formed a Circle of
Survivors as each told their
stories of faith, courage and
gratitude as they battled
cancer. The event was
sponsored by the Northeast
Regional Cancer Institute.
Laura Toole, director of
community and patient ser-
vices at Northeast, remind-
ed attendees that nothing is
stronger than a circle.
Pat Lawless opened the
time of sharing by likening
faith, so important to many
of those faced with the dis-
ease, to a seamstress who
is able to repair lives that
might seem broken. Many
attendees also emphasized
the importance of their faith
as they made it from diag-
nosis to treatment and, ulti-
mately, recovery.
Joe Ferguson, co-chair-
man and cancer survivor,
said he was grateful the
event provided an oppor-
tunity to spend time with
others whose lives had
been affected by cancer.
Although having cancer cer-
tainly means additional chal-
lenges, he said, it is also an
opportunity to grow.
Jeff Thomas, an esopha-
geal cancer survivor, said
the quality of his life has
improved since he was rst
diagnosed. He has been
motivated to improve his
physical health and to build
valued relationships with
other survivors. The journey
had made him a more com-
passionate person, he said.
Thomas, a facilitator of
the YMCAs Livestrong
program, said the program
offers physical activity and
well-being programs for
those whose lives have
been affected by cancer. He
stressed the importance of
caring for the caregivers
as a means of achieving
healthy lifestyle for survi-
vors and their families in the
long term.
Kathleen Zahorsky said
dealing with cancer was
simply a pothole of life.
She credited the medical
community, family members
and the fellowship of other
survivors with helping her
move forward in spite of
challenges.
Many attendees shared
that, although grateful for
recovery and the opportu-
nity to get to know others,
the treatment itself was dif-
cult and the recovery pro-
cess sometimes slow and
frustrating. They found the
support provided by survi-
vors events invaluable.
The experience of hav-
ing cancer and now being
a survivor taught me how
to truly live, said Jean
Connolly, Plymouth, I
truly enjoy everything
about every day.
The circle concluded with
a moment of silence for
those people who had been
lost to the disease, with the
ringing of bells by those par-
ticipating.
Northeast Regional
Cancer Institute is a non-
prot, community-based
agency focused on support-
ing those impacted by can-
cer. The institute partners
with other area entities
including Geisinger Medical
Center and Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital.
Fred Adams | For The Times Leader
Ann Marie Stanton, 76, of Mountain Top, a 20-year cancer survi-
vor, enjoys something to eat at the 21st annual Cancer Survivors
Celebration held Saturday at Kirby Park, Wilkes-Barre.
Finding peace on moms shoulder
Fred Adams | For The Times Leader
Zarie Holcumb lays his head on his mother Karens shoulder Saturday during the International Day of Peace candlelight vigil
in downtown Wilkes-Barre. The service was sponsored by the Wyoming Valley Interfaith Council and Interfaith Peace and
Justice Center. The Day of Peace, first celebrated in 1982, is an annual event promoting the end of war and violence.
Bill Tarutis | For The Times Leader
Benefactor Francis Carrozza, right, is overcome with emotion and his niece Grace
Morgan consoles him after the unveiling Saturday morning of the dedication plaque for
the Francis S. and Mary Gill Carrozza, R.N. Health Sciences Center at Luzerne County
Community College in Nanticoke. His late wife had been head nurse and director of the
surgical recovery unit at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital.
LCCC names Health Sciences Center for nurse
PLAINS TWP. Arthur
Sutton of Wilkes-Barre was
arrested and charged with
driving under the influence
and providing a false report to
police after his Ford Mustang
crashed onto its roof on South
Main Street early Friday morn-
ing, police said.
Police say they found the car
at 1:30 a.m., but the driver was
not at the scene.
Sutton called Luzerne
County 911 to report his car
was stolen, police said. When
they arrived to speak with
him, police say, they noticed
glass fragments on his shirt
and face. He allegedly exhib-
ited signs of alcohol impair-
ment. Sutton also had the cars
key fob in his pants pocket,
police said.
He was taken to Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Medical
Center for a blood alcohol test.
HANOVER TWP.
Shmoopys Bar & Grill was
robbed early Friday morning,
city police said. The thief or
thieves stole an undetermined
amount of money and dam-
aged a jukebox.
WILKES-BARRE
Donald Jedrick of Irving Place
was issued a citation for pub-
lic drunkenness around 6 p.m.
Friday after police said they
saw him urinating in bushes
near Gildersleeve Street.
Jedrick was intoxicated to a
degree that he was a danger
to himself and others, police
said. He was taken into cus-
tody and cited.
POLICE BLOTTER
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Sunday, September 22, 2013 PAGE 3A
JON OCONNELL
joconnell@timesleader.com
KINGSTON Employees
and customers evacuated the
Walgreens along Wyoming
Avenue on Saturday when
a caller threatened to turn
the store into ashes if his
demands were not met.
It was the second bomb
threat in as many days for
the pharmacy chains stores
in Luzerne County. The
Memorial Highway loca-
tion in Dallas was evacuated
Friday after a similar call that
drew police and bomb-sniff-
ing dogs. Luzerne County
Emergency Management
Agency Coordinator Stephen
Bekanich led his bomb-sniff-
ing Labrador around and
inside the building Saturday.
Someone placed Saturdays
call at about 12:45 p.m.,
according to an employee who
asked not to be identied.
The caller made demands
of the employee and said, if he
did not comply, in 5 minutes
the building would become
ashes.
The caller had a strong for-
eign accent and introduced
himself, though his name was
inaudible, the employee said.
An employee memo was
just delivered warning about
the Dallas incident when the
phone rang, the employee
said.
Nine temporarily displaced
employees sat on a curb,
watching police and directing
confused customers. About an
hour and a half later, Bekanich
told employees they were safe
to return.
This type of incident is dif-
cult to investigate because
there is no context, Bekanich
said.
If the conversation allows,
those threatened should lis-
ten for any information that
might help in an investiga-
tion. Bekanich suggested pay-
ing attention for details such
as these:
The time the call was
made.
A call-back number, per-
haps from a caller ID.
A voice description.
Any sounds behind the
caller to help investigators
know from where the call is
coming.
If receiving a threatening
call, employees and busi-
ness owners should evacuate
immediately and call 911.
The investigation into
Saturdays incident is to be
passed to Kingston detectives,
said Kingston police Ofcer
George Kocher, though he
surmised they, too, will have a
hard time following up because
they have little information.
WILKES-BARRE
Might adopt?
Center can help
The Childrens Service Center will
host an adoption matching event
from 1 to 3 p.m. on Oct. 5 in the
multipurpose room of the centers
Milford E. Barnes School, 335 S.
Franklin St.
Biographies of the children seeking
adoption will be available, and repre-
sentatives from many adoption orga-
nizations will be present to answer
questions.
Many times, parents looking to
adopt overlook the fact that there
are many children and adolescents
in the Wyoming Valley desperately in
need of loving and caring families,
said Mike Hopkins, president and
chief executive ofcer of the center.
With this event, we hope to make
this need apparent and enhance the
emotional well-being of children,
adolescents and families.
For more information about the
free event or to register, call Valerie
May at 570-825-6425, ext. 399.
DALLAS TWP.
Gereda selected
for ethics award
The Ethics Institute of
Northeastern Pennsylvania at
Misericordia University will recog-
nize Rodrigo Rod Gereda, chief
facilitator of the Interfaith Resource
Center for Peace
and Justice, with
the 2013 Sister
Siena Finley, RSM
Ethics Award at the
22nd annual Ethics
Institute Dinner on
Oct. 24 at the univer-
sity.
Mr. Gereda has
promoted peace and mutual under-
standing as a teacher and media-
tor, said Joseph Curran, executive
director of the Ethics Institute at
Misericordia University. He has
worked for peace and understand-
ing in our community, transform-
ing lives through his teaching and
example.
Gereda holds a bachelor of archi-
tecture degree from the University
of Houston and is in his third year
as a candidate for a master of divin-
ity.
He is the chief mediation trainer
for The Father James Doyle, CSC,
Community Mediation Institute.
A bilingual peer mediator, Gereda
is committed to conict resolu-
tion, service to building community
through divorce mediation, and
shared parenting and servant leader-
ship skills.
He has been working toward the
common good and opening commu-
nity dialogue to promote peace and
social integration.
The majority of his work is dedi-
cated to the Peace Camp for Kids,
operated by the Peace and Justice
Center in Wilkes-Barre.
Gereda is a longtime supporter of
the Girl Scouts.
He and his wife, Kathy, are the par-
ents of three daughters: Arisa Lucia,
19, Katarina Maria, 16, and Maria
Lucia, 13.
Tickets for the dinner are $40 per
person and can be purchased by call-
ing 570-674-6201. Cocktails begin at
5:30 p.m. with dinner following at
6:15 p.m.
The money raised from the dinner
and program help to support pro-
gramming by the Ethics Institute.
PHILADELPHIA
Opportunities set
for fshing, rafing
The U.S. Army Corps Engineers
Philadelphia District will hold its
nal water releases of the season
from the Francis E. Walter Dam.
Wet conditions throughout the
summer have allowed the corps to
schedule releases for the following
dates:
Oct. 11 400 cubic feet per sec-
ond water release
Oct. 12 1,700 cubic feet per
second
Oct. 13 1,000 cubic feet per
second
Oct. 14 400 cubic feet per sec-
ond
The ramping up and down of
releases allows for shing and white-
water rafting opportunities during
the nal drawdown of the recreation
season.
The corps began releasing 300
cubic feet per second of additional
water storage every day on Sept. 13
as part of the drawdown. To see the
plan or view updates, visit www.nap.
usace.army.mil/fewalter.
Bomb threat evacuates Walgreens
Incident comes a day
afer similar scare
in Back Mountain
Native American history plus old-time crafts and music play a part in cultural bonanza Saturday
RALPH NARDONE
Times Leader Correspondent
PITTSTON The communities
of the Pittston area share a rich and
diverse history, according to mem-
bers of the Greater Pittston Cultural
Coalition, a group that on Saturday
showcased a bit of that history during
the Greater Pittston Riverfest.
The fth annual event was held in
Riverfront Park. It offered attendees
the chance to learn details about the
ancient Native Americans who occu-
pied the area from 10,000 B.C., said
Keith Moss, the coalitions vice presi-
dent.
Event goers also learned about crafts
such as soap, basket, arrowhead, gem
and carpet making, learned about local
archaeological artifacts, listened to live
music, enjoyed food, vendors and vari-
ous childrens activities.
The festival highlights all of the
unique attributes of the Pittston area,
Moss said.
The coalition tries to raise interest
through the festival and other events
throughout the year, all of which pro-
mote and celebrate the multi-ethnic
culture and long history of the Pittston
Area, he said.
Al Pesotine, a coalition member,
added there is a lack of awareness
among many area youth about the
areas history.
The schools dont focus on local his-
tory as much as they should, Pesotine
said. The youth should appreciate
the past struggles to understand why
things are the way they are now. It was
very tough back then. Neighbor knew
neighbor and they relied on each other
to survive, he added.
Durland Siglan, a coalition member
and member of the Mohawk Nation,
organized participation from sev-
eral members of the regions Native
American nations. They performed
traditional songs and dances and
talked about their ancestors lives in
Northeast Pennsylvania.
We tell our history in a way we know
it, he said. We were not heathens.
We built our whole society around our
families and clans.
Anyone wishing to volunteer with
the coalition can contact Moss at 570-
840-2501 or Joe Savokinas, the groups
president, at 570-883-2784.
Bill Tarutis | For The Times Leader
Mining enthusiast Robbie Flowers, of Plains Township, describes an early 1900s-era oil wick mining lamp during a demonstration Saturday morning at the Greater Pittston Riverfest.
Riverfest showcases Pittston history
West Side Trail backers mark progress
EILEEN GODIN
Times Leader Correspondent
WEST WYOMING Step by step,
the dream of establishing the West Side
Trail is becoming a reality, as evidenced
Saturday morning by the dedication at
Daily Park in West Wyoming of phase
two of the urban pathway.
The half-hour ceremony ofcially
opened an additional 2 miles of the trail
system, a Safe Route to School project.
Phase two included sidewalk repairs,
increased sidewalk accessibility and
landscaping along Eighth Street in West
Wyoming, Tenth Street in Wyoming,
and Erie, Memorial and Penn Avenue,
Exeter.
West Side Trail Commission mem-
bers Karen Szwast, of Exeter, and Bill
Goldsworthy, of West Pittston, helped
to power this project and, along the way,
found themselves building relationships
with ofcials from municipalities, the
school district and various governmental
agencies.
The ceremony drew about 100 peo-
ple, including state Sen. John Yudichak,
D-Plymouth Township, state Rep. Phyllis
Mundy, D-Kingston, Bob Morgan, repre-
senting Congressman Matt Cartwrights
ofce, West Wyoming Mayor Joseph
Herbert, John Bolin, president of the
Wyoming Area School District board,
and many residents, business owners
and bicycle enthusiasts.
Goldsworthy, former mayor of West
Pittston and member of Gov. Tom
Corbetts Northeast Regional ofce, said
it is great to see the trail growing.
The West Side Trail master plan,
developed in 2000, calls for 19 miles of
pathways, linking the West Side Trail
to the Wyoming Valley Levee Trail, the
Back Mountain Trail, and through West
Pittston and connecting to the Pittston
River Walk.
So far, 4 miles have been completed.
To develop its vision, The West
Side Trail Commission has received
$2,128,635 in funding from sources
such as the Pennsylvania Department
of Conservation and Natural Resources,
Luzerne County and local governments,
Szwast said.
Yudichak praised the work of local gov-
ernment ofcials, the community, and
state and federal representatives. This
is a regional asset, he said. This repre-
sents communities working together for
the betterment, improved quality of life
and safety of our children.
Morgan said the ribbon-cutting cer-
emony should celebrate the foresight of
communities working together. This
is how our government works best, he
said.
The new trail will take pedestrians
through residential areas, past busi-
nesses and recreational areas, while cre-
ating a safe walking area to three out of
four schools within the Wyoming Area
School District.
Bolin said the trail systems is an out-
standing idea, and he plans to challenge
the students, when they return following
the districts teachers strike, to walk with
him from the Daily Park to the schools.
The goal of the trail is to promote an
active healthy lifestyle and provide chil-
dren with a safe route to schools, Szwast
said.
West WyomingMayor JosephHerbert,
who lives along the trails route, said he
already has seen the amount of families
using the new sidewalks triple. It is the
best thing to happen to this area, he
said.
One of several bicycle enthusiasts on
hand, Rick Williams of Kingston, said
he thought the new branch of the trail
systems is great. It is good for the econ-
omy, and for health and safety of the resi-
dents, he said.
Dave Grilz, of
Wilkes-Barre,
looks over a map
of the developing
West Side Trail in
West Wyoming
and neighboring
communities
before finishing his
Saturday morning
ride on a newly
constructed section
of the trail network.
Eric Seidle | For The
Times Leader
IN BRIEF
LOCAL
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Retailers hard-pressed to stock hunting ammo
Some sporting goods
store owners concerned
of shortage during
peak fall season
The Associated Press
ERIE A national
shortage of rearms
ammunition is start-
ing to be felt at some
sporting goods stores in
Pennsylvania as hunters
begin loading up for deer
and other fall hunting sea-
sons.
3 killed in
blaze at
Dunmore
residence
The Associated Press
DUNMORE Three
people died in an early
morning re in the bor-
ough, authorities said
Saturday.
The Lackawanna
County coroners ofce
said a man and two
women were killed in the
apartment re.
The identities of the
victims were not immedi-
ately released.
The coroners ofce
said the re broke out just
before 2 a.m.
The building where the
re broke out houses a
ground-oor beauty sup-
ply store and ve apart-
ments above it.
A police ofcer was
taken to a hospital after
breathing in too much
smoke, authorities said.
State Fire Marshal
Trooper John Chervanka
told the Times-Tribune
of Scranton that the re
began on the second oor
of the building.
A Dunmore police of-
cer who was passing by
noticed smoke coming
from the building and
alerted residents.
Eight of them escaped
from the building without
any injuries, Chervanka
said.
The re was under
investigation, but
Chervanka said it did not
appear that foul play was
involved.
Certain retailers are
worrying about whether
their supplies of ammu-
nition will hold up, The
Erie Times-News report-
ed Saturday.
Salesman Joel Stafford
of Edinboro Outdoors
says its supply isnt too
bad for the moment, but
he predicts that its going
to be tight.
Owner Dan Seaman of
Elk Creek Sports Store in
Lake City says hes hav-
ing a hard time nding
a reasonable amount of
ammunition that hunt-
ers would normally use,
and customers eventu-
ally could be forced to pay
higher prices for whatev-
er remains.
People dont realize
there isnt going to be
much hunting ammo out
there, Seaman said.
Dave Wurst, the owner
of Presque Isle Gun Shop,
said customers likely will
be forced to buy differ-
ent brands or varieties
in their quest to nd the
right caliber.
Deer season starts Dec.
2.
A few store owners say
the ammunition short-
age is caught in a vicious
cycle as people scramble
to stock up.
The shortages hit ear-
lier this year when ammu-
nition for smaller .22-cali-
ber, 9 mm and .380-cali-
ber rearms started to
become scarce.
As a result, manufactur-
ers shifted away from the
then-well-stocked hunting
rifle ammunition, includ-
ing rounds like .30-06,
.30-30 or .308, Seaman
said.
Rich Weber, president
of the Erie Sport Store,
said .22-caliber rounds
are in such short supply
that he limits customers
in how much they can buy
at one time and he doesnt
know yet whether he will
impose the same limits
on purchases of hunting
ammunition.
People dont realize there isnt going to be
much hunting ammo out there.
Dan Seaman,
Owner of Elk Creek Sports Store
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER NatioN & World Sunday, September 22, 2013 PAGE 5A
MIKE CORDER
Associated Press
THE HAGUE, Netherlands
Technical experts at
the Organization for the
Prohibition of Chemical
Weapons were reviewing
Saturday a further disclosure
from Syria about its chemical
weapons program.
A day earlier, the body that
polices the global treaty out-
lawing chemical weapons said
it had received a preliminary
submission from Syria.
No details have been
released of what is in the
Syrian declarations, and
OPCW spokesman Michael
Luhan refused to give any
more information about the
latest submission.
Under a U.S.-Russia agree-
ment aimed at swiftly ridding
Syria of its chemical arsenal,
Damascus had until Saturday
to submit a full list to the
organization of its chemical
weapons and production facil-
ities so they can be secured
and destroyed.
U.S. ofcials said last week
that Washington and Moscow
agreed that Syria had roughly
1,100 tons of chemical weap-
ons agents and precur-
sors, including blister
agents, such as sulfur
and mustard gas and
nerve agents like sarin.
In the aftermath of
the U.N. report that
concluded sarin had
been used in an Aug.
21 attack in Damascus, the
Hague-based chemical weap-
ons watchdog is looking for
ways to fast-track moves to
secure and destroy Syrias
arsenal of poison gas and
nerve agents as well as its pro-
duction facilities.
However, diplomatic efforts
to speed up the process are
moving slowly. A meeting
initially scheduled for today
at which the organizations
41-nation executive council
was tohave discussed
a U.S.-Russian plan
to swiftly rid Syria
of chemical weap-
ons was postponed
Friday. No new date
has yet been set for
the meeting and no
reason given for its
postponement.
Under the U.S.-Russia
agreement brokered last
weekend in Geneva, inspec-
tors will be on the ground in
Syria by November. During
that month, they are to com-
plete their initial assessment
and all mixing and lling
equipment for chemical
weapons is to be destroyed.
All components of the chem-
ical weapons program are to
be removed from the country
or destroyed by mid-2014.
The destruction plan of
action will be backed up by a
U.N. Security Council resolu-
tion.
U.S. Secretary of State John
Kerry said Friday he talked
to his Russian counterpart,
Sergey Lavrov, about Syrias
chemical weapons.
I had a fairly long con-
versation with Foreign
Minister Lavrov, Kerry said
in Washington. We talked
about the cooperation which
we both agreed to continue
to provide, moving not only
toward the adoption of the
OPCW rules and regulations,
but also a resolution that is
rm and strong within the
United Nations. We will con-
tinue to work on that.
HAMPTON, N.H.
Two dead as car
slams into cyclists
A car slammed into a group of bicy-
clists Saturday during an annual ride
along the New England coastline, killing
two riders and injuring three others,
police said.
The crash happened on a two-lane
bridge in Hampton at about 8:30 a.m.,
just after the start of the 40th annual
Granite State Wheelmen Tri-State
Seacoast Century ride.
It was not immediately clear what
caused the crash, and the victims iden-
tities were being withheld until their
families could be notied. Authorities
havent said whether the driver will be
charged.
ACAPULCO, MexiCO
Storm toll rises;
lost copter found
The Mexican government searched
for victims and continued assessing
the damage Saturday from the one-two
punch of storms Manuel and Ingrid, as a
missing Federal Police helicopter work-
ing on the rescue was found crashed. All
aboard died.
Meanwhile, in Mexico City, criticism
mounted all week in editorials and
public commentary that the govern-
ment had made natural disasters worse
because of poor planning, lack of a pre-
vention strategy and corruption.
President Enrique Pena Nieto and
Guerrero Gov. Angel Aguirre ew to the
remote mountain coffee-growing area
northwest of Acapulco near La Pintada,
the scene of the single-greatest tragedy
wreaked by the two storms.
There is little hope now that we can
nd anyone alive, Pena Nieto said after
the yover, adding that the landslide
covered at least 40 houses.
KABUL, AfgHANisTAN
Three troops
killed in attack
An Afghan wearing a security forces
uniform turned his weapon against
foreign troops Saturday, killing three in
eastern Afghanistan, NATO and Afghan
ofcials said, in another apparent attack
by a member of the Afghan forces
against their international allies.
The shooting took place in Gardez,
capital of eastern Paktia province, Gen.
Mohammad Zahir Azimi, an Afghan
Defense Ministry spokesman, said. The
area, near the border with Pakistan, has
been a front line in ghting with the
Taliban and other militants.
The attack took place inside a base
of the Afghan army in the city, accord-
ing to a security ofcial in Gardez,
who spoke on condition of anonymity
because he was not authorized to give
details while the incident was still
under investigation.
CAiRO
Gen. donkey jab
gets farmer jailed
A farmer in southern Egypt was
arrested Saturday after putting the mili-
tary chiefs name and an army-style cap
on his donkey, and eight people were
detained elsewhere in the country for
spraying anti-military grafti.
The arrests point to a long-standing
taboo in Egypt against criticizing the
countrys powerful military, an offense
magnied amid the ongoing crackdown
on supporters of the countrys ousted
President Mohammed Morsi and his
Muslim Brotherhood.
The farmer, Omar Abul-Magd, was
arrested late Friday in Qena province
for allegedly insulting Gen. Abdel-
Fattah el-Sissi when he rode the don-
key through town, reported the state
MENA news agency.
AP photo
Going fetzig for beer
People celebrate the opening ceremony Satur-
day in theHofbraeuzelt beer tent at the 180th
Bavarian Oktoberfest in Munich, Germany.
The worlds largest beer festival runs until Oct.
6 and typically attracts more than 6 million
guests fromaround the world.
Watchdog gets details of chemical arsenal
No details have been released of
what is in the syrian declarations
Chiquita
denies
liability in
Colombian
deaths
CURT ANDERSON
AP Legal Afairs Writer
MIAMI Faced with poten-
tially billions of dollars in
legal liability, Chiquita Brands
International is asking a federal
appeals court to block lawsuits
led against it in the U.S. by
thousands of Colombians whose
relatives were killed in that coun-
trys bloody, decades-long civil
war.
The produce giant, which
long had huge banana planta-
tions in Colombia, has admitted
paying a right-wing Colombian
paramilitary group $1.7 mil-
lion over a seven-year period.
The Charlotte, N.C.-based com-
pany insists it was blackmailed
into paying or risking violence
against its own operations and
employees, although in 2007
Chiquita pleaded guilty to U.S.
criminal charges that it had sup-
ported terrorists. It paid a $25
million ne.
The Colombian lawsuits,
consolidated for pretrial action
before a federal judge in West
Palm Beach, want Chiquita held
liable for thousands of deaths
at the hands of the AUC, the
Spanish acronym for the right-
wing United Self-Defense Forces
of Colombia. The Colombian rel-
atives have won several key pre-
trial rulings, but now Chiquita is
taking its ght for dismissal to a
new level.
In essence, Chiquita wants
the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals to dismiss the lawsuits
because, the company claims,
each murder cannot be tied spe-
cically to the company. Its not
enough, Chiquitas lawyers say
in court papers, to assume the
companys payments to the AUC
meant Chiquita knew about and
supported those individual kill-
ings.
Chiquita also says the
Colombian cases should be
tossed because of a U.S. Supreme
Court ruling last April in a case
called Kiobel vs. Royal Dutch
Petroleum, which imposed new
limits on the ability of foreign-
ers to use American courts to
seek accountability and mon-
etary damages for human rights
abuses.
Any decision by the 11th
Circuit is likely months away,
adding to years Colombian fam-
ily members have already been
waiting for the lawsuits to be
resolved. The cases were con-
solidated in Florida in 2008.
Human rights groups say
many former paramilitary mem-
bers have reorganized into what
are called emerging criminal
bands involved in extortion and
racketeering.
Chiquitas lawyers say the
Colombians do not allege a
single fact that links Chiquita
to any of the acts of violence
at issue, much less that suggest
Chiquita wanted the violence to
happen.
High levels of generality are
all that plaintiffs have offered,
Chiquita says in the ling.
Produce giant, however,
admits it paid right-wing
paramilitary group
$1.7 million
Al-Qaida-linked gunmen remain holed up with an unknown number of hostages
JASON STRAZIUSO
Associated Press
NAIROBI, Kenya Terried shop-
pers huddled in back hallways and
prayed they would not be found by the
Islamic extremist gunmen lobbing gre-
nades and ring assault ries inside
Nairobis top mall Saturday. When the
coast was thought to be clear, crying
mothers clutching small children and
blood-splattered men sprinted out of
the four-story mall.
At least 39 people were killed and
more than 150 wounded in the assault,
Kenyas president announced on nation-
al TV, while disclosing that his close
family members were among the dead.
Foreigners were among the casual-
ties. Frances president said that two
French women were killed, and there
were reports of American citizens
injured, but the U.S. State Department
said it had no further details.
Early Sunday morning, 12 hours
after the attack began, gunmen
remained holed up inside the mall
with an unknown number of hostages.
President Uhuru Kenyatta called the
security operation under way delicate
and said a top priority was to safeguard
hostages.
As the attack unfolded shortly after
noon Saturday, the al-Qaida-linked
gunmen asked the victims they had
cornered if they were Muslim: If the
answer was yes, several witnesses said,
those people were free to go. The non-
Muslims were not.
Somalias Islamic extremist group al-
Shabab claimed responsibility and said
the attack was retribution for Kenyan
forces 2011 push into Somalia. The
rebels threatened more attacks.
Al-Shabab said on its Twitter feed
that Kenyan security ofcials were try-
ing to open negotiations. There will be
no negotiations whatsoever, al-Shabab
tweeted.
As night fell in Kenyas capital, two
contingents of army special forces
troops moved inside the mall.
Police and military surrounded the
huge shopping complex as helicopters
buzzed overhead. An Associated Press
reporter said he saw a wounded Kenyan
soldier put into an ambulance at night-
fall, an indication, perhaps, of a continu-
ing shoot-out inside.
Witnesses said at least ve gunmen
including at least one woman rst
attacked an outdoor cafe at Nairobis
Westgate Mall, a shiny, new shopping
center that hosts Nike, Adidas and Bose
stores. The malls ownership is Israeli,
and security experts have long said the
structure made an attractive terrorist
target.
The attack began shortly after noon
with bursts of gunre and grenades.
Shoppers expatriates and rich
Kenyans ed in any direction that
might be safe: into back corners of
stores, back service hallways and bank
vaults. Over the next several hours,
pockets of people poured out of the mall
as undercover police moved in. Some of
the wounded were moved out in shop-
ping carts.
We started by hearing gunshots
downstairs and outside. Later we heard
them come inside. We took cover. Then
we saw two gunmen wearing black tur-
bans. I saw them shoot, said Patrick
Kuria, an employee at Artcaffe, the res-
taurant with shady outdoor seating.
Frank Mugungu, an off-duty army
sergeant major, said he saw four male
attackers and one female attacker. One
was Somali, he said, but the others
were black, suggesting that they could
have been Kenyan or another national-
ity.
AP photo
Arescue worker helps a child Saturday outside the Westgate Mall in Nairobi, Kenya, after gunmen threwgrenades and opened fire during an attack
that left at least 39 people dead and dozens wounded.
Kenyan mall attack kills 39
Gunmans employer contacts Navy for more work
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON A
little more than 24 hours
after an IT contractor shot
a dozen workers at the
Washington Navy Yard, the
companys CEO told the
Navy secretary he had the
experience to help improve
military security.
Theemail fromTheExperts
chief Thomas Hoshko, which
included descriptions of his
background and expertise,
stunned some Navy leaders
in the wake of the shootings
Monday that left 13 people
dead, including the gunman,
former Navy reservist Aaron
Alexis.
The correspondence also
fueled concern about what
defense ofcials believe
might have been failures
by the company to alert the
military about Alexis appar-
ent mental health problems.
In the email, which The
Associated Press obtained,
Hoshko said he was dra-
matically affected by the
shootings and wrote that
my heart and prayers go out
to the families and friends of
those innocent victims.
But the email quickly
moves on, with Hoshko lay-
ing out his work experience
and offering his services.
He wrote that he was con-
fident that I can provide
valuable input and solu-
tions to the process that
will provide better security
for the military, contractors
and civilians.
Navy ofcials conrmed
that email was sent to
Secretary Ray Mabus. They
declined to characterize its
contents.
Florida-based The Experts
declined comment.
AP photo
A rosary hangs from a makeshift memorial on a lamp post across the
street from the Washington Navy Yard on Friday. A gunman killed 12
people in the Navy Yard on Monday before being fatally shot in a gun
battle with law enforcement.
IN BRIEF
TERROR IN NAIROBI
Kerry
Companys CeO sends email
touting experience to help
improve military security
PAGE 6A Sunday, September 22, 2013 www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
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from 49-72 months. 49 monthly payments of $21.69 for each $1,000 borrowed. 60 monthly payments of $17.94 for each $1,000 borrowed. 72 monthly payments of $15.16 for each $1,000 borrowed. All lease and APR offers require tier 1 plus credit approval through Toyota Financial Services. **Cash Back offers includes funds fromToyota of Scranton, Toyota Financial Services
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ONE!
Habitat is a non-prot
Christian housing minis-
try that has been working
to provide safe, affordable
housing to families in need
across America and inter-
nationally for more than 30
years. It is not a hand-out,
organizers stress, with par-
ticipating families required
not only to pay off a mort-
gage, but help build or
renovate the home in which
they will live.
Habitat Executive
Director Karen Evans
Kaufer and board member
David J. Harris said they
could not speak to issues
regarding specic home-
owners, but did conrm
that agency policy does not
permit mortgage holders to
lease their homes.
The agency has proce-
dures in place for dealing
with issues involving home-
owners, Evans Kaufer said,
but those procedures take
time.
I have a hardworking
staff, a hardworking board.
Any time there is any issue,
we are on top of it,she
said.
Schaffer also led a right-
to-know request with the
city of Wilkes-Barre, seek-
ing documentation regard-
ing the propertys zoning
and whether the Simpsons
had led any rental inspec-
tion or license request.
Among the documents he
received in return was a
Nov. 13 receipt for a $70
inspection fee. The receipt
does not clarify what type
of inspection was per-
formed.
City investigation
The city is unable to
comment on this case while
it is under investigation and
all of the facts have been
sorted out, spokeswoman
Liza Prokop said last week
when asked about whether
ofcials have received any
complaints about the prop-
erty.
News photos from
November 2009 show
members of Habitats board
presenting the keys to John
Simpson, who with his wife
spent more than 400 hours
of work sweat equity,
in Habitat parlance
transforming the building
donated by Dr. and Mrs.
Eugene Pelczar into a home
suitable for themselves and
their ve children.
Everyone walked away
with something to smile
about: Pelczar saw his for-
mer building put to good
use, the Simpsons worked
their way into a home and a
mortgage and Habitat could
claim its 16th successful
home project, with the
Simpsons mortgage pay-
ments helping fund the con-
struction and renovation of
other Habitat homes.
The benet is, people
who might not have the
opportunity to become
homeowners are given the
opportunity to become
homeowners, Evans
Kaufer said Friday.
We have helped 55 chil-
dren, she added. Those
are 55 children who will
hopefully have better
opportunities, children
who we hope will grow up
and become second-genera-
tion homeowners.
Described in 2009 news
reports, 171 Stanton St.
was one of Habitats most
complex efforts up until
that time.
At 1,700-square-feet,
it was about 600-square-
feet larger than Habitat
was accustomed to han-
dling. The building also
had a at roof, so workers
added a pitched roof to
give it a more residential
feel. Evans Kaufer also
described in contemporary
reports how an architect
was brought in to create
plans for a ve-bedroom
layout suitable for the fam-
ily of seven.
Beyond sweat equity,
other requirements for
home applicants also
were described in a 2009
story: they must have been
Luzerne County residents
for a year; have the ability
to pay a 20-year, no-inter-
est $55,000 mortgage and
other household expenses;
be a rst-time homeowner;
and have a solid credit his-
tory.
Habitat houses are
affordable for low-income
families because there is
no prot included in the
sale price and no interest
charged on the mortgage,
according to the local
groups website.
A review of the
Simpsons mortgage, on
le with Luzerne County,
did not reveal any specic
prohibition on rental in
that document. Harris said
such language, if included,
could be part of separate,
private loan documents
between Habitat and bor-
rowers, but again he said
he could not comment on
whether this is true with
respect to the Stanton
Street home.
I can tell you there are
different documents in
each case, Harris said.
Habitat prohibitions
A Times Leader review
of websites maintained
by other Habitat chapters
around the nation showed
prohibitions on renting out
Habitat homes commonly
listed on frequently asked
questions pages for poten-
tial homeowners.
Schaffer said he has left
several messages for Evans
Kaufer inquiring about
the status of 171 Stanton
St., and was told only that
Habitat was looking into
it.
Evans Kaufer reiterated
that she could not speak to
specics, but said the agen-
cy is diligent with respect
to issues involving its prop-
erties.
We are doing every-
thing in our ability to rem-
edy any issue we have with
Habitat homes, she said.
That includes appropri-
ate legal action, but legal
action takes time, Evans
Kaufer added.
Schaffer said he and
other neighbors dont have
a problem with the people
they say are living in the
home decent folks, in
his words. They just want
to be sure the property is
being used the way donors
and volunteers envisioned.
I want to let you know
that I am not trying to
bash the organization,
but believe that people
who donate their time
and money to this charity
should be made aware of
the problems that do arise,
Schaffer said.
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER NEWS Sunday, September 22, 2013 PAGE 7A
Clark Van Orden | The Times Leader
The city is investigating allegations made by neighbors about this Stanton Street home.
From page 1A
Habitat
were seeking ways to
honor the aging men.
Decoration Day (now
known as Memorial Day),
declared soon after the
Civil War, had already
become a national holiday.
Not for recreation but for
placing owers and memo-
rials on the graves of vet-
erans, whose tombstones
generally highlighted their
military service right down
to regiment and company.
In some local cemeter-
ies, veterans graves were
placed together, as if
marching off to eternity,
still in ranks.
From about 1900 on, the
deaths of veterans were
marked by newspaper
obituaries that often ran as
lengthy news stories, with
headlines using military
imagery and biographies
highlighting their war-
time service. It was a far
more extensive treatment
than most non-veterans
received in that day.
Typical was the 1925
Wilkes-Barre Record obit-
uary for James F. Kirk, a
New Yorker who settled in
Wilkes-Barre after the war
and worked 50 years as a
baggage supervisor for the
Lehigh Valley Railroad.
Civil War vet answers
taps, read the main head-
line in large type, alluding
to the tune played at mili-
tary funerals. Fine war
record, was printed below
it, with the article listing
his company and regiment
and detailing his service in
the battles of Bull Run, the
Seven Days, Gaines Mill,
Alexandria, Antietam and
Fredericksburg, names
that well into the 20th cen-
tury still struck awe.
Peter M. Austins obitu-
ary was headed, in large
type, with a dramatic Last
Veteran Gone and was
accompanied by a photo of
him in his old forage cap.
In the 1920s, the com-
munity found an imagi-
native and enduring way
to honor the men by
memorializing the name
of their beloved organiza-
tion. In October of 1922,
four elderly veterans, once
again in uniform, helped
lay the cornerstone for
Wilkes-Barres new high
school, GAR Memorial,
aptly located between
streets named for generals
Grant and Sherman, and
containing in its foyer a
frieze depicting Civil War
soldiers.
Another planned honor,
however, failed to materi-
alize. A 1931 groundbreak-
ing for a massive Public
Square clock tower, again
by a group of veterans in
uniform, came to nothing
when Luzerne County, fac-
ing demands of the Great
Depression, could not
come up with the funding.
By the end of the 1920s,
so few of the original mem-
bers of the Conyngham
Post remained, that the
group found it necessary
to rent out their GAR Hall.
Part of it became a movie
theater.
It was in a spirit of grati-
tude to a passing genera-
tion that the touching rit-
ual was played out in 1928
by the borough of Luzerne,
where the areas military
training ground, Camp
Luzerne, had been built in
the long-ago 1860s.
When Comrade
Austins casket is low-
ered into the grave at the
Forty Fort Cemetery next
Monday afternoon, there
will be interred with it an
American ag, which was
purchased by school chil-
dren of Luzerne Borough
and presented to the vet-
erans of that town many
years ago, said The Times
Leader.
It has been used to
drape the casket of every
member of the Grand
Army of Luzerne since
that time. Some years ago
the veterans decided that
it should be buried with
the last of their number.
The last Civil War vet-
eran from the Wilkes-Barre
area, Charles Rhenard,
died in 1939. Luzerne
Countys last Civil War
veteran, Alfred W. Gabrio
of Hazleton, once the state
GAR commander, died
in 1946 at age 100. The
South Main Street GAR
Hall was demolished in
the 1960s under a federal
urban redevelopment pro-
gram. Aparkade nowoccu-
pies the site. The Sons of
Union Veterans of the Civil
War, successor to the old
GAR, has a Northeastern
Pennsylvania chapter.
Photos courtesy of the Luzerne County Historical Society
Civil War veterans break ground for a memorial clock tower that was to be built on Public Square in Wilkes-Barre. Funding troubles ensured the tower never materialized.
Civil War veterans at the ceremony for the laying of the corner-
stone for GAR High School in Wilkes-Barre.
These area Civil War veterans gathered in Wilkes-Barre sometime in the early 1900s.
From page 1A
Civil War
MACKINAC ISLAND,
Mich. A clear divide
over the health care law
separates the emerging
eld of potential GOP
candidates for the 2016
presidential race, preview-
ing the battles ahead as
they try to rebuild their
party and seize the White
House.
U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz says
he will ght with every
breath to stop President
Barack Obamas signature
domestic achievement,
even if that means shut-
ting down parts of the
federal government. Its
an approach that former
Florida Gov. Jeb Bush
calls quite dicey politi-
cally for Republicans. Sen.
Rand Paul of Kentucky
says atly that a shutdown
is a dumb idea.
Im acknowledging we
probably cant defeat or
get rid of Obamacare,
Paul told reporters
Saturday while attend-
ing a Republican confer-
ence in Michigan. But by
starting with our position
of not funding it maybe
we get to a position where
we make it less bad.
Allied on the other side
with Cruz are U.S. Sen.
Marco Rubio of Florida
and others who say they
are making a principled
stand, willing to oppose
the law at all costs.
Then there are those
taking what they call
a pragmatic approach
by accepting the law, if
grudgingly, and moving
on. This group includes
Govs. Chris Christie of
New Jersey and Scott
Walker of Wisconsin, who
says a shutdown would
violate the public trust.
The government we
have should work, so thats
why I dont believe we
should shut the govern-
ment down, Walker told
reporters at the Michigan
conference.
The Republican-
controlled House passed a
short-term spending plan
Friday that would con-
tinue funding government
operations through mid-
December while withhold-
ing money for the health
law.
Some GOP lawmak-
ers also advocate holding
back on increasing the
nations borrowing limit,
which could result in a
rst-ever default, unless
the law is brought down.
Obama used his weekly
radio and Internet address
Saturday to scold a fac-
tion on the far right of
the Republican Party,
and he said he would not
allow anyone to harm
this countrys reputation
or threaten to inict eco-
nomic pain on millions
of our own people, just
to make an ideological
point.
While attending the
Michigan conference,
Paul said Republicans
could force a vote in both
houses of Congress, then
negotiate changes to leg-
islation in a joint confer-
ence committee.
Health lawseparates
potential Republican
contenders for 2016
Views range from hard-line stance of Sen. Cruz
to the pragmatic approach of Gov. Christie
THOMAS BEAUMONT
Associated Press
PAGE 8A Sunday, September 22, 2013 www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
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Varieties of Regular or Ridgies, 8.25 9.75 oz. Bag
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24 Pk. 16.9 oz. Btl
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buy 1, gEt 1
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1
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2
49
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99
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turkEy brEast
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Store Made salIsbury stEak
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fagIolI soup
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15
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5
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49
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cabbagE
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5
49
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10
with GOLD CARD
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5
with GOLD CARD
no Added Solutions
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Everyday Low Price through October
with GOLD CARD
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LB
3
99
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www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER NEWS Sunday, September 22, 2013 PAGE 9A
BEL L ES
C O N S TRUC TIO N C O . IN C .
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5
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SALE ENDS SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28th. WHILE SUPPLIES LAST.


KEYSER - OAK SHOPPING CTR., SCRANTON................................ 347-0393
S. MAIN AVE., SCRANTON.................................................................. 342-7103
MEADOW AVE., SCRANTON.............................................................. 961-9030
BIRNEY AVE., MOOSIC......................................................................... 963-7436
552 UNION STREET, LUZERNE .......................................................... 287-9677
WYOMING AVE., WYOMING.............................................................. 283-5555
2280 SANS SOUCI PKWY., HANOVER TWP.................................... 735-1316
801 WYOMING AVE., WEST PITTSTON........................................... 654-3444
THE SUMMIT SQUARE SHOPPING CTR., CLARKS SUMMIT....... 587-3800
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TYPOGRAPHIC ERRORS. ARTWORK FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY.
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The following real estate
transactions were recorded in
the Luzerne County Ofce of the
Recorder of Deeds for the week of
Sept. 15:
Bert F. Smith to Robert and
Evelyn Lloyd, 22 LeeAve., Fairview
Township, $132,500.
John III and Cynthia Dougherty to
Joshua Kuhar, 2911 Nuangola Road,
RiceTownship, $196,000.
Remey Renovations Inc. to
Rebecca L. Motyka, 414E. Grove St.,
Nanticoke, $53,200.
James P. and Stephani OHara
toTracy and MaryVargo, 326
LackawannaAve., Dupont,
$136,900.
JerrodJ. and Kathryn Menta to
Christine G. Miller, 583 Miller St.,
Luzerne, $94,400.
JohnJ. and Susan Nutche to
Jerey Nutche, 107 Pinecrest Ave.,
Dallas, $137,500.
Estate of John Moskal toJames
W. Lasiewski, 23 Laurelwood Drive,
Lafin, $85,000.
James Franklin and Carol B. Keiner
toJoseph L., Leroy L. andAmy L.
Ogin, 406Pond Hill Mountain Road,
ConynghamTownship, $125,000.
Matt and Deborah Kamowski to
CharlesW. Bevan, 266Stanton St.,
Wilkes-Barre, $50,000.
Wilkes-Barre City Industrial
Development Authority to
Bicentennial BuildingAssociates,
15 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre,
$93,900.
Dominic, Angelo and Maria Lussi
to Michael V. Gubitoso and Mark
McDermott, 28Park Lane, Exeter,
$65,000.
Williamand Rose Stone to
Laurence L. Jr. and Diane M. Cook,
21 Fox HollowDrive, DallasTownship,
$240,000.
BarbaraJ. and EdwinJ. Wilhelm
Jr to MBH36LLC, 241 Division St.,
Wilkes-Barre, $50,000.
Laurence L. Jr. and Diane M. Cook
toJoseph ODonnell, 62 E. Carey St.,
PlainsTownship, $117,000.
Presidential Land Company Ltd.
toJason and Kathleen Provinzano,
229Twins Lane, RiceTownship,
$222,500.
TheodoreJohn and Michelle
Patacconi toThomas C. Reilly, 236
Shingle Mill Drive, Butler Township,
$73,140.
Walter P. Gottlieb to Ronald R. and
Margaret M. Lyons, 45 Highland
Drive, Wilkes-Barre, $120,000.
Jason D. andJamie K. Guilford to
Brian R. and Megan L. Chuzas, 701
MontgomeryAve., West Pittston,
$192,500.
Bank of America and HSBCBank
USAtoWilliamO. and Kathleen E.
Morris, 735 Nuangola Road, Rice
Township, $326,000.
Irene and Robert V. Davidson
to DonaldJoseph and Kathleen
Madison Savage, Lakeside Drive,
Harveys Lake, $279,250.
Bent Creek Realty Inc. to Concrete
Alternatives &More Inc., 317 N.
Hunter Highway, Butler Township,
$185,000.
Secretary of Housing and Urban
Development and U.S. Department
of Housing and Urban Development
to Shintaro Industries LLC, 58Lines
Lane, Wright Township, $60,000.
CassandraW. Davis toJohn P. and
Joshua O. Howarth-Skarupa, 14
Jumper Road, LehmanTownship,
$330,000.
Anthony M. Torino to Bernerd
C. Kizis, 148Patriot Circle, Rice
Township, $117,400.
MelissaA. Lucas toJohn and
Kathleen Boyles, Lakeside Drive,
Harveys Lake, $115,000.
Robert Golden toJudyAnn
Lunney, 32 FordhamRoad, Lain,
$315,000.
Michael Mootz to MarkW. and
Marcie C. Haas, 75 River St., Forty
Fort, $150,000.
Joseph and Mary Sabol to Charles
P. Jr. andTressiaA. Dancheck, 88
Evans St., Pringle, $154,000.
Louise Robinson toJoseph M.
and MaryAnn Cosimo, 23 Ivy Lane,
Dupont, $234,500.
AngeloVolpe, Charlene Barge and
MaryAnn Buckley toJoseph Casale
III, 60ColumbusAve., Pittston,
$90,000.
Robert E. and Elizabeth Coyne
and Elizabeth C. Price to Charles E.
White and Lisa M. Falzone, 75 Ninth
St., Wyoming, $162,500.
Estate of Dorothy M. Davis to
Robert G. and Deborah Lynn
Weiskerger, 64Fort St., Forty Fort,
$62,000.
FrankJr. and Grace Spigarelli to
Thomas Lee Schmidt, 1217 Spring
St., Duryea, $125,000.
Estate of Harry Clayton Moyer to
GeorgeW. and Cheryl M. Williams,
306Erie St., White Haven, $72,000.
John E. Boyer to Shickshinny
Borough, 38S. Canal St.,
Shickshinny, $51,500.
Daniel C. and Susan B. Linski to
JohnA. Armstrong and Maria S.
Earles, 35 S. WellesAve., Kingston,
$89,000.
Donald B. Hargraves to
Shickshinny Borough, North Canal
Street, McClintock Street and
49McClintock St., Shickshinny,
$55,600.
John Charles and Christine Lynne
Sidonis to Ryan and Brittany Firth,
S172-174Main St., Conyngham
Township, $80,000.
Rosemary Scott toJoanne and
Zigmund Mizikoski, 18state Route
239, UnionTownship, $130,000.
Thomas Pardi to Nicole S.
Ulitchney, Lakeside Road, Foster
Township, $179,400.
Zigmund andJoanne E. Mizikoski
to Shickshinny Borough, 31 N. Canal
St. and 35 N. Canal St., Shickshinny,
$62,241.
Estate of Michael A. Tombasco to
Terence H. Munson, 127W. 17th St.,
Hazleton, $66,900.
Frank M. Pasquini and Cynthia
Rinish to MaryTherese Pitcavage,
480Church St., Swoyersville,
$90,000.
AnthonyArgo to Barbara C.
Werts, 136Clear Spring Court, West
Pittston, $169,800.
Estate of Cecelia C. Zakjawski to
John Kenneth III and LouAnn Frank,
146Manor Drive, KingstonTownship,
$115,000.
Philip P. and Betsy B. Pack to Mark
Anthony and Lisa Marie Dipippa, 38
HarfordAve., KingstonTownship,
$205,000.
Marvin and Susan Huber to
Christopher Barry and Lisa Marie
Goguen, 38BowCreek Drive,
FairviewTownship, $270,000.
Karl and MaryAnn Mroz
Harkenreader to Devin M. and
SandraA. Olshefski, 159Gardner
Ave., Wilkes-Barre, $110,000.
James R. and Irene Sweigert to
KellyA. King, 276Academy St.,
Luzerne, $109,900.
UFCWFederal Credit Union to
JohnA. Galuska, 311-33 Church St.,
Duryea, $55,000.
Lorraine B. Lucidi to Patricia
Soroka and Scott Meade, 6Harris
Hill Road, KingstonTownship,
$157,000.
Gail M. Popple IrrevocableTrust to
RACRealty LLC, Route 315, Plains
Township, $875,000.
Joseph G. II, Joan, Ronald and
Jeanette Mayer toJosephW. and
Lisa M. Simkulak, 125 Poplar St.,
Kingston, $73,000.
Housing Development Corp.
of Northeastern Pennsylvania to
Katlyn Marie Stasko, 372 McGowan
St., Wilkes-Barre, $120,000.
National Transfer Services LLC
andWHRGroup Inc. toJoseph F.
Carnevale, 47 Riccardi Drive, Butler
Township, $224,900.
Joseph M. Lawson to Gregory R.
andJessica R. Martz, 15 Blackberry
Lane, SalemTownship, $70,000.
Williamand MoniqueY. Rogaski
toThomasJoyceJr., 108Oak St.,
Wilkes-Barre, $103,000.
PamelaA. and Robert Zbylicki and
Michael and Kerry M. Spezaile to
EricA. Kraklio, 69Curtis St., Pittston,
$173,900.
Betone Realty Co. Inc. to Stephen
Uliana, 158Haverford Drive, Lafin,
$80,000.
Joanne andZigmund Mizikoski
to Shickshinny Borough, 27-29N.
Canal St., Shickshinny, $60,000.
DavidAmon to LaurenK. Blitzstein,
138Main St., SalemTownship,
$63,500.
David C. and Maryann E. Budda to
Luis R. RodriguezAlmanzar, 214E.
Green St., West Hazleton, $70,000.
Estate of Vivian Newcomb to
Michael L. and Samuel L. Payne,
109School St., KingstonTownship,
$60,000.
Jason and Melanie Lear to Bre
Diagostino Leonard, 936E. 6th St.,
SalemTownship, $130,000.
Estate of Eleanor M. Gerchak to
Frank E. and Marsha Paczewski, 415
OrchardWest, Dallas, $225,000.
PROPERTYTRANSACTIONS
PAGE 10A Sunday, September 22, 2013 OBITUARIES www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
M .J. JUD G E
M ON UM EN T CO.
M ON UM EN TS -M ARK ERS -L ETTERIN G
8 2 9 -4 8 8 1
N extto the Big Co w o n Rt. 309 8
0
0
2
7
7
4
9
(570) 829-4881
www.mjjudgemonumentco.com
Estate & Medicaid Planning; Wills; Revocable and Irrevocable Trusts: Estate
Probate and Administration; Guardianships; and Special Needs Trusts.
Attorney DAviD r. LipkA
Certifed As an Elder Law Attorney by the National Elder Law Foundation
50 East Main Street, Plymouth, PA (570) 779-5353
IF NURSING HOME PLACEMENT BECOMES
NECESSARY DONT PRESUME ALL IS LOST!
Even under current law, there ARE still ways to legally protect your home
and other hard-earned assets from being spent down on long term care
when you, your spouse or a loved one are either in or about to enter a
nursing home.
Can you save your residence?
Can you transfer assets within the fve year look-back period?
How can annuities help?
Can more income be protected for the spouse at home?
STRAIGHTFORWARD ANSWERS TO COMPLEX QUESTIONS!
THE SOONER YOU ACT, THE MORE YOURE ABLE TO SAVE!
Obituary POlicy
The Times Leader publishes free obituaries, which
have a 27-line limit, and paid obituaries, which can run
with a photograph. Afuneral home representative can
call the obituary desk at 570-829-7224, send a fax to
570-829-5537 or email to ttlobits@civitasmedia.com.
If you fax or email, please call to confrm. Obituaries
must be submitted by 7:30 p.m. for publication in
the next edition. Obituaries must be sent by a funeral
home or crematory, or must name who is handling
arrangements, with address and phone number.
Funerals
DZury - John, service at 6:45
p.m. today at S.J. Grontkowski
Funeral Home, Plymouth.
Friends may call from 5 p.m. to
time of service.
KeMPinsKi - Alicia, funeral
Mass 10 a.m. Monday in
Exaltation of Holy Cross
Church, Buttonwood. Friends
may call 5 to 8 p.m. today
at Mamary-Durkin Funeral
Service, 59 Parrish St., Wilkes-
Barre.
laZeVnicK - Edward Sr.,
services at 3 p.m. today at the
Bernard J. Piontek Funeral
Home Inc., 204 Main St.,
Duryea. Friends may call 2 to
4 p.m.
MasaKOWsKi - Rev. Edward,
Pontifcal Mass of Christian
Burial 10 a.m. Monday in St.
Maria Goretti Church, 42
Redwood Drive, Lafin. Friends
may call 4 to 7 p.m. today and
prior to the Mass in the church.
Solemn vespers 7 p.m.
rHOaDs - Dorene, memorial
services 11:15 a.m. Saturday in
Trucksville United Methodist
Church. Friends may call 10
a.m. to services.
WALTER FUDJAK JR.,
85, of Coal Street, Glen Lyon,
passed away Saturday morning
at Guardian Elder Care Center,
Sheatown.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the George A.
Strish Inc. Funeral Home, 211
W. Main St., Glen Lyon.
EDWARDP. RINCAVAGESR.,
90, passed away on Sept. 13, 2013.
He was preceded in death by par-
ents, John V. and Mary Sincavage
Rincavage; wife, Florence; brothers,
John, Paul and George. Surviving
are sons Edward P. Rincavage Jr.
and wife, Roseanne, and George
Rincavage and wife, Pamela;
grandchildren, Lori Bennett and
husband, Robert, Mark Rincavage
and wife, Gina, Jeffrey Rincavage
and Jillian Rincavage; great-grand-
children, Lauren, Madelyn and
Mason Bennett and Rachel and
Jacob Rincavage; brothers, Joseph
Ryncavage and Peter Rincavage;
and sister, Janet.
Funeral arrangements were made
by the S.J. Grontkowski Funeral
Home, Plymouth. Interment was in
IndiantownGapNational Cemetery.
DONNA M. COOK, 74, of
Wilkes-Barre, died Saturday at
River Run Nursing Center in
Kingston.
Arrangements are in progress
with McLaughlins The Family
Funeral Service. Full obituary
information will be published
in Mondays edition and later
today at www.celebrateherlife.
com.
VerOnica F. DiDgeOn
Sept. 20, 2013
Veronica F. Didgeon, 87,
passed peacefully on Friday at
her private residence, Wilkes-
Barre.
Born on Dec. 6, 1925,
in Wilkes-Barre, she was
one of eight siblings to the
late Theodore and Veronica
Frankauskas Brackna. Veronica
attended area schools and
was a graduate of GAR High
School, class of 1943. Veronica
married the love of her life,
Thomas J. Didgeon, in 1950.
Together they enjoyed 33 years
of marriage until Thomass
passing in 1983. Together
they raised three wonderful
children: Diane, Charles and
Thomas Jr.
Veronica was employed
in the cleaning services at
the United Penn Building in
Wilkes-Barre for many years.
She left this job to attend to her
family needs as a homemaker.
She was a loving mother, car-
ing for her children, and an
angel of mercy caring for her
sick family members. She was
a devoted Catholic and was a
past member of St. Francis of
Assisi Church, Miners Mills,
until the churchs closure. She
was a current member of St.
Benedicts Church, Parsons.
Veronica loved to bake, espe-
cially her delicious pineapple
squares; she enjoyed bingo,
polkas, and loved to bird watch,
especially for her cardinal.
Veronica is preceded in death
by her husband, Thomas Sr.;
sons Thomas Jr.; and brothers,
Sylvester, Joseph, Peter, Albert,
George, Charles and John
Brackna.
She is survived by her son,
Charles, Wilkes-Barre; daugh-
ter, Diane Kosierowski and her
husband, Jerry, Olympia, Wash.;
and grandsons Wesley, Nicholas
and Peter Kosierowski.
Veronicas funeral ser-
vice will be held at 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday at the Yanaitis Funeral
Home Inc., 55 Stark St.,
Plains. A Mass of Christian
Burial will be celebrated at 10
a.m. in St. Benedicts Church,
Austin Avenue, Wilkes-Barre.
Mass will be celebrated by the
Rev. Joseph Kearney, pastor.
Interment will follow in St.
Francis of Assisi Cemetery,
Plains. Friends and family may
call from 6 to 9 p.m. Monday at
the funeral home.
The family thanks Erwine
Hospice for its caring and sym-
pathy when it was most needed,
especially to Andrea and Eli,
thank you.
Words of comfort and
remembrance of Veronica can
be sent to the family at www.
yanaitisfuneralhome.com.
Ellen Bujnowski, 69, of
Hanover Green, died Friday
after a courageous battle with
ovarian cancer.
Ellen was a 1962 graduate of
Hanover Area High School and
received both her bachelors
and masters degrees in speech
pathology from Bloomsburg
University.
Ellens faith and her deter-
mination to contribute to the
lives of those around her guided
her. She was a devoted member
at the Exaltation of the Holy
Cross Church and impacted the
lives of thousands of children in
her nearly 40 years as a speech
pathologist at Wyoming Valley
Childrens Association.
Ellens passions, hobbies
and interests all involved self-
lessly giving to those around
her especially her family. She
was a role model and source of
strength for her children. Her
compassion, resolve and joy for
life, particularly after the death
of her husband and during her
battle with cancer, will forever
inspire.
Ellen was preceded in death
by her beloved husband, John
Bujnowski. She is survived
by daughter Stacia of Acton,
Mass.; son Bo and his wife,
Liz, of Middletown, Del.; and
son David and his wife, Kim,
of Faireld, Conn. Ellen cher-
ished her grandchildren: Grace,
Emerson and Jack.
She is also survived by her
devoted sister Jean Semcheski,
of Hanover Township; niece
Rachael Hammond; great-neph-
ew Colin Hammond; nephew
MatthewSemcheski, of Norfolk,
Va.; aunts, uncles, cousins and
friends who lovingly supported
her throughout her ght and
by the children she touched at
the Wyoming Valley Childrens
Association.
A visitation will be held from
5 to 8 p.m. Tuesday at Charles
V. Sherbin Funeral Home, 630
Main Road, Hanover Township,
and a Mass of Christian Burial
will take place at 10 a.m.
Wednesday in Exaltation of the
Holy Cross Church, 420 Main
Road, Hanover Township.
In lieu of owers, the fam-
ily requests that donations in
Ellens name be made to either
the Abramson Cancer Center at
the University of Pennsylvania
at 215-898-0578 (or www.
penncancer.org/patients/giv-
ing/) or the Wyoming Valley
Childrens Association at 570-
714-1246 (or wvcakids.org/giv-
ing).
lOuise M. DasHnaW
Sept. 20, 2013
Louise M. Dashnaw, 89, of
West Pittston, passed away
on Friday at Geisinger South
Wilkes-Barre in the Hospice
Community Care Inpatient Unit.
Born in West Pittston, she
was the daughter of the late Fred
and Jennie Fruschante Serino.
Mrs. Dashnaw was a mem-
ber of Corpus Christi Parish
at Immaculate Conception
Church, West Pittston, and was
a graduate of West Pittston High
School. Prior to her retirement,
she had worked in the garment
industry, and was a member
of the International Ladies
Garment Workers Union.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, James E. Dashnaw,
in August 1977; a brother, James
Serino; and sisters, Rose Cefalo,
Florence Phillips and Eleanor
Angeli.
Surviving are her daughter,
Mary Lou and her husband, Nick
DeMarco, West Pittston, and
their sons Nicky, Philadelphia,
and James, West Pittston; broth-
ers, Tony Serino, Lititz, Fred and
his wife, Margaret, Glen Mills,
Pa., and Frank and his wife,
Helen Serino, West Pittston;
sisters, Charlotte and her hus-
band, Jerry Vetack, Escondido,
Calif., and Palma Serino, West
Pittston; and numerous nieces
and nephews.
Funeral services will be held
at 10:30 a.m. Thursday at the
Gubbiotti Funeral Home, 1030
Wyoming Ave., Exeter. A Mass
of Christian Burial will be held at
11 a.m. in Corpus Christi Parish
in Immaculate Conception
Church, West Pittston with
Monsignor John Sempa, pas-
tor, as celebrant. Interment will
be in Mount Olivet Cemetery,
Carverton.
Relatives and friends may call
from 5 to 8 p.m. Wednesday at
the funeral home.
The family thanks Hospice
Community Care, especially
Lori, for the special care given
to Louise during her time of
need.
To send the family an expres-
sion of sympathy or an online
condolence, please visit www.
gubbiottifh.com.
Virginia i. PiecZynsKi
Sept. 20, 2013
Virginia I. Pieczynski, 88,
Doylestown, formerly of Dallas,
passed away Friday at Holy
Redeemer, St. Josephs Manor,
Meadowbrook, Pa.
She was the daughter of the
late William and Anna Phillips
Wasser. She attended Dallas
High School. Virginia was a
homemaker. She was a mem-
ber of Gate of Heaven Church,
Dallas, and the churchs Altar
and Rosary Society. For a short
time she had worked at College
Misericordia in the housekeep-
ing department and was a mem-
ber of RSVP with the senior
center in Kingston.
Virginia was preceded
in death by her husband,
Benjamin Pieczynski, in 1995;
and a brother, William Wasser.
Surviving are a son,
Benjamin and his wife, Mary
Jo, Doylestown; daugh-
ters, Rita and her husband,
Thomas Walpole, Bensalem,
Ann and her husband, Joseph
Hometchko, Largo, Fla., and
Mary Lou and her husband,
Richard Stefanovich, Kingston;
sister, Lorraine Hawk, Dallas;
grandchildren, Jennifer Brown,
Ben Pieczynski, Michelle
Pieczynski, Erin Walpole, Ryan
Wolpole, Michael Wolpole, Kyle
Walpole, Victoria Tomberlin,
Michael Hometchko and Jaime
Karpovich; and great-grandchil-
dren, Marielle Brown, Londynn
Tomberlin, Brooklyn Tomberlin
and Braydon Noble.
Funeral will be held at 10
a.m. Tuesday at The Richard
H. Disque Funeral Home, 2940
Memorial Highway, Dallas,
with funeral Mass at 10:30
a.m. in Gate of Heaven Church,
Dallas, with the Rev. Daniel
Toomey, ofciating. Friends
may call 6 to 8 p.m. Monday at
the funeral home.
Donations in Victorias name
may be made to The American
Diabetes Association, c/o 71 N.
Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre, PA
18701.
ellen sWelgin
Sept. 20, 2013
Ellen Swelgin, 84, of
Plymouth Township, peace-
fully embarked on her journey
to heaven on Friday in Hospice
Community Care at Geisinger
South Wilkes Barre.
Ellen was born to the late
Henry and Florence Hughes
in Wilkes Barre on April 24,
1929. She was a 1947 gradu-
ate of Meyers High School. She
married Henry Hank Swelgin,
with whom she shared 64 years
of love and devotion. With her
husband, she was the owner/
operator of Swelgins Garage in
Plymouth Township, which has
been in operation for more than
50 years.
Ellen was a strong woman,
devoted wife, and a loving
mother, grandmother and great
grandmother. Ellen enjoyed
cheering her husband Henry in
his No. 66 race car at the Lake
Moc-A-Tek raceway. She also
loved square dancing, line danc-
ing and excelled at the waltz.
Her favorite hobbies were
doing crafts, sewing and play-
ing the organ. During her life
she was a Sunday school teach-
er, she sang in the choir, was
a Girl Scout leader, and was a
member of the ladies auxiliary
for the Plymouth Township
Volunteer Fire Company. She
enjoyed going to the Senior
Center and joining in activities
and events.
Ellen is survived by her hus-
band, Henry; daughters, Lisa
Lasoski and husband, Kenneth,
of Dorrance Township, and
Sharon Hess and husband,
Daniel, of Benton; and four
grandchildren, Tristan Pierce,
Kenneth Lasoski, Molly Verbyla
and Jillian Peck. She is also sur-
vived by numerous nieces and
nephews.
In addition to her parents,
Ellen was preceded in death by
her brothers, Harry and Tom
Hughes; and her sisters, Flora
Conrad, Jenny Franjoni and
Betty Hess.
Friends and family may call
from 6 to 8 p.m. Monday at the
Earl W. Lohman Funeral Home
Inc., 14 W. Green St., Nanticoke.
Burial will be held Tuesday at
Memorial Shrine, 1831 West
8th St., Wyoming. In lieu of
owers, the family requests that
donations be made to a charity
of their choice.
Mary KasisKy
Sept. 18, 2013
Mary Kasisky, 64, of Pittston,
passed away Wednesday at the
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital.
Born in Pittston on Aug. 11,
1949, she was the daughter
of the late Andrew and Maria
Shoemaker Kasisky.
Mary was a graduate of
Pittston Area High School,
class of 1968. She was a mem-
ber of St. John the Evangelist
Church, Pittston, and the Ladies
Auxiliary of the former St.
Josephs Holy Name Society,
Port Grifth.
Besides her parents, she was
preceded in death by her son
James Kasisky.
She is survived by broth-
ers, Richard, of Nanticoke,
Andrew, of Pittston, Ronnie, of
Wyoming, Joseph, of Wilkes-
Barre, and Michael, of Pittston;
grandchildren, James Kasisky
Jr. and Kaitlyn Kasisky, Exeter;
and nieces and nephews.
A Mass of Christian Burial
will be celebrated at 9:30
a.m. Tuesday in St. John the
Evangelist Church, William
Street, Pittston. Family and
friends are asked to meet at
the church the morning of the
funeral. Interment will be at the
convenience of the family.
Visitation for family and
friends will be from 6 to 8 p.m.
Monday at the Kizis-Lokuta
Funeral Home, 134 Church St.,
Pittston.
MicHael J. Marcy sr.
Sept. 18, 2013
Michael J. Marcy Sr., 53,
of Pringle, died unexpectedly
Wednesday at Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital.
He was born in Wilkes-
Barre, son of the late Harold
and Margaret Cosloskey
Marcy. Mike was employed by
Geisinger Medical Center in
the Environmental Services
Department. He was a member
of the St. Paolina Social Club,
Wilkes-Barre.
Besides his parents, he
was preceded in death by his
daughter, Catherine Blanche
Marcy; and brother, Mark
Marcy.
He was greatly loved and will
be deeply missed by all who
knew him, especially his bet-
ter half for more than 10 years,
Ruth Brislin; daughter, Mekel
Marcy Reeder and her husband,
Brandon, Wyoming, and her
mother, Catherine Karpovich;
sons, Michael and Mark Marcy,
both of Pringle, and their moth-
er, Lori Tucker; grandchildren,
Caleb, Kala and Kaya; brothers,
Edward Marcy and his wife,
Colleen, of Luzerne, Harold
Marcy and his wife, Karen, of
Pringle, and Joseph Marcy,
Pringle; and numerous aunts,
nieces, nephews and cousins.
Funeral will be at 10 a.m.
Tuesday at the Kopicki Funeral
Home, 263 Zerbey Ave.,
Kingston. Interment will be
in St. Hedwigs Cemetery,
Larksville. Friends may call
from 6 to 9 p.m. Monday.
MicHael a. saVOKinas
Sept. 20, 2013
Michael A. Savokinas, 71,
of Pittston Township, passed
away on Friday at Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital following a
brief illness.
Born Oct. 8, 1941, in Pittston,
he was a son of the late Joseph
and Madeline (Fay) Savokinas.
He was a graduate of Pittston
Area High School and a member
of St. Joseph Marello Parish in
Pittston. He was a member of
the U.S. Air Force Reserves from
1962 to 1968.
In 1964, along with his
brother Raymond, he found-
ed Savos Pizza and Family
Restaurant on Main Street in
Pittston. Throughout 49 years,
he proudly served as its owner,
including at its current location
in the Pittston Commons, where
he always greeted his custom-
ers with a friendly smile and
handshake. He was also an avid
collector of Greater Pittston his-
torical items and was a founding
member of the Greater Pittston
Historical Society, where he
served as treasurer. He was
one of the original owners of
The Staircase Lounge in 1975
and was a former president
and treasurer of the Pittston
Mall Merchants Association.
From 1983 to 2003, he was
the sponsor of the Savos Little
League Baseball Tournament of
Champions.
In addition to his parents,
he was preceded in death by a
brother, Lawrence, and a sister,
Mary Beth Orlowski.
Surviving are his loving wife
of 43 years, the former Georgia
Bartolai; sons, Arthur and his
wife, Kimberly, Hughestown,
and Michael Jr. and his wife,
Alice, Pittston Township; grand-
sons, Austyn Pivarnik, Austin
Killino, and Brandon Savokinas;
brothers, Raymond and his wife,
Marie, West Pittston, Jimmy and
his wife, Diane, Hughestown,
and Joseph, Pittston; sisters,
Cynthia Hrobuchak and her
husband, William, Old Forge,
Dorothy Kroll and her hus-
band, Robert, Plains, and Rose
Butera, Jenkins Township; and
sister-in-law, Deanna Savokinas,
California. Also surviving are
numerous cousins, nieces, neph-
ews and countless numbers of
employees who worked for him
over the last 49 years.
Funeral services
have been entrusted to
Graziano Funeral Home
Inc., Pittston Township.
Viewing hours will be held from
5 to 8 p.m. Monday and Tuesday
at the funeral home. Funeral ser-
vices will begin at the funeral
home at 9 a.m. Wednesday. A
Mass of Christian Burial will be
held at 9:30 a.m. in St. Joseph
Marello Parish, William Street,
Pittston, with the Rev. Joseph
Sibilano ofciating. Interment
services will follow in Mount
Olivet Cemetery, Carverton.
In lieu of owers, the family
requests that all donations be
made to the Greater Pittston
Historical Society at GPHS,
131 Bear Creek Road, Pittston
Township, PA 18640. To express
your condolences to Michaels
family or for directions to the
funeral home, please visit www.
GrazianoFuneralHome.com.
to view
legacy
obituaries
online, visit
www.timesleader.com
tHOMas g. engle
Sept. 21, 2013
Thomas G. Engle, 77, of
Forty Fort, died Saturday
in Commonwealth Hospice
Inpatient Unit, St. Lukes Villa,
Wilkes-Barre.
Born in West Wyoming on
Sept. 7, 1936, he was the son
of the late Martin and Mary
Goldsworthy Engle. He was
a graduate of West Wyoming
High School. He served in the
Army, stationed in Frankfurt,
Germany. Tom was employed
by Western and Southern Life
Insurance, and after his retire-
ment worked for Penn Patio.
In addition to his parents, he
was preceded in death by his
wife, Rosemary Engle.
Surviving are his children,
attorney Peggy Engle, Dallas,
and Thomas Engle and his
wife, Rene, Exeter; grandchil-
dren, Danielle and Nicholas
Melnick, Dallas; brothers,
William Engle, West Wyoming,
and Martin Engle, Maryland;
nieces and nephews and his
faithful canine companion,
Carmel.
Special thanks to
Commonwealth Hospice and
the staff of Riverview Ridge.
Funeral services will
be private and held at
the convenience of the
family from the Kopicki
Funeral Home, 263 Zerbey
Ave., Kingston. Memorial con-
tributions may be made to the
American Cancer Society or the
SPCA.
ellen buJnOWsKi
Sept. 20, 2013
DeVin Kelly
Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES The
note Patsy Swayze tucked
in her son Dons suitcase
was simple but meaningful.
It was 1980, and Don had
just moved to California to
pursue an acting career. He
was sleeping on his older
brother Patricks couch and
scared to death of the pros-
pect of auditions.
Then he found the note
from his mom. It began,
Donny, and followed
with a laundry list of all the
awards hed ever received.
Remember when you
won the second grade spell-
ing bee? Remember the Pee
Wee World Series in base-
ball?
She knew I needed a lit-
tle more encouragement,
Don Swayze, a character
actor who has appeared in
many lms and TV shows,
said in a phone interview.
It was a little thing I
needed when I was having
doubts.
Patsy Swayze a dance
teacher and choreogra-
pher whose most famous
students included her son
Patrick and Fame direc-
tor Debbie Allen died
Monday at her home in
Simi Valley, Calif., after
a stroke on Sept. 8, Don
Swayze said. She was 86.
She choreographed the
1980 lm Urban Cowboy
and worked with John
Travolta on the movements
of the two-step. Other cred-
its include Liars Moon
and One Last Dance.
Her former students
include Broadway star
Tommy Tune and actors
Randy Quaid and Jaclyn
Smith.
All ve of Swayzes chil-
dren became dancers and
actors most famously
Patrick, who trained in
her studio and struck star-
dom in 1987 with Dirty
Dancing. Patrick Swayze
died of pancreatic cancer in
2009 at age 57.
Feisty and demanding,
Swayze devoted herself to
nurturing talent and poten-
tial.
I love watching people
develop strong bodies and a
sense of self-worth, Swayze
told the Los Angeles Times
in 1991. To see the child
blossom, thats the thrill of
teaching.
Yvonne Helen Karnes,
nicknamed Patsy, was
born Feb. 7, 1927, and grew
up in Houston. Her father
was a World War I pilot and
a geologist. Her mother
was a nurse.
At age 10, Swayze was
hit by a car. She enrolled in
dance classes for therapy,
eventually training in clas-
sical ballet and jazz dance.
While in high school,
Patsy met and married
Jesse Wayne Swayze, a
mechanical engineer. He
had a sense of humor; she
was serious about home-
work, behavior and pos-
ture.
Patsy Swayze,
mother of
actor Patrick,
dies at 86
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER NEWS Sunday, September 22, 2013 PAGE 11A
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Popes blunt remarks pose challenge for bishops
Church in US must
balance mentality
of culture warrior
with compassion
RACHEL ZOLL
AP Religion Writer
NEW YORK In recent
years, many American bish-
ops have drawn a harder line
with parishioners on what
could be considered truly
Roman Catholic, adopting a
more aggressive style of cor-
rection and telling abortion
rights supporters to stay
away from the sacrament of
Communion.
Liberal-minded Catholics
derided the approach as
tone-deaf. Church leaders
saidthey hadno choice given
what was happening around
them: growing secularism,
increasing
acceptance
of gay mar-
riage and
a broader
c u l t u r e
they con-
s i d e r e d
more and
more hos-
tile to Christianity. They felt
they were following the lead
of the pontiffs who elevated
them.
But in blunt terms, in
an interview published
Thursday in 16 Jesuit jour-
nals worldwide, the new
pope, Francis, called the
churchs focus on abortion,
marriage and contraception
narrow and said it was driv-
ing people away.
Now, the U.S. bishops face
a challenge to rethink a strat-
egy many considered essen-
tial for preserving the faith.
I dont see howthe popes
remarks can be interpreted
in any other way than argu-
ing that the churchs rhetoric
on the so-called culture war
issues needs to be toned
down, said John Green,
a religion specialist at the
University of Akrons Bliss
Institute of Applied Politics.
I think his language calls
for less stridency on these
issues.
The leadership of the
American church is com-
posed of men who were
appointed by Popes John
Paul II or Benedict XVI, who
made a priority of defending
doctrinal orthodoxy.
Over the last decade or so,
the bishops have been work-
ing to reassert their moral
authority, in public life and
over the less obedient within
their ock.
The U.S. Conference of
Catholic Bishops warned
Catholics that voting for
abortion-rights supporters
could endanger their souls.
Church leaders in
Minnesota, Maine and else-
where took prominent roles
in opposing legal recogni-
tion for same-sex marriage
in their states.
Bishops censured some
theologians and prompted
a Vatican-directed takeover
of the largest association for
American nuns by bringing
complaints to Rome that the
sisters strayed from church
teaching and paid too little
attention to abortion.
Terrence Tilley, a theolo-
gian at Fordham University,
said Francis wasnt silencing
discussion of abortion or
gay marriage, but indicating
those issues should be less
central, for the sake of evan-
gelizing. But he noted that
bishops have independence
to decide how they should
handle local political issues.
Although Francis is send-
ing a clear signal that hes
not a culture warrior, that
doesnt mean the bishops
will follow in lockstep,
Tilley said.
Few of the U.S. bishops
who have commented so far
on Francis interviewindicat-
ed they planned to change.
Archbishop William Lori
of Baltimore, head of the
bishops religious liberty
committee, said in a phone
interview, Issues do arise,
and we cannot always con-
trol the timing.
However, he added,
Every time I make a state-
ment about one of these
things, I will certainly take
another look at it and ask,
Does this really lead people
back to the heart of the
Gospel? Thats what hes
asking us to do. I think thats
a fair question.
Lori said he expected
no changes in the bishops
push for broader religious
exemptions fromthe contra-
ception coverage rule in the
Affordable Care Act.
Dozens of Catholic chari-
ties and dioceses, along
with evangelical colleges
and others, are suing the
Obama administration over
the regulation. The bishops
say the provision violates
the religious freedom of
faith-based nonprots and
for-prot employers.
Francis said in the inter-
view, We cannot insist only
on issues related to abor-
tion, gay marriage and the
use of contraceptive meth-
ods.
He said the church
should instead act like a
eld hospital after battle,
to heal wounds and to
warm the hearts of people
so they feel welcome.
New York Cardinal
Timothy Dolan said he
thought the pope was telling
everyone inside and out-
side the church to focus
less on polarizing debates
on sex and morals.
I dont knowif its just the
church that seems obsessed
with those issues. It seems
to be culture and society,
Dolan said on CBS This
Morning. What I think
hes saying is, Those are
important issues and the
church has got to keep talk-
ing about them, but we need
to talk about them in a fresh
new way. If we keep kind of
a negative, nger-wagging
tone, its counterproductive.
Pope Francis
PAGE 12A Sunday, September 22, 2013 www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
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www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER NEWS Sunday, September 22, 2013 PAGE 13A
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Howwill Pennsylvania pay for more elderly on Medicaid?
State spends more than $23,000 per year for each of the older residents in program
MARC LEVY
Associated Press
HARRISBURG Gov.
Tom Corbetts plan to
extend taxpayer-paid
health insurance to hun-
dreds of thousands of the
working poor came with
his repeated warnings
that it is not an expan-
sion of Medicaid and that
he would not expand an
entitlement program that
he views as already too
costly, bloated and ineffec-
tive.
What went without
mention by Corbett,
however, is the driving
force behind the cost of
Pennsylvanias Medicaid
program: the elderly who
need nursing home care
or something like it on a
long-term basis.
When you talk about
the escalating cost of the
(Medicaid) system, you
cant get around it with-
out attacking the long-
term care problem that
we have, said Michael
Rosenstein, who repre-
sents the arms of private
insurers and hospitals that
are paid by Pennsylvania
to manage the care of 1.6
million Medicaid enroll-
ees.
Nearly half of the states
2.2 million Medicaid
enrollees are children.
More than 900,000 elder-
ly and disabled receive
Medicaid services, wheth-
er to stay in a nursing
home, receive help in their
homes with tasks they
have difculty doing or
health care services.
Then theres the cost.
Statistics from the
Medicaid and CHIP
Payment Access
Commission in
Washington, D.C., or
MACPAC for short, show
that Pennsylvania spends
more than $23,000 per
year for each of the elder-
ly persons on Medicaid
among the costli-
est in the nation and
$15,700 per year for each
of the disabled persons on
Medicaid. The price tag
for someone to stay in a
nursing home is around
$60,000 a year.
Those gures dwarf
the cost of covering the
kind of working-age, able-
bodied adult who would
primarily benet from the
use of Medicaid expan-
sion money that becomes
available Jan. 1 under
President Barack Obamas
signature health care
law. For example, each
able-bodied adult who
is already on Medicaid
because they are destitute
or are a low-income par-
ent costs only $4,600 to
insure each year, accord-
ing MACPACs informa-
tion.
Meanwhile, the elderly
continue to be the fast-
est growing group of
Medicaid recipients in
Pennsylvania, which is
among the nations oldest
states.
The question of what to
do about the cost to care
for the growing number of
elderly on Medicaid is not
a new one.
The Medicaid man-
aged care companies in
Rosensteins group are
lobbying to extend their
services to also include
nursing care for the elderly
and disabled, a move they
say would save money and
improve quality of life.
The AARP is press-
ing for Pennsylvania to
catch up to other states
in expanding the role of
attendants who take care
of the elderly in private or
community homes.
Meanwhile, some nurs-
ing home operators insist
the Medicaid enrollees
in their care cannot get
the 24-hour care that
they need anywhere
else. Rather, they say the
growth of the elderly on
Medicaid is due to the
expansion of in-home ser-
vices that has displaced
the role once lled by fam-
ily and friends.
Ronald Barth, whose
organization represents
a range of not-for-prot
businesses that provide
services to the elderly
from nursing home care to
daytime services, said the
state needs to update its
Medicaid reimbursement
system to provide better
access for the elderly to
a wider range of services
that often cost less than a
nursing home. The reim-
bursement system is root-
ed in the 1960s, when peo-
ple didnt live as long and
were more likely to have
able-bodied family mem-
bers nearby, Barth said.
We have the old-old to
care for now, Barth said.
Medicaid and Medicare
were created when the
lifespans of people were
not reaching the mid-80s
and the 90s and mid-90s
the way they are today.
Tucked into Corbetts
plan to use the federal
Medicaid dollars to
extend health insurance
to an estimated 520,000
low-income adults is a
pledge to create a Long-
Term Care Commission
to recommend best prac-
tices that improve the
coordination of care for
all Pennsylvanians in
need of long-term care
services and support.
There were few details
beyond that.
We dont know
what the results of that
could be, as far as pol-
icy changes, said Ray
Landis of the AARP of
Pennsylvania. Im hop-
ing that, since that was
in there, its a recognition
that that is a big cost driv-
er in Medicaid.
PAGE 14A Sunday, September 22, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
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Toronto
56/44
Montreal
58/43
Winnipeg
71/53
SEVEN-DAY FORECAST
HIGH
LOW
TEMPERATURES
ALMANAC NATIONAL FORECAST
PRECIPITATION
Lehigh
Delaware
Sunrise Sunset
Moonrise Moonset
Today Today
Today Today
Susquehanna Stage Chg Fld Stg
RIVER LEVELS
ACROSS THE REGION TODAY
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation today. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Shown is
todays weather.
Temperatures are
todays highs and
tonights lows.
SUN & MOON
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Wilkes-Barre
Scranton
Philadelphia
Reading
Pottsville
Allentown
Harrisburg
State College
Williamsport
Towanda
Binghamton
Syracuse
Albany
Poughkeepsie
New York
PHILADELPHIA
THE JERSEY SHORE
MON WED
THU FRI
TUE
SAT
TODAY
63
42
Mostly
sunny
64 36
Nice with
bright sun-
shine
78 51
Mostly
sunny and
pleasant
76 47
Sunny and
beautiful
74 55
Mostly
sunny and
warmer
73 40
Sunny
73 50
Cooler
with
clouds
and sun
COOLING DEGREE DAYS
Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the
total degree days, the more energy is necessary to cool.
Yesterday 1
Month to date 70
Year to date 772
Last year to date 864
Normal year to date 566
Anchorage 47/37/pc 46/34/c
Baltimore 74/48/pc 70/47/s
Boston 68/49/r 61/48/s
Buffalo 56/44/c 59/40/s
Charlotte 78/58/pc 79/58/pc
Chicago 64/46/s 69/51/s
Cleveland 61/47/pc 62/46/s
Dallas 83/62/s 87/65/s
Denver 82/48/pc 73/47/s
Honolulu 89/73/s 88/76/s
Indianapolis 68/47/s 74/51/s
Las Vegas 80/66/s 85/67/s
Milwaukee 62/47/s 64/50/s
New Orleans 84/71/t 85/75/t
Norfolk 74/60/pc 71/53/pc
Okla. City 82/55/s 83/60/s
Orlando 88/74/t 87/75/t
Phoenix 93/70/s 93/70/s
Pittsburgh 61/44/c 67/46/s
Portland, ME 69/45/r 60/40/pc
St. Louis 74/52/s 76/57/s
San Francisco 70/55/pc 72/56/s
Seattle 62/53/r 63/49/r
Wash., DC 74/54/pc 74/52/s
Bethlehem 1.63 -0.01 16
Wilkes-Barre 1.79 -0.20 22
Towanda 1.22 -0.12 16
Port Jervis 2.62 -0.01 18
In feet as of 7 a.m. Saturday.
Today Mon Today Mon Today Mon
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. 2013
Sept 26 Oct 4
Oct 11
Last New
First Full
Oct 18
6:51 a.m.
8:46 p.m.
7:01 p.m.
10:11 a.m.
THE POCONOS
Highs: 57-63. Lows: 36-42. Times of sun and clouds today with a show-
er in spots; breezy. Colder tonight. Mostly sunny tomorrow.
Highs: 71-77. Lows: 49-55. A shower in spots this morning, then
becoming less humid; breezy. Cooler tonight.
THE FINGER LAKES
Highs: 55-61. Lows: 40-46. More clouds than sun today; breezy and
cooler with a shower in spots. Partly cloudy tonight.
NEW YORK CITY
High: 72. Low: 50. A shower in spots this morning, then becoming less
humid; breezy. Cooler tonight.
High: 73. Low: 50. Partly sunny, breezy and less humid today. Clear
and cooler tonight. Mostly sunny tomorrow.
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport
through 7 p.m. Saturday
High/low 72/59
Normal high/low 70/50
Record high 95 (1895)
Record low 32 (1956)
24 hrs ending 7 p.m. 0.06"
Month to date 0.75"
Normal m-t-d 2.81"
Year to date 19.12"
Normal y-t-d 27.84"
63/42
64/42
73/50
69/45
66/41
68/44
68/46
62/40
64/42
60/40
56/39
58/43
64/42
68/41
72/50
Summary: While rain is slow to move through New England, showers and
thunderstorms will persist along the Southeast and Gulf coasts today. Drenching
rain will spread across western and central Colorado.
RICARDOALONSO-ZALDIVAR
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Getting
covered through President
Barack Obamas health care law
might feel like a combination
of doing your taxes and mak-
ing a big purchase that requires
research.
Youll need accurate income
information for your household,
plus some understanding of how
health insurance works, so you
can get the nancial assistance
you qualify for and pick a health
plan thats right for your needs.
The process involves federal
agencies verifying your identity,
citizenship and income, and you
have to sign that you are provid-
ing truthful information, subject
to perjury laws.
You heard it was going to be
like buying airline tickets online?
Not quite. But even if the process
triggers some anxiety, its not the
government poking in your med-
ical records, as Obamacare
foes have suggested.
After state health insurance
markets open Oct. 1, consum-
ers can apply online, via a call
center, in person or by mail.
Trained helpers are supposed to
be available, but there may not
be enough of them.
The main steps are:
Identify yourself and your
family members.
Provide current information
on income, jobs and any avail-
able health insurance options.
Learn how much fnancial
assistance youre entitled to.
Shop for a health plan and
enroll.
Many people, ranging from
lower-income workers to the
solid middle class, will qualify
for tax credits to help buy a pri-
vate plan through the state mar-
kets. The government will send
money directly to your insurer,
and youll make arrangements
to pay any remaining premium.
The poor and near-poor will
be steered to Medicaid in states
that agree to expand that pro-
gram.
Heres an overview of what
to expect applying online, with
tips:
Go to healthcare.gov and
click on Get Insurance. The
site has links to every state mar-
ket. Youll set up an account and
password. Youll provide your
contact information and the
best way to reach you.
Tip Treat your password
like a bank account or credit
card password. Its not a good
idea to set it as 1234567.
Now you can tackle the actual
application. Youll need birth
dates and Social Security num-
bers for yourself and other fam-
ily members listed on your fed-
eral tax return.
Youll also be asked if youre
a citizen. Legal immigrants will
need their immigration docu-
ments.
Tip You dont have to plow
through the entire application in
one sitting. You can save your
work and come back later.
Next, youll be asked about
income.
You may need your most
recent tax return, pay stubs
and details on other kinds of
income, such as alimony, pen-
sions and rents. You can still
apply if you havent led a tax
return. Youll also be asked
about access to health insur-
ance through your job. You
may be required to take that
insurance if available.
Your personal and income
details will be routed through
a new government entity called
the data services hub, which
will ping agencies like Social
Security, Homeland Security
and the Internal Revenue
Service for verication. The
feds will also rely on a major pri-
vate credit reporting company
to verify income and employ-
ment.
How smoothly all this works
is one of the big unknowns. It
could get tedious if discrepan-
cies take time to resolve.
Tip Provide the most accu-
rate estimate of your expected
income for 2014. Lowball the
number, and you might see
a smaller tax refund in 2015.
Overestimate and you wont get
as big a tax credit now.
If youre like most people,
youll be getting a tax credit
to help pay your premiums.
The credits are based on your
income and keyed to the premi-
um for a benchmark plan known
as the second-lowest cost silver
plan in your area.
With your tax credit, you
can nally shop for insurance.
Beware: youll probably have to
live with your decision until the
next annual enrollment period.
Youll have up to four levels
of coverage to consider: bronze,
silver, gold and platinum. Plans
at every metal level cover the
same benets and have a cap of
$6,350 a year in out-of-pocket
expenses for an individual,
$12,700 for families.
Bronze plans generally have
the lowest premiums, but cover
only 60 percent of medical
costs on average. Policyholders
will pay the difference, up to
the annual out of pocket cap.
Platinum plans have the high-
est premiums, but cover 90
percent of costs. Young adults
up to age 30 can pick a skinny
catastrophic plan but you
cant use your tax credit on a
catastrophic plan.
Tip Make sure your doc-
tors and hospitals are in the plan
you pick. You may have to check
the plans own website, or call
your doctor.
Tip Your share of the pre-
mium could be lower even
zero if you apply your tax
credit to a bronze plan. Its
because the credit is keyed to
the cost of a silver plan, which is
generally more expensive.
Tip Check if you are eligi-
ble for cost-sharing subsidies,
in addition to your tax credit.
Extra help with out-of-pocket
costs is available to people with
modest incomes. But only with
a silver plan.
Head spinning?
Richard Onizuka, director of
the Washington state market,
says picking a plan could be
the most difcult step. Most of
his customers were previously
uninsured, so insurance jargon
could seem like a foreign lan-
guage.
The biggest challenge for
consumers will be understand-
ing health insurance and how to
purchase it, he said.
Applying for health insurance? Theres homework involved
Consumers can apply online, via a call
center, in person or by mail, but you
are advised to come prepared
Editors note: This is one
in an occasional series by
The Associated Press about
the impact of the Afordable
Care Acts health insurance
exchanges. Open enrollment
for these exchanges, or
marketplaces, begins Oct. 1.
mandates under the
Affordable Care Act, includ-
ing the requirement to
cover all people, regardless
of their medical condition,
and to provide coverage for
10 new essential benets
that include mental health
treatment and maternity
care.
Glen Melnick, a health
economist at the University
of Southern California,
said he believes many
younger singles who are
self-employed will decide
against buying health
insurance despite the gov-
ernment mandate, opting
instead to pay the ne.
Theyre going to decide
not to play. They are risk-
takers to begin with, he
said.
Yet the additional ben-
ets under the law could
outweigh the added costs
for some, said Dylan
Roby, assistant profes-
sor and researcher at the
University of California,
Los Angeles Center for
Health Policy Research.
Another positive of the
federal reforms is the abil-
ity to more easily compar-
ison-shop between insur-
ance companies and poli-
cies, he said.
Brethorst said the
Affordable Care Act is
likely to provide freedom to
those who currently cannot
afford to escape employer-
based coverage to pursue
their own dreams.
The iPhone app devel-
oper and business consul-
tant cites as an example a
friend and colleague with
asthma. They started a
new company together a
few years ago while his
friend was buying his
insurance from a former
employer through the fed-
eral COBRA plan.
When the venture capi-
tal funding they were
seeking fell through before
his access to company
health insurance ran out,
Brethorsts friend left
for another company job
where he could get health
insurance as an employee.
Weve been talking
about working together
again at some point,
Brethorst said. Once
these provisions go into
effect, its going to be sig-
nicantly easier to go off
and pursue his entrepre-
neurial dreams.
From page 1A
Self-employed
Gumbravich and his part-
ner, Pat Flynn. The initia-
tive has grown to include
about 30 men fromLuzerne
County, a blended vat of dif-
ferent folks including truck
drivers and surgeons all
brought together to pur-
sue perfection in excellent
wine.
They do not sell their
product, rather they fer-
ment for their own plea-
sure and to compete
in Corrados Amateur
Winemaking Competition,
where they regularly earn
medals.
We dont call this home-
made wine. We take offense
to that, Gumbravich said.
Were amateur winemak-
ers.
The elusive grapes
chosen by a hired broker
were a Merlot variety,
picked for their high sugar
content and shipped from
California a few days ago.
They eventually arrived
at Gumbravichs winery
Saturday morning. His
garage has been converted
to hold a de-stemming
machine, a wine press and
stainless steel vats for fer-
menting. In the corner sit
tall pub tables, a resting
place where the days work
is to be enjoyed about seven
months from now.
Making wine is a long
string of irreversible deci-
sions, Gumbravich said.
Punching down the must,
a marshy vat of crushed
grapes, three times daily
instead of two will change
the avor, he said, and let-
ting the must ferment for a
week longer will change it
again.
The single most impor-
tant decision, Gumbravich
said: How much are you
going to spend on grapes?
He said they put great
trust in their broker to get
the best grapes for the fair-
est price.
Bernard Walter, a mem-
ber of the group, spoke
highly of Gumbravichs
commitment to perfection
in every detail.
A little bit of bacteria
can destroy the whole
thing, Walter said. Hes
extremely fastidious in
protecting every step of
the way. Its an example of
why hes the master wine-
maker.
Good wine stays with
you long after swallow-
ing, Walter said. He com-
pared it to tasting Greek
yogurt over regular yogurt.
When you sip and want to
lean into it, theres some-
thing there to hold you.
Ultimately, members of this
group are working to make
wine that is better than any
store-bought wine, he said.
Wine with a meal brings
sophistication and helps
dinner mates nd more
thoughtful conversa-
tion, a phenomenon to be
explained only by snifng
and sipping a glass that
goes well with the menu,
Walter said. If you sit
down and have a glass of
milk with dinner, its going
to be a very different expe-
rience than if you have a
glass of wine, he said.
The goal ultimately is to
enhance the quality of life
for us all.
There might be some
aloofness among wine
connoisseurs, those who
pride themselves in a
superior palate, but wine-
makers seemingly are a
different breed. Choosing
the grape, fermenting and
bottling bring equality for
all involved because so
many things can go wrong,
Walter said.
When confronted with
the beauty of nature, humil-
ity is a natural outcome,
Walter said. The more you
know about wine, like the
more you know about art
or anything else, the more
you realize how little you
know. That induces a feel-
ing of humility.
From page 1A
Winemakers
A sign warns parking is only for wine connoisseurs at the Dallas residence of ameteur winemaker
Richard Gumbravich.
Bill Tarutis photos | For The Times Leader
Volunteers Tommy Tarnalicki, of Pittston, left, and Wally Songaila, of Swoyersville, dump grapes into
the crusher, which also removes stems from the fruit.
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Sunday, September 22, 2013 PAGE 1B
SUNDAYEXTRA
VOWS
Did the grandpas make this happen?
When she was in grade
school, Colleen Horn remem-
bers having sort of a crush
on Patrick Doyle.
But he was ve years older
a colossal difference at
that age. Patrick didnt really
notice the little girl in the
plaid St. Nicholas-St. Marys
uniform, though he knew she
existed because their families
had been friends for genera-
tions.
It wasnt until she was
attending Villanova University
School of Law and he was
working in the Philadelphia
District Attorneys ofce that
a gathering of Bishop Hoban
High School alums brought
them together.
In a bar lled with singing
and piano playing, Colleen
stood out.
Theres a spark about her
that makes you feel more
alive, Patrick said.
By the end of the evening,
he asked: Colleen Horn, why
arent we dating?
Thus began the courtship
that led to the couples Sept.
14 wedding at St. Nicholas
Church in Wilkes-Barre.
Both Colleen, 27, and
Patrick, 32, say it was meant
to be. On their wedding
website, they suggest their
late grandfathers, Pop-pop
George Horn and Pop Joseph
Doyle, who were best friends
and neighbors on Maxwell
Street in the East End sec-
tion of Wilkes-Barre, may have
pulled some heavenly strings
to bring the couple together.
They sincerely believe their
grandfathers had something to
do with it, said mother-of-
the-bride Mary Ellen Horn.
The young couple both
wanted to return to the
Wilkes-Barre area where they
had grown up, and Colleen
was the rst to have an oppor-
tunity to do so, thanks to a job
offer from Rosenn, Jenkins &
Greenwald.
Perhaps it was Pop and Pop-
pops doing, then, when a big
shiny car pulled up alongside
Patrick as he was walking on
Broad Street in Philadelphia.
Literally, within a week of
Colleens deciding, I was walk-
ing to work, right past City
Hall, the day after I convicted
a drug dealer, Patrick said.
When the car pulled up, I was
scared that it was a hit.
But the car contained attor-
neys William Anzalone and
Jamie Anzalone who said
theyd just been talking about
Patrick. Would he like to join
them for coffee and discuss
how they wanted to expand
their Wilkes-Barre law rm?
I loved my job in
Philadelphia, Patrick said.
But I thought, This is all sup-
posed to happen. I couldnt
say no.
Back in Northeastern
Pennsylvania, the couple of-
cially became engaged on Aug.
24, 2012, in the parking lot of
St. Nicholas Church.
It was where we both had
gone to school and where we
go to church, Colleen said,
adding the parking lot also
had been the scene of a St.
Patricks Day kiss the couple
remembers as a sign they
wanted to be together forever.
That sealed the deal,
Patrick said.
The proposal itself entailed
quite a bit of planning and
took place on a Friday when
Colleen believed she and
Patrick would be driving to the
shore. She was eager to start
the trip, but then Patricks
brother called and said he
needed his running shoes that
were in the trunk of Patricks
car. Patrick suggested the
parking lot as a meeting place
and asked Colleen to join him
in rummaging for the shoes.
It was just the two of us in
the parking lot. I said, Colleen,
I cant nd them. Will you help
me? Then I went down on one
knee.
After she said yes, the
bride-to-be was surprised by
the arrival of a limousine that
whisked the couple to her
parents home in Kingston,
where Neil and Mary Ellen
Horn had invited 100 peo-
ple to an engagement party.
Adding to the festivities was
an airplane that ew overhead
pulling a banner that read,
Congratulations, Colleen and
Patrick Engaged!
Soon there was another
celebration, exactly one year
before the wedding, dur-
ing which the couples pas-
MARYTHERESE BIEBEL
mbiebel@timesleader.com
EDITORS NOTE: Vows is
a series of stories telling how
a couple found each other. If
you would like to share the
story of your wedding, contact
Mary Therese Biebel at 570-
829-7283 or mbiebel@civita-
smedia.com.
Colleen Horn and Patrick Doyle recite their vows at St. Nicholas Church in
Wilkes-Barre.
The new Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Doyle prepare to depart from the church after
the ceremony.
Fred Adams Photos | The Times Leader
The church was crowded, with about 250 of the 300 wedding guests attend-
ing the ceremony.
So, what does a
doomed airplane
have in common with
a shimmering pond?
There are movies on
television. And then there
are movies on the big
screen, in all their cin-
ematic greatness.
Bill Bachman says there
is no comparison.
The senior instructor
of communications at
Penn State Wilkes-Barre
plans to demonstrate that
when the school sponsors
Five Great Films, Five
Great Genres, a lm-and-
discussion series begin-
ning this week. Over ve
Thursday nights, movie
fans who sign up can view
and discuss the movies
Airplane! a 1980 com-
edy; On Golden Pond,
an inspirational 1981 lm;
Raiders of the Lost Ark,
a thriller, also from 1981;
The Day the Earth Stood
Still, from 1951, listed
under the Cheers catego-
ry; and High Noon, a
1952 Western.
The movies will be
shown at R/C Wilkes-
Barre Movies 14 through
Oct. 24.
We do a different topic
every semester, Bachman
said.
In the spring of 2012,
for the 100th anniver-
sary of the Titanic sink-
ing, the course included
ve different lms on the
Titanic. On the last night,
two different people who
had a family member on
the Titanic attended the
screening. One persons
mother and anothers
grandmother survived the
sinking.
For this fall, Bachman
thought about what lms
people have seen but only
on the small screen.
My current under-
grad students have never
seen Airplane! on a big
screen, he said. These
lms are picked as they
are rated by AFI, the
American Film Institute. I
know every student I have
has seen Raiders of the
Lost Ark.
But likely not on the
big screen. Bachman said
seeing the movie on a the-
aters big screen will put
the students right in the
middle of the action.
Bachman puts The Day
the Earth Stood Still,
number 67 on AFIs 100
Years 100 Cheers list,
in the Cheers category,
because it is the type of
movie in which the audi-
ence cheers for a par-
ticular character. In that
movie, an alien lands in
Washington, D.C., to deliv-
er an important message
to humanity. Bachman
said High Noon is
always listed number 1 or
2 by AFI among Westerns.
He said each of the ve
movies has characteristics
that stand out.
With Airplane! the
most salient point is the
comedy that thing is
infused with, Bachman
pointed out. On Golden
Pond, I think what
makes it so inspiring is
the level of the writing
in On Golden Pond is
so top-notch. Katharine
Hepburn, Henry Fonda
and Jane Fonda bring
those characters to life.
He also noted a direct
correlation between the
release of Raiders of the
Lost Ark and the increase
JOE SYLVESTER
jsylvester@timesleader.com
Covering flms in fve genres, a popular
PSU flm course will get folks thinking
Rare Leonardo da Vinci codex nowat National Air and Space Museum
WASHINGTON A rare avian has
landed at the National Air and Space
Museum. Leonardo da Vincis Codex
on the Flight of Birds will be on dis-
play until Oct. 22.
Despite the title, Leonardo, in fact,
did not give any title to his codex, said
Giovanni Saccani, director of the Royal
Library of Turin. The codex has left
Italy only three times in 120 years.
Written between 1505 and 1506
when da Vinci was working in the court
of Milan, and painting the Mona Lisa,
the codex was broken up and pages sold
piecemeal after his death.
Passing through several hands,
the codex was listed at the Biblioteca
Ambrosiana in Milan in 1637. More
than a century later, in 1796, Napoleon
Bonaparte had the manuscript sent
to Paris. In the mid-1800s, a book
lover removed pages and sold them in
London. In 1892, a Russian reunited
most of the book.
Later, after additional missing pages
were discovered and added, the com-
plete codex ended up at the Biblioteca
Reale in Turin, Italy. The Biblioteca
Reale also holds a da Vinci self-portrait
from 1512.
This is the second time it has come to
the United States.
Italian journalist Silvia Rosa-Brusin,
the Royal Library of Turin and the
Italian space agency approached
Californias Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) to
put a digital scan of the codex on a chip
and put it on the Mars Curiosity rover,
said JPL Director Charles Elachi. So
we can truly say Leonardo is on Mars.
A video about the codex titled
Leonardos Flight was produced for
the Smithsonian for the exhibit by
Rosa-Brusin for Rai Radiotelevisione
Italia.
The codex a small 8-by-6-inch
notebook is being shown next to the
exhibit on early aviators, the Wright
Brothers and the Wright Flyer. Three
tablets nearby enable visitors to leaf
through the 18 pages electronically,
with an English translation on the left
and Italian on the right. During the rst
week, there will be timed ticketing. No
photography or videotaping will be per-
mitted.
Amid the technical drawings and
mirror writing is proof that da Vinci
reused his paper. One page has a gro-
cery list, which includes pollo, or
chicken.
Da Vinci was fascinated with all
aspects of ight.
Peter L. Jakab, chief curator of the
National Air and Space Museum, said
da Vinci produced more than 34,000
words and 500 sketches dealing with
ying machines and the nature of
air and bird ight, scattered over his
many writings.
Soaring near the codex is a recon-
struction of da Vincis design for an
ornithopter a man in a winged har-
ness on loan from Finmeccanica.
From military tactics he became
interested in aerial reconnaissance.
Most of Leonardos aeronautical
designs were ornithopters, machines
that employed apping wings for lift
and propulsions, Jakab said. But the
fundamental barrier of a ornithopter is
the demonstrable limited muscle power
and endurance of humans compared
with birds.
In other words, no amount of ap-
ping would ever make a human y.
TISH WELLS
McClatchy-Tribune News Service
Leonardo Da Vincis Codex on the Flight of
Birds will be on display at the National Air
And Space Museum through Oct. 22. This is
a model of Da Vincis Flying Machine donated
by Finmeccanica.
See VOWS | 14B
MCT Photos
The slender book illustrates Leonardo Da Vincis fascination with birds and flying machines.
IF YOU GO
What: Leonardo DaVincis Codex on
the Flight of Birds
Where: National Air and Space
Museum, Washington, D.C.
When: 10a.m. to 5:30p.m. daily
through Oct. 22
See MOVIES | 2B
Fall in Love
Tues Thur 10am - 7pm Fri, Sat, Mon 10am - 5pm
355 Market St. Kingston | 570. 763.0044 | ArchComfort.com
by
PAGE 2B Sunday, September 22, 2013 EXTRA www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Old Alner gets more than he bargained for once again
COMING OVER TO watch
the game? my buddy Alner
called as I got out of my car,
church bulletin in hand.
Wouldnt miss it, I
answered.
You know, he said, I won-
der what people did back in the
old days when Sunday was just
sitting at home, twiddling your
thumbs you know, before we
had these big TVs and every-
thing and all the stores had to
close.
Alner, I said, shaking my
head, the scantiness of your
knowledge never ceases to
amaze me. Lets take a trip.
Why do I give you these
openings? he moaned. Now
well miss the kickoff.
No we wont. My power of
metaphysical travel will get us
back in time a couple of gen-
erations, and
my theoretical
simultaneity will
freeze-frame the
entire NFL and
its legion of TV
commentators.
S o me t h i n g
smells good,
he said as we
strolled down a
Wyoming Valley
street on an early
autumn Sunday
in the 1940s.
Its called dinner with the
family, I said. For many of us
in 2013 it has been succeeded
by shopping with the credit
cards.
I can smell roast chicken and
pumpkin pie a mile away.
These folks have been
through a lot, I said. They
survived the Great Depression
and the war. They know whats
valuable and what they can do
without.
Dont they have any youknow
entertainment? Alner asked.
They have big, thick Sunday
papers, probably delivered by
a boy pulling a coaster wagon
full of them. New York, Philly,
the Independent, whatever
you want, he has. While moms
mashing the potatoes, dads
probably reading the funnies
to the younger kids and doing
goofy voices to keep them
laughing.
I can hardly even nd the
funnies today, he said.
Theyre a dying institution,
I said. We live in a grim time.
Hey, he smirked, they
dont have any TV.
No, but theyve got rst-
class radio. In the evening
theyll listen to some of the
best comedy ever Phil Harris,
Jack Benny, Our Miss Brooks.
Theres never been a mystery
show to equal The Shadow
either. Try putting an invisible
crime ghter on TV!
I dont see many cars on the
streets, he said.
A lot of neighborhoods are
pretty much self-sufcient.
They have little grocery stores,
which are closed today of
course, and there are clusters
of shops drugstores, variety
stores, restaurants and the like
not far away. And, let me be
clear about this, people used to
walk to where they wanted to
go, even if it took an hour or
so. Besides, during the week
theres great bus service.
OK, now lets say there was
a problem, like maybe little
Susie or Johnnie had a sudden
earache.
Good question, I nodded.
People helped each other back
in this time. Often relatives
lived close together, and there
was always somebody with the
right remedy.
Looks like party time,
Alner said, pointing to a family
standing on a front porch as the
dad knocked on the front door.
In a sense, I said. Folks did
a lot of visiting back and forth.
Whole families got together
in the evening or on Sunday,
sometimes just because they
were neighbors. Theres anoth-
er lost art.
With Alner uncharacteristi-
cally silent for a few moments, I
stepped in.
Lets not miss the game, I
said.
Yeah, lets not, he grinned.
Hey, I can tell you who todays
losers are.
Oh?
Us! If you hadnt picked a
Sunday, we could have loaded
up on chips and sodas for about
50 cents.
Tom Mooney is a Times Leader colum-
nist. Reach him at tmooney2@ptd.net.
Tom
Mooney
Remember
When
From page 1B
Movies
in enrollment in
archaeology courses.
The Day the Earth
Stood Still shows
there is hope for
humanity, and High
Noon exemplies
the best of everything
people want to see in
a Western, he said.
Developed about
10 years ago, the lm
discussion series that
takes place every fall
and spring is going
into its second decade,
Bachman said.
We started this on
campus at Penn State
Wilkes-Barre, he
said. Before it was a
one-credit academic
course for students.
Over time we broad-
ened it so the general
public could come in
for general education
credits, as well.
The course meets
the requirements for
primary and second-
ary education teach-
ers in Pennsylvania,
including 15 hours of
class for one credit.
The course was
held on campus until
recent years. Movies
14 invited the school
to show the movies
in the theater. This is
the third season in the
theater.
Those who wish to
take part must sign
up for the ve weeks.
Only students receive
a grade. They must
attend and participate
in discussions, and at
the conclusion of the
ve weeks, students
pick any two of the
movies and write a
paper at least ve
pages long comparing
and contrasting the
movies.
The general regis-
tration fee is $40 per
person and $20 per
person for Penn State
employees or alumni,
high school or college
students, high school
teachers, Greater
Wilkes-Barre Chamber
of Commerce mem-
bers and those who
previously attended
the lm and discus-
sion series.
IF YOU GO
What: Filmand discussion
series
When: 7 p.m. Thursdays
Sept. 26-Oct. 24
Where: R/CWilkes-
Barre Movies 14, 24 E.
Northampton St., Wilkes-
Barre
Fee: $40 per person, $20
for certain groups
More info: Registration
information at wb.psu.edu/
ce or 675-9253
Schedule:
Sept. 26: Airplane!
Oct. 3: On Golden Pond
Oct. 10: Raiders of the Lost
Ark
Oct. 17: The Day The Earth
Stood Still
Oct. 24: High Noon
ChalkFest to be held on the River Common
The Riverfront Parks
Committee is hosting the
fourth annual ChalkFest from
11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday
at the Millennium Circle
Portal on the River Common.
In the event of inclement
weather, the rain date will be
Oct. 5.
ChalkFest is a free event
that celebrates childrens
art and creativity while also
providing education about
nature and the environment.
Children of all ages and abil-
ity are invited and will be
given a box of sidewalk chalk
and a designated space to
draw. The River Common
will be lled with various
activity tables and exhibits
that promote both creativ-
ity and environmental educa-
tion.
The water education pro-
gram, Hydromania!, will
teach children about the
properties of water through
experimentation. Other
entertainment includes a
childrens yoga class at noon,
a balloon act, a magic show,
face painting, mural painting
and more. There will also be
vendors Johnnie Boys Crave
the Cart and The Lands at
Hillside Farms Ice Cream
truck on site.
Some members of the planning committee, from left: Vincent Cotrone, president, Riverfront
Parks Committee; Tim Walker, Restored Church; Jessica Kush, Riverfront Parks Committee;
John Maday, executive director, Riverfront Parks Committee; Allison Davis, Building Blocks
Learning Center; Jeanne Kenney, Riverfront Parks Committee; April Davies, Riverfront Parks
Committee; Laura Eory, Riverfront Parks Committee; and Dina Stewart, Balance Yoga Studio.
The Day The Earth Stood Still will
be the focus of the Oct. 17 event.
Airplane will be discussed during
the Sept. 26 session.
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www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER EXTRA Sunday, September 22, 2013 PAGE 3B
MenWe Reaped a tale of young lives lost too soon
HECTOR TOBAR
Los Angeles Times
Men We Reaped
by Jesmyn Ward;
Bloomsbury (272 pages,
$26)

Jesmyn Wards heart-
rending new memoir,
Men We Reaped, is a
brilliant book about beau-
ty and death. The beau-
ty is in the bodies and
the voices of the young
men she grew up with
in the towns of coastal
Mississippi, where a kind
of de facto segregation
persists.
There is C.J. Martin,
one of her many cousins.
He was small and lean,
angled all over with mus-
cle, Ward writes. His
face was shaped like a tri-
angle, and the only things
that were dark about him
were his eyes, which were
so deep in color they were
a surprise.
Ward lls almost every
page of Men We Reaped
with lyrical descriptions
of the people and the land,
much as she did with her
2011 novel Salvage the
Bones, which won the
National Book Award.
Men We Reaped is
at once a coming-of-
age story and a kind of
mourning song as Ward
describes her upbringing
in a poor Mississippi fam-
ily and the violent, early
deaths of ve young men
who were close to her,
including younger broth-
er Joshua.
One by one, the young
men die. Car accidents, a
suicide, a drug overdose,
a murder. Its a painfully
tragic story but also one
of community and famil-
ial strength. In the end,
Men We Reaped tells
the story of Wards own
salvation thanks to her
mothers grit and sac-
rice, her love for the
people around her and
the power of literature to
liberate the soul.
Early in her book, Ward
is a twentysomething col-
lege grad hanging out at
home with the kids she
grew up with. Over cray-
sh and beers, she tells
her friends that shes try-
ing to be a writer, one
who pens Books about
home. About the hood.
You should write about
my life, says Demond
Dedeaux, a bright young
man who is one of the few
in Wards orbit with a sta-
ble household but whose
future is limited to menial
jobs in the local service
and casino industries.
Most of the men in
my life thought their sto-
ries, whether they were
drug dealers or strait-
MCT Photo
Men We Reaped by Jesmyn Ward tells a story about growing up
black and poor in the post-civil-rights-era 21st-century South.
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laced, were worthy of
being written about,
Ward writes. Then, I
laughed it off. Now, as I
write these stories, I see
the truth of their claims.
Men We Reaped is
not a book about the sor-
rows of growing up black
in America. Rather, it
tells a story about grow-
ing up black and poor in
the post-civil-rights-era
21st-century South. Class
looms over the fate of
Wards family as much as
race does. Near the end,
Wards upper-middle-
class African-American
boyfriend makes a cameo,
and its clear that his life
couldnt be more differ-
ent than hers. Every
time some ill luck befell
my family, some unique
conuence of events that
bespoke what it meant
to be poor and Black
and southern, it shocked
him, Ward writes.
The Southern economy
has cratered, leaving fami-
lies adrift in towns such as
DeLisle. In spite of being
seen as a black commu-
nity by outsiders, DeLisle,
Miss., is really a place of
mixing, with African,
French, Spanish, and Native
ancestry all smoothed to
the dening Black in the
American South.
Ward and her siblings
are themselves a prod-
uct of this mixing. She
is closest to her younger
brother, Joshua, and she
offers this deeply moving
description of him act-
ing out as a slightly older
boy on the day their phi-
landering father nally
leaves home:
He ran around the
house, lap after lap
crying for Daddy. The
uncles and aunts ran after
him, caught him, held
him squirming to them,
told him to stop, but he
sobbed louder and fought
and squirmed in their
arms. He was six now, his
once blond afro shaved
short, and he was strong.
They let him go and he hit
the ground running and
crying. The boy runs for
hours, until he nally col-
lapses in tears.
Men We Reaped is
lled with many such
intimate and familial
moments, each described
with the passion and pre-
cision of the polished nov-
elist Ward has become.
We learn early in this book
that Joshua is doomed to
an early death. And yet in
each appearance here, he
is a fully realized charac-
ter rst as a boy and
then as a young man full
of life, a dreamer despite
his limited horizons.
DeLisle is also known
as Wolf Town, and its
a place that swallows up
dreams and turns them
into ghosts. At an early
age, Ward is given the gift
of a private education
at a school where she is
the only black student.
(The wealthy white fam-
ily her mother works for
pays her tuition.)
Ward is one of those
rare writers whos trav-
eled across Americas
deepening class rift with
her sense of truth intact.
What she gives back to
her community is the
hurtful honesty of the best
literary art. She writes in
Men We Reap of her
struggles to capture the
people of her community
and their many foibles
on the written page.
At rst, she writes, I
loved them too much:
as an author, I protected
them from death, from
drug addiction, from
needlessly harsh sen-
tences for doing stupid,
juvenile things. All the
young Black men in my
community had been prey
to those things in real
life, and yet in the lives
I imagined for them, I
avoided the truth.
The young men who die
in Men We Reaped are
all, in Wards telling, real,
awed and human. And
yet, not all can be said to
be directly responsible for
their own deaths. A kind of
dark fate hovers over Wolf
Town, with life cheapened
by societal neglect, preju-
dice and crime. The deaths
of Roger, Demond, C.J,
Ronald and Joshua, seem-
ingly coming one right
after the other, leave Ward
and her relatives feeling as
if theyve been through a
kind of war, Ward writes.
Men We Reaped
is the stirring and sad
record of that war, a quiet
violence that is sweeping
through many American
communities, but that
has not yet destroyed the
resilient people who live
within them.
When recovering from an
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sometimes, even the
simplest tasks can seem
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PAGE 4B Sunday, September 22, 2013 OCCASIONS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Falkowski, Hewitt
Announcement is made of the
engagement and upcoming wed-
ding of Danielle Morgan Falkowski,
Pittston, to Nicholas James Hewitt,
Pittston.
The bride-to-be is the daughter
of Phyllis and Joseph Falkowski,
Pittston.
She attended Bishop Hoban High
School and Florida Gulf Coast
University, where she earned a bach-
elors degree in legal studies. She is
pursuing her Juris Doctorate degree
at The Pennsylvania State University
Dickinson School of Law and plans to
graduate in May 2014.
The prospective groom is the son of
Janine and Brian Hewitt, Pittston.
He attended Riverside Junior-
Senior High School. He has been
employed at CPG International,
Moosic, for the past 10 years.
The wedding is set for Aug. 16 in
Nativity of Our Lord Parish, Duryea.
Crater, Kerestes
Stephen Joseph Kerestes III and
Mary Crater were united in mar-
riage May 24, 2013, in St. Stanislaus
Church, Wilkes-Barre, by the Rev.
Michael Kloton.
The bride is the daughter of George
and Irene Fristic, Wilkes-Barre.
The groom is the son of Stephen
Kerestes Jr., Plains Township, and
Deborah Kerestes, Nanticoke.
The bride was given in marriage
by her father. She chose her sister,
Anna Jones, as her maid of honor.
Bridesmaids were Megan Madjeski,
Jennifer Smith, Heather Kerestes and
Christine Peterlin. Daughter of the
bride, Alexis Crater, was the ower
girl.
The groom chose his father as his
best man. Groomsmen were Jeffry
Florek, Jeremy Smith, Sean Wasilesky
and James Larson. Son of the groom,
Ryan Gensel, was the ring bearer.
An evening reception was held at
the Genetti Hotel and Conference
Center, Wilkes-Barre. Reception
entertainment was provided by ABC
DJ Entertainment.
The bride is a 2003 graduate of
Coughlin High School and a 2009
and 2013 graduate of Kings College,
Wilkes-Barre, where she earned a
Bachelor of Arts degree in mathemat-
ics and a Master of Education degree
in curriculum and instruction with a
concentration in mathematics. She
is employed by the Wyoming Valley
West School District as a high school
mathematics teacher.
The groom is a 2003 graduate of
Coughlin High School and attended
Luzerne County Community College.
He works at Lion Brewery, Wilkes-
Barre.
The couple resides in Hudson with
their children, Alexis and Ryan.
Abdelmalek, DeVincenzo
Dr. Justin DeVincenzo and Dr.
Diana Abdelmalek were united in mar-
riage Sept. 22, 2012, at the historic St.
Clements Church, Philadelphia, by the
Rev. Gordon Reid.
The bride is the daughter of Af and
Shadia Abdelmalek, West Chester, Pa.,
Cairo, Egypt. She is the granddaughter
of the late Samira Ragheb, Cairo, Egypt,
and Noza and Youssef Abdelmalek,
Cairo, Egypt.
Thegroomisthesonof JohnandKathie
Clifford-DeVincenzo, Plains Township,
Pa. He is the grandson of Betty Clifford
and the late James Clifford, Scranton,
Pa., and Marie DeVincenzo and the late
Henry DeVincenzo, Mahopac, N.Y.
The bride was given in marriage
by her father. She chose her sister,
Sandy Abdelmalek, as the maid of
honor. Bridesmaids were Dr. Sarah
DeVincenzo, sister-in-law of the bride
and groom; Erin Johnson, cousin of the
groom; Laura Saleh, cousin of the bride;
and Kelly Shetron and Dr. Kim Ngo,
friends of the bride. Junior bridesmaids
were Olivia and Isabella Ragheb and the
ower girls were Jacqueline and Katelyn
Ragheb.
The groom chose his twin brother, Dr.
Michael DeVincenzo, as his best man.
Groomsmen were Dr. Mark Abdelmalek,
brother of the bride; Patrick Johnson,
cousin of the groom; and Dr. Christopher
Pino, Mark Burns and Donald Spicer,
friends of the groom. Ring bearers were
Dane Huggler and Tucker Rook.
An evening cocktail hour and recep-
tion took place at the Franklin Institute.
A rehearsal dinner, hosted by the
grooms parents, was held on Boat
House Row overlooking the Schuylkill
River. The post wedding brunch was
held at the Four Seasons Hotel. The
bride was honored with a bridal shower
given by her mother-in-law at Coopers
Seafood and at the home of Dr. Semia
Henein, Newtown Square.
Dr. Abdelmalek is a 2004 gradu-
ate of West Chester East High School,
West Chester, Pa., and a 2010 summa
cum laude graduate of the University
of the Sciences, Philadelphia, Doctorate
in Pharmacy. She is employed as a
patient safety specialist by AstraZeneca
Pharmaceuticals, Wilmington, Del.
Dr. DeVincenzo is a 2003 graduate
of Bishop Hoban High School, Wilkes-
Barre, Pa., and a 2009 cum laude gradu-
ate of the University of the Sciences,
Philadelphia, Doctorate in Pharmacy.
Justin is employed by Thomas
Jefferson Hospital, Methodist Campus,
Philadelphia, Pa.
Justin and Diana are members of Rho
Chi Honor Society, the Alpha Lambda
Delta National Honor Society and Phi
Lambda Sigma National Pharmacy
Leadership Society.
The couple honeymooned in Tahiti
and Bora Bora. They reside in Chester
Heights, Pa.
Adzema, Waligorski
Stefanie Sophia Waligorski and
Charles John Adzema Jr. were united
in marriage on June 8, 2013, at St.
Jude Church, Mountain Top, Pa., with
the Rev. Gerald Shantillo ofciating
the ceremony.
Parents of the bride are Richard and
Sophia Waligorski, Mountain Top, Pa.
Parents of the groom are Charles
Adzema Sr., Chula Vista, Calif., and
Marianne Adzema, Forty Fort, Pa.
Deborah Prokelia was the maid
of honor and Brian Adzema served
as the best man. Other attendants
were Charlene Adzema, Cristen
Chickerino, Janelle Klepacki,
MaiLynn Nguyen, Erik Adzema,
Richard Waligorski, Joseph Brozonis
and Bryan Jones. Jonathan Gorman,
Edward Kopec, Jonathan Kresge and
Brian Malys served as ushers. Angela
Adzema was a ower girl and Donald
Casterline III served as ring bearer.
Scriptural readings were given
by Suzanne Prokelia and Georgine
Brozonis. Gifts were presented by
Donald Casterline Jr. and Christina
Adzema.
A dinner reception was held at
Edgewood Golf Course, Drums, Pa.
The bride is a 2003 graduate of
Crestwood High School. She gradu-
ated with a Bachelor of Social Work
degree from Misericordia University
in 2007 and earned a Masters in
Social Work degree at Marywood
University. She is employed as a care
manager at United Health Group,
Philadelphia, Pa.
The groom is a 2004 gradu-
ate of Wyoming Valley West High
School and a 2008 graduate from
Pennsylvania State University. He
earned a Bachelor of Science degree
in energy, business and nance.
Charles is employed as a senior pro-
duction analyst for PPL Solutions,
Allentown, Pa.
The couple honeymooned to St.
Lucia. They reside in Lansdale, Pa.
McManus, Mertz
Alison McManus and Alexander
Mertz were united in the sacrament
of marriage Saturday, June 15, 2013,
in Bennett Presbyterian Church,
Luzerne, by the Rev. James Quinn.
The bride is the daughter of Robert
and Jane McManus, Wilkes-Barre.
She is the granddaughter of Robert
and Rita McManus and the late Dale
and Anne Rinker, all of Wilkes-Barre.
The groom is the son of Philip and
Maria Mertz, Forty Fort. He is the
grandson of George and Madeline
Mertz, Bainbridge, N.Y., and the late
Dinos and Jenny Bardoutsou, Patra,
Greece.
The bride was given away in mar-
riage by her father. Bridesmaids were
Abby and Lindsey McManus, sis-
ters of the bride. Groomsmen were
Michael Elias, friend of the groom,
and Bryan McManus Jr., cousin of the
bride.
A reading was given by Leanne
McManus, cousin of the bride.
A bridal shower was hosted by the
mother of the bride and the mother
of the groom at Irem Country Club,
Dallas.
Alison is a 2007 graduate of E.L.
Meyers High School and earned a
bachelors degree in marketing and
nance from Kings College in 2011.
She is employed by IBEW Local
Union 1319 in Wilkes-Barre.
Alex is a 2003 graduate of E.L.
Meyers High School. He earned a
Bachelor of Arts degree in political
science from St. Josephs University
in 2007 and earned his certicate
of education in secondary studies
from Kings College in 2012. He is
employed as a substitute teacher.
Culver, Ulichney
Corin Eileen Culver and John
George Ulichney IV were married
July 27, 2013, at First English Baptist
Church, Bloomsburg, by Pastor Lee
Barnhart.
The bride is the daughter of Paul
and Emily Culver, Shickshinny, Pa.
The groom is the son of John and
Joselle Ulichney, Mocanaqua, Pa.
The bride was given in marriage by
her father. She chose her best friend
since high school, Amanda Lazicki, as
her matron of honor. Bridesmaids were
Heather Seigfried, Melanie Hill and
Laura Lanning. Niece of the groom,
Camille Ide, was the ower girl.
The groom chose his best friend
since they were little, Nick Peck, as
his best man. Groomsmen were Greg
Mullins, Dustin Ulichney and Brandon
Culver. Nephew of the bride, Daniel
Seigfried, was the ring bearer.
The bride wore a Maggie Sottero,
lace sweetheart dress with ower
embellishments and a beautiful lace
train. She had a blusher over her face
which her father lifted to kiss and pres-
ent her to her groom.
Kristina Culver sang A Thousand
Years by Christina Perry during the
sand ceremony at the wedding. The
bride and grooms nieces, Julia Ide,
Grace Seigfried, Tawney Culver and
Madison Culver, helped the guests
before and after the ceremony.
The evening reception was held at
the Nescopeck Social Hall, Nescopeck.
Reception entertainment was provid-
ed by Ian MacDougall.
The bride is a 2006 graduate of
Berwick Area High School and a 2010
graduate of Bloomsburg University,
where she earned a Bachelor of Science
degree in special education and ele-
mentary education. She is employed
by New Story School in Wyoming, as
an autistic support teacher.
The groom is a 2005 graduate of
Greater Nanticoke Area High School
and a 2009 graduate of Bloomsburg
University, where he earned a bach-
elors degree in criminal justice.
The couple honeymooned in Myrtle
Beach, S.C. They reside in Kingston,
Pa.
The Sadowskis
Thomas and Dolores Sadowski,
Edison, N.J., recently celebrated
their 50th wedding anniversary at a
surprise party given in their honor
on July 7 at The Villa Gennaro
Restorante, Edison, N.J.
The couple was married on July
6, 1963, at St. John Nepomecene
Church, Luzerne, Pa. They have
resided in Edison, N.J., since their
wedding.
Thomas is the son of the late Lillian
Sadonski, Exeter, Pa.
Dolores is the daughter of the late
John and Mary Spirko, Swoyersville,
Pa.
They are the parents of Thomas
Jr. and his wife, Shary, Ewing, N.J.;
Linda Sadowski, Hillsboro, N.J.; and
Dianne Odman and Jeffrey Sadowski,
Kent, Wash.
They have four grandchildren,
Victoria and David Sadowski and
Kayse and Bailey Odman.
They will celebrate the Diocesan
anniversary Mass on Oct. 6 at the
Cathedral of St. Francis of Assisi
in Metuchen by Bishop Paul G.
Bootkonski.
The Nerbeckis
Robert and Susan Nerbecki, Plains
Township, celebrated their 25th wed-
ding anniversary in September. They
were married on Sept. 17, 1988,
at St. Stanislaus Kostka Church in
Wilkes-Barre by the late Rev. Stanley
Kalinowski.
Bridesmaids were Karel Zubris and
Carol Marino. Ushers were Bernie and
Stephen Nerbecki.
Mrs. Nerbecki is the former Susan
Gosciewski, daughterof JohnGosciewski
and the late Madlyn Gosciewski. Susan
worked for the Department of Disability,
Hearings Division, and retired this year.
Robert is the son of the late Stephen
and Irene Nerbecki. He works for
Geisinger Health Plan as a licensed rep-
resentative.
The couple celebrated with a spring
trip to Secrets Wild Orchard in Jamaica
and enjoyed the day with a great dinner
with friends.
Sharon Marie Skochen and David
Christian Amrowski were united in
marriage Sept. 15, 2012, at St. Faustina
Parish, Nanticoke. The ceremony was
ofciated by the Rev. James Nash.
The bride is the daughter of Joseph
R. Skochen, Shavertown, and the late
Bernadette Skochen.
The groom is the son of Charles and
Kathleen Amrowski, Mocanaqua.
The bride was given in marriage by
her father, Joseph Skochen. She chose
her niece and goddaughter, Emily
Brzozowski, as her maid of honor. Flower
girl was Meghan Duda, friend of the bride
and groom.
The groom chose his best friend,
Joseph Delaney, as best man. Calvin
Brzozowski, nephew of the bride, was
ring bearer. Ushers were Joseph Pirillo Jr.
and Evan Pirillo, cousins of the bride.
Scripture readings were given by
Madison Kachinko, cousin of the bride.
Offertory gifts were given by Charles,
Kathleen and Denise Amrowski, parents
and sister of the groom. Music was by
organist Robert Passetti and soloist was
their dear friend Juana Gyza. Bubble
distributors were Samantha Owens and
Robbie Kachinko, cousins of the bride.
Following the ceremony, an autumn-
themed evening cocktail hour and recep-
tion were held at Saint Faustina Grove,
Sheatown, at which the invocation was
given by their dear friend Deacon Florian
Gyza. A rehearsal dinner was hosted by
Diane and Dan Brzozowski, sister and
brother-in-law of the bride, at their home
in Plymouth Township.
The bride is employed by
Comprehensive Professional
Reimbursement, Inc., Dunmore, as a
remote emergency physician medical
coder.
The groom is employed by Linde
Corp., Pittston.
They reside in Shavertown.
Skochen, Amrowski
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www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER OCCASIONS Sunday, September 22, 2013 PAGE 5B
The OBoyles
John and Phyllis OBoyle, Dupont, are
celebrating their 50th wedding anniver-
sary . They were married on Sept. 21,
1963, in Our Lady of Mount Carmel
Church, now St. Joseph Marello Parish,
Pittston, Pa., by the late Rev. Nicholas
Pecci.
Their attendants were Patricia
Iannuzzo Wanalista, Mt. Laurel,
N.J., maid of honor; the late Thomas
Kazokas, best man; Paulette Iannuzzo
Jay, Auckland, New Zealand, brides-
maid; Robert Chapman, usher; and the
late Mary Ann Calabrese, ower girl.
Mrs. OBoyle is the daughter of
Winifred Iannuzzo and the late Louis
Iannuzzo, Dupont.
Mr. OBoyle is the son of the late
John and Annabelle Mahon OBoyle,
Scranton, Pa.
Theyaretheproudparents of Dr. Louis
OBoyle, Lakeville, Pa.; Linda OBoyle
Zaneski and her husband, Stanley,
Edwardsville, Pa.; Joseph OBoyle and
his wife, Christine, Malvern, Pa.; and Dr.
Amy OBoyle Neal and her husband, Dr.
Michael Neal, Lakeville, Pa.
They are the proud grandparents of
six, Rebecca Lynn and Stanley Zaneski,
Sean Alexander and Scott Andrew
OBoyle, Elisabeth Grace (Elle) OBoyle
and Christopher Curtis Neal, and are
awaiting the birth of another grandchild.
They celebrated the event with an
anniversary Mass at St. Joseph Marello
Parish, Pittston, followed by a recep-
tion hosted by their children at The
Gramercy Ballroom, Pittston, Pa., for
family and friends. A trip is planned for
next spring.
The Harrises
Raymond (Bob) and Melanie
Harris, The Village, Florida, former-
ly of Dallas, Pa., recently celebrated
their 50th wedding anniversary. They
were married on Aug. 31, 1963, in St.
Josephs Church, Hudson, Pa.
They lived in Hudson for eight
years and then moved to Dallas.
Melanie (Zielinski) and Ray have
two daughters, Helene Hobbis and
Raquel Fasciani. They also have four
granddaughters who live in New
Jersey and Georgia.
The couple celebrated their anni-
versary on a cruise to Hawaii in May
and then spent two weeks traveling
between New Jersey and Pennsylvania
with their family.
They have been in The Village for
12 years and are content to remain
there for the rest of their lives.
Ray worked for the post ofce
in Kingston and Melanie was a reg-
istered nurse at the Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital and the Department
of Veterans Affairs Medical Center.
She also had a career in real estate for
several years.
The Harrises
Mr. and Mrs. Harold D. Harris,
Wilkes-Barre, will celebrate their 50th
wedding anniversary on Sept. 28, 2013.
They were married on Sept. 28, 1963, by
the Rev. George Demuth in St. Nicholas
Roman Catholic Church, Wilkes-Barre.
Mrs. Harris is the former Elizabeth
A. Henry, Wilkes-Barre, daughter of
the late Louis and Hazel Henry, Wilkes-
Barre.
Mr. Harris is the son of the late David
and Edna Harris, Wilkes-Barre.
The couple has a son, Thomas, who
is an attorney with the State Supreme
Court of Nevada in Carson City, Nev.
A family dinner, given by their son,
was held in their honor.
The Barans
Lisa and Richard W. Baran, Hanover
Green, celebrated their 25th wedding
anniversary on Sept. 17, 2013.
Mrs. Baran is the daughter of Carole
and Bob Reedy, Exeter.
Mr. Baran is the son of Patricia and
Nick Baran, Hanover Green.
Lisa and Rick were married in 1988 by
the Rev. Clement Markowski in St. John
the Baptist Church, Exeter.
Attendants were Karen Reedy
Maguire, Linda Baran Bonsavage, Linda
Vensky Wagner and Mary Jo Montagna
Reedy. Ushers were Kevin Baran, Robert
Reedy, Brian Reedy and Rick Sepko.
Lisa and Rick have two children, Ricky,
22, a student at the University of Central
Florida in Orlando, and Kaylee, 18, a stu-
dent at East Stroudsburg University.
They are planning a family trip to
Florida to mark the occasion.
Births
Nesbitt Womens and Childrens
Center at Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital
Williams-Brister, Shaqueen and
Jason Halm, Sugar Notch, a daughter,
Sept. 6.
Haas, Kathryn and Jose Colon,
Plymouth, a daughter, Sept. 6.
Gomelko, Abigail and Scott,
Kingston, a daughter, Sept. 8.
Tavella, Dana and Joseph Franze,
Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, Sept. 8.
Milunic, Jill Chapin and Michael,
Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, Sept. 10.
Fitz, Samantha and Nathan, Glen
Lyon, a son, Sept. 10.
Walp, Jennifer and Galen Waltman,
Dallas, a son, Sept. 10.
Antosh, Kelly and Joshua,
Mountain Top, a daughter, Sept. 11.
Mosley, Melissa and Bruce Florek,
Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, Sept. 11.
Hudock, Alyssa and Austin
Garrity, West Pittston, a daughter,
Sept. 11.
Vest, Jessica, Hanover Township, a
daughter, Sept. 11.
Vincent, Samantha, Wyoming, a
daughter, Sept. 12.
Gilbert, Autumn and James,
Weatherly, a son, Sept. 13.
Centeno, Kimberly and Alton
Jenkins, Edwardsville, a son, Sept.
13.
Werkheiser, Victoria, Pittston, a
son, Sept. 13.
Walls, Delnah and Alton Kennedy,
New Jersey, a son, Sept. 14.
Tillman, Aisha and Kevin J.
Roberts, Wilkes-Barre, a son, Sept.
14.
Aponte, Yelitza Y. and Justin C.
Rivera, Pittston, a daughter, Sept.
16.
Alzahrani, Eman and Naif,
Kingston, a daughter, Sept. 16.
Tapia, Sonia and Daniel, Wilkes-
Barre, a son, Sept. 16.
Piazza, Danielle and Phillip Smith,
Duryea, a son, Sept. 16
Warman, Felicia Lynn and Eric
Scott Jones, Wilkes-Barre, a son,
Sept. 16.
Out-Of-tOwn Births
Loudon Hospital, Leesburg, Va.
Lucchino, Erin and Michael, Aldie,
Va., a daughter, Aug. 15. Grandparents
are Robert Lucchino and step-grand-
mother Judy Lucchino, Larksville; the
late Marilyn Lucchino; and Michael
and Pam Meador, Martinsburgh,
W.Va.
Wyoming Valley West
Class of 1968 holds reunion
women class members (above), from left, first row, are June Kulka sims, Diane Dukas Coleman, Patricia tribus sapolis, Betty Pope McCuen,
Deborah spock Zlotnicki, Carla Agresti finn, Deidre Miller Kaminski, Juanita wright sarnak, irene Orourke Mackiewicz, Barbara Coburn Davis,
Denise wildoner strickland, Maribeth Girton and sandra Davenport roberts. second row: Joy Kaufman hammerman, Barbara Morris Quinn,
Lynn Banta, Diane wujcik finnegan, Christine Pagoda, Alice rae Joyce Kutish, Marsha Menko sipper, Marianne Kolojejchick Matysczak, Molly
hourigan Malpass, Geni Kuchinskas Klein, rita ryneski Borzatti, shirley Myers, Donna Cacciatore siene, Lynn Karnofsky Ahmad, Karen Mundy
Grady, Betty Abraham Andaloro, Cheryl Levey, Linda Emershaw horvath, Mary naparlo hosey and Judith siarkowski shipe. third row: Donna
Kraynak Barto, Carol nawratowicz herbert, Maureen Gregg west, Erna James Benjamin, Donna Matson rybka, Marva weiss Myslak, Christine
Madaya Zambo and Louise hilla wassil. fourth row: tina Benkovsky randazzo, shelley Goldstein robinson, roberta Doughton toloczko, Karen
Lewis wagner, trudy norcross Olszewski, Beverly houck funk, Carol Allen hunold, ruth richards Krakosky, Lois slivinski santopietro, Edith
schultz Delnegro, Christine Michaels Adamski, Patricia Brannigan, A. Marie swire Marth, Peggy Adamski rovine, Elaine ricko Barnes and Amy
rome.
Back Mountain Chamber
sponsoring jazz event
the Back Mountain Chamber is presenting Back to Jazz from 6-10 p.m. on saturday at
huntsville Golf Club. the evening will feature a variety of live jazz performances and new
Orleans-inspired cuisine. Proceeds will benefit the Back Mountain Chamber. featured per-
formers are the indigo Moon Brass Band, Marko Marcinko Latin Jazz Quartet and trumpeter
nate Birkey with the Jim ridl trio. for more information and tickets, visit www.backmountain-
chamber.com/jazz. Committee members, from left, first row, are sandy race, terry Clemente,
Joanne Gensel, Cindy Post-Mitchell, Marko Marcinko, Lynn Pyskoty, suzanne DePrimo and
Cheryl summa. second row: Marty Leandri, Jim reino, Peggy hamilton, Chris Mochin, Amy
Campbell and royal sutton. Also on the committee are sonia Jones, Jack Jones, Cary Jeffcoat,
Laura novakowski, sam siracuse, Don webster and Malcolm williams.
Redmond,
Lipperini
Maggie Redmond, Wilkes-Barre,
and Joel Lipperini, Pittston, togeth-
er with their families, are pleased
to announce their engagement and
approaching marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Lois and Brian Redmond, Shavertown.
She obtained her Bachelor of
Science degree in nursing at Wilkes
University, a masters degree in nurs-
ing from Widener University and a
masters degree in healthcare admin-
istration from Trinity University. She
is employed at the Regional Hospital
of Scranton.
The prospective groom is the son
of Carol and Daniel Lipperini. He
obtained a Bachelor of Science degree
in marketing at Kings College. Joel
owns and operates Genesis Marketing
and Associates, a full service advertis-
ing agency; Lipperini Sales, a local
car dealership; and RaceLabz, a race
car preparation shop. He is an accom-
plished, four-time SCCA national
championship race car driver, holding
records at a number of racing venues.
The couple plans to exchange vows
on the Caribbean island of Aruba in
May 2014.
Robinson,Duaime
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Duaime,
Kingston, announce the engage-
ment and approaching marriage
of their daughter, Maria Anne, to
Matthew Jeffrey Robinson, son of
Jeffrey and Susanne Robinson, East
Longmeadow, Mass.
The bride-to-be is the grand-
daughter of the late Frank and Anne
Krackenfels and the late William and
Regina Duaime.
She is a graduate of Bishop Hoban
High School and earned a Bachelor of
Science degree in chemical engineer-
ing from the Massachusetts Institute
of Technology. She is employed by
Advanced Energy Economy.
Her attendants will be Piotr
Fidkowski and Matthew Peddie.
The groom is the grandson of the
late Joseph and Anne Macaulay and
the late Michael and Cora Robinson.
He is a graduate of East
Longmeadow High School and
Northeastern University, with bach-
elors and masters degrees in electri-
cal engineering. He is employed by
Three-C Electrical.
His groomsmen will be his brother,
David, and William Munro.
The couple will exchange vows on
Oct. 19, 2013, at St. Bridgets Church,
Framingham, Mass., where they
reside with their dog, Guinness.
Wyoming Valley West High School Class of 1968 held its 45th anniversary reunion July 26-28. A pre-reunion mixer
was held on July 26 at Yalick Farms, Dallas. The reunion took place on July 27 at The Woodlands Inn and Resort, Plains
Township, with The Neighborhood Band and a special appearance by Eddie Day Pashinski. An afternoon brunch was
held on July 28 at the boathouse of classmate Lynn Banta, Pole 13, Harveys Lake.
Men class members (above), from left, first row, are Elliot reiff, David wolfe, Joseph Osolnick, thomas Morris, John Dobish nash, richard Pries,
Charles wayne Bevan, william OBoyle, Joseph senick, David steever, John sipper, Joseph Laskowski and Joseph Zambo. second row: Edward
Mitchell, John Barto, Donald Austin, Daniel Austin, richard holzman, Park Johnson, robert figlock, frank Picchi, Charles ultsh, Edward Vnuk,
Paul Kutish, walter Bloom, Pierce hooper, John Michaels and robert Opet. third row: stanley Durtan, Joseph naparlo, ned Lynch, Michael Capp,
Max Blaskiewicz, David Dudek, Donald Bonawitz, thomas Kevin williams, Daniel Doughton, Lewis Attardo and MatthewCollura. fourth row: Mark
Ludwikowski, robert Masterson, Duanne Kersteen, Peter Beoris, ted Olshefski, David roberts, ronald hillard, robert Barney, Daniel walters,
Edward Matley, william London, robert shivy, Allen Austin, John Benkoski, ronald Brown and richard Devans.
PAGE 6B Sunday, September 22, 2013 BIRTHDAYS/COMMUNITY NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
GAR announces Homecoming Court
GAR Memorial High School recently announced its 2013 Homecoming Court.
The Homecoming game versus Holy Redeemer High School is scheduled for 7 p.m.
on Saturday at Wilkes-Barre Memorial Stadium. The Homecoming King and Queen
will be crowned prior to kickoff. Members of the Homecoming Court, from left,
rst row, are Marissa Yurchak, Breana Mosier, Madisen Nichol, Michelle Huertero,
Allyson Mulvihill and Abbigail Borum. Second row: Jahlil Harvey, Elijah Harris,
Joseph Arcelay and Rashaun Mathis. Third row: Korey Welkey and Richard Sickler.
Jenkins Township Lions plans ham dinner
The Jenkins Township Lions Club is conducting its annual ham dinner from
noon to 5 p.m. on Sept. 29 at the Jenkins Township Fire Hall, Second Street, Port
Grifth, behind Tonys Pizzeria. Take outs, with containers provided by the Lions
Club, will be available from noon to 5 p.m. Menu items include baked ham, scal-
loped potatoes, vegetable, apple sauce, coleslaw, rolls and butter, cake and coffee.
Tickets will be available at the door, or for advance sales, call any Jenkins Lion.
Participants are asked to bring a canned good for the Greater Pittston Food Pantry.
Planning committee members, from left, rst row: Danny Ball; Mike Dantone; Steve
Vitek, president; Victor Dsouza; and John Baloga. Second row: Stanley Rovinsky,
Jack Albert, Nancy Pappas and Jill Stahl.
IN BRIEF
DALTON: The 35th annual
family reunion of the family
of the late Michael and Helen
Sakelaridos, Wilkes-Barre,
was held on July 27 at the
home of James Saks and Terri
Sherman, Dalton. In atten-
dance were more than 34 of
their descendants comprising
four generations. Heading the
organization for this years
event were Sharon Bartos,
Terri Sherman and Gene
Pappas. Guests enjoyed swim-
ming and shing at the pond
on the property. The sun-lled
day was spent eating many
traditional Greek dishes and
American picnic favorites and
sharing family updates and
memories. In attendance were
two of Helen and Michaels
seven children, Sophie Pappas
and Joseph Sakelaridos. Their
other children, daughters
Marie Politis, Irene Rowe and
Betsy Lion and sons James
Saks and Michael Sakelarides
are deceased. Tayllor Capps,
Florida, traveled the furthest
to attend. The youngest in
attendance was Lila Pagniucci,
1, the great-granddaughter of
Sophie Pappas, who was the
oldest in attendance. Next
years reunion will be held on a
date still to be decided.
KINGSTON: The Hoyt
Library, 284 Wyoming Ave.,
is hosting a free workshop by
Jennifer L. Severini-Kresock,
NEPA Career and College
Counseling Association, for
high school students, college
students andtheir parents from
1-2p.m. onSaturday. Thework-
shop entitled, Standardized
Testing-Standardized College
Testing: Information and
Preparation, will address all
of the options for standard-
ized college admissions testing
and provide tips for successful
preparation. Registration is
required. Contact the library at
570-287-2013.
SWOYERSVILLE: The
Swoyersville American Legion
Auxiliary is hosting a meet
and greet from 2-4 p.m. today
in the main reception hall of
the Swoyersville American
Legion Post 644, Shoemaker
Street. There will be refresh-
ments, snacks and socializing.
Participants should bring a
snack to share.
HAPPYBIRTHDAY!
Elissa Florence Dennis,
daughter of Sean and
Robin Dennis, Waverly,
N.Y., is celebrating her rst
birthday today, Sept. 22.
Elissa is a granddaughter
of Barbara Dennis and Paul
Noonan, Wilkes-Barre,
and Mr. and Mrs. George
Young, Apalachin, N.Y. She
is a great-granddaughter
of the late Mr. and Mrs.
Alfred Perlowski. Elissa has
a sister, Faith, 6, and two
brothers, Devan, 11, and
Austin, 9.
Aleina Ivy Rose Hall-
Brown, daughter of Brandon
and Heather Hall-Brown, is
celebrating her rst birthday
today, Sept. 22. Aleina is a
granddaughter of Elizabeth
ODay and Richard and
Ivy Hall-Brown. She has a
brother, Zachery, 3.
Elissa F. Dennis
Aleina I. Hall-Brown
Timothy and Erik Nickas
Timothy and Erik Nickas, sons of Tom and Deanna
Nickas, Lain, are celebrating their fourth birthdays
today, Sept. 22. Timothy and Erik are the grandsons of
Vincent and Mary DeGiusto, Plains Township, and Rose
Mary Nickas and the late Tom Nickas, Stroudsburg. They
are the great-grandsons of Francis Coniglio, Stroudsburg.
Timothy and Erik have a brother, Tommy, 16, and three
sisters, Amberle, 21, Rachel, 19, and Jeni, 14.
Shane Macko, son of
Trish and Andy Macko,
Vernon, celebrated his
ninth birthday Sept. 19.
Shane is a grandson of
Joe and Roseanne Gates,
Centermoreland, and Tina
Macko and the late Andy
Macko, Wilkes-Barre. He
has a brother, A.C., 14, and
two sisters, Nicole, 13, and
Dana, 10.
Noah Garraoui, son of
Bechir and Nabiha Garraoui,
is celebrating his eighth birth-
day today, Sept. 22. Noah is
a grandson of Ahmed and
Aisha Bey, Tunisia. He has a
brother, Adam, 10.
Shane Macko
Noah Garraoui
Michael John
Stachowiak, son of Mike
and Megan Stachowiak,
Nanticoke, is celebrating his
sixth birthday today, Sept.
22. Michael is a grandson
of Bernard and Kathleen
Czeck, Mocanaqua,
and Mike and Janice
Stachowiak, Nanticoke. He
has a brother, Lucas, 8.
Michael J. Stachowiak
Patrick J. DePriest,
son of Sean and Nicole
DePriest, is celebrat-
ing his seventh birthday
today, Sept. 22. Patrick
is a grandson of Bonnie
Lahart, Swoyersville;
Thomas Lahart, Kingston;
and Edward and Margaret
DePriest, Exeter. He is a
great-grandson of Joseph
Pugliese, Wyoming. Patrick
has a sister, Leah, 9.
PatrickJ. DePriest
Logan Jacob Hite, son
of Tom and Maureen Hite,
Shavertown, is celebrating
his seventh birthday today,
Sept. 22. Logan is a grand-
son of Tom and Pat Hite
and Charles and Margaret
Burgerhoff, Dallas. He has
two brothers, Liam, 8, and
Wyatt, 5.
LoganJ. Hite
Alexis Rose Panzik, daugh-
ter of Dr. Lora A. Panzik and
Dr. Robert Panzik, Mountain
Top, celebrated her fth
birthday Sept. 21. Alexis is
a granddaughter of Nadine
Ebert, Nanticoke, and Wendy
Chichester, Terre Haute, Ind.
She is a great-granddaughter
of Ann Guravich, Nanticoke,
and Robert Panzik and
Robert Luffman, Bath, N.Y.
Alexis has a sister, Ella, 8.
Alexis R. Panzik
BIRTHDAYS
POLICY
Childrens birthdays (ages
1-16) will be published free
of charge. Photographs and
information must be received
two full weeks before your
childs birthday.
Your information must
be typed or computer-
generated. Include your
name and your relationship
to the child (parent,
grandparent or legal
guardians only, please),
your childs name, age
and birthday, parents,
grandparents and great-
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siblings and their ages. Dont
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Email your birthday
announcement to people@
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to: Times Leader Birthdays,
15 North Main St., Wilkes-
Barre, PA18711-0250. You
also may use the formunder
the People tab on www.
timesleader.com.
2013
Motown and More
featuring Souled Out Oct. 11
Ballroom With a Twist Oct. 26
The Graduate Nov. 15
Christmas with Sara Gazarek Dec. 6
2014
PROJECT Trio Feb. 7
Christopher ORiley Feb. 22
American Idiot March 7
Swan Lake March 29
Pedrito Martinez April 13
Box Ofce Hours:
Monday and Friday from noon to 5 p.m.;
Tuesday and Thursday, 1 to 5 p.m.,
Wednesday, noon to 7 p.m.
Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania
Celebrity Artist Series
2013-2014 Season
Adult tickets range from $35 to $45 Learn More:
www.bloomu.edu/cas
or call (570) 389-4409
Motown and More
Sara Gazarek
www.bloomu.edu/cas
Season Schedule
Motown and More
Sara Gazarek
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER COMMUNITY NEWS Sunday, September 22, 2013 PAGE 7B
Wyoming Area High School
Class of 1973 celebrates reunion
The Wyoming Area High School Class of 1973 recently celebrated
its 40th anniversary reunion weekend. An ice breaker was held
Aug. 30 at Coopers Pub, Pittston. A clambake was held on Aug. 31
at the Swoyersville American Legion Pavilion with entertainment
by Twins DJs. A memorial Mass for deceased classmates was held
on Sept. 1 at St. Barbaras Parish, Exeter, followed by breakfast at
Avenue Diner, Wyoming. Classmates in attendance at the clam-
bake, from left, first row, are Gloria Castellani Sekusky, Elizabeth
Rutkowski, JoAnn Barletta Pellegrini, Denise Maffei McGlinsey,
Maria Nilson Pacchioni, Diane Amato, Raline Mastruzzo Center,
Rebecca Rowlands, Jill Smith Space, Theresa Zibuck Guarino,
Bonnie Edwards and Gloria Cavello Kolbeck. Second row: Fred
Melvin; Mariella Bravyak Confair; Andrea Budash Prokopchak;
Mary Orzewski; Nancy Krause LaNunziata; Linda Hughes Thorne;
Lou Palmeri, class secretary; Alan Freed, class president; Joyce
Palum Mashinski; Joyce Matreselva Kubiak; Mary Kay Carchilla
Embleton; Mariann Alfano Liberati; and Maria Leandri Yonki. Third
row: Mark Lacina, Andy Hergan, Bob Yonki, Mike Marancik, Frank
Gubbiotti, John Grabowski, John Cenera, Alvin Bauman, Dotty
Martin, Mike Lizza, John Jurosky, Joe Bartoletti, Elmer Hurrey,
Warren Stahl and Bernie Serbin. Fourth row: Frank Goryl, Stan
Rushefski, Gary Hughes, Mike Venetz, Dave Sokach and Wayne
Lewis. Absent at the time of the photo was Lou Degnan.
West Side Central Catholic
Class of 1971 holds party
Graduates of the West Side Central Catholic High School Class of 1971 recently celebrated60 is the new 40 birthday party at The Grove
at the Checkerboard Inn, Trucksville. Graduates came from as far away as California, Colorado, Arizona and Georgia. The group also cel-
ebrated with an icebreaker the night before the party at Grotto Pizza. Aspecial guest was Mr. Strutcko, former football coach and English
teacher. At the event, from left, first row, are Carol Polocko Montgomery, Linda Hincken, Dorean Bonham Burkhardt, George Burkhardt,
Veronica Ciarufolli, Kate Bustin Taroli, Eileen Cadden Barto, Ann Pieczynski Hometchko, Linda Condusta, Barb Sedeski Regan, Denise
Goodwin Pace and Joanne Dillon. Second row: John Warnigaris, Donna Tobin Crawley, Sally Hogan Rothstein, Elaine Craig, Peter Salus,
Don Repshas, John Onzik, Maureen, Mary Roach Bailey, Ron Orkwis, Peter Kraynack, Cathy Narcum Wolfe, Peg Hennebaul Jesse, Jim
McAndrew; Third Row, Kate Kosek Kelly, Jeff Hosle, Joe Volinski, Patrick Beiter, Jim Regan, Tom Baloga, Bernie Walko, Tony Shamus, Don
Wolfe, Vince Velikis, Pat Stenger and Frank Lutinski. Absent from photo, Linda Baur Chase, Alexa Carros Loughlin, and Mary Jo Wolinski.
Breuer earns masters
degree in stage set design
Holly M. Breuer, granddaughter
of John and Jo Anne Rygiel,
Wyoming, earned a masters
degree of fine arts in stage
set design from Kent State
University in Ohio. She is a
graduate of Wyoming Seminary,
Kingston, and earned her bach-
elors degree in fine arts from
Syracuse University in 2008.
She earned a masters degree
in fine arts from Kent State
University in 2013. Breuer is
the daughter of Patricia Rygiel
Breuer, Penn Lake, and Lloyd
Breuer. Her sister, Heather, is
also a graduate of Wyoming
Seminary and has a bach-
elors degree from Penn State.
Breuer accepted a position at
BirminghamChildrens Theatre,
Birmingham Ala. At the presen-
tation of a bound copy of her
masters thesis to her grand-
parents are John and Jo Anne
Rygiel and Breuer.
Crochet group donates
blankets and booties
The Womens Crochet Group from the Plains Seniors Center
recently donated lap blankets and booties to area residents at
the Golden Living East Mountain Center. The group devoted many
hours into making these heirlooms. To donate to the group, call
570-822-7682. At Golden Living Center, from left, first row: Lillian
Sienkiewicz and Isabelle Meizanis, members of the crochet group,
and Carmella Saitta, resident. Second row: Marge McCarty, volun-
teer, Golden Living Center.
Birchwood residents
enjoy Casino Day
Residents at Birchwood Nursing and Rehabilitation Center recently
held a Casino Day. They enjoyed trying their luck at the Big 6 wheel,
horse races, roulette and Black Jack. Some of the participants, from
left, first row, are Ann Franklin, Frances Koblish and John Olshefski.
Second row: Marcia Luskey and Deborah Linkiewicz, activity assis-
tants.
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Rating Policy Parents and/or Guardians (Age 21 and older) must
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*No passes accepted to these features.
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***3D features are the regular admission price plus a surcharge of $2.50
D-Box Motion Seats are the admission price plus an $8.00 surcharge
First Matinee $5.50 for all features (plus surcharge for 3D features).
Man Of Steel in RealD 3D/DBox
Motion Code Seating - PG13 - 150 min -
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**Man Of Steel in RealD 3D - PG13
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*Man Of Steel 2D - PG13 - (12:00), (1:45),
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*This Is The End - R - 110 min - (1:30),
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The Internship PG13 125 min
(1:00), (1:45), (3:35), (4:20), 7:00, 7:40, 9:35,
10:15
The Purge R 95 min
(12:40), (2:45), (4:50), 7:30, 9:45
Now You See Me PG13 120 min
(1:30), (4:15), 7:05, 9:35
After Earth PG13 105 min
(2:00), (4:20), 7:25, 9:45
Fast & Furious 6 PG13 135 min
(12:50), (1:30), (3:40), (4:20), 7:00, 7:25,
9:50, 10:10
Epic PG 110 min
(12:30), (3:00), 7:15, 9:40
The Hangover 3 R 105 min
(12:45), (3:00), (5:15), 7:40, 9:55
*Star Trek Into Darkness RealD 3D
PG13 140 min
(1:15), (4:15), 7:30, 10:20
Special Events
World War Z & World War Z RealD 3D -
8pm on Thursday, June 20th
Monsters University & Monsters University in RealD 3D -
8pm on Thursday, June 20th
Friday Sept. 20th through
Thursday Sept. 26th
Battle of the Year 2D PG-13,
1hr 49min - (1:40), (4:10), 7:10,
9:40
***Battle of the Year 3D PG-13,
1hr 49min - (2:20), (4:50), 7:40,
10:05
Prisoners R, 2hr 33min - (2:00),
(3:00), (5:15), 7:00, 9:00, 10:10
The Family R, 1hr 51min -
(2:15), (4:45), 7:15, 9:45
Insidious: Chapter 2 PG-13,
1hr 45min - (1:45), (2:30), (4:15),
(5:00), 7:00, 7:30, 9:35, 10:00
Riddick R, 1hr 59min -
(1:50), (4:25), 7:20, 10:05
uRiddick DBOX R, 1hr 59min -
(1:50), (4:25), 7:20, 10:05
***One Direction: This is Us 3D
Extended Cut PG, 1hr 55min -
(2:30), (4:40), 7:20, 9:40
Youre Next R, 1hr 34min - 7:20,
9:40
Lee Daniels The Butler PG-13,
2hr 12min - (1:55), (4:30), 7:10,
9:50
Planes PG, 1hr 32min - (2:15),
(4:25)
Were the Millers R, 1hr 50min
- (1:40), (4:15), 7:15, 9:45
Grown Ups 2 PG-13, 1hr 40min
- 7:40, 10:10
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SCREEN 2
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MOVIES ONFRI., SAT., ANDSUN.
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Prisoners (XD) (r)
newmovie
12:00Pm3:20Pm6:40Pm
10:00Pm
You must be 17 with ID or accompanied by a parent to attend R rated features.
Children under 6 may not attend R rated features after 6pm
**Note**: Showtimes marked with a \\ indicate reserved seating.
8
0
0
9
8
9
3
7
Battle of the Year (3D) (PG-13)
new movie 2:45PM 7:55PM
Battle of the Year (DiGital)
(PG-13) new movie 12:10PM
520PM 10:30 PM
Blue Jasmine (DiGital) (PG-13)
1:35PM 4:45PM 7:15PM 9:40PM
ConJurinG, the (DiGital) (r)
10:10
familY, the (DiGital) (r) 11:55AM
1:20PM 2:45PM 4:10PM 5:35PM
7:00PM 8:25PM 9:50PM
GetawaY, the (DiGital) (PG-13)
8:00PM 10:15PM
GranDmaster, the (DiGital)
(PG-13) 10:25PM
insiDious ChaPter 2 (DiGital)
(PG-13) 1:00PM 2:20PM 3:40PM
5:00PM 6:20PM 7:40PM 9:00PM
10:20PM
lee Daniels Butler, the
(DiGital) (PG-13) 12:30PM 3:30PM
7:05PM 10:05PM
mortal instruments (DiGital)
(PG-13) 12:25PM 3:45PM
6:45PM** 9:45PM***
one DireCtion: this is us -
eXtenDeD fan Cut (3D) (PG)
3:50PM 9:20PM
one DireCtion: this is us -
eXtenDeD fan Cut (DiGital) (PG)
1:15PM 6:50PM
Planes (3D) (PG) 2:30PM 7:10PM
Planes (DiGital) (PG) 12:10PM
4:50PM
Prisoners (DiGital) (r) new
movie
1:40PM 5:00PM 8:20PM
Prisoners (XD) (r) new movie
12:00PM 3:20PM 6:40PM 10:00PM
riDDiCk (DiGital) (r) 12:20PM
1:30PM 3:10PM 4:25PM 6:05PM
7:25PM 8:50PM 10:15PM
smurfs 2 (DiGital) (PG) 12:05PM
2:50PM 5:25PM
sPeCtaCular now, the
(DiGital) (r) 12:15PM 2:40PM
5:05PM 7:30PM 9:55PM
unfinisheD sonG (DiGital) (PG-
13) new movie 1:55PM 4:30PM
7:20PM
were the millers (DiGital) (r)
2:05PM 4:55PM 7:35PM 10:35PM
worlDs enD, the (DiGital) (r)
12:00PM 2:35PM 5:10PM 7:45PM
10:35PM
Youre neXt (DiGital) (r)
12:40PM*, 3:50PM *
5:30PM*** 7:50PM***
10:10PM
*Does not play on Sunday 9/22 or
Wednesday 9/25
** Does not play on Tuesday 9/24 or
Wednesday 9/25
*** Does not play on Wednesday 9/25
PAGE 8B Sunday, September 22, 2013 PUZZLES www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE
BONUS PUZZLE
KENKEN
JUMBLE
The Sunday Crossword
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
Puzzle Answers
on 3F
HOROSCOPE
HOROSCOPE
ARIES (March 21-April 19).
Heres one rule that will
protect your time and
happiness: Dont give
unsolicited advice. Share
your expertise with those
who ask or pay for it.
Theyre the ones who will
value it.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20).
If you obsess and overana-
lyze, you will become tired
before youve handled all
of your work. If you start
to feel anxious, shift your
focus to the things that
help you access your inner
peace.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21).
Of course doing the same
things will produce the
same results. The change
you desire will begin
because of a choice you
make to try something
unfamiliar.
CANCER (June 22-July 22).
Conforming to the rules
of a culture is sometimes
necessary to survive, fit
in, influence others and
more. But conforming all
the time is soul-crushing.
You need your moments of
rebellion, too.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22).
Everyone experiences
things differently. But
today, your experience
will be completely differ-
ent from that of others
around you because your
sensitivity causes you
to feel things with great
intensity.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).
Youll be inspired by the
people you meet and the
stories you hear. Listening
to others and mirroring
their feelings and memo-
ries creates a great sense
of satisfaction.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).
You are a comfortable per-
son because you accept
yourself and try not to
judge anyone, includ-
ing yourself, too harshly.
Today you have a way of
bringing out a side of peo-
ple that they hide around
others.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
21). Does energy that is
directed at people really
make a difference in what
happens to them and how
they feel? You do your fair
share of sending out good
vibes just in case.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.
21). Lay down boundaries
to help you avoid having
another one of those con-
versations in which some-
one else feels better after
sharing their feelings and
pain with you, but you feel
worse.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19). Its strange how being
around certain people
can cause you to act out
of character. You may
find this liberating now,
as its fun not to know
exactly what someone
is going to do next, espe-
cially if that someone
is you.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18). The bear who craves
honey strongly enough
is willing to risk it with
the bees. Youre cleverer,
though. Youll stand by
and watch until you figure
out how honey can be had
with the least chance of
getting stung.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20).
A new opportunity is mas-
querading as the same-old
same-old. Once you give
it a familiar label, you
wont be able to see its
potential. So observe
more closely. Whats
different?
TODAYS BIRTHDAY (Sept.
22). Youre always watch-
ing out for a chance to
make someone smile.
Youll seek and find
romance in October.
November brings the end
of a battle. In December,
decisions fall in your favor,
benefiting your profession-
al status. Youll track down
a long-lost friend in 2014.
Rekindling the tie has
long-term benefits. Pisces
and Leo people adore you.
Your lucky numbers are:
36, 24, 13, 20 and 48.
HURRY!
Julian Lim
9/22/13
1. Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1 through 4. 2. The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners. 3. Freebies:
Fill in single-box cages with the number in the top-left corner.
Answers on Next
Puzzle Page
STONE SOUP/ by Jan Eliot
THE ARGYLE SWEATER/ by Scott Hilburn
SALLY FORTH/ by Francesco Marciuliano & Jim Keefe
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER COMICS Sunday, September 22, 2013 PAGE 9B
HERMAN/ by Jim Unger MALLARD FILMORE/ by Bruce Tinsley
GET FUZZY/ by Darby Conley
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM/ by Mike Peters
THE LOCKHORNS/ by Bunny Hoest & John Reiner
PAGE 10B Sunday, September 22, 2013 COMICS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER Sunday, September 22, 2013 PAGE 11B
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#19408A
2006 Kia sedona
PER MO.
$7,311 OR
$142******
#19472A
2013 CheVy iMpala
PER MO.
$16,483 OR
$248*
#19535
2004 hyundai sonata
PER MO.
$7,999 OR
$155********
2013 nissan rouge
PER MO.
$18,999 OR
$285*
#19533
PER MO.
$19,754 OR
$297*
2012 hyundai santa fe
#19537
#19415A, Sunroof, Only 44K
2013 CheVy Malibu
PER MO.
$19,980 OR
$299*
#19600
2008 Mitsubishi eClipse
PER MO.
$9,835 OR
$155****
#19458A
2013 ford eXplorer Xlt
PER MO.
$28,745 OR
$430*
#19583
2012 nissan Versa s
PER MO.
$12,986 OR
$195*
#19520, Only 3 Left At This Price
2013 CheVy equinoX awd lt
PER MO.
$23,988 OR
$359*
PER MO.
$16,555 OR
$249*
2012 honda aCCord
#19389
#19511
2013 hyundai sonata
PER MO.
$16,688 OR
$250*
#19609
2012 Kia optiMa
PER MO.
$17,354 OR
$260*
#19610
2013 ford esCape
PER MO.
$23,995 OR
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2012 toyota raV 4 4X4
PER MO.
$19,860 OR
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2013 hyundai tusCon
PER MO.
$22,816 OR
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PER MO.
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2013 Chrysler 300C awd heMi
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2012 hyundai sonata
PER MO.
$14,999 OR
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2012 CheVy Malibu zlt
PER MO.
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2012 Jeep liberty
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2013 nissan Murano
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$15,995 OR
$240*
2013 Vwpassat
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per Mo.
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PAGE 12B Sunday, September 22, 2013 TRAVEL www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Newtours combine biking with local breweries
Beer lovers are nding
a new way to explore the
burgeoning craft-brewing
world: on bicycles.
From Oregon to New
Mexico to Vermont, beer
acionados can now hop on
a bike and be led from one
brewery to another.
After sampling the latest
microbrew, they can then
pedal away all those extra
calories.
The tours, which range
from a few hours to several
days, offer a chance to meet
other travelers, learn about
the local culture and, of
course, sample some great
beer.
And each tour has a dif-
ferent strategy for prevent-
ing biking under the inu-
ence, from limiting tastes
to 4 ounces and providing
a back-up van, to saving the
swigs for the end of the trip.
Heather Wess Arnold and
her husband, Josh, owners
of Routes Bicycle Rentals &
Tours in Albuquerque, took
their love for beer and bik-
ing and combined them in a
tour in April.
We were expecting it to
be mostly tourists, but its
also been a lot of locals, she
said.
Novice riders will appre-
ciate the bicycle-friendly
paths, lanes, roads with
light trafc. Beer-lovers can
enjoy visits to at least three
breweries. The $45 tours
rental included are
offered the third Sunday of
each month.
Every three months, the
tour is changed so people
can learn about new neigh-
borhoods and new beers.
The three-and-a-half to four-
hour tours cover 10 to 15
miles.
Along the way, bikers
learn about the history of
brewing in Albuquerque,
some local trivia and are
given backroom tours of the
breweries, led by the master
brewers.
Some of the spots even
let bikers participate in the
process, adding the hops or
stirring the mash.
There are three to four
tastings each 4 ounces
at each brewery. Plenty
of water is served, and
Wess Arnold says the tour
spreads out the drinking to
keep bikers under the legal
limits of driving um,
biking while under the
inuence. A vehicle follows
the group in case anyone
becomes too impaired to
bike.
So far that hasnt had to
happen, she said.
The vehicle also offers a
way for bikers to transport
any six-packs or growlers
of beer, T-shirts and pint
glasses without worrying
about juggling the souvenirs
on the bikes.
For those looking for a
bit more of a challenge,
Sojourn Bicycle Vacations
offers a Vermont Bike &
Brew tour. The six-day,
ve-night trip is geared
toward more avid cyclists
who ride 50 miles a day and
includes many hills.
It just combines some
great riding and some of
the worlds best craft brew-
eries, said Susan Rand,
president of the company.
We do more riding than
drinking.
The group stops at seven
breweries along the way
but also ends each day with
some local beers out of a
cooler. One night, there is
a private chefs beer-pairing
dinner led by the brew-
master from Otter Creek
Brewing.
The 18-person trip, which
goes for $2,195 per person,
covers the rural back roads
of Vermont.
Bob Gross, 63, and his
wife Cyndy, 54, were on
the rst tour last summer.
Theyve done wine bike
tours but thought it was
time to learn more about
beer. More than 20 years
ago, she bought him a
home-brewers kit and hes
been hooked ever since.
I like specialty beers, I
love microbrewers, he said.
All our bike trips gravitate
toward alcohol.
She loves Michelob Ultra
but went along on the trip
because they bike together
two to three times a week.
The cool thing about the
trip, you got to meet the
brew masters. You learn a
lot about the business, he
said.
As for getting drunk while
biking, he said, Youre just
really sipping a very small
amount.
Most of the drinking hap-
pens at the end of the day.
Mount Major Adventures
offers customized Vermont
Bike and Brewery tours
that visit more than a dozen
breweries in the state over
a four- to eight-day period.
Too exhausted to think
about that much biking?
Well, there are plenty of
other day trips out there
includingthose offeredsince
2008 by Cycle Portland Bike
Tours in Oregon.
Owner Evan Ross sums
up the tours as a great way
to work off some calories
and build up some thirst.
The group visits three
breweries over three hours
and then ends in the bike
shop where there is a keg
of beer from another local
brewery. Like all of the
tours, Ross tends to change
the beers with the seasons
and his tastes.
The $40 tour used to
include alcohol, but Ross
said people got too wast-
ed. Now, participants pur-
chase drinks a la carte along
the way. This way, no one
feels like the need to nish
every beer to get their mon-
eys worth.
Other companies around
the country offering simi-
lar trips include Beer &
Bike Tours in Fort Collins,
Colo., and Motor City Bike
& Brew Tours in Detroit,
which focus on the citys
brewing revitalization
as well as sites from the
Prohibition era.
SCOTT MAYEROWITZ
Associated Press
AP photos
Bikes are parked outside Il Vicino Canteen in Albuquerque, N.M.,
on a brewery tour. Bike tours that take beer-lovers to visit craft
breweries are offered around the country.
A brewery tour group relaxes at Marble Brewery in Albuquerque, N.M.
Patrick McGraw, M.D.
Harvey Reiser, M.D.
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www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER PUZZLES Sunday, September 22, 2013 PAGE 13B
For information about WonderWord volumes and Treasuries, call Universal Press Syndicate at 1-800-255-6734.
WONDERWORD
By David Ouellet
Cryptograms New York Times
Bonus Puzzle Diagramless
GOREN BRIDGE
LAST WEEKS PUZZLE ANSWERS
WITH OMAR SHARIF
& TANNAH HIRSCH
1995 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU KIDS
MINUTE MAZE
PREVIOUS DAYS SOLUTION
PREVIOUS SUNDAYS SOLUTION
For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com
O N T H E W E B
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Angeles,
CA 90069
9/22
DEAR ABBY
Driver puts phone out of
reach after a close call
Dear Abby:
The other
day, while
backing out
of a park-
ing space,
I nearly hit
a woman who was walking
behind my car with her tod-
dler son. I didnt see them
because I was dialing my
cellphone and was distract-
ed. The woman rightfully
yelled at me to pay attention
and get off my phone, and al-
though she was gracious and
encouraged me to consider
it a wake-up call, I didnt
react as kindly to her out of
embarrassment. Instead, I
became defensive and didnt
apologize, even though it
was my fault.
I shudder to think of what
might have happened, and
I admit this wasnt the first
close call Ive had. Im a
married mother of two and
should know better.
While I cant go back and
find her, I hope the woman
sees this letter. I want her to
know that because of that in-
cident, I now lock my purse
and phone in the trunk or
place them on the backseat
out of reach before I start
my car. This way, I avoid the
temptation to look at mes-
sages or make a call.
I have also asked my kids
to keep me accountable by
reminding me if I happen to
forget. They will be driving
in a few years, and I want to
set a good example for them.
Please pass this idea along
especially to moms like
me who try to multitask in
the car.
Hands On the Wheel in
California
Dear Hands On The Wheel:
Your suggestion of placing
your purse and phone on the
backseat is a good one. You
are really lucky you didnt
kill or seriously injure that
mother and her child. Re-
gardless of whether or not
the woman sees your letter,
I hope it will remind other
drivers of the danger of driv-
ing while distracted.
And while Im on the sub-
ject, I read an article recently
that discussed distracted
WALKING. According to
U.S. Secretary of Transporta-
tion Anthony Foxx, this has
caused an increase in pedes-
trian deaths. In 2011, more
than 1,500 pedestrians were
treated in emergency rooms
because of injuries they suf-
fered while using a portable
electronic device.
The safest course of action
is to do only one thing at a
time, and to be fully present
while doing it.
Dear Abby: I have been
divorced for 13 years, and I
often wonder how to fill out
questionnaires that ask my
marital status. I have recent-
ly started checking single
because enough time seems
to have passed, and I dont
define myself by my divorce.
However, now Im wonder-
ing if theres a certain eti-
quette recommended.
Status Unknown in Ohio
Dear Status Unknown:
Honesty is recommended.
As much as you might like
to present yourself that way,
you are no longer single. As
someone who has been mar-
ried and divorced, you are a
divorcee and you will be
until you remarry. Saying
you are single is a misrepre-
sentation of the facts.
Dear Abby: I have a son-in-
law whom I hate to ask ques-
tions. He goes into so much
detail that Im always sorry
I asked. Is there any way to
make him get to the point?
Likes It Brief
Dear Likes It Brief: Yes.
Explain that when he goes
into so much detail, you can
remember only 10 percent of
what he says, so please get
to the point. And when he
forgets, remind him.
Good advice for everyone
teens to seniors is
in The Anger in All of Us
and How to Deal With It.
To order, send your name
and mailing address, plus
check or money order for
$7 (U.S. funds) to: Dear
Abby, Anger Booklet, P.O.
Box 447, Mount Morris, IL
61054-0447. (Shipping and
handling are included in the
price.)
To receive a collection of Abbys most memorable and most
frequently requested poems and essays, send a business-
sized, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for
$3.95 ($4.50 in Canada) to: Dear Abbys Keepers, P.O. Box
447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included.)
A D V I C E
KenKen
9/22
New York Times
9/22
Bonus Puzzle
9/22
tor, Monsignor Joseph
G. Rauscher, blessed the
engagement ring. Its a
family tradition, Mary
Ellen Horn said, explaining
her parents, Jack and Cece
McCarthy, had arranged
similar ring blessings when
she, her brother and her sis-
ter each became engaged.
Then the planning began
in earnest. The bride found
a dressmaker to custom-sew
a gown and complemented
it with a 12-foot veil. Three
hundred guests were invited,
and a ower girl and two
ring bearers were chosen,
along with 11 bridesmaids
and 11 groomsmen, many
of them friends since child-
hood.
We each have friends
we went to school with that
we still spend a lot of time
with, Colleen said.
The grooms parents,
Patrick and Maureen Doyle,
arranged a rehearsal party
at the Luzerne County
Courthouse. Its a beautiful
building that so many people
dont get to see unless they
have jury duty, the bride
said.
In honor of our very Irish
grandfathers, a bagpiper
greeted the couple at the
church, which was decorated
with white orchids on golden
tree branches, giving some
guests the impression of an
enchanted forest. The offer-
tory gifts, carried by the god-
parents of the couple, includ-
ed donations to the bride and
grooms favorite charities.
We wanted to come back
here, and we want to try to
make Wilkes-Barre a little bit
better, Colleen said, noting
the couple enjoys serving on
the boards of the St. Vincent
de Paul Kitchen and Big
Brothers/Big Sisters.
The reception was at the
Radisson in Scranton, fol-
lowed by an afterglow
and, the next morning, by a
breakfast. The honeymoon
is a trip to Mexico and, upon
their return, the couple will
move into a new home in
Plains Township.
PAGE 14B Sunday, September 22, 2013 EXTRA www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
From page 1B
Vows
Fred Adams photos | The Times Leader
Above: The new Mr. and Mrs.
Patrick Doyle prepare to depart
from the church after the
ceremony. Right: The happy couple
shares a kiss after their wedding
ceremony; Far right: The couple
shares a laugh.
601 Market St., Kingston, PA 288-9311
Penn State vs UCF
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Booking Deadline Oct. 24th!!
Harrisburg
March 23
April 27
Lancaster
April 20
June 8
2014 Departure Dates
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton
March 2
March 9
March 30
April 13
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April 6
May 4
May 25
June 1
June 15
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Fly nonstop to Orlando from local airports!
Flights depart early Sunday morning and return the
following Saturday evening on select dates, giving you
seven full days in sunny Orlando, Florida. There are no
hidden fees for seat assignments or luggage!
2014 Orlando Charter Dates
Contact or visit us within Boscovs Department Store.
15 S. Main Street, Wilkes-Barre 570-823-4141
See the World with Globus and Boscovs Travel
Thursday, September 26, 2013 | 6:30pm - 8:00pm
Discover Disney
Saturday, October 05, 2013 | 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Join our Boscovs Travel Specialists for a fun and informative seminar on whats new at Walt Disney
World and everything else needed to plan a magical vacation. This event will be held in the Sophia
Room, Boscovs Travel Wilkes-Barre.
Please contact Boscovs Travel Wilkes-Barre to reserve your seats. Call 570-823-4141 or email us
bostravwilkesbarre@boscovs.com
Learn about escorted tours to Europe and the USA, plus exciting river cruises throughout the world.
Refreshments will be served and door prizes awarded. This event will be held in the Sophia Room,
Boscovs Travel Wilkes-Barre.
A CHRISTMAS STORY DEC. 11 Madison Square Garden
BROADWAY: Wicked, Motown, Les Miserables, Pippin, Aladdin
BLOOMSBURG FAIR SEPT. 28 Round-Trip Transportation only
9/11 MEMORIAL SEPT. 28 Free Time in New York City
PA GRAND CANYON OCT. 5 Covered-Wagon Tour, Lunch, Wellsboro
ENGLISHTOWN FLEA MARKET OCT. 5 Acres of savings!
PHILA. GHOST TOUR OCT. 12, 19 Eastern State Penitentiary, too
SHIP WRECK! PIRATES & TREASURES EXHIBIT OCT. 19 NYC
Discovery Center. Hundreds of gold & silver artifacts!
PEDDLERS VILLAGE APPLE FESTIVAL NOV. 2
KING OF PRUSSIA MALL SHOPPING NOV. 2
CONNECTICUT CASINOS NOV. 12-14 Foxwoods, Mohegan Sun
GIANTS: Eagles Oct. 6, Vikings Oct. 21, Packers Nov. 17
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Martz Specials are subject to Availability.
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timesleader.com
THETIMES LEADER Sunday, September 22, 2013
SECTION C
McGrath ready
to fght for spot
TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
Patrick McGrath skated onto the ice at Coal Street
for the rst day of Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins
training camp hoping to eventually make a bit of his-
tory.
McGrath, who grew up in the Back Mountain, hopes
to become the rst player who was born and trained in
the area to skate for the Penguins. Its a goal that the
20-year-old Lake-Lehman graduate set years ago.
Now, with Saturdays start of training camp,
McGraths goal is as attainable as ever.
It was a pretty special feeling. I grew up here
watching (the Penguins), he said. Guys like Tom
Kostopoulos and Andy Chiodo those were guys I
looked up to and Im just trying to follow their foot-
steps.
Kostopoulos and Chiodo are also in camp, so
McGrath is getting an opportunity to skate with some
of his childhood heroes.
But he isnt treating his invite to training camp as
simply a goodwill gesture. McGrath, who is a physical
winger with a penchant for dropping the gloves, has
been paying his dues to get to this level. He spent the
last two seasons in the Quebec Major Junior Hockey
League, where he was tops last season with 29 ghting
majors.
And in the offseason, McGrath has
trained religiously with Penguins train-
Don Carey | For The Times Leader
Penguins forward Patrick McGrath, front, approaches the goal dur-
ing training camp at Coal Street on Saturday morning.
Wilkes defense strong
in loss to Widener
DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
EDWARDSVILLE Looking to
avenge embarrassment at the hands of
Widener a year ago, Wilkes fell short of
a victory on Saturday.
But in the 21-0 loss to the Pride at
Schmidt Stadium, the Colonels take the
good with the bad.
First the good.
The Wilkes defense picked up four
turnovers three interceptions and a
fumble recovery including three in
the red zone, and sacked Widener quar-
terback Seth Klein three times.
Senior linebacker Tate Moore-Jacobs
was all over the Pride on Saturday after-
noon. He registered one of the sacks,
piled up a game-high 17 tackles and four
tackles for a loss. The unit only allowed
14 points as one of Wideners touch-
downs was an interception return.
I thought the defense created some
opportunities for us today that obvi-
ously youd like to take advantage of,
Colonels coach Frank Sheptock said. I
thought our players demonstrated some
great energy and enthusiasm. So Im
very pleased with our effort all around.
Speaking of the interception return,
that begins the not-so-good stats for the
Colonels, who fell t0 1-2 on the season
and 0-2 in the MAC.
Starting quarterback Tyler Berntsen
looked good early on. But the senior
only lasted one drive. On the last play
of the Colonels rst possession of the
game, he was sacked, left with an injury
to his non-throwing arm and did not
return. His replacement, sophomore
Dan Van Mater threw a pair of intercep-
tions, including the one returned for a
59-yard score in the third quarter that
put Widener ahead 14-0.
But on the return, Van Mater suf-
fered a leg injury, left the game and
did not return. Third-string fresh-
man Taylor Young, from peren-
nial state powerhouse Southern
Columbia, entered the game. He, like
Van Mater, only had two completions
See WILKES | 8C See PENGUINS | 8C
Fighting Irish fend of upset bid
TOM COYNE
Associated Press Writer
SOUTH BEND, Ind. Cam
McDaniel scored on a 7-yard run
following a questionable pass
interference call, one of several
penalties that hurt Michigan
State, as Notre Dame beat the
Spartans 17-13 Saturday for
their 10th straight home win.
The Irish (3-1) also took
advantage of another question-
able pass interference in the rst
half that set up a 2-yard touch-
down pass from Tommy Rees to
TJ Jones and a holding penalty
that kept alive a drive that led
to a 41-yard eld goal by Kyle
Brindza. The Spartans (3-1) had
10 penalties for 115 yards by the
Big Ten ofcials.
But Michigan State made
some costly mistakes on its own,
including a trick play after the
Spartans appeared to be gain-
ing momentum. After open-
ing the second half with a eld
goal, receiver R.J. Shelton threw
a pass that was intercepted by
safety Matthias Farley and led
to Notre Dames go-ahead touch-
down.
Michigan State had a chance to
tie the game in the fourth quar-
ter when Connor Cook threw a
19-yard pass to Bennie Fowler
to drive to the Notre Dame 14,
but the drive stalled. Irish line-
backer Dan Fox tackled Nick Hill
for a 5-yard loss, receiver Aaron
Burbridge was called for a false
start and Nick Hill dropped a
shovel pass, one of several drops
by Michigan State receivers, and
the Spartans had to settle for a
42-yard eld goal by Michael
Geiger.
The Spartans entered the game
with the nations No. 1 defense,
allowing 50 yards a game rush-
ing, 127 yards a game pass-
ing and its defense had scored
four touchdowns, which is also
how many touchdowns it had
allowed. They stopped the Irish
on the ground, holding them to
82 yards, and holding Rees to
AP photo
Notre Dame safety Matthias Farley, left, intercepts a pass intended
for Michigan State wide receiver Bennie Fowler (13) during the
second half Saturday in South Bend, Ind. Notre Dame defeated
Michigan State 17-13.
See IRISH | 5C
BACK ON
TRACK
PSU defense rebounds,
shuts out Kent State
DEREK LEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com
STATE COLLEGE A soggy
and sleepy afternoon at Beaver
Stadium was stirred to life by Bill
OBrien.
Shortly after his defense righted
itself with a 34-0 pasting of Kent
State, the Penn State coach grew
irritated that much of the post-
game discussion was about the
Nittany Lions offense.
You guys need to ask me some
defensive questions. Defense just
pitched a shutout, OBrien said
to reporters, his voice rising as he
gathered steam. You guys were all
over em last week, and they just
pitched a shutout. So can we get
some defensive questions?
He didnt wait for one to come,
drawing some laughs.
I thought the defense played a
hell of a football game today, he
continued, uninterrupted. They
pitched a shutout. And I think
(defensive coordinator) John
Butler and that crowd of coaches
over there and that crowd of play-
ers over there did a hell of a job.
Well, all right then.
Penn States defensive leaders
challenged the unit right from
the rst practice following a
last weeks 34-31 loss to Central
Florida.
Against UCF, the Lions (3-1)
looked out of position and a step
behind. They missed tackles. They
couldnt get that one big stop to
turn the game around.
On Saturday, through perpet-
ual rain, Kent State never stood
a chance against a re-energized
defense that pitched Penn States
rst shutout since 2010. As it so
happens, that one came against
Kent as well.
The Lions held the Golden
Flashes to just 190 yards of total
offense after surrendering more
than 500 a week ago.
Hey look, any time you go out
Lions get a big kick out of Ficken
PAUL SOKOLOSKI
psokoloski@timesleader.com
STATE COLLEGE Up, up and
away the football sailed into the night,
rising above the rst level of the stands,
cutting through the raindrops and knif-
ing between the uprights.
Sam Ficken never even saw it take
this historical ight.
He kicked the ball so hard, Ficken
spun himself around trying to drive a
54-yard eld goal through a steady rain
Saturday. But he didnt have to watch it
to know it was good.
All he had to do was look at the reac-
tion of his holder.
Alex Butterworth jumped up and
spun around, Ficken said of Penn
States punter who has been doubling
as a holder on the teams eld goal
attempts lately. I had no idea if it went
in or not. I could tell from his reaction
it went in. It felt pretty good.
It should have felt like a dening
moment in Fickens kicking career.
No other kicker in Penn State history
ever converted a kick as far as 54 yards
at Beaver Stadium.
The last Lions kicker to connect on
one of that distance came in a road
game more than three decades ago,
when Herb Menhardt nailed a 54-yard
against North Carolina State in 1979.
Only one other Nittany Lions kicker
connected on a longer eld goal, and
that was Chris Bahr who made three
55-yarders in 1975.
And just two other kickers hit a
53-yard eld goal at home for Penn
State, the last coming when Kevin
Kelly accomplished the feat in 2007.
The fact that Fickens 54-yard eld
goal came at the very end of Penn
Penn State
running back
Zach Zwinak
(28) tries to
elude Kent
State defen-
sive lineman
Ro o s e v e l t
Nix (5) in
the first half
of an NCAA
college foot-
ball game
in State
College, Pa.,
S a t u r d a y ,
Sept. 21,
2013. Penn
State offen-
sive tackle
Adam Gress
(58) tries to
block Nix.
AP photo
PENN STATE 34. KENT STATE 0
See DEFENSE | 3C See FICKEN | 3C
RPI 23, Castleton St. 8
Rutgers 28, Arkansas 24
Sacred Heart 78, Chowan 35
Shippensburg 41, East Stroudsburg 31
Springfeld 41, Mount Ida 0
St. Francis (Pa.) 38, Lincoln (Pa.) 7
Syracuse 52, Tulane 17
Trinity (Conn.) 28, Bates 17
Ursinus 20, Franklin &Marshall 9
Vanderbilt 24, UMass 7
Villanova 35, Stony Brook 6
W. Connecticut 35, Plymouth St. 3
Wake Forest 25, Army 11
Waynesburg 23, St. Vincent 6
Westfeld St. 36, Mass.-Dartmouth 7
Widener 21, Wilkes 0
Wis.-Whitewater 55, Bufalo St. 14
Yale 39, Colgate 22
SOUTH
Bridgewater (Va.) 51, Ferrum28
Carson-Newman 41, Brevard 7
Centre 37, Washington &Lee 28
Charleston (WV) 38, Virginia-Wise 15
Charleston Southern 20, Norfolk St. 12
Cumberland (Tenn.) 41, Belhaven 31
Emory &Henry 61, Methodist 22
Florida 31, Tennessee 17
Fort Valley St. 12, Clark Atlanta 9
Georgia 45, NorthTexas 21
Georgia Tech 28, North Carolina 20
Greensboro 34, Apprentice 21
Huntingdon 34, Louisiana College 27
Jacksonville 69, Warner 16
Jacksonville St. 32, Georgia St. 26, OT
Johnson C. Smith 35, Davidson 22
Lindsey Wilson 35, Pikeville 26
Louisville 72, FIU0
Maryland 37, West Virginia 0
Maryville (Tenn.) 42, Sewanee 30
Memphis 31, Arkansas St. 7
Middle Tennessee 42, FAU35, OT
Millsaps 38, Point (Ga.) 17
Pittsburgh 58, Duke 55
Randolph-Macon 36, Bethany (WV) 28
S. Virginia 33, Va. Lynchburg 30
SCState 59, Benedict 6
SE Louisiana 34, Samford 31
Salisbury 28, NCWesleyan 10
Shepherd 28, Urbana 21
Southern U. 17, MVSU7
St. Augustines 35, Stillman 7
St. Josephs (Ind.) 45, Alderson-Broaddus 17
Towson 35, NCCentral 17
UAB 52, Northwestern St. 28
UNC-Pembroke 41, Shaw20
Virginia 49, VMI 0
Virginia Tech 29, Marshall 21, 3OT
W. Carolina 30, Mars Hill 23
Webber 20, Union (Ky.) 19
West Liberty 9, W. Virginia St. 0
Winston-Salem35, Tuskegee 13
SOUTHWEST
Baylor 70, Louisiana-Monroe 7
Houston 31, Rice 26
Trinity (Texas) 33, Sul Ross St. 6
MIDWEST
Albion 38, Aurora 20
Augsburg 19, Gustavus 16
Augustana (Ill.) 35, Loras 10
Augustana (SD) 24, Bemidji St. 0
Ball St. 51, E. Michigan 20
Beloit 38, Lawrence 21
Benedictine (Ill.) 28, Kalamazoo 23
Benedictine (Kan.) 42, Baker 28
Bethel (Minn.) 47, Buena Vista 14
Blufton 36, Earlham21
Bowling Green 48, Murray St. 7
Carroll (Wis.) 24, Knox 14
Cent. Methodist 37, Culver-Stockton 36
Cent. Missouri 47, Lindenwood (Mo.) 28
Chadron St. 30, Mesa St. 24
Cincinnati 14, Miami (Ohio) 0
Coe 10, Washington (Mo.) 0
Colorado Mines 62, Black Hills St. 22
Concordia (Moor.) 33, St. Olaf 29
Concordia (Neb.) 35, Midland 14
Doane 62, Hastings 7
Drake 31, Indianapolis 14
Evangel 43, Avila 20
Franklin 48, Manchester 7
GrandView30, Marian (Ind.) 7
Greenville 28, Eureka 27
Heidelberg 55, Ohio Northern 27
Hillsdale 41, Malone 16
Hiram20, Allegheny 3
Hope 37, Wis. Lutheran 7
Iowa 59, W. Michigan 3
Kansas 13, Louisiana Tech 10
Lake Erie 35, Wayne (Mich.) 17
Lake Forest 15, Grinnell 7
Lakeland 21, Alma 20
Macalester 30, Maranatha Baptist 6
Mary 17, Sioux Falls 10
Mayville St. 46, Cole 0
MichiganTech 29, Walsh 7
Minn.-Morris 41, Iowa Wesleyan 24
Minnesota 43, SanJose St. 24
Missouri S&T27, Wis.-LaCrosse 14
Missouri Southern 59, Lincoln (Mo.) 10
Missouri Western 34, Nebraska-Kearney 19
Morningside 79, Dordt 14
Mount St. Joseph 16, Hanover 13
Mount Union 37, Muskingum0
N. Dakota St. 51, Delaware St. 0
Nebraska 59, S. Dakota St. 20
Nebraska Wesleyan 31, Briar Clif 7
North Central (Ill.) 41, Wis.-Stout 14
Northwestern 35, Maine 21
Northwestern (Iowa) 49, Dakota Wesleyan 42
Northwestern (Minn.) 15, Martin Luther 8
Northwood (Mich.) 42, Quincy 39
Notre Dame 17, Michigan St. 13
Notre Dame Coll. 34, WVWesleyan 25
Ohio 38, Austin Peay 0
Ohio Dominican 30, N. Michigan 23
Ohio St. 76, Florida A&M0
OhioWesleyan 20, Kenyon 13
Olivet 34, Rockford 7
Olivet Nazarene 24, Concordia (Mich.) 7
Otterbein 30, Wilmington (Ohio) 14
Peru St. 21, Graceland (Iowa) 7
Rose-Hulman 23, Defance 19
S. Illinois 36, SE Missouri 19
SW Assemblies of God 19, Haskell Indian Na-
tions 8
SaginawValley St. 35, Findlay 34
Siena Heights 30, Waldorf 0
Simpson (Iowa) 35, Wis.-River Falls 34
St. Johns (Minn.) 20, St. Thomas (Minn.) 18
St. Norbert 33, Ripon 6
Taylor 27, Lane 21
Toledo 38, Cent. Michigan 17
Trine 47, Concordia (Wis.) 41
Trinity (Ill.) 41, St. Francis (Ill.) 39
Upper Iowa 24, Northern St. (SD) 17
Wabash 50, Denison 13
Wartburg 27, Carthage 10
Wayne (Neb.) 41, Minn.-Crookston 25
Westminster (Mo.) 21, Mac Murray 14
Wheaton (Ill.) 38, Luther 12
Winona St. 65, Minn. St.-Moorhead 21
Wisconsin 41, Purdue 10
Wittenberg 45, DePauw0
Wooster 39, Oberlin 21
Youngstown St. 59, Duquesne 17
FARWEST
CSU-Pueblo 44, W. NewMexico 7
Carroll (Mont.) 24, Rocky Mountain 17
Harvard 42, San Diego 20
La Verne 25, Whitworth 20
Linfeld 52, Cal Lutheran 14
Montana 47, Panhandle St. 14
Montana St.-Northern 49, Dickinson St. 24
Montana Western 29, Montana Tech 22
N. Iowa 26, N. Colorado 7
Pacifc 28, Menlo 21
Pacifc Lutheran 35, Redlands 14
Puget Sound 42, Whittier 33
Simon Fraser 21, Cent. Washington 14
Southern Cal 17, Utah St. 14
Washington 56, Idaho St. 0
PAGE 2C Sunday, September 22, 2013 SPORTS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
FRidAyS LATE BOxES
Rays 5, Orioles 1
Baltimore AB R H Bi BB SO Avg.
McLouth lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .260
Machado 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .282
C.Davis 1b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .288
A.Jones cf 3 0 1 1 1 1 .289
Markakis rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .269
Hardy ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .262
Valencia dh 3 0 0 0 0 2 .301
Clevenger c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .286
A.Casilla 2b 3 0 0 0 0 3 .214
Totals 31 1 5 1 2 12
Tampa Bay AB R H Bi BB SO Avg.
DeJesus lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .267
De.Jennings cf 3 2 2 4 1 0 .249
Zobrist 2b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .272
Longoria 3b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .263
W.Myers rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .288
Fuld rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .196
D.Young dh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .229
Loney 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .294
J.Molina c 3 1 0 0 1 0 .239
Y.Escobar ss 2 2 1 0 1 0 .261
Totals 30 5 7 5 5 3
Baltimore 000 000 0011 5 1
Tampa Bay 000 030 20x5 7 0
E_Hardy (11). LOB_Baltimore 5, Tampa Bay 6.
2B_D.Young (2). 3B_C.Davis (1), De.Jennings (6),
Y.Escobar (1). HR_De.Jennings (14), of Mig.Gon-
zalez. RBIs_A.Jones (106), De.Jennings 4 (54),
Zobrist (70).
Runners left in scoring position_Baltimore
3 (Markakis, A.Jones, Hardy); Tampa Bay 4
(W.Myers 3, Y.Escobar). RISP_Baltimore 1 for 5;
Tampa Bay 3 for 10.
Runners moved up_Machado, C.Davis, Marka-
kis. GIDP_Valencia, De.Jennings, J.Molina.
DP_Baltimore 2 (Hardy, A.Casilla, C.Davis),
(Hardy, A.Casilla, C.Davis); Tampa Bay 1
(Y.Escobar, Zobrist, Loney).
Baltimore iP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Mig.GonzalezL,10-8 6 2 3 3 5 2 96 3.94
Fr.Rodriguez 1 4 2 2 0 1 23 4.29
S.Johnson 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 7.07
Oakland iP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
CobbW, 10-3 8 1-3 5 1 1 2 12 117 2.90
Rodney 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 9 3.36
Inherited runners-scored_Rodney 1-0. WP_
Fr.Rodriguez. PB_Clevenger.
Umpires_Home, Mike Everitt; First, TimWelke;
Second, Dan Bellino; Third, Bruce Dreckman.
T_2:51. A_23,835 (34,078).
Angels 3, Mariners 2, 11 innings
Seattle AB R H Bi BB SO Avg.
Ackley 2b 5 0 2 0 0 1 .253
M.Saunders cf 4 0 2 2 1 1 .240
F.Gutierrez rf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .250
K.Morales dh 5 0 0 0 0 3 .277
Ibanez lf 3 0 0 0 2 1 .250
Smoak 1b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .243
Franklin ss 5 1 3 0 0 1 .222
Zunino c 3 1 0 0 1 0 .211
1-A.Almonte pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .288
H.Blanco c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .137
Triunfel 3b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .122
a-Seager ph-3b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .267
Totals 40 2 7 2 5 12
Los Angeles AB R H Bi BB SO Avg.
Shuck lf 4 0 0 0 1 0 .293
H.Kendrick 2b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .304
Trout cf 3 0 1 0 2 0 .330
J.Hamilton dh 5 0 1 0 0 1 .245
Trumbo 1b 5 1 0 0 0 1 .238
Calhoun rf 4 2 2 0 1 0 .294
Aybar ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .268
Conger c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .259
b-Cowgill ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .224
c-E.Navarro ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000
Iannetta c 2 0 1 1 0 1 .228
An.Romine 3b 4 0 3 2 0 0 .272
Totals 38 3 10 3 4 6
Seattle 000 000 200 002 7 1
Los Angeles 000 000 200 013 10 1
Two outs when winning run scored.
a-struck out for Triunfel in the 7th. b-was an-
nounced for Conger in the 7th. c-struck out for
Cowgill in the 7th.
1-ran for Zunino in the 9th.
E_Seager (15), Conger (7). LOB_Seattle 10,
Los Angeles 9. 2B_M.Saunders (22), Franklin
(19), H.Kendrick (18). RBIs_M.Saunders 2 (44),
Iannetta (39), An.Romine 2 (9). SB_M.Saunders
(13). S_H.Kendrick, Aybar.
Runners left in scoring position_Seattle
6 (K.Morales, F.Gutierrez 2, Ackley, Ibanez,
M.Saunders); Los Angeles 5 (Trumbo, Shuck 2,
Calhoun, J.Hamilton). RISP_Seattle 2 for 14; Los
Angeles 1 for 9.
Runners moved up_M.Saunders, Triunfel.
GIDP_Shuck, J.Hamilton 2.
DP_Seattle 3 (Ackley, Franklin, Smoak), (Ack-
ley, Franklin, Smoak), (Ackley, Franklin, Smoak).
Seattle iP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
E.Ramirez 6 6 2 0 1 3 93 4.56
O.PerezH,8 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 3.53
RuffinBS,1-1 2-3 2 0 0 1 1 16 7.04
Luetge 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 4.63
Capps 2 0 0 0 2 1 27 5.75
LaFromboiseL,0-111-3 2 1 1 0 0 21 7.88
Los Angeles iP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Shoemaker 5 2 0 0 2 5 93 0.00
Boshers 1 1 0 0 0 2 24 3.29
Kohn 1 3 2 2 1 1 26 3.61
D.De La Rosa 1 0 0 0 0 1 19 2.99
Frieri 1 1 0 0 1 1 19 3.56
J.Gutierrez 1 0 0 0 1 0 11 3.91
Cor.Rasmus W, 1-1 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 3.55
E.Ramirez pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
Rufn pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
Inherited runners-scored_O.Perez 2-0, Ruf-
fn 2-2, Luetge 2-0, Capps 2-0, LaFromboise
2-0. IBB_of Rufn (Trout), of Capps (Trout).
WP_Shoemaker.
Umpires_Home, Andy Fletcher; First, Rob
Drake; Second, Joe West; Third, JimJoyce.
T_4:10. A_39,469 (45,483).
Athletics 11, Twins 0
Minnesota AB R H Bi BB SO Avg.
Presley cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .276
C.Herrmann c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .210
Dozier 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .242
Bernier 2b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .226
Arcia rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .251
Willinghamdh 3 0 2 0 0 1 .214
b-Colabello ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .195
Parmelee 1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .229
E.Escobar 3b 4 0 2 0 0 2 .222
Thomas lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .214
Florimon ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .225
Totals 33 0 6 0 1 13
Oakland AB R H Bi BB SO Avg.
Crisp cf 3 1 0 0 1 0 .255
S.Smith lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .248
Donaldson 3b 3 2 2 2 1 0 .306
Parrino ss 1 0 0 0 0 1 .094
Lowrie ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .284
Sogard 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .264
Cespedes dh 4 1 1 1 0 1 .243
D.Norris c 3 3 2 0 0 1 .243
C.Young lf-cf 4 1 0 0 0 1 .201
J.Weeks cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Callaspo 2b-3b 4 1 2 2 0 0 .254
Reddick rf 3 1 2 1 0 0 .220
a-Choice ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .250
Barton 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .256
Totals 35 11 11 6 2 6
Minnesota 000 000 0000 6 4
Oakland 030 152 00x11 11 0
a-struck out for Reddick in the 7th.
E_C.Herrmann (2), E.Escobar 2 (7), Arcia
(2). LOB_Minnesota 7, Oakland 3. 2B_Arcia (17),
Willingham (20), D.Norris (15). HR_Cespedes
(25), of A.Albers; Donaldson (24), of Pressly.
RBIs_Donaldson 2 (91), Cespedes (77), Callaspo
2 (51), Reddick (53). SB_Dozier (13), D.Norris (5).
Runners left in scoring position_Minnesota 5
(Arcia, Florimon, Thomas, Parmelee, E.Escobar);
Oakland 2 (Crisp, Barton). RISP_Minnesota 0 for
8; Oakland 3 for 9.
Runners moved up_Callaspo. GIDP_Lowrie.
DP_Minnesota 1 (E.Escobar, Dozier, Parmelee).
Minnesota iP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
A.AlbersL,2-4 42-3 8 8 3 1 2 96 3.98
Pressly 11-3 3 3 3 1 2 30 3.86
Tonkin 2 0 0 0 0 2 19 0.00
Oakland iP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
ColonW, 17-6 6 5 0 0 1 8 94 2.64
Milone 2 0 0 0 0 3 25 4.17
Scribner 1 1 0 0 0 2 27 3.86
Inherited runners-scored_Pressly 1-1. HBP_by
harness raci ng
POCONO dOWNS RESULTS
Friday
First - $13,000Trot 1:55.0
5-Bullish (Jo Pavia Jr)
4.00 2.40 2.10
1-Home Turf (An McCarthy)
3.00 2.40
7-Perfect Tententen (Mi Simons)
2.80
EXACTA(5-1) $8.00
50 CENTTRIFECTA(5-1-7) $41.80
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $10.45
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(5-1-7-8) $184.40
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $9.22
Scratched: Stevonya
Second - $9,000 Pace 1:52.3
1-Heavenly Way (Ty Buter)
3.80 2.60 2.20
5-Pura Vida (Mi Simons)
3.00 2.20
7-Senorita Bella (Da Rawlings)
3.40
EXACTA(1-5) $12.00
50 CENTTRIFECTA(1-5-7) $44.20
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $11.05
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(1-5-7-9) $596.00
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $29.80
DAILYDOUBLE (5-1) $9.80
Third - $13,000Trot 1:56.3
5-Karets (Si Allard)
30.00 9.00 5.40
4-Gliding Boy (Ma Kakaley)
3.60 3.00
7-Vitamin Hanover (Ty Buter)
3.20
EXACTA(5-4) $109.60
50 CENTTRIFECTA(5-4-7) $542.40
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $135.60
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(5-4-7-8) $2,469.20
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $123.46
PICK3 - 15%TAKEOUT(5-1-5) $126.20
Fourth - $6,000 Pace 1:52.0
4-UBettor Watch Out (Si Allard)
4.40 2.80 3.00
2-Nathaniels Big Boy (An McCarthy)
4.20 3.40
6-Joans Bad Boy (Ma Kakaley)
3.40
EXACTA(4-2) $14.60
50 CENTTRIFECTA(4-2-6) $51.20
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $12.80
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(4-2-6-3) $163.60
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $8.18
Fifth - $13,000Trot 1:58.1
2-Hold OnTightly (Ma Kakaley)
2.80 2.40 2.40
6-Abbis Gabbi (An McCarthy)
5.20 3.80
3-Triumph (RoAllen)
5.20
EXACTA(2-6) $13.80
50 CENTTRIFECTA(2-6-3) $75.00
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $18.75
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(2-6-3-4) $283.40
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $14.17
Scratched: Contntious Hanover
Sixth - $12,000 Pace 1:52.2
9-We Adore Thee (Ge NapolitanoJr)
3.60 3.00 2.10
6-ImSo Happy (Jo Pavia Jr)
6.60 4.00
5-American Shuttle (An McCarthy)
3.00
EXACTA(9-6) $46.60
50 CENTTRIFECTA(9-6-5) $142.20
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $35.55
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(9-6-5-8) $867.00
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $43.35
PICK3 - 15%TAKEOUT(4-2-9) $27.80
Seventh - $6,000Trot 1:56.2
1-Judith (An Napolitano)
4.00 4.20 2.60
3-Captain Brady (Ho Parker)
7.40 3.60
4-Ashcroft (Mi Simons)
4.40
EXACTA(1-3) $41.00
50 CENTTRIFECTA(1-3-4) $156.80
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $39.20
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(1-3-4-9) $1,393.80
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $69.69
Eighth - $10,000 Pace 1:52.1
6-Grace Seelster (Ma Kakaley)
3.80 4.00 3.20
2-Express Jet (Jo Pavia Jr)
5.20 4.20
5-Aubsession (Ma Romano)
3.00
EXACTA(6-2) $43.60
50 CENTTRIFECTA(6-2-5) $184.00
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $46.00
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(6-2-5-7) $1,302.60
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $65.13
Ninth - $11,000Trot 1:54.3
4-Mister King (Er Carlson)
18.20 6.00 3.20
3-Keystone Wyatt (Ge NapolitanoJr)
3.60 3.00
2-Zuerest (Jo Pavia Jr)
2.60
EXACTA(4-3) $50.60
50 CENTTRIFECTA(4-3-2) $323.00
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $80.75
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(4-3-2-5) $2,127.40
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $106.37
PICK3 - 15%TAKEOUT(1-6-4) $512.40
Tenth - $19,000 Pace 1:51.0
2-Certifed Ideal (An McCarthy)
12.40 7.00 6.20
3-Keepers Destiny (Ty Buter)
5.20 3.80
7-Shawnee Dancer (An Napolitano)
10.20
EXACTA(2-3) $63.60
50 CENTTRIFECTA(2-3-7) $903.40
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $225.85
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(2-3-7-6) $5,317.40
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $265.87
Eleventh - $15,000Trot 1:55.3
7-Mr Fenwick (Ke Wallis)
25.40 9.20 5.40
4-Dr Cal (Ge NapolitanoJr)
4.80 2.20
6-Like AHush (An McCarthy)
8.80
EXACTA(7-4) $85.40
50 CENTTRIFECTA(7-4-6) $1,131.00
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $282.75
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(7-4-6-1) $3,935.80
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $196.79
Twelfth - $13,000 Pace 1:55.3
6-Moonless Night (Ge NapolitanoJr)
9.40 4.40 3.00
7-Sweet Lady Jane (Ke Wallis)
2.60 2.20
8-Rachelles Beat (Ty Buter)
4.20
EXACTA(6-7) $38.80
50 CENTTRIFECTA(6-7-8) $177.60
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $44.40
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(6-7-8-3) $967.80
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $48.39
PICK3 - 15%TAKEOUT(2-ALL-6) $81.00
PICK3 - 15%TAKEOUT(ALL-7-6) $81.00
Scratched: Western Cullen, Lady Alice
Thirteenth - $13,000Trot 1:54.1
1-Tui (Ma Romano)
4.80 3.40 2.20
2-Simone Hall (Mi Simons)
9.00 7.60
6-Maravich (Ma Kakaley)
4.60
EXACTA(1-2) $46.00
50 CENTTRIFECTA(1-2-6) $317.00
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $79.25
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(1-2-6-5) $1,693.60
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $84.68
Scratched: Abby
Fourteenth - $11,000Trot 1:55.1
3-Proud Moment (Ty Buter)
4.00 3.20 2.10
7-Free Rollin (Ma Kakaley)
4.00 3.40
1-Berkshire (Ke Wallis)
2.80
EXACTA(3-7) $30.60
50 CENTTRIFECTA(3-7-1) $97.40
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $24.35
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(3-7-1-8) $558.60
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $27.93
LATE DOUBLE (1-3) $9.60
Scratched: QuantumCashman
Total Handle-$338,803
LATEST LiNE
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
FAVORiTE LiNE UNdERdOG LiNE
at Washington -250 Miami +220
at Pittsburgh -110 Cincinnati +100
at Philadelphia -200 NewYork +185
at Chicago -105 Atlanta -105
Arizona -115 at Colorado +105
Los Angeles -130 at San Diego +120
St. Louis -155 at Milwaukee +145
American League
at Cleveland -260 Houston +230
at Detroit -280 Chicago +240
at Boston -160 Toronto +150
at Tampa Bay -105 Baltimore -105
at Kansas City -135 Texas +125
at Los Angeles -125 Seattle +115
at Oakland -250 Minnesota +220
interleague
at NewYork (AL) -140 San Francisco +130
NFL FOOTBALL
Tonight
FAVORiTE OPEN TOdAy O/U UNdERdOG
at Tennessee 3 3 (44) San Diego
at Minnesota 3 6 (40) Cleveland
at NewEngland 7 7 (44) Tampa Bay
Houston 2 1 (44) at Baltimore
at Dallas 3 3 (47) St. Louis
at NewOrleans 7 7 (48) Arizona
at Washington 2 Pk (49) Detroit
Green Bay +1 2 (49) at Cincinnati
N.Y. Giants +2 1 (47) at Carolina
at Miami 1 2 (44) Atlanta
at San Francisco 10 10 (46) Indianapolis
at Seattle 16 19 (40) Jacksonville
at N.Y. Jets 2 2 (39) Bufalo
Chicago 2 2 (40) at Pittsburgh
Tomorrow
at Denver 14 15 (49) Oakland
AUTO RACiNG
7:30 a.m.
NBCSNFormula One, Singapore Grand Prix
2 p.m.
ESPNNASCAR, Sprint Cup, Sylvania 300, at
Loudon, N.H.
4:30 p.m.
ABC Global Rallycross Championship, at
Concord, N.C.
8:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, Fall Nationals, at Ennis, Texas
(tape)
GOLF
8 a.m.
TGC European PGATour, Open dItalia, fnal
round, at Turin, Italy
Noon
TGC PGA Tour, Tour Championship, fnal
round, at Atlanta
1 p.m.
NBC PGA Tour, Tour Championship, fnal
round, at Atlanta
7 p.m.
TGCChampionsTour, Hawaii Championship,
fnal round, at Kapolei, Hawaii
MLB
1 p.m.
TBS, YES San Francisco at N.Y. Yankees
1:30 p.m.
ROOTCincinnati at Pittsburgh
SNYN.Y. Mets at Philadelphia
WQMYN.Y. Mets at Philadephia
2 p.m.
WGNAtlanta at Chicago Cubs
8 p.m.
ESPNSt. Louis at Milwaukee
NFL
1 p.m.
CBS Houston at Baltimore
FOXN.Y. Giants at Carolina
4:15 p.m.
CBS Bufalo at N.Y. Jets
8 p.m.
NBCChicago at Pittsburgh
NHL
5 p.m.
NHLPreseason, Chicago at Detroit
SOCCER
10:55 a.m.
NBCSNPremier League, Manchester United
at Manchester City
WNBA
3 p.m.
ESPN2Playofs, frst round, game2, Chicago
at Indiana
5 p.m.
ESPN2 Playofs, frst round, game 2, Min-
nesota at Seattle
what s on tv
SUNdAy
COLLEGE CO-Ed SOCCER
PSU Wilkes-Barre at PSU New Kensington, 1
p.m.
COLLEGE MENSTENNiS
Kings at Susquehanna
COLLEGE WOMENSTENNiS
Kings at Susquehanna
MONdAy
HiGH SCHOOL FiELd HOCKEy
Crestwood at Wallenpaupack
Dallas at Coughlin
GAR at Elk Lake
Holy Redeemer at Wyoming Seminary
Lake-Lehman at Abington Heights
Nanticoke at Lackawanna Trail
WyomingArea at Honesdale
WyomingValley West at HazletonArea
HiGH SCHOOL GOLF
Pre-Districts at Fox Hill, 9 a.m.
HiGH SCHOOL BOyS SOCCER
Berwick at Hanover Area
Coughlin at PittstonArea
GAR at WyomingArea
Holy Redeemer at Nanticoke
Meyers at HazletonArea
Wyoming Seminary at MMI Prep
WyomingValley West at Tunkhannock
HiGH SCHOOL GiRLS SOCCER
Berwick at WyomingValley West
Coughlin at PittstonArea
Hanover Area at Dallas
Nanticoke at Holy Redeemer
Tunkhannock at Lake-Lehman
HiGH SCHOOL GiRLSTENNiS
Holy Redeemer at Berwick, 4 p.m.
MMI Prep at HazletonArea
PittstonArea at Hanover Area
Tunkhannock at GAR
WyomingArea at Dallas
Wyoming Seminary at Crestwood, 4:15 p.m.
WyomingValley West at Coughlin
HiGH SCHOOL GiRLSVOLLEyBALL
Crestwood at Coughlin, 4:30 p.m.
Delaware Valley at PittstonArea
HazletonArea at Meyers
Lake-Lehman at WyomingValley West
WyomingArea at Dallas
COLLEGE WOMENSVOLLEyBALL
Penn College at PSUWilkes-Barre, 6 p.m.
Central Penn College at PSUHazleton, 7 p.m.
TUESdAy
HiGH SCHOOL FiELd HOCKEy
Crestwood at Lake-Lehman, 7 p.m.
Elk Lake at Northwest
Meyers at Northwest
PittstonArea at Tunkhannock
HiGH SCHOOL GiRLS SOCCER
Meyers at WyomingArea
HiGH SCHOOL GiRLSVOLLEyBALL
GAR at Tunkhannock
Hanover Area at MMI Prep
Holy Redeemer at Berwick, 4:30 p.m.
North Pocono at Nanticoke
COLLEGE FiELd HOCKEy
Kings at Marywood, 4 p.m.
COLLEGE CO-Ed SOCCER
PSUWilkes-Barre at PSUSchuylkill, 4 p.m.
COLLEGE MENS SOCCER
Wilkes at Elmira, 4 p.m.
PSUYork at PSUHazleton, 6 p.m.
COLLEGE WOMENSVOLLEyBALL
Kings at Delaware Valley, 7 p.m.
LCCCat Manor, 7 p.m.
Misericordia at FDU-Florham, 7 p.m.
Wilkes at Manhattanville, 7 p.m.
WEdNESdAy
HiGH SCHOOL CROSS COUNTRy
MMI Prep/Dallas/GAR/Pittston/Wyoming
Area/Crestwood at MMI Prep, 4:15 p.m.
Holy Redeemer at Northwest, 4:15 p.m.
HiGH SCHOOL FiELd HOCKEy
Abington Heights at Wyoming Valley West,
6:30 p.m.
Coughlin at Delaware Valley
HazletonArea at Nanticoke
Honesdale at Holy Redeemer
Lackawanna Trail at WyomingArea
Wallenpaupack at Lake-Lehman
Wyoming Seminary at Dallas
HiGH SCHOOL BOyS SOCCER
HazletonArea at Crestwood, 7 p.m.
Wyoming Seminary at Meyers
Lake-Lehman at Dallas
Nanticoke at Hanover Area
PittstonArea at Tunkhannock
WyomingArea at MMI Prep
HiGH SCHOOL GiRLS SOCCER
Dallas at Lake-Lehman
Hanover Area at Tunkhannock
HazletonArea at Wyoming Seminary
Nanticoke at Coughlin
WyomingValley West at Meyers
HiGH SCHOOL GiRLSVOLLEyBALL
Dallas at HazletonArea
Meyers at Crestwood, 4:30 p.m.
WyomingArea at Lake-Lehman
WyomingValley West at Delaware Valley
COLLEGE GOLF
Wilkes, Kings at Scranton (Glenmaura), 1 p.m.
COLLEGE FiELd HOCKEy
Misericordia at Haverford, 4 p.m.
Wilkes at Albright, 4 p.m.
COLLEGE MENS SOCCER
LebanonValley at Misericordia, 7 p.m.
COLLEGE WOMENS SOCCER
Misercordia at Elizabethtown, 4:30 p.m.
Wilkes at Susquehanna, 7 p.m.
COLLEGE WOMENSTENNiS
Baptist Bible at Kings, 3 p.m.
Susquehanna at Misericordia, 3:30 p.m.
THURSdAy
HiGH SCHOOL FiELd HOCKEy
Berwick at Tunkhannock
GAR at PittstonArea
Meyers at Elk Lake
HiGH SCHOOL GOLF
League Playofs
HiGH SCHOOL BOyS SOCCER
Meyers at Coughlin, 7 p.m. at Wilkes-Barre Me-
morial Stadium
HiGH SCHOOL GiRLSVOLLEyBALL
Berwick at Nanticoke
Coughlin at Hanover Area
MMI Prep at Holy Redeemer, 4:30 p.m.
PittstonArea at GAR
Tunkhannock at North Pocono
COLLEGE FiELd HOCKEy
Cedar Crest at Kings, 7 p.m.
COLLEGE GOLF
PSUACat PSUWilkes-Barre, 10 a.m.
COLLEGE WOMENSVOLLEyBALL
Kings at Staten Island, 6 p.m.
LCCCat Lackawanna, 6 p.m.
Misericordiat at SUNYCortland, 4 p.m.
Penn College at PSUHazleton, 7 p.m.
caLenDar
basebaLL
A.Albers (D.Norris). WP_Pressly.
Umpires_Home, Wally Bell; First, Marvin Hud-
son; Second, TimMcClelland; Third, Marty Foster.
T_2:57. A_36,067 (35,067).
Cardinals 7, Brewers 6, 10 innings
St. Louis AB R H Bi BB SO Avg.
M.Carpenter 2b 5 2 3 0 1 1 .323
Beltran rf 4 1 1 2 1 1 .297
Holliday lf 5 1 3 2 1 1 .297
Ma.Adams 1b 5 1 3 3 1 0 .280
Y.Molina c 5 0 2 0 0 0 .316
Jay cf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .268
Freese 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .265
1-Kozma pr-ss 1 0 1 0 0 0 .218
Descalso ss-3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .234
S.Miller p 1 1 0 0 0 0 .077
b-S.Robinson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .254
S.Freeman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Maness p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200
c-Chambers ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .158
Rosenthal p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Mujica p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Axford p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
e-Wong ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .151
Ca.Martinez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Totals 39 7 16 7 7 6
Milwaukee AB R H Bi BB SO Avg.
Aoki rf 4 3 4 0 1 0 .284
Gennett 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .317
Henderson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
D.Hand p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .091
d-L.Schafer ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .220
Blazek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Lucroy c 4 1 1 0 1 0 .278
Ar.Ramirez 3b 4 1 3 5 0 0 .277
C.Gomez cf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .283
Gindl lf 4 0 0 0 1 1 .252
Halton 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .265
Bianchi ss 5 1 2 0 0 0 .245
Hellweg p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000
Wooten p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
a-J.Francisco ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .228
Mic.Gonzalez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Kintzler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Y.Betancourt 2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .210
Totals 38 6 13 6 3 7
St. Louis 100 010 202 17 16 0
Milwaukee 300 010002 06 13 0
a-struck out for Wooten in the 6th. b-fied out
for S.Miller in the 7th. c-singled for Maness in the
8th. d-singled for D.Hand in the 9th. e-walked for
Axford in the 10th.
1-ran for Freese in the 8th.
LOB_St. Louis 12, Milwaukee 8. 2B_M.Car-
penter 2 (53), Beltran (29), Bianchi (8). HR_
Ma.Adams (15), of Henderson; Ar.Ramirez (11),
of S.Miller. RBIs_Beltran 2 (81), Holliday 2 (91),
Ma.Adams 3 (48), L.Schafer (32), Ar.Ramirez 5
(47). S_Descalso, Gennett, Halton. SF_Beltran,
Ar.Ramirez.
Runners left in scoring position_St. Louis 6
(Descalso, Y.Molina 2, Jay, Beltran, Ma.Adams);
Milwaukee 4 (Hellweg, J.Francisco, C.Gomez 2).
RISP_St. Louis 5 for 14; Milwaukee 5 for 12.
Runners moved up_Beltran. GIDP_Beltran,
Y.Molina, Freese, C.Gomez.
DP_St. Louis1 (Descalso,Y.Molina, Ma.Adams);
Milwaukee 3 (Bianchi, Gennett, Halton), (Bianchi,
Gennett, Halton), (Bianchi, Gennett, Halton).
St. Louis iP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
S.Miller 6 7 4 4 2 4 103 3.12
S.Freeman 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 4 2.53
Maness 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 6 2.29
Rosenthal 1 0 0 0 0 2 9 2.74
MujicaH,5 1-3 3 2 2 1 0 23 2.53
AxfordW,7-7BS,7-72-3 1 0 0 0 0 9 4.14
Ca.MartinezS,1-1 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 5.76
Milwaukee iP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Hellweg 5 7 2 2 5 1 97 7.43
Wooten H, 6 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 2.63
Mic.Gonzalez H, 111-3 2 2 2 0 0 9 4.74
Kintzler BS, 3-3 1 4 0 0 0 1 25 2.88
Henderson 2-3 1 2 2 1 2 15 2.53
D.Hand 1 1 0 0 0 1 23 3.68
Blazek L, 0-1 1 1 1 1 1 0 26 6.46
Henderson pitched to 2 batters in the 9th.
Inherited runners-scored_Maness 1-0, Axford
3-1, Kintzler 1-1, Henderson 2-0. HBP_by Hellweg
(S.Miller). WP_Hellweg.
Umpires_Home, Scott Barry; First, Alfonso
Marquez; Second, Ted Barrett; Third, Mike
DiMuro.
T_3:56. A_37,148 (41,900).
Rockies 9, diamondbacks 4
Arizona AB R H Bi BB SO Avg.
Eaton lf 5 1 1 0 0 0 .259
Pollock cf 3 2 2 2 1 1 .264
Goldschmidt 1b 4 1 2 2 1 0 .306
Prado 3b 4 0 1 0 1 0 .280
A.Hill 2b 5 0 0 0 0 0 .293
G.Parra rf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .265
Nieves c 3 0 1 0 1 0 .298
Gregorius ss 2 0 0 0 2 1 .255
W.Harris p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Delgado p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .200
a-Bloomquist ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .333
Sipp p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Putz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
E.De La Rosa p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Langwell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Owings ss 1 0 0 0 0 0 .241
Totals 33 4 9 4 7 2
Colorado AB R H Bi BB SO Avg.
Blackmon rf 5 2 2 1 0 1 .299
Rutledge 2b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .228
Co.Dickerson cf 4 1 1 2 0 0 .288
Tulowitzki ss 3 1 2 2 1 0 .315
Helton 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .243
Corpas p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Pacheco c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .236
Arenado 3b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .268
Culberson lf 3 1 2 1 1 0 .300
Chacin p 2 1 1 2 0 0 .194
b-Fowler ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .263
Boggs p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Belisle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
c-R.Wheeler ph-1b1 0 1 1 0 0 .189
Totals 35 9 13 9 3 3
Arizona 200 000 1014 9 0
Colorado 002 004 21x9 13 0
a-lined out for Delgado in the 6th. b-struck
out for Chacin in the 6th. c-singled for Belisle in
the 8th.
LOB_Arizona 10, Colorado 5. 2B_Nieves (11),
Helton (19). 3B_Eaton (4). HR_Pollock (8), of
Chacin; Goldschmidt (35), of Boggs; Chacin (1),
ofDelgado; Blackmon(5), ofSipp; Co.Dickerson
(4), of Sipp; Tulowitzki (24), of Langwell. RBIs_
Pollock 2 (36), Goldschmidt 2 (121), Blackmon
(19), Co.Dickerson 2 (16), Tulowitzki 2 (80), Cul-
berson (12), Chacin 2 (7), R.Wheeler (6). SB_Cul-
berson (3).
Runners left in scoring position_Arizona 7 (Ea-
ton, A.Hill 2, Delgado, Bloomquist 2, Gregorius);
Colorado 2 (Fowler, Rutledge). RISP_Arizona 2 for
12; Colorado 5 for 10.
Runners moved up_Nieves, Rutledge,
Co.Dickerson. GIDP_Goldschmidt, Prado, Del-
gado, Pacheco, Culberson.
DP_Arizona 2 (Gregorius, A.Hill, Goldschmidt),
(A.Hill, Gregorius, Goldschmidt); Colorado 3
(Rutledge, Tulowitzki, Helton), (Helton, Arenado,
Rutledge), (Tulowitzki, Rutledge, Helton).
Arizona iP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Delgado 5 3 2 2 2 0 73 3.96
SippL,3-2 0 3 3 3 0 0 15 4.66
Putz 1 3 1 1 0 2 21 2.56
E.DeLaRosa 2-3 1 1 1 0 0 11 5.02
Langwell 2-3 2 2 2 1 0 22 6.35
W.Harris 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 11 3.12
Colorado iP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
ChacinW, 14-9 6 6 2 2 5 0 95 3.21
Boggs 1 1 1 1 0 1 22 8.86
Belisle 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 4.44
Corpas 1 1 1 1 2 0 24 4.85
Sipp pitched to 3 batters in the 6th.
Inherited runners-scored_Langwell 1-1,
W.Harris 2-1. HBP_by Chacin (Pollock). WP_Cha-
cin.
Umpires_Home, Paul Schrieber; First, Jef Kel-
logg; Second, Toby Basner; Third, Chad Fairchild.
T_3:17. A_38,247 (50,398).
Padres 2, dodgers 0
Los Angeles AB R H Bi BB SO Avg.
D.Gordon ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .239
HairstonJr. 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .216
Schumaker 2b-cf 4 0 3 0 0 0 .275
Van Slyke lf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .244
Federowicz c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .237
b-Ad.Gonzalez ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .295
2-Punto pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .258
Buss cf-rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .133
c-Puig ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .331
A.Castellanos rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .200
Marmol p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
O.Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
d-Kemp ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .273
Butera 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000
Volquez p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .122
M.Young 2b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .284
Totals 33 0 6 0 1 9
San diego AB R H Bi BB SO Avg.
Venable cf-rf 5 0 2 0 0 1 .269
Denorfa rf-lf 4 1 0 0 0 2 .269
Gyorko 2b 3 1 1 2 1 1 .251
Headley 3b 2 0 0 0 2 1 .243
Medica 1b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .250
Blanks lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .252
Street p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
R.Cedeno ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .292
Hundley c 3 0 1 0 1 2 .237
Erlin p 3 0 0 0 0 0 .071
Gregerson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
a-Kotsay ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .193
1-Amarista pr-cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .249
Totals 30 2 5 2 7 9
Los Angeles 000 000 0000 6 3
San diego 100 010 00x2 5 0
a-walkedfor Gregersoninthe 8th. b-singledfor
Federowicz in the 9th. c-struck out for Buss in the
9th. d-struck out for O.Garcia in the 9th.
1-ran for Kotsay in the 8th. 2-ran for
Ad.Gonzalez in the 9th.
E_Marmol (1), D.Gordon (7), Federowicz (5).
LOB_Los Angeles 7, San Diego 11. 2B_Schumaker
2 (16). HR_Gyorko (20), ofVolquez. RBIs_Gyorko
2 (53). SB_D.Gordon (10), Venable (21), Denorfa
(10), R.Cedeno (3), Hundley (1), Amarista (4).
Runners left in scoring position_Los Angeles 4
(Federowicz, Buss, HairstonJr., Kemp); SanDiego
7 (Blanks 2, Venable 3, Erlin, Medica). RISP_Los
Angeles 1 for 11; San Diego 0 for 11.
Runners moved up_D.Gordon, Schumaker, Gy-
orko, Headley, R.Cedeno.
Los Angeles iP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
VolquezL,9-12 61-3 5 2 1 4 6 111 5.77
Marmol 11-3 0 0 0 3 3 30 4.60
O.Garcia 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 13.50
Oakland iP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
ErlinW, 3-3 7 2-3 4 0 0 1 7 105 4.34
Gregerson H, 22 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 2.82
Street S, 32-33 1 2 0 0 0 2 14 2.52
Inherited runners-scored_Marmol 1-0,
O.Garcia 2-0, Gregerson 1-0. IBB_of Marmol
(Headley).
Umpires_Home, Bill Miller; First, Hal Gibson;
Second, Kerwin Danley; Third, Vic Carapazza.
T_2:52. A_34,986 (42,524).
NATiONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE
AMERiCAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
NewEngland 2 0 0 1.000 36 31
Miami 2 0 0 1.000 47 30
N.Y. Jets 1 1 0 .500 28 30
Bufalo 1 1 0 .500 45 46
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 2 0 0 1.000 61 52
Indianapolis 1 1 0 .500 41 41
Tennessee 1 1 0 .500 40 39
Jacksonville 0 2 0 .000 11 47
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 1 1 0 .500 41 34
Baltimore 1 1 0 .500 41 55
Cleveland 0 2 0 .000 16 37
Pittsburgh 0 2 0 .000 19 36
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Kansas City 3 0 0 1.000 71 34
Denver 2 0 0 1.000 90 50
Oakland 1 1 0 .500 36 30
San Diego 1 1 0 .500 61 61
NATiONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 1 1 0 .500 52 48
Philadelphia 1 2 0 .333 79 86
N.Y. Giants 0 2 0 .000 54 77
Washington 0 2 0 .000 47 71
South
W L T Pct PF PA
NewOrleans 2 0 0 1.000 39 31
Atlanta 1 1 0 .500 48 47
Carolina 0 2 0 .000 30 36
Tampa Bay 0 2 0 .000 31 34
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 2 0 0 1.000 55 51
Detroit 1 1 0 .500 55 49
Green Bay 1 1 0 .500 66 54
Minnesota 0 2 0 .000 54 65
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 2 0 0 1.000 41 10
St. Louis 1 1 0 .500 51 55
San Francisco 1 1 0 .500 37 57
Arizona 1 1 0 .500 49 48
Thursdays Game
Kansas City 26, Philadelphia 16
Sundays Games
San Diego at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
Arizona at NewOrleans, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at Dallas, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
Houston at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Carolina, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Washington, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay at NewEngland, 1 p.m.
Green Bay at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Atlanta at Miami, 4:05 p.m.
Indianapolis at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.
Jacksonville at Seattle, 4:25 p.m.
Bufalo at N.Y. Jets, 4:25 p.m.
Chicago at Pittsburgh, 8:30 p.m.
Mondays Game
Oakland at Denver, 8:40 p.m.
Thursday, Sep. 26
San Francisco at St. Louis, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday, Sep. 29
N.Y. Giants at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Houston, 1 p.m.
Baltimore at Bufalo, 1 p.m.
Arizona at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Chicago at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Pittsburgh vs. Minnesota at London, 1 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Tennessee, 4:05 p.m.
Washington at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.
Dallas at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
Philadelphia at Denver, 4:25 p.m.
NewEngland at Atlanta, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Carolina, Green Bay
Monday, Sep. 30
Miami at NewOrleans, 8:40 p.m.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
TOdAy
EAST
American International 48, Pace 27
Amherst 23, Hamilton 7
Bloomsburg 31, Kutztown 12
Bowie St. 16, Concord 10
Brown 45, Georgetown 7
California (Pa.) 20, Edinboro 7
Colby 31, Williams 8
Cornell 45, Bucknell 13
Cortland St. 26, WilliamPaterson 15
Delaware Valley 20, Albright 17
Dickinson 24, Susquehanna 21
Fordham52, Columbia 7
FraminghamSt. 42, Fitchburg St. 21
Frostburg St. 36, Case Reserve 33
Gallaudet 37, Rochester 13
Gannon 38, Slippery Rock 27
Hampden-Sydney 49, Coast Guard 7
Hartwick 45, Becker 19
Howard Payne 38, Wayland Baptist 34
Husson 13, Alfred 0
Ithaca 17, Union (NY) 3
Johns Hopkins 52, Moravian 14
Juniata 38, Gettysburg 16
Kean 24, Endicott 17
LebanonValley 38, Kings (Pa.) 17
Lycoming 52, Misericordia 14
Mass. Maritime 52, Maine Maritime 18
Merchant Marine 7, NYMaritime 6
Middlebury 27, Bowdoin 5
Morrisville St. 28, St. Lawrence 23
Muhlenberg 58, McDaniel 0
Norwich 31, WPI 14
Penn St. 34, Kent St. 0
FootbaLL
TOUR CHAMPiONSHiP PAR
SCORES
Saturday
At East Lake Golf Club
Atlanta
Purse: $8 million
yardage: 7,307; Par: 70
Third Round
Henrik Stenson 64-66-69199 -11
DustinJohnson 68-68-67203 -7
Steve Stricker 66-71-68205 -5
ZachJohnson 69-68-69206 -4
Justin Rose 68-68-70206 -4
Billy Horschel 66-70-70206 -4
Jordan Spieth 68-67-71206 -4
Luke Donald 70-70-67207 -3
Nick Watney 72-65-70207 -3
Webb Simpson 68-71-69208 -2
Sergio Garcia 68-71-69208 -2
Bill Haas 70-69-69208 -2
Phil Mickelson 71-67-70208 -2
Gary Woodland 70-67-71208 -2
AdamScott 65-69-74208 -2
D.A. Points 72-67-70209 -1
Keegan Bradley 72-65-72209 -1
Jason Dufner 74-70-66210 E
Jason Day 68-74-68210 E
Hunter Mahan 70-69-71210 E
Roberto Castro 67-71-72210 E
Brandt Snedeker 69-75-67211 +1
GrahamDeLaet 68-71-72211 +1
JimFuryk 70-68-73211 +1
Matt Kuchar 69-74-69212 +2
Tiger Woods 73-71-69213 +3
Brendon de Jonge 70-72-71213 +3
Kevin Streelman 69-72-74215 +5
BooWeekley 70-75-73218 +8
Charl Schwartzel 68-79-77224 +14
goLF
FRidAyS SCORES
LACKAWANNACONFERENCE
Carbondale 27, Lakeland 0
Crestwood 27, Wallenpaupack 19
Dunmore 21, Old Forge 16
Honesdale 21, Montrose 0
Lackawanna Trail 45, WesternWayne 10
Valley View21, East Stroudsburg North 14
West Scranton 24, North Pocono 0
diSTRiCT 11 CLASS 4A
BethlehemCatholic 41, Northampton 24
East Stroudsburg South 36, AllentownAllen 6
Easton 34, Allentown Central Catholic 14
Emmaus 33, BethlehemFreedom13
Parkland 34, BethlehemLiberty 6
Pocono Mountain East 49, Quakertown 28
Stroudsburg 28, Pocono MountainWest 0
Whitehall 27, Nazareth 7
OTHER SCORES
Abington 41, Council Rock North 6
Aliquippa 43, NewBrighton 0
Apollo-Ridge 58, Leechburg 13
Avella 27, Jeferson-Morgan 26
Avonworth 48, West Shamokin 0
Baldwin 20, Mount Lebanon 19
Beaver Falls 30, Beaver Area 24
Bedford 49, Bishop McCort 0
Bellwood-Antis 48, Juniata Valley 35
Berks Catholic 33, Columbia 25
Berlin-Brothersvalley 48, ConemaughValley 7
Bermudian Springs 28, York County Tech 6
Bethel Park 31, Canon-McMillan 0
BethlehemCenter 80, Bentworth 0
Bishop Shanahan 42, West Chester East 21
Blairsville 24, Northern Cambria 19
Bristol 40, Delco Christian 24
Brookville 46, Keystone 13
Cambridge Springs 36, Iroquois 14
Cardinal OHara 41, Del-Valley Charter 8
Carlynton 42, Serra Catholic 0
Catasauqua 58, Salisbury 14
Cedar Clif 41, Hershey 14
Cedar Crest 32, Warwick 19
Central Bucks South 30, Hatboro-Horsham16
Central Bucks West 34, Souderton 21
Central Cambria 10, Cambria Heights 7
Central Mountain 41, Bellefonte 6
Central Valley 41, Blackhawk 0
Central York 35, Susquehannock 9
Chambersburg 23, Central Dauphin 20
Chartiers-Houston def. Imani Christian Academy,
forfeit
Cheltenham28, Springfeld Montco 26
Chestnut Ridge 23, Bald Eagle Area 10
Clarion 62, Moniteau 0
Clearfeld 58, Huntingdon 30
Coatesville 42, Avon Grove 13
Cocalico 52, Conestoga Valley 6
Cochranton 42, Union City 22
CumberlandValley 32, Central Dauphin East 7
Curwensville 25, St. Josephs Catholic 7
DallastownArea 19, Dover 17
Danville 37, Mifinburg 13
Donegal 28, Garden Spot 7
Downingtown West 17, West Chester Henderson
14
East Pennsboro 35, Boiling Springs 7
EasternYork 34, Fairfeld 14
Eisenhower 29, Mercyhurst Prep 26
ELCO55, Pequea Valley 28
Elizabeth Forward 35, Belle Vernon 13
Ellwood City 28, Chartiers Valley 13
Episcopal Academy 29, The Hill School 9
Erie Cathedral Prep 49, St. Francis, N.Y. 14
Everett 28, Williamsburg 19
Exeter 17, ConradWeiser 16
Fairview34, North East 20
Farrell 40, Redbank 22
Fels 26, Philadelphia Central 13
Fleetwood 52, Hamburg 7
Fort Leboeuf 20, Corry 10
Frankford 27, Philadelphia Northeast 6
Franklin Regional 42, Greensburg Salem20
Frazier 48, West Greene 6
Garnet Valley 42, Radnor 8
Gateway 21, Altoona 0
General McLane 56, Franklin 7
Gettysburg 29, Greencastle Antrim27
Girard 50, Seneca 0
Glendale 34, West Branch 12
Governor Mifin 28, Daniel Boone 0
Great Valley 48, Octorara 12
Greensburg Central Catholic 35, Waynesburg
Central 20
Greenville 21, Sharon 16
Hampton 47, Laurel Highlands 0
Harrisburg Bishop McDevitt 43, Mechanicsburg 14
Haverford 21, Strath Haven 2
HempfeldArea 27, Kiski Area 0
Hickory 37, Grove City 7
Homer-Center 37, Purchase Line 14
Indiana 56, Derry 6
James Buchanan 27, Waynesboro 7
Jeannette 47, Brownsville 20
Jenkintown 28, Calvary Christian 6
JimThorpe 49, Panther Valley 20
Kane Area 35, Brockway 31
Karns City 53, Union 20
Kittanning 15, Summit Academy 6
Knoch 22, Hollidaysburg 17
Lancaster Catholic 31, ManheimTownship 28, 2OT
Laurel 34, Springdale 7
Lebanon 44, Ephrata 42
Lewisburg 14, Shikellamy 7
Ligonier Valley 29, Marion Center 8
Littlestown 55, Biglerville 0
Lower Dauphin 24, Red Land 0
Loyalsock 34, Mount Carmel 27
Mahanoy Area 53, Tamaqua 28
ManheimCentral 55, Elizabethtown 7
Maplewood 39, Youngsville 8
Mars 39, Highlands 0
Mastbaum12, Olney 8
McGufey 28, Freedom12
McKeesport 34, Penn-Traford 14
Mercer 19, Lakeview8
Middletown 31, Susquenita 12
Mifin County 28, Carlisle 7
Milton 32, Central Columbia 20
Milton Hershey 52, Camp Hill 20
Mohawk 42, Elwood City Riverside 6
Montoursville 41, Hughesville 0
Mount Pleasant 74, Charleroi 7
Mount Union 44, MoshannonValley 13
Muhlenberg 27, TwinValley 0
Muncy 26, Warrior Run 7
Neshaminy 41, WilliamTennent 7
Neshannock 35, Shenango 14
NewCastle 32, Montour 12
NewOxford 24, SouthWestern 17
Newport 45, Juniata 42
NorthAllegheny 29, Pine-Richland 28
North Hills 49, Butler 0
North Penn 27, Central Bucks East 0
North Schuylkill 19, Schuylkill Haven 0
North Star 28, Saltsburg 14
Northern Bedford 37, Claysburg-Kimmel 0
Northern Lebanon 33, Annville-Cleona 26
NorthernYork 47, Big Spring 13
Northwestern 35, Harbor Creek 0
Notre Dame-Green Pond 38, Bangor 2
Oil City 48, Dubois 41
Oxford 13, Kennett 9
Palisades 28, Northern Lehigh 13
Penn Manor 34, Hempfeld 20
PennWood 23, Archbishop Carroll 7
Pennridge 28, Academy Park 13
Penns Manor 48, United 0
Pennsbury 42, Harry S. Truman 7
PerkiomenValley 49, OwenJ Roberts 0
Perry Traditional Academy 23, Carrick 6
Peters Township 48, Shaler 7
Philadelphia Roman Catholic 41, Bonner Prend-
ergast 14
Pittsburgh North Catholic 56, Riverview7
Pleasant Valley 28, Lehighton 6
Plum51, Woodland Hills 0
Plymouth-Whitemarsh 41, Upper Moreland 28
Pope John Paul the Great, Va. 55, Pottsville Nativ-
ity 0
Portage Area 43, Meyersdale 28
Pottsgrove 28, Methacton 7
Pottsville 28, Reading 16
Prep Charter 26, Roxborough 6
Punxsutawney 26, Allegheny-ClarionValley 23
Quaker Valley 52, Keystone Oaks 0
Red Lion 14, West York 7
Reynolds 52, Saegertown 7
Richland 48, Greater Johnstown 7
Ridgway 28, Elk County Catholic 8
Ringgold 60, Uniontown 21
Riverside 13, Susquehanna 9
Rochester 27, South Side 19
SauconValley 49, Palmerton 6
Schuylkill Valley 46, Kutztown 0
Selinsgrove 42, Shamokin 13
Seneca Valley 36, Connellsville 0
Seton-LaSalle 28, Steel Valley 7
Shade 26, Ferndale 0
Shady Side Academy 49, Burrell 14
Sharpsville 50, Kennedy Catholic 6
Shefeld 27, Cameron County 0
ShenandoahValley 41, Minersville 14
Shippensburg 21, West Perry 0
Slippery Rock 62, Bradford 12
Southern Columbia 48, SouthWilliamsport 14
Southern Lehigh 13, Northwestern Lehigh 7
Spring Grove 42, Kennard-Dale 30
Spring-Ford 41, Boyertown 14
Springfeld Delco 20, Ridley 0
St. Marys 48, Clarion-Limestone 28
Steelton-Highspire 51, Camp Hill Trinity 0
Sto-Rox 54, Our Lady Of Sacred Heart 0
Susquehanna Township 55, Palmyra 21
Thomas Jeferson 44, Trinity 7
Tyrone 57, Philipsburg-Osceola 21
Unionville 38, SunValley 13
Upper Darby 41, Marple Newtown 0
Upper Dublin 45, Wissahickon 28
Upper Merion 31, Norristown 27
Upper St. Clair 35, Penn Hills 0
Warren 33, Meadville 21
Washington 35, Yough 13
West Allegheny 55, Hopewell 0
West Chester Rustin 26, Downingtown East 6
West LawnWilson 45, Lancaster McCaskey 7
West Middlesex 31, Conneaut Area 21
West Mifin 56, Albert Gallatin 12
Williams Valley 39, Line Mountain 2
Wilmington 47, Titusville 0
Windber 47, Blacklick 0
Wyomissing 21, Blue Mountain 13
York 33, Northeastern 7
York Catholic 44, Hanover 8
York Suburban 28, Delone 14
hi gh schooL
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER SPORTS Sunday, September 22, 2013 PAGE 3C
GAME SUMMARY
PENN STATE 34, KENT STATE 0
at Beaver Stadium, State College
Kent State 0 0 0 0 0
Penn State 7 7 7 13 34
Team Statistics KSU PSU
First downs 9 27
Rushes-yards 24-56 53-287
Passing 134 176
Comp-Att-Int 17-36-1 13-36-1
Return Yards (-4) 6
Punts-Avg. 10-46.5 5-39.8
Fumbles-Lost 2-0 2-0
Penalties-Yards 8-79 3-28
Time of Possession 27:16 32:44
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING KSU, Durham11-38,
Calhoun 2-25, Meray 4-6, Fisher
1-(minus 6), Reardon 6-(minus 7). PSU,
Lynch 14-123, Belton 13-90, Zwinak 15-
65, Walker 4-10, Hackenberg 7-(minus 1).
PASSING KSU, Reardon 12-28-1-100,
Fisher 5-8-0-34. PSU, Hackenberg 13-
35-1-176, Ferguson 0-1-0-0.
RECEIVING KSU, Humphrey 5-47,
Calhoun 3-12, Pierce 2-21, Goode 2-20,
Boyle 2-18, Woods 1-7, Durham1-5,
Levandowski 1-4. PSU, Robinson 3-43,
Felder 3-35, James 3-20, Carter 1-29,
Breneman 1-27, Belton 1-15, Anderson 1-7.
FIRST QUARTER
PSU Bill Belton 15-yard pass from
Christian Hackenberg (SamFicken
kick), 0:09. Drive: 9 plays, 87 yards,
3:39. Analysis: Its a rainy, miserable
day in State College and it shows with
both teams putting a slippery ball on
the ground in the opening quarter. Penn
State struggles out of the gates once
again and nearly has its frst turnover
on second-and-goal as Hackenberg
simply loses his grip right at the back
of his windup. Tackle Donovan Smith
is there to save the day and fall on it
at the 15. Hackenberg then comes up
with his biggest third-down conversion
of the young season, rifing one in to
Belton on the left sideline. The tailback
makes a tricky catch, tightropes the
boundary and dives in for his second
career receiving score. PENN STATE 7,
KENT STATE 0.
SECOND QUARTER
PSU Zach Zwinak 2-yard run (Ficken
kick), 9:26. Drive: 10 plays, 82 yards,
2:59. Analysis: Bill OBriens rotation at
running back is paying of and the Lions
ofense has shifted into gear in the rain.
Bill Belton gives the unit a nice spark
by showing of his acceleration on a
cutback to the right sideline, picking up
28 yards. Aface mask penalty moved
it to the Kent 12-yard line. Zwinak
then comes on to polish of the drive,
bulldozing his way into the end zone
for his sixth touchdown of the young
season. PSU 14, KSU 0.
THIRD QUARTER
PSU Zwinak 1-yard run (Ficken kick),
4:53. Drive: 9 plays. 51 yards, 2:55.
Analysis: Amid-game malaise hits
both teams, and its not all because
of the rain. Neither ofense looks
sharp as the weather calms down as
the second half begins. Hackenberg
throws an interception at midfeld to
give the Flashes some life, but Ryan
Keiser answers on the next play with
his frst career interception to settle
things down. After trading punts, Belton
helps get the Lions going with a few
brisk runs and appears to score from
11 yards out. Instant replay overturns
the touchdown, and Zwinak picks it up
instead on the next play, diving over
the pile. Its Zwinaks seventh TD in four
games, topping his total from2012.
PENN STATE 21, KSU 0.
FOURTH QUARTER
PSU Ficken 25-yard feld goal, 13:12.
Drive: 10 plays, 72 yards, 3:26. Analysis:
With Kent State down two defensive
tackles to injury, the middle of the
Flashes line is vulnerable. Redshirt
freshman Akeel Lynch proves that point
when he fres up a crease between the
tackles and into the open feld, gaining
43 yards before being dragged down
frombehind. Lynchs legs drive the
Lions to the 8-yard line, but a third-
down fade pass to Allen Robinson is
well-defended, bringing out the feld
goal unit for the frst time. Ficken, who
had his school-record streak snapped
a week ago, gets to start a newone,
comfortably connecting fromshort
range. PENN STATE 24, KENT STATE 0.
PSU Zwinak 1-yard run (Ficken kick),
6:42. Drive: 12 plays, 83 yards, 5:34.
Analysis: Lynch continues to grind
away Kent State along with the clock,
setting a career high with 123 yards
rushing. But he coughs it up deep in
Kent territory, only to be bailed out by
lineman Angelo Mangiro, who ripped
it away froma defender at the bottom
of the pile. Zwinak checks back in from
there, converts a fourth-and-short, and
then scores a third rushing touchdown
for the second straight week. Rack up
those fantasy points. PENN STATE 31,
KENT STATE 0.
PSU Ficken 54-yard feld goal,
2:45. Drive: 6 plays, 10 yards, 2:59.
Analysis: The defense makes a stop on
fourth down to preserve Penn States
second straight shutout of the Flashes.
Tyler Ferguson and the second-team
ofense take over fromthere. But
theres one last footnote on this dreary
afternoon as the Lions trot out Ficken
for a 54-yarder. The junior continues
his remarkable turnaround fromlast
September by booting the fourth-
longest kick in school history and the
longest since 1979. Only Chris Bahr
is above him, hitting three 55-yarders
during his All-America career. PENN
STATE 34, KENT STATE 0.
there and you dont perform the way you
think you should perform its a disap-
pointment, OBrien said. And those guys
took it to heart.
It showed.
Kents rst drive of the game started
from the Penn State 36 after a short punt
and a penalty. The Flashes missed a eld
goal and then didnt cross the Lions 40 for
the rest of the day.
For seniors like Glenn Carson, it was a
matter of pride.
This was really important for us, the
veteran linebacker said. Coming off a loss,
everyone wants to see how we respond,
both the teams and the coaches. And we
responded well.
Carson backed it up with a team-high
seven tackles, including two for a loss. The
defense came up with three sacks, includ-
ing the rst from last years leader, Deion
Barnes, who split one with Jordan Lucas.
Penn State made seven stops behind
the line as a team and never allowed the
Flashes (1-3) to seriously threaten. With
the offense struggling in the third quar-
ter and the score just 14-0, Christian
Hackenberg threw an interception that
might have given Kent some life.
No problem. Safety Ryan Keiser came
through with his rst career interception
on the next play to put an emphatic stop
to that.
Keiser, a junior from Selinsgrove, had
a career day, also recording a sack before
exiting in the second half with an undis-
closed injury.
The defense held serve long enough for
Penn States ground game to chew up the
Flashes. Penn States trio of tailbacks
Zach Zwinak, Bill Belton and Akeel Lynch
complemented each other nicely as the
Lions nished with 287 yards rushing.
Zwinak (67 yards) scored three times
from short yardage for the second straight
week. Belton (90 yards) added a score
through the air, catching a 15-yard strike
from Hackenberg to open the scoring late
in the rst quarter. Lynch hammered Kent
late, picking up all 117 of his game-high
123 yards in the second half.
That helped ease some struggles for
Hackenberg, who had the shakiest outing
of his young career, nishing just 13-of-35
for 176 yards.
The freshman had opened the game
7-for-10 but went 6-for-25 the rest of the
way, completing just two passes after half-
time.
I think hes probably a little frustrated
tonight, OBrien said. But thats OK.
Thats the mark of a fantastic player, and
thats what he is. Hell get better and youll
see improvement as we go on here.
Penn State now has a week off to think
about it before heading into Big Ten play.
The Lions return to the eld Oct. 5 at
Indiana.
By the end of the day, OBrien thought
his teamhad gotten better.
Yeah, I think we did, OBrien said.
Winnings like salt water. It cures a lot of
things.
From page 1C
Defense
States 34-0 victory over Kent
State didnt lessen the accom-
plishment.
Its a denite condence-
booster, said Ficken, a junor
who also drilled a 25-yard eld
goal earlier in the fourth quarter.
My condence is as high as it
could get right now.
He nearly rose higher than
anyone on Penn States kicking
charts last week, when Fickens
57-yard eld goal attempt at the
end of the rst half had the pre-
cision but dropped just short of
the crossbar.
That miss ended Fickens
school-record string of 15 con-
secutive eld goals, dating back
to last season. It was a Hurculean
attempt that Lions coach Bill
OBrien felt bad about asking his
red-hot kicker to try, but he was
trying to win a game Penn State
ultimately lost to Central Florida
by three points.
But it was Ficken who felt the
need to apologize for that miss.
Unfortunately, I missed that
one a little short, Ficken said of
the only eld goal try he didnt
hit in eight attempts this season.
It was still a good kick.
It was good enough for
OBrien to trust Ficken again
Saturday, from a record-setting
spot on the eld that was just a
bit shorter this time.
Sam, its just been fantastic
the way hes kicked the ball,
OBrien said. I think that was
the longest (Penn State) eld
goal since the 70s. Thats a heck
of a kick.
The long shot he made didnt
carry as much impact as the one
he missed, Ficken admitted.
There is a big difference in try-
ing one in a game your team is
scrapping to stay in, and hitting
one at the end of a blowout win.
Its not a big pressure situa-
tion, Ficken said of Saturdays
record-setter. There is still
pressure, but its not the end of
the world if you miss it.
Ironically, his one miss from
more than 50 yards this season
may have helped him make the
next one.
Ive made them in practice,
said Ficken, who once drilled a
52-yard eld goal at Valparaiso
High School in Indiana to set
that schools record. We always
try at least one (long one) in
practice. Its still not a game situ-
ation. You want to go out in the
game and get that experience.
Experience played a part
in Ficken reaching the record
books for Penn States longest
home eld goal.
After struggling mightily at
the start of last season, Ficken
changed his kicking technique
to a two-step approach to the
ball. But long-distance attempts
require more drive, so Ficken
used a 2 1/2-step surge and com-
pensated for any compromised
accuracy by changing his aim
almost like a golfer trying to
play the right club.
My ball tends to fade to the
left from that distance, said
Ficken, who insisted the rain
didnt pound the turf eld hard
enough to affect his footing. I
tried 2 1/2 steps instead of two
steps, just trying to get a little
more power in the ball. The snap
was good, hold was good.
I just followed through and it
was good.
So good, in fact, he didnt even
have to see his record-breaking
kick to believe it.
From page 1C
Ficken
Ofenses bogged down byweather
DEREK LEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com
STATE COLLEGE One quick look
at the radar was all it took. This was
going to be a long afternoon.
Rain began falling a bit before the
gates opened at Beaver Stadium before
Saturdays game against Kent State. At
that point, the leading edge of the storm
band was over State College, with the
trailing edge just leaving Columbus dur-
ing Ohio States game.
A heavy downpour began roughly an
hour before kickoff and tapered off as
players began their warmups. But the
rain was constant for the entire after-
noon under heavy gray clouds.
That meant a rough day for quarter-
backs and fans in the stands. But it was
just ne for a mudder like Zach Zwinak.
Days like today are great, the 240-
pound tailback said with a grin. I grew
up loving the mud and the rain. Some of
my favorite weather to play in, despite
what everyone thinks.
Surprisingly there were only two
turnovers an interception on each
side to go with four fumbles, all
recovered by the offense.
Not so surprisingly, the weather kept
the stands very patchy. The attendance
was announced at 92,371, a number
that represents tickets sold, not seats
lled. That fact that could be veried
just by looking out at the bleachers. By
the time the second half begun, the sta-
dium was nearing half-capacity.
Attendance for all three Penn State
home games have been announced as
being between 92,000 and 93,000.
Lions coach Bill OBrien personally
thanked fans who stuck around until
the end.
I just enjoy coaching, OBrien said.
I love to coach. It really doesnt mat-
ter what to me what the weather is. I
said when I was hired here, the type of
team we want to be is a smart, tough
football team that can play in all types of
weather. Thats what we showed today.
Infirmary report
Linebacker Mike Hull remains Penn
States biggest question mark on the
injury front. And given the circum-
stances, it wasnt a surprise at all that
the junior didnt suit up on Saturday.
Hull missed his second game of the
year and has played sparingly this sea-
son thanks to a sprained knee he suf-
fered early on in the opener. He also sat
out Week 2 against Eastern Michigan
before returning for a handful of series
against UCF.
For the third straight week, convert-
ed safety Stephen Obeng-Agyapong
started in Hulls place at outside line-
backer.
There was little reason for Hull to
risk anything this week.
The opponent was Penn States
weakest remaining on the schedule.
The heavy rain led to a slippery eld.
And the Lions also have next week off
before starting Big Ten play, giving
Hull an extra chance to rest leading
into the next game at Indiana on Oct.
5.
Hull had gutted it out against UCF
but was clearly not 100 percent.
Safety Ryan Keiser left the game in
the second half with an undisclosed
injury. Keiser had suffered a concus-
sion two weeks ago against Eastern
Michigan but returned to action
against UCF and Kent State.
The rain also did no favors for
Kent State star Dri Archer. The All-
American has been battling an ankle
injury and was labeled doubtful by
coach Paul Haynes at the start of the
week.
Like he did last week at LSU, Archer
dressed for the game. But this time, he
never saw the eld.
The Golden Flashes badly missed his
production on Saturday, nishing with
just 56 yards on the ground.
Geno watch
For the rst time in four collegiate
games, Eugene Lewis didnt have an
ofcial touch. Christian Hackenberg
targeted him once on the afternoon,
looking for Lewis in the front corner of
the end zone in the third quarter.
Lewis nearly hauled in his second
career touchdown, but a Kent State
defender appeared to slap it away from
Lewis body at the last minute.
He never got a chance at a kick
return. Because the Flashes were shut
out, their only kickoff was at the very
start of the game and was elded by
Von Walker.
AP photo
Penn State coach Bill OBrien, right, personally thanked fans for sticking it out through drenching rains after Saturdays win over Kent State at Beaver Stadium.
AP photo
Akeel Lynch (22) and his Penn State team-
mates celebrated Saturdays 34-0 win in the
rain following a disheartening loss to UCF a
week earlier at Beaver Stadium.
PAGE 4C Sunday, September 22, 2013 www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
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East Mountain Corporate Center
100 Baltimore Drive
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
345 Enterprise Way
CenterPoint West
Pittston Township, PA
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320-330 Stewart Road
Hanover Industrial Estates
Hanover Township, PA
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mile from I-81 and I-476
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East Mountain Corporate Center
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www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER COLLEGE FOOTBALL Sunday, September 22, 2013 PAGE 5C
JOEDYMcCREARY
APSportsWriter
DURHAM, N.C. Tom Savage, Tyler
Boyd and the Pittsburgh Panthers made
themselves right at home on the road in the
Atlantic Coast Conference both in the
end zone and in the record book.
Savage tied a league record with six touch-
down passes and the ACC newcomers held
on to win the second-highest-scoring game
in conference history, 58-55 over Duke on
Saturday.
Basically, everybody on the offense
scored, Boyd said.
Savage threw for a career-high 424 yards
on 23-of-33 passing with three touchdowns
to the freshman Boyd.
Thats a quarterbacks dream, especially
playing (behind) the line that we have and
the receivers we have, Savage said. Stat-
wise, it was pretty good, but I think its easy
to do with those kind of guys. I think any-
body can throw those bombs and be protect-
ed by our offensive line.
The Panthers (2-1, 1-1) never trailed in
their rst ACC victory and rst league road
game despite receivingplenty of scares down
the stretch from a persistent Duke team.
Today was a true test, and I think it was a
good indication of where were at, receiver
Devin Street said. Wins and losses come a
dime a dozen, but effort cant be matched,
and we had effort out there.
Brandon Connette had four touchdown
passes and four interceptions, and he rushed
for 101 yards and two touchdowns for Duke
(2-2, 0-2).
There was never a moment that you
thought that the team was ready to shut
down, coach David Cutcliffe said.
Connettes 4-yard scoring run with 3:17
left pulled the Blue Devils within three.
Pitt recovered the onside kick, and Savages
15-yard pass to Kevin Weatherspoon on
third-and-7 helped the Panthers run out the
clock.
Thats what you dream for as a quarter-
back third down, you can win the game
with a rst down and (Weatherspoon) came
up with a big catch, Savage said.
The teams combined for 1,130 total
yards, and the 111 combined points were
a touchdown shy of the record set last
November in Georgia Techs 68-50 win at
North Carolina.
Savage surpassed both of the major
career highs he set for Rutgers in 2009
or, two transfers ago before halftime of
this one while becoming the rst ACC play-
er to throw for six scores since Virginias
Dan Ellis and Florida States Chris Weinke
both did it on Nov. 13, 1999.
He had plenty of help from his big play-
makers: Street had touchdown catches of
67 and 21 yards and nished with a career-
high 166 yards receiving. Boyd scored on
catches of 69, 27 and 14 yards to go along
with his season-high 154 yards.
The new sheriff in town, Street said of
Boyd.
Freshman James Conner rushed for a
season-high 173 yards and had a short,
early touchdown run.
Pittsburgh outscores Duke in wild one
season-low 142 yards
passing after he opened
the season with three
straight 300-yard passing
games. But the defense
couldnt do enough to win
as the game was decided
by a touchdown or less for
the ninth time in the past
14 meetings.
Rees was 14-of-34 pass-
ing as the Irish matched
the schools longest win-
ning streak under Bob
Davie from 1997-99. The
Irish won 19 straight
under Lou Holtz 1987-90.
Cook was 16-of-32 pass-
ing for 135 yards while
the Irish held Michigan
State to 119 yards rushing,
led by 68 yards by Jeremy
Langford.
The key to the victory
Saturday, though, was tak-
ing advantage of Michigan
States mistakes.
The costliest mistake,
though, likely was the inter-
ception thrown by Shelton
that shifted momentum
Notre Dames way after
the Spartans were making
progress against the Irish.
Shelton threw into double
coverage and picked it
off. The Irish, who con-
tinually passed even on
short running situations,
appeared to surprise the
Spartans with the run call
as McDaniel raced into the
end zone.
It was a defensive strug-
gle in the rst half, with
both teams needing key
mistakes by the opponent
to score. It started in the
rst quarter when on third-
and-9 fromthe Notre Dame
21, Darqueze Dennard was
called for a hold to give the
Irish a rst down. On the
next play, Rees completed
a 37-yard pass to fresh-
man Will Fuller, for his
rst career catch, to the
Michigan State 32. That
set up a 41-yard eld goal
by Kyle Brindza to give the
Irish a 3-0 lead late in the
rst quarter.
The Irish responded
with a key penalty in the
second quarter when on
fourth-and-1 from the
Notre Dame 41, the Irish
appeared to stop Nick Hill
short of the rst down.
But defensive end Kona
Schwenke was called for
a personal foul, giving the
Spartans the ball on the
25-yard line. Cooks, who
was only 5-of-15 passing
in the rst half, completed
a 12-yard scoring pass to
Macgarrett Kings in the
end zone to make it 7-3.
After Michigan State
couldnt recover when a
bouncing punt hit Notre
Dame returner TJ Jones,
the Irish took advantage
of a questionable pass
interference call on fourth-
and-1, giving the Irish a
rst down on the Michigan
State 19. A 19-yard pass
from Rees to Corey
Robinson set up a 2-yard
TD catch by TJ Jones, who
outmuscled Dennard in
the end zone with 17 sec-
onds left in the half.
From page 1C
Irish
Cardinals blast Florida Intl 72-0
LOUISVILLE, Ky.
Teddy Bridgewater threw
four touchdown passes
and Louisvilles defense
allowed a school-record 30
yards, helping the seventh-
ranked Cardinals blow out
Florida International 72-0 on
Saturday.
It was the highest scoring
game for the Cardinals (4-0)
since a 73-10 victory over
Murray State in 2007. It also
matched the schools fourth-
largest margin of victory.
Bridgewater hit DeVante
Parker for two TD passes
and Gerald Christian and Eli
Rogers for one each before
Will Gardner came in to
throw another touchdown
to Michaelee Harris in the
fourth quarter. Dominique
Brown, Senorise Perry,
Michael Dyer and Brandon
Radcliff rushed for scores.
Charles Gaines returned
the second-half kickoff 93
yards for a TD and recov-
ered a muffed punt to set
up Bridgewaters second TD
pass in the second quarter.
Louisvilles defense mean-
while didnt allow FIU (0-4)
a rst down until early in the
second quarter and just two
overall.
No. 1 Alabama 31,
Colorado St. 6
TUSCALOOSA, Ala.
AJ McCarron passed for 258
yards and threw a 30-yard
touchdown to DeAndrew
White in the fourth quarter
to lift Alabama.
Kenyan Drake set up one
touchdown with a blocked
punt and scored on a 3-yard
touchdown run for the
Crimson Tide (3-0), which
sputtered at times. Alabama
managed only one offensive
touchdown and no third-
down conversions in the rst
three quarters a week after
winning a 49-42 shootout
over Texas A&M.
The Rams (1-3) nursed
hopes for a monumental
upset into the fourth quar-
ter before allowing two
touchdowns. Trey DePriest
stripped the ball from quar-
terback Garrett Grayson and
recovered the fumble.
The next play McCarron
laced a perfect strike to
White in the end zone and
restless Alabama fans got
something to cheer about.
No. 5 Stanford 42,
No. 23 Arizona State 28
STANFORD, Calif.
Tyler Gaffney ran for 95
yards and two touchdowns,
Anthony Wilkerson added
68 yards and another score,
and Stanford started strong
in a victory over Arizona
State in the Pac-12 opener
for both teams.
The defending conference
champions controlled every
facet of the game to turn
the only matchup between
ranked opponents this week
into a 29-0 halftime lead.
The Cardinal (3-0, 1-0)
scored in the air and on the
ground, forced two turn-
overs, blocked two punts,
tallied 10 tackles for loss and
recorded three sacks.
Taylor Kelly threw for 367
yards, including three touch-
down passes in the fourth
quarter, and Jaelen Strong
caught 12 passes for 168
yards and a score in an other-
wise disappointing showing
for the Sun Devils (2-1, 0-1).
No. 8 Florida State 54
Bethune-Cookman 6
TALLAHASSEE, Fla.
Florida State and quarter-
back Jameis Winston defeat-
ed FCS opponent Bethune-
Cookman despite plenty of
sloppy play.
The defending ACCcham-
pions (3-0, 1-0) will want
to clean up their offense
before starting a seven-game
stretch against conference
foes next week.
Winston completed 10 of
19 passes for 148 yards and
two touchdowns. Devonta
Freeman ran for a game-high
112 yards and a touchdown.
Karlos Williams nished
with 83 yards rushing and
two touchdowns, and James
Wilder, Jr. added 56 yards
and a touchdown.
No. 9 Georgia 45,
North Texas 21
ATHENS, Ga. Aaron
Murray threw for 408 yards
and three touchdowns, and
ran for another score to lead
Georgia over pesky North
Texas.
Murray overcame an early
interception in the end zone,
hooking up with freshman
Reggie Davis on a 98-yard
TD the longest pass play
in school history. Arthur
Lynch and Chris Conley also
had touchdown catches for
the Bulldogs (2-1).
The Mean Green (2-2)
came in as a 33-point under-
dog, but big plays on special
teams helped make a game
of it. Brelan Chancellor
returned a kickoff 99 yards
for a touchdown, and Zac
Whiteld fell on a blocked
punt in the end zone early in
the second half to stunningly
tie the game at 21.
No. 10Texas A&M42, SMU 13
COLLEGE STATION,
Texas Johnny Manziel
accounted for 346 yards
with three touchdowns in
just more than a half to help
No. 10 Texas A&M cruise
past SMU.
Texas A&M (3-1) was up
32-6 at halftime, and Manziel
led the Aggies to a touch-
down on their rst drive of
the third quarter before the
Heisman Trophy-winner
went to the bench.
Manziel had 244 yards
passing with a touchdown
and ran for 102 yards and
two more scores.
Deshazor Everett
returned a fumble 12 yards
for a touchdown and Ben
Malena ran for 71 yards and
two scores. He got things
going for A&Mwith a 3-yard
touchdown run in the rst
quarter.
No. 16 Miami 77,
Savannah St. 7
MIAMI GARDENS, Fla.
Dallas Crawford and
Gus Edwards both scored
three touchdowns and No.
16 Miami got into the end
zone on its rst seven pos-
sessions, rolling to a 77-7
victory over Savannah State
on Saturday night.
The Hurricanes set a
school record for points in a
game, topping the 75 scored
against Fordham in 1954.
Stacy Coley had a kick-
off return for a score and a
touchdown catch for Miami,
which has won ve straight
games for the rst time since
2008.
No. 17 Washington 56,
Idaho St. 0
SEATTLE Keith Price
threw for 213 yards and
three touchdowns in less
than a half, Deontae Cooper
scored his rst career touch-
down after three major knee
surgeries, and Washington
routed Idaho State in the
Huskies nal tuneup before
the start of Pac-12 play.
Bishop Sankey, the nation-
al leader in yards rushing per
game, barely broke a sweat
against the Bengals (2-1) of
the FCS. Sankey saw action
on the Huskies rst three
series and scored on a 3-yard
TD run in the rst quarter.
Sankey nished with 77
yards on four carries.
No. 19 Florida 31,
Tennessee 17
GAINESVILLE, Fla.
After starting quarterback
Jeff Driskel was lost to a
season-ending ankle injury,
Tyler Murphy led Florida
to ve scores in a some-
what ugly game, helping the
Gators open Southeastern
Conference play with a vic-
tory over Tennessee.
Murphy had a 52-yard
touchdown throw to
Solomon Patton, a swing
pass that went the distance,
and made several plays with
his legs as Florida (2-1, 1-0)
won its ninth straight in the
series. Murphys 7-yard TD
scamper in the fourth quar-
ter made it 31-10 and sent
fans scrambling for the exits.
The Volunteers (2-2, 0-1)
had hoped to rebound from
an embarrassing 59-14 loss
at No. 2 Oregon a week ago,
but they left Gainesville with
another double-digit set-
back.
No. 20 Baylor 70,
Louisiana Monroe 7
WACO, Texas Bryce
Petty threw for 351 yards
with four touchdowns and
ran 2 yards for another
score, and Baylor kept piling
up the points in a win over
Louisiana-Monroe.
The fast-paced Bears (3-0)
had seven offensive touch-
downs in the 10 drives Petty
played. Those TD drives
took a total of 6 minutes.
Baylor is the rst FBS
team since LSU in 1930 to
open a season with at least
60 points in three consecu-
tive games, according to
STATS. The Bears nished
with 781 total yards, match-
ing the school record they
set in their last game, two
weeks ago in a 70-13 win
over Buffalo.
No. 25 Texas Tech 33,
Texas State 7
LUBBOCK, Texas
Backup quarterback Davis
Webb threw for two touch-
downs and 310 yards to lead
Texas Tech.
Webb threwa 4-yardtouch-
downpass toEric Wardinthe
third quarter and a 10-yarder
to Bradley Marquez in the
fourth after Texas State failed
on a fake punt deep in its own
territory.
Webb nished 19 for 43
and had two interceptions.
AP photo
Louisville quarterback Teddy Bridgewater (5) celebrates with
fans in the student section after shutting out winless Florida
International 72-0 on Saturday in Louisville, Ky.
Record day for Buckeyes against FAMU
TheAssociated Press
COLUMBUS, Ohio Kenny Guiton
again starred in place of the injured
Braxton Miller, setting a school record
with six touchdown passes all in the
rst half to lead No. 4 Ohio State to
a 76-0 victory against Florida A&M on
Saturday.
It was the most lopsided Ohio State
win since 1935.
The Buckeyes (4-0) needed a total of
four offensive plays and 46 seconds to
go up 21-0 in the opening 6 minutes and
never looked back. It was an epic mis-
match between a team with national-title
aspirations and a Football Championship
Subdivision member getting a $900,000
guarantee.
FAMU (1-3), which suffered its worst
loss ever, trailed 48-0 before picking up
its initial rst down in the second quarter.
Guiton completed 24 of 34 passes for
215 yards. His TDpasses went to ve dif-
ferent receivers.
The game was Ohio States last tuneup
before opening Big Ten play next week
against No. 24 Wisconsin at home on
Saturday night.
The last time the Buckeyes won by
such a large margin was an 85-7 victory
over Drake in 1935. They had not won a
shutout by such a landslide since a 76-0
win at Western Reserve in 1934.
The Rattlers biggest previous margin
of defeat was 73-6 to Tuskegee in 1926.
They lost to Oklahoma 69-13 a year ago
and South Florida 70-17 in 2011.
Ohio State had a 34-2 edge in rst
downs and a 603-80 differential in yards.
No. 18 Northwestern 35, Maine 21
EVANSTON, Ill. Linebacker
Damien Proby and defensive end Dean
Lowry each had an interception return
for a touchdown to lead Northwestern
over Maine.
Northwestern improved to 4-0 as it
wrapped up its non-conference slate, but
this was not the consistent, steady per-
formance coach Pat Fitzgerald was look-
ing for heading into Big Ten play. If not
for the interception returns, Maine (3-1)
could have been in line for an upset down
the stretch.
Running back Mike Trumpy and quar-
terback Kain Colter each had rushing
TDs for Northwestern.
Marcus Wasilewski was 25-for-40 for
237 yards with two touchdowns and two
interceptions for Maine, which had a 379
to 373 edge over the Wildcats in total
yards.
Northwestern had posted better than
500 yards of offense in each of its rst two
games against California and Syracuse.
No. 24 Wisconsin 41, Purdue 10
MADISON, Wis. Melvin Gordon
ran for three touchdowns, James White
added 145 yards rushing and a 70-yard
score, and Wisconsin opened Big Ten
play with a win over Purdue.
Gordon scored from 5 and 27 yards in
the rst half before capping the opening
drive of the second half with a 15-yard
touchdown run to give Wisconsin (3-1,
1-0) a 31-10 lead.
Nose guard Warren Herring had a sack
and three tackles, and linebacker Chris
Borland had six stops and a pass breakup
at the goal line with the game still close in
the rst half.
Wisconsin moved on nicely from last
weeks stunning 32-30 loss to Arizona
State, after ofcials mishandled the nal
seconds to deprive the Badgers of a game-
winning eld-goal try.
Quarterback Rob Henrys 22-yard
scramble for a score on what appeared to
be a busted play provided one of the few
highlights for the Boilermakers (1-3, 0-1).
Nebraska 59, S. Dakota St. 20
LINCOLN, Neb. Tommy
Armstrong Jr. and Ron Kellogg III
combined to pass for 305 yards, Ameer
Abdullah ran for a career-high 139 yards
and Nebraska shook off South Dakota
State.
Armstrong got the start in place of
the injured Taylor Martinez, but playing
time was evenly split between the red-
shirt freshman and Kellogg.
Nebraska (3-1), which nished with
645 yards, scored 38 straight points after
falling behind 17-14 in the rst quarter
against the Championship Subdivision
Jackrabbits (3-1).
Martinez didnt practice this week
because of a turf-toe injury on his left
foot and was in shorts and a T-shirt on
the sideline. He had started 32 straight
games since 2010.
The victory will do little to quell con-
cern over Nebraskas defense. SDSUs
Zach Zenner ran for 202 yards, tied for
10th-most by a Nebraska opponent, and
the Jackrabbits nished with 465 total
yards.
Minnesota 43, San Jose State 24
MINNEAPOLIS Quarterback
Mitch Leidner rushed for 151 yards and
four touchdowns to lift Minnesota.
Leidner was lling in for injured start-
er Philip Nelson, who was out with a bad
hamstring. He also passed for 71 yards
as the Golden Gophers improved to 4-0.
Gophers coach Jerry Kill returned to the
sideline a week after missing the second
half because of an epileptic seizure and
made it through the game without inci-
dent.
David Fales threw for 439 yards with
three touchdowns and two intercep-
tions for San Jose State (1-2). Chandler
Jones had seven catches for 197 yards
and three touchdowns for the Spartans,
who were missing top receiver Noah
Grigsby with a knee injury.
David Cobb rushed for 125 yards and
two touchdowns and the Gophers dom-
inated the time of possession 40:38-
18:58 to grind Fales and the high-ying
Spartans into submission.
Iowa 59, W Michigan 3
IOWA CITY, Iowa Kevonte
Martin-Manley returned back-to-back
punts for touchdowns; B.J. Lowery
returned a pair of interceptions for TDs
and Iowa rolled.
The Hawkeyes (3-1) now enter Big
Ten play with a three-game winning
streak, their longest since 2010.
Martin-Manley scored on returns of
83 and 63 yards early in the second
quarter as Iowa jumped out to a 38-3
halftime lead.
Lowery took back picks for 35 and
13-yard TDs for Iowa, which scored
its most points since it had 62 against
Northwestern in 2002.
Tyler Van Tubbergen had 114 yards
passing for the Broncos (0-4).
AP photo
Pittsburgh quarterback Tom Savage (7) looks to pass against Duke during the first half Saturday in
Durham, N.C.
PAGE 6C Sunday, September 22, 2013 SPORTS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Photos provided
Wyoming Valley Country Club recently honored a number of club tournament champions. The Womens Golf Association held its 10th annual Ryder Cup Tournament recently. The Yellow Team
was ahead by one point after the rst day. The White team rallied on the second day but was unable to overcome the lead. The Yellow team was victorious again this year. Pictured (left photo),
from the tournament, rst row, from left: Miriam Sable, Linda Shypulefski, Jeanne Elinsky, Debbie Mileski, June Olszewski. Second row: Carol Lippincott, Crystal Hritzik, Natalie Sokoloski,
Sallie Price, Joyce Gelli, Julia Chmielowski, Maureen Umpherd, Shiley Keefe, Donna Long, Mary Zabresky, Mabel Selig. In the center picture are the Twi-Light League champion, Bill Davis,
left, and Joe Baranowski. Ladies Senior Club champions, in the right picture are Sallie Price, left, and Mary Zabresky.
Hanover AreaJuniors win
District 16championship
Photo provided
The Hanover Area Junior Division Little League team
won the District 16 championship recently. Front row: Jaed
Stefanowicz, Sal Gurani, Ryan Kornacki, Matthew Clarke,
Michael Piscotty, Tyler Gavlick, Joey Wheeler Llyod Deno.
Second row: Austin Gately, Kevin Rimmer, Devin Senk, Sean
Hart. Third row: Assistant coach Bernie Gurnari, assistant
coach John Senk, manager Michael Piscotty, head coach Mark
Stefanowicz.
TripppresentedWiesley
Rhiel Memorial Award
Photo provided
The Wesley Rhiel Memorial Award was presented to co-
winners Emilee Tripp and Jena Pursell. The award is pre-
sented to the outstanding player that played in both the
Swoyersville Girls 7-12 and teener leagues. Emily Tripp
played for Lehmans and Barillas, and Jenna Pursell played
for the Luzerne Bank and Kiwanis. Pictured is Kenny Rhiel,
co-winner Emilee Tripp and league president Rick Harden.
Kiwanis Club held
annual golf tournament
Photo provided
The Kiwanis Club of Swoyersville recently held its 14th annu-
al golf tournament at the Four Seasons Golf Club in Exeter.
The proceeds were used for their annual scholarship awards
and childrens projects. Shown are golf committee members
Gene Breznay, Kathy Jamiolkowski, Frank Caolo and Barbara
Hartnett.
Chevrolet oferedat
charitygolf tournament
Photo provided
Fairway Chevrolet will offer a 2014 Chevrolet Impala for the rst
hole-in-one on a desginated hole during the 20th annual Maz and
Lorraine Foundation Golf Tournament on Friday, Oct. 4, at Mt.
Laurel Golf Course. Proceeds fromthe tournament will benet Camp
AsthmaCadabra, a camp for children with asthma. Preparing for the
event, fromleft: Fairway Chevrolet sales advisor Joe Perilla, Fairway
Chevrolet sales manager Keith Laylo, Fairway Chevrolet owner Jim
Corazza, Kate Button of the Max and Lorraine Foundation.
Pursell presentedWesley
Rhiel MemorialAward
Photo provided
The Wesley Rhiel Memorial Award was presented to co-
winners Emilee Tripp and Jena Pursell. The award is pre-
sented to the outstanding player that played in both the
Swoyersville Girls 7-12 and teener leagues. Emily Tripp
played for Lehmans and Barillas, and Jenna Pursell played
for the Luzerne Bank and Kiwanis. Pictured is Kenny Rhiel,
co-winner Jena Pursell and league president Rick Harden.
St.MaryAntiochanOrthodox
Churchholdingtourney
Photo provided
St. Mary Antiochian Orthodox Church is sponsoring a golf
tournament to be held Friday, Sept. 27 at Sand Springs Country
Club in Drums. The format is captain and crew, with a 1 p.m.
shotgun start time. Entry fee is $75 per person. Committee
members in front row: Lorraine Joseph, Ed Audi, Jane Saba, Dan
Norman, Joanna Tenneriello, George Saba. Back row: Madelyn
Elias, Rev. Dr. David Hester, Norman Namey, Theresa Solomon,
Gene Marinelli.
Miners Mills CCWN
Horseshoe League
celebrates 13 years
Photo provided
The Miners Mills CCWN Horeshoe League recently con-
cluded its 13th season with a catered party at the league presi-
dents home. Seated, from left: Cindy Wilegosz, Ralph Huges,
Sherry Kruchinsky, Lisa Christman, Terry Ordish, league
president Stanley Makuch Sr., Jim Waters. Standing: Erik
Kolesar, Dave Petroski, league commisioner Stanely Makuch
Jr., Cathy Makuch, Donny Rossi, Greg Christman, Matt Scott,
Josh Urban. Absent from photo: Joe Koval, Jeremy Hrable.
Kirby Park tennis
camp concludes
Photo provided
The secondsessionof the Kings College/Kirby Park Junior Tennis
Camp concluded at the Kirby Park Tennis Courts. Twenty-three
juniors took part in the session, with groups working in age and
ability levels. Row one, from left: Tea Amerise, Nyles Mangan, Ama
Reitsma, Audrey Flynn, Jen Zemetro, Anya Gamlich, Nina Guthrie,
William Wolfgang, Vaughn Kutish. Row two: Aidan Temple, Meika
Reitsma, Emily Cheskiewicz, Allison Lampman, Isabel Kaspriskie,
Josh Wychock, Russ Kutish. Row three: Deterich Reitsma, Cavan
Temple, Samir Sing, instructor Anthony Bevevino, instructor
George Parkhurst, instructor Jacob Rohring, Matt Finnegan, instruc-
tor David Kaluzavich. Absent from photo: Bhauya Phuygat, Valerie
Gerchak, Danica Mits.
Newberry Ladies Golf
League Firecracker
Tournament winners
Photo provided
The Newberry Ladies Golf League heldtheir annual Firecracker
Tournament recently. Members of the league dressed and deco-
rated carts in patriotic colors. Pictured is the winning team. In
the rst row is Peg Mihalick and Jayne Loyd, and in the second
row is Sharon Davis and Jean Brennan.
AT PLAY
Wyoming Valley Country Club honors its champions
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER FOOTBALL Sunday, September 22, 2013 PAGE 7C
Its early, but
there are some
things we know
RICH SHEPOSH
rsheposh@timesleader.com
Anyone who has played fantasy football long enough
knows how mind-bendingly unpredictable it can be.
Trying to forecast games accurately week-to-week is
like relying on a fortune teller with short-term memo-
ry loss and attention deficit disorder.
I see in your future WAIT. Why am I holding a
glass bowling ball? Hey, I found some gum!
The early parts of the season are especially hard to
find lasting trends.
Is 49ers QB Colin Kaepernick the guy who threw for
412 yards and 3 TDs in the opener? Or the guy who
stunk up the joint with 127 yards and 3 interceptions
Week 2?
And which Jared Cook is real? The tight end who
looked like the second coming of Antonio Gates in
Week 1 with 7 receptions, 2 TDs and 141 yards? Or
the dude who looked like the second coming of Kyle
Brady with 1 catch for 10 yards Week 2?
Chances are good both guys are closer to their Week
1 numbers, but it will take a few more games to be
sure.
In the meantime, there are a few trends that are
quickly turning into facts after the first two games.
The smart fantasy owner will look to capitalize on
them now and beat your opponent to the punch.
1: This ones obvious, but the Eagles LeSean
McCoy should have been the first pick in the fantasy
draft. He is made for that Chip Kelly offense and the
offense is made for him. Only injury will slow him
down.
2: The Redskins defense is bad. Bad, with a capi-
tal awful. Take a look ahead on Washington s sched-
ule and rejoice if you have any Lions, Vikings, Bears,
Chargers or Chiefs. Double rejoice if you have players
from the other NFC East teams because you get to face
that revolving door to the end zone twice.
3: The Chiefs defense may be a Top 5 fantasy unit.
Theyve held two potent offenses (Dallas, Philly) to
17 and 16 points respectively, and one terrible offense
(Jacksonville ) scoreless (But no shutout. Thanks,
safety). They get lots of sacks and force turnovers.
None of this should be a surprise considering its a
defense that had four Pro Bowlers last year.
4: Trent Richardsons trade from the Browns to the
Colts should mean better days for him and the Colts
offense. Richardson has a bit of an injury history, so
thats not a fact you can set in stone. But, a running
game should open up more room for QB Andrew Luck.
The hard fact to take out of the trade, is that if you
jumped to pick up Richardson s replacement with the
Browns, you wasted a waiver move. Willis McGahee
is turning 32 and has not been a reliable fantasy back
for years. (If he ever really was one)
Ask yourself this: If the Browns offense was strug-
gling with a talented 22-year-old running the ball,
what do you think it will do with a 32-year-old retread
in the backfield?
5: The Chargers Philip Rivers is back to being a No.
1 QB. This team has an offense again thanks to head
coach Mike McCoy. That should surprise no one con-
sidering McCoy called the shots for Peyton Manning
in Denver last year, and turned Arena League castoff
Jake Delhomme into a Super Bowl QB when he was in
Carolina.
Chances are good that Rivers isnt even your start-
ing QB. So that leaves you a nice option: Keep Rivers
and spend the year with a potent 1-2 QB punch, or
trade him for some help at another position.
QUICK HITS FOR WEEK 3
Start em: Take a look at Rams QB Sam Bradford
vs. the Cowboys. Bradford looks like hes ready to have
a breakout year and games against Dallas usually lead
to shootouts.
Titans RB Chris Johnson. It still confounds me
how Tennessee forgets about its best player at times.
Its almost as if their philosophy is, The other team
THINKS were going to run Johnson, so well fool
them! Throw the ball! This week though, at home,
with the possibility for a high-scoring affair, CJ2K
should thrive.
Take a flier on Cardinals WR Andre Roberts today
against the Saints. Larry Fitzgerald has been battling
injury and Roberts has seen the most targets from QB
Carson Palmer over the first few weeks. And any game
against the Saints will involve many footballs being
chucked about thought the air.
Any and all Lions except the defense. Get them off
your bench and into your lineup. If youre in a league
that starts a waterboy, get him in there this week
Sit em: Just for this week, sit Trent Richardson.
Traded players often need a week or so to adjust to
new offenses. Unfortunately, this adjustment week
comes against the 49ers defense.
Last year, Panthers QB Cam Newton was off to
a slow start and had his worst game of the season
against the N.Y. Giants. This year, Newton is off to a
slow start and here come those Giants again. Can you
say dj vu all over again?
By the end of the year, you will thank the draft gods
that you got WR Cecil Shorts on your team. You will
not be thanking anyone today. Jacksonville travels to
Seattle in a hide-the-women-and-children matchup.
That Seahawk defense eats ornery for breakfast and
spits out nasty. Avert your eyes during this one.
AP photo
When the Washington Redskins come to town, get every player you
can from the opposing team in your starting lineup. Their fantasy
numbers will thank you for it.
WEEK 3 PREDICTIONS
GREG COTE
The Miami Herald
GAME OF THE WEEK
TEXANS (2-0) AT RAVENS (1-1)
Line: HOU by 2
Cotes pick: HOU 27-23.
The Week 3 plate is light on Grade A GOTW candidates, but were
OK offering a reigning Super Bowl champ at home facing a visitor
with SB aspirations. Both have much to prove, with Houston the
first team since 1970 to be 2-0 winning both on the games final
plays Probably not the best for your blood pressure, noted J.J.
Watt and Baltimore less than impressive after a 14-6 defeat of
Cleveland. Both teams have notable injury concerns, but Texans
WR Andre Johnson (concussion) entered Friday seeming likelier to
be full strength than Ravens RB Ray Rice (hip). Thats partly why,
despite mad respect for BALs home field, I like Texans here.
UPSET OF THE WEEK
BEARS (2-0) AT STEELERS (0-2)
Line: CHI by 2 .
Cotes pick: PIT 21-17.
AAAWWWK! bellows the Upset Bird. Dont be too quick to bury
Pittsbaawwk! Yes, Ben Roethlisberger needs a running game
like popcorn needs better. Yes, a once-vaunted Steelers D has
zero takeaways in two games. And yes, your home field does cede
some mystique when you lose your opener there to Tennessee.
Despite all that, the prime-time Sunday stage and a dose of early
desperation will summon a vintage effort and dodge Pitts first 0-3
start since 2000. Sounds like a venue pick, notes a professorially
nodding U-Bird. Roethlisbaaawwwk!
DOG OF THE WEEK
JAGUARS (0-2) AT SEAHAWKS (2-0)
Line: SEA by 19 .
Cotes pick: SEA 24-7.
Its the Miami-Savannah State of NFL Week 3! The Sunday betting
lines dont get much bigger than this. The involvement of sad
Jacksonville alone makes any game a Dog candidate, and here
we add the likelihood of a miserable rout. Looks like Chad Henne
again over Blaine Gabbert; like it matters? Strange as it seems I
might ride Jags with all that head start, though. Hawks figure to
have an almost indifferent effort coming after an emotional rout
of rival San Francisco.
PACKERS (1-1) AT BENGALS (1-1)
Line: GB by 2 .
Cotes pick: GB 31-23.
Cincys defense dating to last season has not allowed a visitor
more than 20 points in five straight home games. The thing is,
Aaron Rodgers and that pass attack render trends like that moot.
Packers generally score 20 before the national anthem ends. The
Bengals are good, playoff good, but Andy Dalton is not cut out to
outscore Mr. Rodgers, no matter the neighborhood.
RAMS (1-1) AT COWBOYS (1-1)
Line: DAL by 4.
Cotes pick: DAL 27-20.
Dallas figures to be in rebound mode after a 1-point loss in KC,
and I like the Boys at home even though WR Dez Bryants iffy back
is tormenting his fantasy owners. STL is improved but doesnt
generally travel well. DeMarco Murray ran for 253 yards when last
he faced the Rams. Homies would take about half of that here.
Cant be greedy.
CHARGERS (1-1) AT TITANS (1-1)
Line: TEN by 3.
Cotes pick: SD 24-23.
Upset! Im beginning to gather a bit of faith in new Chargers coach
Mike McCoy, especially the way he has revitalized QB Philip Rivers.
Also, Bolts have won eight straight in this series. That combo
portends Tennessees home-opening crowd filing out quietly.
BROWNS (0-2) AT VIKINGS (0-2)
Line: MIN by 51/2.
Cotes pick: MIN 28-16.
Week of tumult in Cleveland. First the Earthtones vault third-
stringer Brian Hoyer to starting QB, then they shockingly trade
starting RB Trent Richardson to Indy for a 2014 No. 1 draft pick.
Have they set a league record for earliest concession and playing
for next year? Give Brownies a slight upset shot, but far likelier
Vikes roll in their home opener.
BUCCANEERS (0-2) AT PATRIOTS (2-0)
Line: NE by 7 .
Cotes pick: NE 24-13.
This is the NFL: Patriots 2-0 by combined five points and Bucs
0-2 by combined three points, the margin of error at times paper
thin. NE has won 31 of past 34 home games and should safely
sputter to its first 3-0 start since 2007. Side note: A chance TE
Rob Gronkowski could return from injury. Note II: Greg Schiano
got Tampa job largely on recommendation of Bill Belichick.
LIONS (1-1) AT REDSKINS (0-2)
Line: WAS by 2.
Cotes pick: WAS 30-27.
A coin-flip of a game rendered even more unpredictable by the
uncertainty with Reggie Bush, who is questionable (knee) for
a Detroit squad that needs him. Lions arent the awful roadies
they used to be, and Matthew Stafford could throw for miles on
the Unspeakable Nicknames bad pass-D, but I still make this is a
venue pick, albeit a very anxious one.
GIANTS (0-2) AT PANTHERS (0-2)
Line: CAR by 1.
Cotes pick: NYG 24-20.
Upset! (Although it hardly feels like one). Giants 0-2 start is self-
inflicted, with 10 turnovers, including seven INTs by Eli Manning.
Oh-and-3 is a death knell for playoff prospects, so this is huge.
Biggies won in Carolina 36-7 a year ago so this result will measure
how far NYG has fallen, or announce theyre still around.
CARDINALS (1-1) AT SAINTS (2-0)
Line: NO by 7 .
Cotes pick: NO 34-20.
Drew Brees has a 131.3 passer rating in two career meetings with
Cardbirds, and him at home vs. this pass D should make for more
fantasy-pleasing numbers. The gut is to like Arizona getting a
touchdown-plus here, but WR Larry Fitzgerald being questionable
(hamstring) bodes ill for the Cacti and makes us like NAwlis on
the cover.
FALCONS (1-1) AT DOLPHINS (2-0)
Line: MIA by 2
Cotes pick: MIA 24-20
Atlanta is a better team overall but also is diminished, with RB
Steven Jackson (thigh) out and WR Roddy White (high ankle
sprain) not himself even if he does play. That levels the field and
makes me lean Miami on the tailwind of the franchises 48th home
opener all of this presuming Ryan Tannehill will be OK after
being limited in practice this week by a sore shoulder. Cornerback
Brent Grimes, the seven-year ex-Falcon, versus excellent Julio
Jones should be an individual duel worth watching. Also of note,
Dolphins guard John Jerry vs. Falcons DT Peria Jerry in a Battle
of Bros. (Hey, so it isnt exactly Manning vs. Manning!) Keys will
be Miamis two lines, one putting pressure on Matt Ryan and the
other keeping it off Tannehill. Dolphins not drafting Ryan No. 1
overall in 2008 has been fairly second-guessed, but that old ghost
will largely disappear if Tannehill can best Ryan head-to-head here
and lift Miami to its first 3-0 bustout since 2002. With admittedly
modest confidence, Im betting it happens.
BILLS (1-1) AT JETS (1-1)
Line: NYJ by 2.
Cotes pick: NYJ 19-16.
Round 1 in the fight for the AFC East cellar brings us a duel of
young QBs EJ Manuel and Geno Smith, who became friends out
of high school attending a South Florida football camp together.
NYJ has won eight of past 10 in series, including three straight
at home, so make this one a venue call. Planes bring a bit better
defense, too.
COLTS (1-1) AT 49ERS (1-1)
Line: SF by 10 .
Cotes pick: SF 27-20.
I get loving San Fran outright here, on a fierce rebound after
Niners were flat-out embarrassed in Seattle 29-3 last week. I
also get that nobody knows Andrew Luck (or presumably how to
defend him) better than his former Stanford coach, Jim Harbaugh.
This is a lot of points, though, to give a 2012 playoff team that got
better this week by trading for RB Trent Richardson.
RAIDERS (1-1) AT BRONCOS (2-0)
Line: DEN by 15.
Cotes pick: DEN 34-23.
This is a record 17th MNF meeting for Raiders-Broncos, and this
one finds Denver as only the third team in past 30 years to start
2-0 with 40-plus points in each game. And you wonder why TV
loves Peyton Manning? Do not see an upset by any stretch, but
see Oaks keeping it reasonably close. Raiders can run the ball, and
losing LT Ryan Clady to injury will be cause a void that Manning
cant help but feel.
Steelers receivers
dont measure up
RAYFITTIPALDO
PittsburghPost-Gazette
In their four seasons
together, Ben Roethlisberger
and Mike Wallace teamed
up for 29 touchdowns, 19 of
which were 20 yards or more
in distance. The Steelers
gured they would lose
some of their quick-strike
capabilities when Wallace
was not re-signed over the
offseason, but did anyone
gure Roethlisberger would
go from one of the best deep
passers in the game to one of
the most ineffective?
Its only two games, but
Roethlisberger and his
receivers have not produced
the types of big plays he used
to engineer with Wallace and
others in previous years. And
it hasnt been for a lack of try-
ing.
Roethlisberger has taken
his shots on deep routes, but
his receivers havent been
able to make many big catch-
es. He tried to connect with
Emmanuel Sanders on the
rst play from scrimmage in
Week 1 against Tennessee,
and Sanders let the ball go
through his hands. In the loss
to Cincinnati Monday night,
Roethlisberger was 1 for 8 on
throws of 20 yards or more.
Wallace isnt a big target
but at 6 feet, he is taller than
Sanders (5-11) and Antonio
Brown (5-10).
Theyre arent the biggest
guys in the world, so its easy
for defensive backs to hold
them, push them and arm-
bar them, and they arent get-
ting the calls, Roethlisberger
said earlier this week. So
its tough. They just need to
keep ghting through those
things. I know they will do
that. They take pride in their
work and they work hard at
it.
Roethlisberger might be
jealous of Chicago quarter-
back Jay Cutler on Sunday
night if he sneaks a peek at
the Bears offense. Cutlers
starting receivers are 6-4
Brandon Marshall and 6-3
Alshon Jeffery. There are
six receivers on the Bears
53-man roster and only one
is shorter than 6 feet.
It makes it nice, Cutler
said. The window to throw
in is a lot bigger when youre
dealing with guys who are
6-2 or 6-4.
The Steelers have ve
receivers on their 53-man
roster and only two
Jerricho Cotchery and Derek
Moye are 6 feet or taller.
The Steelers knew they
had a small group of receiv-
ers, which is one of the rea-
sons general manager Kevin
Colbert re-signed 6-5 Plaxico
Burress.
When Burress had a sea-
son-ending shoulder injury
in training camp, it opened
the door for Moye, who also
is 6-5. Moye caught the rst
touchdown of his career
against the Bengals when
Roethlisberger lobbed a pass
to him in the corner of the
end zone from a yard out.
Ive always had the con-
dence that I could play
at this level, but whenever
you go out there and do it,
you show yourself and your
coaches that youll be ready
for the moment, Moye said.
Its a positive for me to show
the coaches that I can go out
there and play and they can
rely on me if the situation is
needed.
AP photo
Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiv-
er Emmanuel Sanders (88) is
one of many receivers on the
Steelers who are not at least
6-feet tall.
Ross may return to Giants lineup
ARTSTAPLETON
The Record(Hackensack, N.J.)
EAST RUTHERFORD,
N.J. Aaron Ross has not
started a game for the Giants
since Super Bowl XLVI,
although that includes a sea-
son away in Jacksonville last
year.
That will change if cor-
nerback Corey Webster is
unable to play he is listed
as doubtful for Sundays
game against Carolina with
a hip exor and Ross gets
the call.
Of course, the defensive
assignment opposite Prince
Amukamara would come just
one week after Ross played
zero defensive snaps in the
41-23 loss to Denver.
My mind-set going into
Sunday is the same that it is
every week, Ross said after
practice Friday. I go in pre-
paring like Im a starter. You
never know whats going to
happen, like the rst week
when Prince went down
and I had to come in, step in
for him and know the plays,
know what was going on,
know the formations, know
what (Tony) Romo likes to
do.
I prepare like Ima starter
every week no matter if I play
or not.
Webster has started 34
consecutive regular-season
games, the third-longest
streak on the Giants after
Manning (137) and Antrel
Rolle (50). He practiced
Wednesday, but was unavail-
able Thursday and Friday,
placing his status in doubt.
The way we look at it in
our defensive room is that
everyone is a starter, Rolle
said. You never know whats
going to take place. It can be
before the game, it can be
during the course of a game,
the guy has to be ready and
step in. Ross has been a start-
er in this league for a number
of years. Hes played multiple
positions for us, so were not
looking for any kind of let-
down, were looking for Ross
to go in there and play ball,
as he did going into the game
against Dallas.
While Ross is happy to be
back where he calls home
with the Giants, another
teammate still remains in line
for a homecoming of his own
Sunday.
Tom Coughlin said he
expects wide receiver
Hakeem Nicks to start
against the Panthers despite
missing Fridays practice
with an excused absence for
personal reasons.
Nicks suffered a dislocat-
ed middle nger on his left
hand in the Denver defeat,
but practiced all week and
joked nothing would not
keep him from playing in his
hometown of Charlotte, N.C.,
come Sunday afternoon.
Oh yeah, theyre gonna
see me this time, Nicks said
earlier this week, referenc-
ing the fact that he did not
make the trip to Carolina
last season because of a
knee injury.
After foot and knee ail-
ments plagued his entire
2012 campaign, Nicks had
been a regular contributor
at every Giants practice
since returning Aug. 6 from
a groin issue that cost him
four days in training camp.
The Panthers ruled
out three-quarters of their
starting secondary Friday,
including CB Josh Thomas
(concussion) and S Quintin
Mikell.
Coughlin has made no
secret of the Giants desire to
get their struggling ground
game going Brandon
Jacobs called their 19-carry,
23-yard performance against
the Broncos terrible but
Carolinas injury situation
could make them easy tar-
gets for Eli Manning, receiv-
ers Victor Cruz and Nicks
and the passing attack.
TV SCHEDULE
1 p.m.
CBS Houston at
Baltimore
FOXN.Y. Giants at
Carolina
4:15 p.m.
CBS Bufalo at N.Y.
Jets
8 p.m.
NBC Chicago at
Pittsburgh
McGahee ready to run again
The Associated Press
BEREA, Ohio The
cursive, decade-old tat-
too on Willis McGahees
neck reads Guess Whos
Back.
Briey out of the league,
he is indeed back again
this time with his fourth
team, hoping to bring sta-
bility to the reeling Browns.
OnWednesday, Cleveland
dealt running back Trent
Richardson to Indianapolis,
less than two years after
drafting him in the rst
round. On Thursday, the
Browns signed McGahee,
who practiced for the rst
time on Friday.
And ready or not,
McGahee, 31, is going
to play Sunday, when the
Browns (0-2) visit the
Minnesota Vikings (0-2).
Such is life in the NFL.
Its a fresh start, a new
beginning, McGahee said.
The players are great, its
a young team. Weve got
work to do.
McGahee, who has
played for Buffalo,
Baltimore and Denver after
a memorable career at the
University of Miami, has a
familiarity with the offense,
but knows he must get the
language down.
I want to come and
do everything I can, he
said. But I gotta gradually
come in. I just cant come
in and do the whole work-
load. But Im going to do
whatever it takes.
Despite the quick
turnaround, coach Rob
Chudzinski has 100 per-
cent faith in him and
knows nothing is holding
him back.
All that said, McGahee
joins the team during one
of its most tumultuous
weeks.
In addition to
Richardsons stunning
trade, third-string quar-
terback Brian Hoyer was
named the starter follow-
ing Brandon Weedens
thumb injury, while wide
receiver Greg Little lost
his starting job to Davone
Bess.
Its not a safe business
where anybody can say
that Im comfortable and
they cant trade me or they
cant cut me or anything
like that, left tackle Joe
Thomas said. Nobodys
untouchable.
Even as a six-time
Pro Bowl player and the
anchor of the offensive
line, Thomas doesnt see
himself as trade-proof.
Thats the way you have
to work, Thomas said.
Because if you ever get
complacent, thats when
youre going to get beat or
play bad.
Thomas also under-
stands that fans are all
too familiar with the con-
cept of rebooting the
team, but he doesnt see
Richardsons trade as
another full-on rebuilding
effort.
It doesnt mean were
starting over from Day
1, Thomas said. Its a
process and were try-
ing to build a consistent
winner. Thats what the
goal is. Obviously, they
felt the trade of Trent is
something that is going
to help move us forward
to be a consistent winner.
PAGE 8C Sunday, September 22, 2013 FOOTBALL www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
but netted a team-
high 28 passing yards.
Even though current
tight end Alex George has
three years of experience as
quarterback in the system,
Sheptock said the thought
of returning George back
behind center was not an
option.
When we made the
switch I told Alex were
jumping in this with both
feet, the coach said. The
only way we wouldve
done that is if Tyler had
gotten hurt in the spring
or during the rst two
weeks of camp. That
was sort of the window
of our go-back period.
The bright spots for
the quarterbacks is that
if Berntsen will miss any
amount of time, Van Mater
and Young have shaken
off the nerves by seeing
action.
They have to get bap-
tism under re at some
point, so Im very optimis-
tic of what theyre going to
be able to bring to the game
because I do believe both
Taylor and Ryan are excel-
lent passers, Sheptock
added. Those are the rst
time that those guys are in
play in varsity ball, so to
say there was a buttery or
two I think that would be
the understatement of the
day.
Running back Pat
Inguilli ran for a bruising
game-high 102 yards on
29 carries for the Colonels
helping the two quarter-
backs get acclimated to the
offense.
Widener 21, Wilkes 0
Widener 7 0 7 7 21
Wilkes 0 0 0 0 0
First quarter
WIDE Richard Brown 2 run (Ryan OHara kick)
1:30
Third quarter
WIDE Colin Masterson 59 interception return
(Ryan OHara kick) 2:31
Fourth quarter
WIDE Robert Getz 3 run (Ryan OHara kick)
9:52
Teamstatistics Wide Wilkes
First downs 23 13
Rushes-yards 43-189 47-107
Passing yards 203 58
Total yards 392 165
Passing 27-35-3 5-17-4
Sacked-yards lost 3-19 6-23
Punts-avg. 4-42.8 7-38.9
Fumbles-lost 1-1 0-0
Penalties-yards 9-99 5-32
indiVidUAl sTATisTiCs
rUsHinG WIDE, Terrant Morrison 16-70, Chris
Wickes 9-63, Richard Brown 8-32, Jermaine Quat-
telbaum1-13, Rashon Sorrell 1-9, Kyle Shostek 1-3,
Robert Getz 1-3, Seth Klein 6-(minus-3). WILKES,
Pat Inguilli 29-102, Calvin Garvin 2-8, Mason
Smith 2-6, P.J. Incremona 3-5, Tyler Berntsen
3-2, Taylor Young 3-(minus-3), Dan Van Mater
5-(minus-13).
PAssinG WIDE, Seth Klein 27-35-3-203. WIL-
KES, Dan Van Mater 2-9-2-19, Taylor Young 2-7-2-
28, Tyler Berntsen 1-1-0-11.
reCeiVinG WIDE, Anthony Davis 11-111, Con-
nor Schlegel 3-14, Jermaine Quattelbaum 3-12,
Chris Wickes 3-2, Philip Ragona 2-31, Terrant Mor-
rison 2-18, Adam Marucci 2-9, Richard Brown 1-6.
WILKES, Alex George 2-21, Drew Devitt 1-15, Dan
Curry 1-13, Ryan Behrmann 1-9.
inTerCePTiOns WIDE, Brandon Harper,
Dylan Ditmer, Colin Masterson, Ameer Sorrell.
WILKES, Dylan Mohring, Jared Powell, Matt
Briskie
Missed FGs none
From page 1C
Wilkes
Dutchmens big frst half dooms Kings
TheTimes Leader staf
ANNVILLE A rough
rst half doomed Kings on
Saturday as Lebanon Valley
jumped out to a 28-point
lead after the rst 30 min-
utes en route to a 38-17 vic-
tory over the Monarchs.
After holding Lebanon
Valley to just a 1-yard rush-
ing TD in the rst quarter,
quarterback Brian Murphy
got going in the second. He
picked up three TD passes
in the period, including two
in the nal 56 seconds of the
rst half as the Dutchmen
opened up a 28-0 lead at
halftime. Overall the signal-
caller threw for 280 yards
and four touchdown passes.
Kings (0-2, 0-1 MAC)
gured out some things in
the second half only allow-
ing 10 points the rest of the
way and outscored Lebanon
Valley 17-10 in that time.
The Monarchs got on
the board midway through
the third quarter when
Kevin Mulvihill drilled a
27-yard eld goal to cut
into Lebanon Valleys lead
at 28-3.
LebVals very next play
was a long scoring play from
Murphy to Jake Ziegler for
73 yards to regain momen-
tum the Monarchs may have
had and extended the lead
to 35-3.
Kings added a pair of
touchdowns in the fourth
quarter. The rst being an
11-yard pass from Tyler
Hartranft to Dan Kempa
capping off a 10-play,
80-yard drive.
The teams second score
of the quarter came defen-
sively with the Dutchmen
driving deep in Kings terri-
tory. Thats when defensive
end Ron Garrett scooped
up a fumble and rumbled 95
yards for the defensive TD.
For Kings, Hartranft
completed 12-of-33 passes
for 146 yards and one touch-
down. Kempa had nine
catches for 114 yards and a
score. Kings tailback Kyle
McGrath was held to 38
yards on 16 carries.
lebAnOnVAlley38, kinGs 17
kings 0 0 3 14 17
lebanon Valley 7 21 7 3 38
First quarter
LVAustinHartman1 run(SeanFakete kick) 3:16
second quarter
LV Darryl Sweeper 26 pass from Brian Murphy
(Sean Fakete kick) 6:24
LV Tyler George 14 pass from Brian Murphy
(Sean Fakete kick) :56
LV Tyler George 35 pass from Brian Murphy
(Sean Fakete kick) :07
Third quarter
KINGS Kevin Mulvihill 27 feld goal 6:40
LV Jake Zeigler 73 pass from Brian Murphy
(Sean Fakete kick) 6:18
Fourth quarter
KINGSDan Kempa 11 pass fromTyler Hartranft
(Kevin Mulvihill kick) 13:31
LVSean Fakete 35 feld goal 9:36
KINGS Ron Garrett 95 fumble recovery (Kevin
Mulvihill kick) 2:40
Teamstatistics kinGs lV
First downs 15 21
Rushes-yards 33-48 40-136
Passing yards 159 265
Total yards 207 401
Passing 14-37-0 12-23-0
Sacked-yards lost 4-30 1-7
Punts-avg. 8-30.0 5-23.6
Fumbles-lost 0-0 1-1
Penalties-yards 10-80 4-54
indiVidUAl sTATisTiCs
rUsHinGKINGS, Kyle McGrath 16-38, Judens
Goimbert 8-22, Tyler Hartranft 8-(minus-20),
Tom Hehre 1-8. LV, Jeremy Franck 2-(minus-7),
Brian Murphy 5-42, Jake Ziegler 1-(minus-5), Jef
Hacker 7-8, Matt Richmond 2-7, Austin Hartman
13-64, Brendan Irving 10-27.
PAssinG KINGS, Tyler Hartranft 12-33-0-146,
Tom Hehre 2-4-0-13. LV, Jeremy Franck 1-2-0-7,
Brian Murphy 11-20-0-258, Tyler George 0-1-0-0.
reCeiVinG KINGS, Dan Kempa 9-114, Josh
Sanders 2-30, Judens Goimbert 1-6, Kyle McGrath
1-2, Antoine Basquiat 1-7. LV, Joey Miller 1-43, Jake
Ziegler 2-100, Darryl Sweeper 1-26, Nate Myers
3-29, Kevin OConnell 1-7, Tyler George 4-60.
inTerCePTiOnsnone.
Missed FGs KINGS, Mulvihill (31). LV, Fakete
(27)
with Dennis Bonvie to hone
his ghting skills.
His approach to becoming a
pro is much like to his approach
on the ice.
An in-your-face style of play.
Just relentless and do whatever
it takes to help my team win,
McGrath said.
McGraths hockey path began
when his brother got him into
the sport and he started playing
for the Pocono Pirates before
heading to Canada in 2011.
And on Saturday, McGrath
found himself skating on the ice
with some of the very Penguin
players he grew up watching.
He didnt hesitate to let them
know about it, either.
He was telling me he
watched me play when he was a
kid, Kostopoulos said. So he
was making me feel a little old.
But its really neat to have
a kid who grew up in Wilkes-
Barre in this dressing room.
In order for McGrath to
remain in the Penguins dress-
ing room for the long-term,
head coach John Hynes said
he has to be able to play to his
strengths.
The number one thing for
a player in his position is you
want to play to your strengths.
Whatever got you here you
want to be able to show,
Hynes said.
While opportunities to ght
in training camp are slim,
McGraths best chance to show
of his skills would be in a game
situation. Hes hoping to play
in an exhibition game with the
Penguins preferably one at
home, but McGrath isnt being
picky.
Hes also willing to play in
the ECHL with Wheeling if
thats what it takes to even-
tually earn a spot with the
Penguins.
I started out in the Q two
years ago and they sent me
down to the Maritime league.
It didnt discourage me,
McGrath said. I had to climb
fromthe bottomup and I came
back to the Q and played every
game, except for the ones I got
suspended for.
notes
Hynes was pleased with
how the rst day of camp
went, especially with how well
the players picked up on drills.
More often than not things
were going right, he said.
Goaltender Peter
Mannino, who signed a deal
with the Penguins over the
summer, didnt practice due to
an injury. Hynes said Mannino
is skating and is considered
day-to-day. In the meantime,
former Penguin netminder
Andy Chiodo has been invited
to camp. Hynes said Chiodo
was brought in as a result of
Mannino missing time, but the
opportunity may be greater.
He (Chiodo) is here
because he has good experi-
ence and we also want to give
him a look, Hynes said.
Kostopoulos, who was
signed to an AHL deal, par-
ticipated in his rst Wilkes-
Barre/Scranton camp since
2003. With 630 games of NHL
experience under his belt,
Kostopoulos is being viewed
as a veteran leader for the
young guys a role he is ne
with.
That will be a big part
of my role here this year
help the younger guys move
along. When I was young in
this organization a lot of older
guys helped me through,
Kostopoulos said. My rst
year Tyler Wright took me
under his wing and taught me
a lot. He was a great guy for
me to look up to. Then Dennis
Bonvie, John Slaney, Chris
Kelleher that whole group.
Thats the good thing about
this organization, they keep
quality people around to help
the young guys.
The Penguins will practice
again today at the Ice Rink at
Coal Street from 10 a.m. to
noon.
From page 1C
Penguins
Don Carey | For The Times Leader
Penguins forward Patrick McGrath approaches the goal during training camp at
Coal street on saturday morning.
Lycoming defense
too much for Cougars
TheTimes Leader staf
WILLIAMSPORT
Playing against one of the
top defenses in the country
over the last few seasons was
problematic for second-year
program Misericordia on
Saturday.
The Cougars, who piled
up 1,076 total yards in their
rst two games, only man-
aged 197 on the afternoon in
a 52-14 loss to Lycoming.
Misericordia (0-3, 0-2
MAC), was in the game early.
After the Warriors (2-1,
2-0) took a 14-0 lead after
their rst two drives, they
were threatening on their
third possession of the game.
But thats when Cougars
defensive back Phil Arnold
intercepted the pass from
Lycoming QB Tyler Jenny
and returned it 52 yards for a
touchdowntrimmingthe lead
to 14-7.
Jenny, missed just three
passes on Saturday, including
the interception.
But that was the lone high-
light for Misericordia until
the fourth quarter.
The Lycoming defense
picked up three sacks, two
interceptions, ve tackles for
a loss and held Misericordias
Jeff Puckett, the MACleading
rusher to just 43 yards on the
ground. The Cougars only
managed 157 rushing yards
after averaging 478.5 the rst
two games of the season.
Jenny threw a pair of TD
passes with the rst giving
the Warriors a 21-7 lead at the
end of the rst quarter.
Lycoming tacked on three
more scores in the second
quarter opening up a 42-7
lead at halftime as Craig
Needhammer (182 rushing
yards) had two of his three
TDs in the second period.
TheCougars other scoreof
the game came in the fourth
when backup quarterback
Ryan Kurtz the teams
leading rusher of the game
with 48 yards capped a
12-play, 70-yard drive with a
1-yard running score.
lyCOMinG 52, MiseriCOrdiA14
Misericordia 7 0 0 7 14
lycoming 21 21 7 3 52
First quarter
LYCOTyler Jenny 1 run (Zack Czap kick) 11:40
LYCO Craig Needhammer 21 run (Zack Czao
kick) 5:29
MIS Phil Arnold 52 interception return (Patrick
Newins kick) 3:53
LYCO Matt Atkinson 7 pass from Tyler Jenny
(Zack Czap kick) :51
second quarter
LYCO Craig Needhammer 23 run (Zack Czap
kick) 11:59
LYCO Matt Atkinson 43 pass from Tyler Jenny
(Zack Czap kick) 3:26
LYCO Craig Needhammer 36 run (Zack Czap
kick) 2:32
Third quarter
LYCO John Sibel 11 pass from Matt McGinley
(Zack Czap kick) 10:24
Fourth quarter
LYCOZach Fannin 27 feld goal 14:14
MIS Ryan Kurtz 1 run (Patrick Newins kick)
10:01
Teamstatistics Mis lyCO
First downs 11 22
Rushes-yards 43-157 50-335
Passing yards 40 93
Total yards 197 528
Passing 5-12-2 11-14-1
Sacked-yards lost 3-11 1-9
Punts-avg. 6-27.5 2-34.5
Fumbles-lost 2-2 0-0
Penalties-yards 8-70 11-95
indiVidUAl sTATisTiCs
rUsHinG MIS, Ryan Kurtz 13-48, Jef Puckett
15-43, Frank Santarsiero 7-27, Carmine Verducci
2-26, Robin Custodio 4-10, Vince Grausso 2-3.
LYCO, Craig Needhammer 16-182, Blake Bow-
man 18-83, EthanJefries 3-35, Zach Cooney 5-17,
ColtonTurns 5-16, Nick Mongiello 1-10, Tyler Jenny
2-(minus-8).
PAssinG MIS, Jef Puckett 4-11-2-29, Ryan
Kurtz 1-1-0-11. LYCO, Tyler Jenny 9-12-1-179, Matt
McGinley 2-2-0-14, N
reCeiVinG MIS, Dean Lucchesi 1-11, Chris
Kirkland 1-8, Tyler Roew 1-8, Juwan Petties-Jack-
son 1-7, Kurt Kowalski 1-6. LYCO, Ryan Umpleby
4-66, Matt Atkinson 3-68, John Sibel 2-20, Corey
Talerico 1-36, Pat Whalen 1-3, Craig Needhammer
0-0.
inTerCePTiOns MIS, Phil Arnold. LYCO, Tyler
Denike, Ryan Mihoci
Missed FGs none
Phillys Shoemaker does it again
rOberT Miner
For The Times Leader
SCRANTON Jake
Shoemaker ran to his second
straight win in the Race for the
Cure 5K Run on Saturday at
Courthouse Square in downtown
Scranton.
Shoemaker, 28, of Philadelphia,
led a eld of more than a thousand
runners, nishing in 17 minutes
and 12 seconds. He outran sec-
ond-place nisher, Mark Arzie, 17,
of Jermyn, by nine seconds. Brian
Conniff, 56, of Moscow, nished
third in 18:29.
The pressure was on,
Shoemaker said. After winning
last year, my family was expecting
me to win again. If I hadnt won
again, they would have been bust-
ing me. But I was able to pull it
off.
Shoemaker didnt go out too
hard at the start. He actually took
the lead at the top of the hill near
Coopers Bar and Restaurant a
little later in the race than when he
took the lead in last years event.
Once I took the lead, I just tried
to push it as hard as I could, said
Shoemaker, who ran track and
cross country in high school, but
not at the college level. At times,
throughout the race, Shoemaker
had a large lead over Arzie as
much as an entire city bock. But
Arzie closed on Shoemaker late in
the race. But Shoemaker was able
to hold on for the victory.
Kathleen Casey didnt have to
chase anybody down en route
to her female division victory
in 18:57. The 23-year-old from
Dickson City led right from the
start and never relinquished the
lead. Kristen Wilce, 29, of Old
Forge, nished second in 21:24.
Patti Betti, 16, of Moscow, n-
ished third in 21:53.
I took some time off fromtrain-
ing, Casey said. Ive been run-
ning, but not hard. I only started
training hard for this race about a
month ago. But, I did OK. I want
to get back in shape so I can run in
the Steamtown Marathon not
this year, but hopefully next year
or the year after.
Casey ran track and cross coun-
try for Bishop OHara and eventu-
ally Holy Cross High School. At
the college level, she ran for three
years at St. Josephs University
and one year for West Chester
University.
This years race, according to
Dolly Woody, executive director
of Susan G. Komen Northeastern
Pennsylvania, Drew about 5,000
participants. That gure is down
by about 1,500 from last year.
Last year, between the race
and other race-related events, we
were able to fund about $292,000
for education, screening and treat-
ment grants to non-prot organi-
zations throughout 16 counties
in northeastern Pennsylvania,
Woody said. For this year, it looks
like were going to reach our goal
of $275,000. The race is for one
day, but the impact is forever.
Seventy-ve percent of the
money raised from the event stays
in northeastern Pennsylvania, 25
percent goes for breast cancer
research.
Jason Riedmiller | For The Times Leader
runners leave from the start area at the race For The Cure in downtown
scranton on saturday. results will appear in Mondays Times leader.
Hockenbury tops at invitational
HERSHEY Lake-
Lehman sophomore
Domenic Hockenbury
won the Class AA boys
title Saturday at the PIAA
Foundation Invitational
cross country meet.
In Class 2A boys, Lake-
Lehman placed 17th out
of 26 overall and Holy
Redeemer finished 11th,
while Hazleton Area fin-
ished 25th out of 30 and
Wyoming Valley West fin-
ished 28th in Class 3A.
In girls Class 2A, Pittston
Area finished 11th out of
25 and Holy Redeemer fin-
ished 25th, while in Class
3A, Hazleton Area finished
13th out of 29 and Wyoming
Valley West finished 29th.
COlleGe Mens Tennis
kings 9, Alvernia 0
Kings earned a shutout
win over Alvernia.
George Parkhurst earned
a 6-2, 6-0 win over at No. 1
singles while Parkhurst and
Stephen Brand scoring an
8-4 win in doubles.
COlleGe Mens CrOss
COUntTry
Misericordia places 11th
Misericordia finished
11th of 15 teams at the
Lock Haven Invitational.
Mikael Hause (26:38) led
the Cougars in 56th place
while Shadrack Kiprop
(27:08) and Eric Deignan
(27:13) were 77th and
78th, respectively.
Wilkes places 14th
Wilkes finished 14th of
15 teams at the Lock Haven
Invitational.
Daniel Lykens led the
way with the fifth-fastest
time in school history fin-
ishing at 29:06 (138th)
while Tyler Sutton ran his
personal best time, ranking
sixth in school history with
a time of 29:09 (142nd).
COlleGe WOMens CrOss
COUnTry
Misericordia places 11th
Misericordia finished
11th of 16 teams at the
Lock Haven Invitational.
Bethany Killmon finished
the 6K course in 23:20 to
lead the Cougars in 36th
place.
Wilkes places 15th
Wilkes came in 15th of 16
squads at the Lock Haven
Invitational.
Rachel Quinn led the way
with a time of 25:36 for
135th place.
COlleGe Mens sOCCer
Arcadia 1, kings 0
Kings dropped a hard-
fought game to Arcadia.
Karl Jamiolkowksi made
one save in the net for the
Monarchs.
Lebanon Valley 3,
Wilkes 0
Wilkes saw its five-game
winning streak end by the
hands of Lebanon Valley.
Senior Dave Marr made
six saves in net despite the
loss.
COlleGe WOMens
sOCCer
Arcadia 1, Wilkes 0
Wilkes allowed a goal in
the last minute of the first
half that ended up being the
game-winner for Arcadia.
kings 0, Albright 0, 2 OT
Kings played through
a steady rain and walked
away with a double-over-
time tie with host Albright.
Jessica Natale played all
110 minutes for Kings and
posted five saves.
Misericordia 0,
Messiah 0, 2OT
Two full periods and two
overtime periods werent
enough as Misericordia
played to a draw with
defending national cham-
pion Messiah.
Sophomore keeper
Maureen Ciccosanti made
34 saves in the net.
COlleGe VOlleybAll
Misericordia splits tri-meet
Misericordia swept
Rutgers-Camden, 3-0 (25-
20, 25-21, 25-19) before
falling to Catholic, 3-1 (25-
18, 13-25, 14-25, 18-25).
Against Rutgers-Camden,
Meghan Stack had 14 kills
and 15 digs and Shelby
Brochetti and against
Catholic had 11 kills.
HiGH sCHOOl bOys
sOCCer
Holy redeemer 4, Hanover
Area 3, OT
Chris Pawlenok scored
two goals, including the
game winner in overtime,
and had one assist in the
Royals overtime win on
Friday.
Paul Ramon and Matt
Clemons had one score
each for the Hawkeyes.
HiGH sCHOOl Girls
sOCCer
berwick 14, Wyoming
seminary 1
The Bulldogs put up a
6-1 lead after the first half
and then scored eight more
goals in the second to earn
win over the Blue Knights
on Friday.
Brianna Floryshak
recorded four goals and two
assists, while Abby Kemp
scored four goals.
HiGH sCHOOl bOys sOCCer
Holy redeemer 4, Hanover Area 3, OT
Holy redeeer 2 1 1 4
Hanover Area 2 1 0 3
First half 1. HR Chris Pawlenok; 2. HR Tyler
Kukosky (Pawlenok); 3. HAN Matt Clemons; 4.
HAN Dillon Luzny, second half 5. Kukosky;
6. HAN Paul Ramon; Overtime Pawlenok
(Mauicio Rodriguez).
shots HR 12; HAN 1. saves HR 7 (Ian Mc-
Grane); HAN 2 (Joe Gagliardi). Corner kicks
HR 6; HAN 2
Holy redeemer 2, GAr 0
GAr 0 0 0
Holy redeemer 1 1 2
First half 1. HR Mauricio Rodriguez (Chris-
topher Pawlenok); second half 2. Pawle-
nok.
shots GAR 1; HR 6. saves GAR 2 (Gino
Altezilla); HR 3 (Ian McGrane). Penalty cor-
ners GAR Unavailable; HR 3
HiGH sCHOOl Girls sOCCer
berwick 14, Wyoming seminary 1
Wyoming seminary 1 0 1
berwick 6 8 14
First half BER Carly Montecalvo (Brianna
Floryshak); 2. Floryshak (Amanda OKane),
37:43; 3. SEM Bethany Carper, 34:30; 4. BER
Gabby Kishbaugh (Floryshak), 34:07; 5. BER
Abby Kemp (Floryshak), 19:47; 6. Kemp (Emily
Wynings), 18:14; 7. Kishbaugh, 10:28; second
half 8. Floryshak, 32:11; 9. Kemo (Wyn-
ings), 20:17; 10. Kishbaugh, 19:30; 11. Wynings
(Paige Superko), 17:40; 12. Floryshak, 8:30; 13.
Kemp, 5:00; 14. Floryshak, 3:00; 15. Superko,
00:40.
shots SEM 4; BER 24. saves SEM 11
(Meera Patel); BER 2 (Allison Rinehimer). Cor-
ners kicks SEM 0, BER 6
The Associated Press
DELAWARE, Ohio
Vegas Vacation won
the Little Brown Jug
late Thursday, beating
Urbanite Hanover by
two lengths in 1:50 at
the Delaware County
Fairgrounds.
It was the second
straight Little Brown Jug
victory for trainer Casie
Coleman, who won with
Michaels Power in 2012.
In the second heat,
driver Brian Sears went
first over and got Vegas
Vacation to the front at
the three-quarter mark
in 1:22. Vegas Vacation
came home in 28 seconds
to earn the victory in the
second leg of the three-
year-old pacing Triple
Crown.
After the first elimina-
tion, Coleman changed
the shoes on Vegas
Vacation.
The shoeing change
(to steel shoes) made a
big difference. I knew he
was sticking to the track,
said Coleman. Plus, I
shortened his hobbles by
a half inch.
Vegas Vacation, with
Sears driving, took the
first elimination with a
three-wide move at the
three-quarter mark, win-
ning by 2 1/4 lengths in
1:50. Lucan Hanover,
driven by David Miller,
won the second elimina-
tion by 3 1/2 lengths, in
1:49.4. Miller also made a
three-wide move at three-
quarters to get to the top.
Resistance Futile, a
24-1 shot, made a big
move past the half mile
to win the third elimina-
tion in 1:49.3. Driven
by Corey Callahan,
Resistance Futile won by
5 1/2 lengths.
Lucan Hanover, also
trained by Coleman,
was third in the final.
Resistance Futile broke
stride and finished eighth.
Capt ai nt reac herous
won the Cane Pace, the
first leg of the Triple
Crown, at Tioga Downs
on Sept. 2, but did not
race in the Little Brown
Jug.
Monmouth Park
OCEANPORT, N.J.
Sierra Ancha rallied in the
closing strides to beat In
Gods Country by a neck
in the $60,000 Charles
Hesse III Handicap at
Monmouth Park on
Saturday.
Belmont Park
NEW YORK Cluster
of Stars improved to 6
for 6 with a mild upset
of Dance to Bristol on
Saturday in the $300,000
Gallant Bloom Handicap
for fillies and mares at
Belmont Park.
Making her first start
since winning the Distaff
Handicap at Aqueduct
in April, Cluster of Stars
shot right to the front and
controlled the pace as the
3-1 third choice. Dance to
Bristol, winner of seven
in a row and the 2-1 favor-
ite, rallied for second, five
lengths bDance Card paid
$3.20 as the 5-2 second
choice.
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER SPORTS Sunday, September 22, 2013 PAGE 9C
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225/65-17.............
$
87
99
235/65-17.............
$
84
99
235/60-18.............
$
94
99
235/55-18.............
$
91
99
245/65-17.............
$
89
99
255/55-18.............
$
101
99
275/55-20.............
$
112
99
Passenger Performance SUV & LT
All-Season Tire Specials All-Season SUV Tires Speed-Rated Performance
* To qualify for Buy 3 get 1 Free promotion, all 4 new tires must be balanced and the vehicle aligned. Buy 3 Get 1 Free is, buy 3 at regular price, get 1 free.
All tires must be same size. Must buy (4) Four Tires to receive discounts. Offers are not to be combined with any other promotions or discounts.
Excludes warranty tires and special orders. Ad must be presented at time of purchase. Ends 10/22/13
by mail-in rebate when you purchase a set of four Michelin tires. Must buy 4. Not combinable with any other offers.
See stores for details. Valid 8-22-13 - 9-24-13
by mail-in rebate when you purchase a set of four select Goodyear tires. Must buy 4. Not combinable with any other offers.
See stores for details. Valid 8-1-13 - 9-30-13
** by mail-in rebate when you purchase a set of four select Cooper tires. Must buy 4. Not combinable with any other offers.
See stores for details. Valid 8-23-13 - 11-05-13
Actual tread design may vary from those shown. Some items/sizes by special order only. If we are out-of-stock on an advertised item, we will issue a rain
check. Purchases may be limited to normal retail quantities. Not responsible for typographical errors. See stores for warranty info. PRICES VALID W/AD ONLY.
$25 off exhaust purchases over $125. Most cars.
w/AD. Not combinable w/ any other offers.
O
P
E
N
S
unday
O
P
E
N
S
unday
O
P
E
N
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unday
LACKAWANNA COUNTY
Hazleton
970 North Church St.
570-455-9591
Down the Street from Rite Aid
Wilkes-Barre
452 Kidder St.
570-829-2155
Across From Pet Supply Plus
Edwardsville
92 S. Wyoming Ave.
570-288-9329
Next Door to Ollies Restaurant
Scranton
220 W. Market St.
570-346-7343
Across From Holy Rosary Hall
Taylor
1406 South Main St.
570-961-1422
Across From Wal-Mart
LUZERNE COUNTY
HOURS
Mon.-Fri. 8:00AM-6:00PM, Sat. 8:00AM-5:00PM
OPEN SUNDAY 9:00AM-5:00PM (SELECT LOCATIONS)
Save!
$
109
99
**
225/75-16
REG. PRICE
$
129
99
PRICE AFTER REBATE
SUV & LT
215/65-17.........
$
141
99
.........
$
124
49
225/65-17.........
$
145
99
.........
$
128
49
205/60-16.........
$
140
99
.........
$
123
49
Energy

Saver A/S
$
99
49

205/65-16
205/65-15 ..........
$
116
99
...........
$
99
49
215/65-16 ..........
$
135
99
.........
$
118
49
215/60-16 ..........
$
132
99
.........
$
115
49
REG. PRICE
$
116
99
PRICE AFTER REBATE
REG. PRICE
$
116
99
PRICE AFTER REBATE
195/60-15 ...........
$
94
99
...........
$
79
99
205/65-15 ...........
$
94
99
...........
$
79
99
215/60-15 ...........
$
94
99
...........
$
79
99
$
69
99
**
185/65-14
REG. PRICE
$
84
99
PRICE AFTER REBATE
$
99
49

205/65-15
Defender

Discoverer

A/T3
CS4 Touring

Integrity

$
84
99
185/65-14
Eagle

GT
Goodyear Performance
$
89
99

195/65-15
REG. PRICE
$
99
99
PRICE AFTER REBATE
205/55-16.........
$
119
99
..........
$
109
99
215/50-17.........
$
134
99
..........
$
124
99
225/45-17.........
$
129
99
..........
$
119
99
PASSENGER PASSENGER PASSENGER
PERFORMANCE PERFORMANCE
50,000
MILE TREAD LIFE
LIMITED WARRANTY
55,000
MILE TREAD LIFE
LIMITED WARRANTY
90,000
MILE TREAD LIFE
LIMITED WARRANTY
60,000
MILE TREAD LIFE
LIMITED WARRANTY 65,000
MILE TREAD LIFE
LIMITED WARRANTY
225/70-15....BK .....
$
124
99
.....
$
104
99
225/70-15....OWL..
$
124
99
.....
$
104
99
235/75-16....BK .....
$
134
99
.....
$
114
99
Lifetime Warranty on Pads PremiumBrake Pads Includes Labor
185/65-15 .............
$
99
99
205/65-15 .............
$
89
99
225/60-16 ...........
$
104
99
Explorer

Plus
S = Starfire Tires K = Kelly Tires Explorer

Plus
$
71
24*
185/65-14
REG. PRICE (EACH)
$
94
99
SK
Avg. Price
Size Brand Reg. Price After FREE
185/60-15 ..SK .......
$
105
99
............
$
79
49
195/70-14 ..SK .........
$
94
99
............
$
71
24
205/70-15 ..SK .......
$
105
99
............
$
79
49
205/65-15 .....S .......
$
107
99
............
$
80
99
205/60-16 .....S .......
$
116
99
............
$
87
74
205/55-16 ..SK .......
$
119
99
............
$
89
99
215/70-15 ..SK .......
$
105
99
............
$
79
49
225/60-16 ..SK .......
$
119
99
............
$
89
99
PASSENGER
PERFORMANCE
$
82
49*
235/75-15
REG. PRICE (EACH)
$
109
99
S
Avg. Price
Size Brand Reg. Price After FREE
235/75-15 ........S.........
$
109
99
.......
$
82
49
235/70-16 ........S.........
$
139
99
.......
$
104
99
245/75-16 ........S.........
$
145
99
.......
$
109
49
245/70-16 ........S.........
$
145
99
.......
$
109
49
265/70-16 ........S.........
$
158
99
.......
$
119
24
265/70-17 ........S.........
$
172
99
.......
$
129
74
LT225/75R16 ............S.........
$
152
99
.......
$
114
74
LT265/75R16 ............S.........
$
182
99
.......
$
137
24
SUV & LIGHT
TRUCK DEALS
S
a
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e
!
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a
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e
!
OR
S
a
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B
ig!
S
a
ve
B
ig!
S
a
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ig! $
7
0
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O
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$
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O
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$
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O
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UP
TO
UP
TO
868-GOLF
260 Country Club Drive, Mountaintop
www.blueridgetrail.com
Tuesday thru Friday
Play & Ride for Just
$
33.00
Weekday Special
Must Present Coupon.
One coupon per foursome. Cannot be used in
tournaments or with any other promotion. TL
Monday Special $32
Senior Day Monday-Friday $28
Ladies Day Thursday $28
Weekends After 1 p.m. $36
GPS CART INCLUDED
27 Unique Holes
One Breathtaking Course
80018448
Vegas Vacation claims
Little Brown Jug
Pa. Derby, Cotillion Stakes winners cash in
The Associated Press
BENSALEM Close
Hatches took the lead
around the far turn and
sprinted down the home
stretch to win the $1 mil-
lion Cotillion Stakes at
Parx Racing on Saturday.
The win earned the
three-year-old lly a
possible start in the $2
million Breeders Cup
Distaff at Santa Anita in
November.
The winner of Belmont
Parks $300,000 Mother
Goose went postward in
the eld of nine llies as
the 8 to 5 favorite. After
covering the 1 1/16 miles
in 1 minute, 44 seconds,
the Bob Baffert-trained
horse returned $5.20,
$3.00 and $2.60.
Will Take Charge, the
winner of Saratogas $1
million Travers Stakes
last month, overtook
Moreno an eighth of a
mile from home to win
the co-featured $1 million
Pennsylvania Derby by
2 1/2 lengths. The 2-to-
1 choice in the eld of
seven three-year-old colts
paid $6.60, $3.80 and
$2.80.
PAGE 10C SUNDAY, September 22, 2013 BASEBALL www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
MLB STANDINGS STATS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
x-Boston 94 62 .603 6-4 L-1 52-28 42-34
Tampa Bay 85 69 .552 8 7-3 W-2 49-30 36-39
NewYork 82 73 .529 11 3 5-5 W-2 46-31 36-42
Baltimore 81 73 .526 12 3 4-6 L-3 42-33 39-40
Toronto 71 83 .461 22 13 4-6 W-1 38-40 33-43
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Detroit 91 64 .587 8-2 W-3 51-29 40-35
Cleveland 85 70 .548 6 8-2 W-3 48-30 37-40
Kansas City 81 73 .526 9 3 6-4 L-1 43-37 38-36
Minnesota 65 89 .422 25 19 2-8 L-3 31-43 34-46
Chicago 60 94 .390 30 24 2-8 L-3 35-41 25-53
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Oakland 92 63 .594 8-2 W-3 51-29 41-34
Texas 84 70 .545 7 3-7 W-1 39-35 45-35
Los Angeles 75 78 .490 16 9 8-2 W-2 36-40 39-38
Seattle 67 87 .435 24 17 2-8 L-2 33-42 34-45
Houston 51 104 .329 41 34 2-8 L-8 24-54 27-50
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Atlanta 91 63 .591 4-6 L-1 52-22 39-41
Washington 83 71 .539 8 4 8-2 W-2 46-33 37-38
Philadelphia 71 83 .461 20 16 5-5 L-3 43-37 28-46
NewYork 70 84 .455 21 17 6-4 W-2 32-45 38-39
Miami 56 98 .364 35 31 2-8 L-2 31-44 25-54
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
St. Louis 91 64 .587 6-4 W-2 48-27 43-37
Pittsburgh 89 66 .574 2 5-5 W-1 50-30 39-36
Cincinnati 88 67 .568 3 6-4 L-1 48-26 40-41
Milwaukee 68 86 .442 22 19 6-4 L-3 36-44 32-42
Chicago 65 90 .419 26 23 3-7 W-1 30-47 35-43
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
x-Los Angeles 88 66 .571 3-7 L-1 46-32 42-34
Arizona 78 76 .506 10 9 6-4 W-1 44-34 34-42
San Diego 72 81 .471 15 15 6-4 W-1 42-33 30-48
San Francisco 71 84 .458 17 17 6-4 L-2 38-38 33-46
Colorado 71 85 .455 18 17 4-6 L-1 44-34 27-51
x-clinched division
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Fridays Games
Cleveland 2, Houston 1, 7 innings
N.Y. Yankees 5, San Francisco 1
Detroit 12, ChicagoWhite Sox 5
Tampa Bay 5, Baltimore 4, 18 innings
Boston 6, Toronto 3
Kansas City 2, Texas 1
Oakland 11, Minnesota 0
L.A. Angels 3, Seattle 2, 11 innings
Saturdays Games
Tampa Bay 5, Baltimore 1
N.Y. Yankees 6, San Francisco 0
Oakland 9, Minnesota 1
Cleveland 4, Houston 1
ChicagoWhite Sox at Detroit, 7:08 p.m.
Texas 3, Kansas City 1
Toronto at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Seattle at L.A. Angels, 9:05 p.m.
Sundays Games
Houston (Bedard 4-11) at Cleveland (Kluber 9-5),
1:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Petit 4-0) at N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte
10-10), 1:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Er.Johnson 1-2) at Detroit
(Ani.Sanchez 14-7), 1:08 p.m.
Toronto (Dickey 13-12) at Boston (Doubront 10-
6), 1:35 p.m.
Baltimore (Feldman 5-4) at Tampa Bay (Romero
0-0), 1:40 p.m.
Texas (Ogando 7-4) at Kansas City (Shields 12-9),
2:10 p.m.
Seattle (F.Hernandez 12-9) at L.A. Angels
(C.Wilson 17-6), 3:35 p.m.
Minnesota (De Vries 0-0) at Oakland (Gray 3-3),
4:05 p.m.
Mondays Games
Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 3:10 p.m.
Houston at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Detroit at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Toronto at ChicagoWhite Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Oakland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Fridays Games
Atlanta 9, Chicago Cubs 5
Cincinnati 6, Pittsburgh 5, 10 innings
Washington 8, Miami 0
N.Y. Mets 6, Philadelphia 4
N.Y. Yankees 5, San Francisco 1
Colorado 9, Arizona 4
St. Louis 7, Milwaukee 6, 10 innings
San Diego 2, L.A. Dodgers 0
Saturdays Games
N.Y. Yankees 6, San Francisco 0
Chicago Cubs 3, Atlanta 1
Pittsburgh 4, Cincinnati 2
Miami at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
St. Louis 7, Milwaukee 2
Arizona at Colorado, 8:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at San Diego, 8:40 p.m.
Sundays Games
San Francisco (Petit 4-0) at N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte
10-10), 1:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Arroyo 13-11) at Pittsburgh (Locke
10-6), 1:35 p.m.
Miami (Flynn 0-2) at Washington (Haren 9-13),
1:35 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (C.Torres 3-5) at Philadelphia (Cl.Lee
14-6), 1:35 p.m.
Atlanta (Teheran 12-8) at Chicago Cubs
(E.Jackson 8-16), 2:20 p.m.
Arizona (Corbin 14-7) at Colorado (Nicasio 8-8),
4:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 15-3) at San Diego (Cash-
ner 10-8), 4:10 p.m.
St. Louis (J.Kelly 9-4) at Milwaukee (W.Peralta
10-15), 8:05 p.m.
Mondays Games
Milwaukee at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
Washington at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Arizona at San Diego, 10:10 p.m.
Sandbergs hiring a mere formality
MATTGELB
The Philadelphia Inquirer
The initial days were
awkward, and there was no
handbook to guide Ryne
Sandberg. The Hall of Fame
player carries impressive cre-
dentials, but he replaced the
most successful manager in
Phillies history. Talk about
next year was suppressed
his stated focus was just the
next days game and having
six weeks to make an impres-
sion.
But from the moment
Sandberg was hired prior to
the 2011 season as the man-
ager of triple-ALehighValley,
it was assumed he would suc-
ceed Charlie Manuel. A suc-
cessful stint as interim man-
ager with a depleted teamfar
from postseason contention
only solidied Sandbergs
future as the 52nd manager
in Phillies history.
His promotion is a mere
formality.
It will be intriguing to
see which coaches hired
by Manuel are retained by
Sandberg. While the Phillies
are evaluating everyone,
Sandberg said forming a
coaching staff is not a prior-
ity.
No, Sandberg said, Im
not doing that at all.
AP Photo
NewYork Yankees pitcher Ivan Nova (47) hugs catcher Chris Stewart after Nova pitched a complete game
shutout as theYankees defeatedthe SanFrancisco Giants, 6-0onSaturday at Yankee StadiuminNewYork.
Yankees 6, Giants 0
San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Pagan cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .279
G.Blanco lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .267
Belt 1b 4 0 2 0 0 2 .291
Posey c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .297
Pence rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .288
Sandoval 3b 3 0 2 0 0 0 .274
Noonan 3b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .216
H.Sanchez dh 3 0 0 0 0 0 .267
a-Monell ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .167
B.Crawford ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .253
Abreu 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .236
Totals 33 0 6 0 1 7
NewYork AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
I.Suzuki rf 3 0 0 1 0 0 .262
A.Rodriguez dh 4 0 0 1 0 2 .253
Cano 2b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .311
A.Soriano lf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .262
Granderson cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .239
Nunez 3b 3 1 1 2 1 0 .254
Mar.Reynolds 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .219
Ryan ss 3 1 1 0 0 1 .198
C.Stewart c 1 1 0 0 2 0 .212
Totals 30 6 7 6 3 4
San Francisco 000 000 0000 6 0
NewYork 003 201 00x6 7 0
LOB_San Francisco 7, New York 4. 2B_Belt
(35), Sandoval (25), Cano (37). HR_Nunez (2),
of Vogelsong; A.Soriano (17), of Moscoso.
RBIs_I.Suzuki (35), A.Rodriguez (19), Cano (105),
A.Soriano (50), Nunez 2 (25). SF_I.Suzuki.
Runners left in scoring position_San Fran-
cisco 2 (B.Crawford, Sandoval); NewYork 1 (Mar.
Reynolds). RISP_San Francisco 0 for 5; NewYork
1 for 5.
Runners moved up_A.Rodriguez, Granderson..
San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ER
Vogelsong L, 3-6 5 5 5 5 1 1 75 5.90
Moscoso 1 1-3 1 1 1 1 2 27 4.21
Kickham 1 1-3 1 0 0 1 1 25 9.22
Dunning 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 2.78
NewYork IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Nova W, 9-5 9 6 0 0 1 7 108 3.13
Inherited runners-scored_Kickham 1-0, Dun-
ning 2-0.
Umpires_Home, Paul Nauert; First, Doug Ed-
dings; Second, Angel Hernandez; Third, Dana
DeMuth.
T_2:32. A_42,420 (50,291).
Rays 5, Orioles 1
Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
McLouth lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .260
Machado 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .282
C.Davis 1b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .288
A.Jones cf 3 0 1 1 1 1 .289
Markakis rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .269
Hardy ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .262
Valencia dh 3 0 0 0 0 2 .301
Clevenger c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .286
A.Casilla 2b 3 0 0 0 0 3 .214
Totals 31 1 5 1 2 12
Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg
DeJesus lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .267
De.Jennings cf 3 2 2 4 1 0 .249
Zobrist 2b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .272
Longoria 3b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .263
W.Myers rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .288
Fuld rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .196
D.Young dh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .229
Loney 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .294
J.Molina c 3 1 0 0 1 0 .239
Y.Escobar ss 2 2 1 0 1 0 .261
Totals 30 5 7 5 5 3
Baltimore 000 000 0011 5 1
Tampa Bay 000 030 20x5 7 0
E_Hardy (11). LOB_Baltimore 5, Tampa Bay 6.
2B_D.Young (2). 3B_C.Davis (1), De.Jennings (6),
Y.Escobar (1). HR_De.Jennings (14), of Mig.Gon-
zalez. RBIs_A.Jones (106), De.Jennings 4 (54),
Zobrist (70).
Runners left in scoring position_Baltimore
3 (Markakis, A.Jones, Hardy); Tampa Bay 4
(W.Myers 3, Y.Escobar). RISP_Baltimore 1 for 5;
Tampa Bay 3 for 10.
Runners moved up_Machado, C.Davis, Marka-
kis. GIDP_Valencia, De.Jennings, J.Molina.
DP_Baltimore 2 (Hardy, A.Casilla, C.Davis),
(Hardy, A.Casilla, C.Davis); Tampa Bay 1
(Y.Escobar, Zobrist, Loney).
DPCincinnati 2 (Cozart, B.Phillips, Votto),
(Cozart, B.Phillips, Votto); Pittsburgh 1 (Liriano,
N.Walker, Morneau).
Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Mig.Gonzalez L, 10-86 2 3 3 5 2 96 3.94
Fr.Rodriguez 1 4 2 2 0 1 23 4.29
S.Johnson 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 7.07
Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
CobbW, 10-3 8 1-3 5 1 1 2 12 117 2.90
Rodney 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 9 3.36
Inherited runners-scored_Rodney 1-0. WP_
Fr.Rodriguez. PB_Clevenger.
Umpires_Home, Mike Everitt; First, TimWelke;
Second, Dan Bellino; Third, Bruce Dreckman.
T_2:51. A_23,835 (34,078).
Athletics 9, Twins 1
Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Presley cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .275
Dozier 2b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .244
Ploufe 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .249
Arcia lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .249
Doumit dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .241
Pinto c 3 1 2 1 0 1 .377
Parmelee rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .227
Colabello 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .191
Florimon ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .223
Totals 32 1 6 1 0 4
Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
C.Young cf 4 0 0 1 0 1 .198
Lowrie ss 5 1 3 0 0 0 .287
Donaldson 3b 5 1 2 0 0 2 .306
Cespedes dh 5 2 2 3 0 1 .245
Callaspo 2b 5 2 4 3 0 0 .260
K.Suzuki c 4 1 1 2 1 0 .313
Reddick rf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .221
Choice lf 4 1 2 0 0 2 .313
Barton 1b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .256
Totals 39 9 16 9 2 8
Minnesota 000 010 0001 6 2
Oakland 150 000 21x9 16 0
E_Colabello (2), Florimon (17). LOB_Minne-
sota 4, Oakland 9. 2B_Dozier (32), Lowrie (44),
Donaldson (36), Reddick (18). HR_Pinto (3), of
J.Parker; Callaspo (9), of P.Hernandez; K.Suzuki
(2), of Hendriks; Cespedes (26), of Hendriks.
RBIs_Pinto (9), C.Young (38), Cespedes 3 (80),
Callaspo 3 (54), K.Suzuki 2 (7). SF_C.Young.
Runners left in scoring position_Minnesota 1
(Arcia); Oakland 5 (Reddick 2, C.Young, Callaspo,
Cespedes). RISP_Minnesota 0 for 2; Oakland 3
for 13.
Runners moved up_Cespedes, Barton. GIDP_
Dozier.
DP_Oakland 1 (Lowrie, Callaspo, Barton).
Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
P.Hernandez L, 3-22 8 6 6 1 1 52 6.05
Hendriks 6 8 3 3 1 7 102 6.54
Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
J.Parker W, 12-7 6 4 1 1 0 1 93 3.74
Otero 1 1 0 0 0 1 19 1.43
Blevins 2 1 0 0 0 2 25 3.30
Umpires_Home, Marvin Hudson; First, TimMc-
Clelland; Second, Marty Foster; Third, Wally Bell.
T_2:53. A_26,393 (35,067).
Cubs 3, Braves 1
Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Simmons ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .244
J.Upton rf-lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .259
F.Freeman 1b 2 1 1 0 2 1 .311
C.Johnson 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .332
Gattis lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .235
Heyward rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .251
G.Laird c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .252
Uggla 2b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .181
B.Upton cf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .186
Medlen p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .170
S.Downs p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
D.Carpenter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Totals 30 1 5 0 4 10
Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
St.Castro ss 4 1 2 0 0 1 .243
Valbuena 3b 2 0 1 0 1 0 .223
b-Do.Murphy ph-3b 1 1 1 0 0
0 .256
Rizzo 1b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .231
D.Navarro c 3 0 1 1 1 1 .299
Schierholtz rf 3 0 0 1 0 0 .252
Sweeney cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .267
Bogusevic lf 3 0 2 0 0 1 .281
Barney 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .207
Tr.Wood p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .222
Villanueva p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .161
a-Lake ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .305
Strop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 30 3 9 3 2 6
Atlanta 000 100 0001 5 0
Chicago 000 000 03x3 9 1
a-struck out for Villanueva in the 8th. b-singled
for Valbuena in the 8th.
E_Schierholtz (3). LOB_Atlanta 7, Chicago
6. 2B_J.Upton (26), Valbuena (15), Rizzo (38).
RBIs_Rizzo (77), D.Navarro (33), Schierholtz
(68). S_Medlen. SF_Schierholtz.
Runners left in scoring position_Atlanta 4
(B.Upton 2, Simmons, Gattis); Chicago 2 (Schier-
holtz, Rizzo). RISP_Atlanta 1 for 6; Chicago2for 4.
GIDP_C.Johnson, Barney 2.
DP_Atlanta 2 (Simmons, F.Freeman), (Uggla,
Simmons, F.Freeman); Chicago 1 (Valbuena,
Rizzo).
Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Medlen 7 1-3 6 1 1 2 6 106 3.24
S.Downs L, 2-1 BS, 1-10 2 2 2 0 0
10 3.46
D.Carpenter 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 12 1.84
Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Tr.Wood 7 5 1 1 4 7 106 2.98
Villanueva W, 7-8 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 4.16
Strop S, 1-1 1 0 0 0 0 3 16 2.70
Tr.Wood pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
S.Downs pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
Inherited runners-scored_S.Downs 1-1,
D.Carpenter 2-2, Villanueva 2-0. WP_Medlen.
Umpires_Home, Chris Conroy; First, Gary Dar-
ling; Second, Jerry Meals; Third, Paul Emmel.
T_2:42. A_34,612 (41,019).
Indians 4, Astros 1
Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Villar ss 4 0 1 0 0 2 .267
Altuve 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .283
M.Dominguez 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .242
Carter 1b 4 1 3 1 0 0 .226
B.Laird dh 3 0 0 0 0 2 .185
b-Krauss ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .207
J.D.Martinez lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .252
c-Crowe ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .228
Hoes rf 2 0 1 0 1 1 .284
B.Barnes cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .246
C.Clark c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .086
a-Corporan ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .233
Totals 31 1 5 1 2 12
Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Bourn cf 4 1 2 0 1 0 .259
Swisher rf-1b 3 1 1 0 2 0 .250
Kipnis 2b 3 0 0 1 1 2 .274
C.Santana 1b 5 0 0 0 0 0 .265
M.Carson rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .778
Brantley lf 4 1 1 2 0 1 .276
As.Cabrera ss 4 0 3 0 0 0 .241
Giambi dh 3 0 0 0 1 2 .177
1-Jo.Ramirez pr-dh0 0 0 0 0 0 .333
Y.Gomes c 3 1 2 0 0 0 .297
Chisenhall 3b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .226
Totals 33 4 10 4 5 5
Houston 000 000 0011 5 1
Cleveland 300 100 00x4 10 0
a-struck out for C.Clark in the 8th. c-grounded
out for J.D.Martinez in the 9th.
1-ran for Giambi in the 7th.
E_Harrell (1). LOB_Houston 5, Cleveland 12.
2B_Hoes (7), Bourn 2 (21), As.Cabrera (33),
Y.Gomes (18). HR_Carter (28), of J.Smith;
Brantley (9), of Clemens. RBIs_Carter (78),
Kipnis (80), Brantley 2 (66), Chisenhall (36).
SB_As.Cabrera (9). SF_Kipnis.
Runners left in scoring position_Houston 2
(B.Barnes, Villar); Cleveland 6 (C.Santana 4,
Chisenhall 2). RISP_Houston 0 for 4; Cleveland
3 for 11.
Runners moved up_J.D.Martinez, Swisher.
GIDP_Altuve, Chisenhall.
DP_Houston 1 (C.Clark, Carter); Cleveland 1
(Chisenhall, Kipnis, C.Santana).
Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Clemens L, 4-64 2-3 8 4 4 3 4 91 5.69
Harrell 3 1-3 2 0 0 2 1 50 5.80
Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Kazmir W, 9-9 7 4 0 0 1 10 97 4.14
Allen 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 2.55
J.Smith 1 1 1 1 1 0 16 2.37
Kazmir pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Inherited runners-scored_Harrell 2-0, Allen
1-0. HBP_by Clemens (Y.Gomes). WP_Harrell.
Umpires_Home, Jordan Baker; First, CB Buc-
knor; Second, Dale Scott; Third, ToddTichenor.
T_2:45. A_26,611 (42,241).
Red Sox 6, Blue Jays 3
Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Reyes ss 5 0 1 0 0 1 .295
R.Davis lf-rf 5 2 2 0 0 1 .263
Lawrie 3b 5 0 1 1 0 1 .255
Col.Rasmus cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .276
Pillar lf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .171
a-Lind ph-1b 1 1 1 2 0 0 .285
Sierra dh 3 0 1 0 1 1 .313
DeRosa 1b-lf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .234
Gose rf-cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .267
Arencibia c 4 0 0 0 0 3 .195
Goins 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .232
Totals 37 3 10 3 2 10
Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Pedroia 2b 5 1 3 1 0 0 .301
Nava rf 5 2 2 0 0 0 .300
D.Ortiz dh 2 1 1 1 2 0 .308
Napoli 1b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .257
Carp lf 3 0 1 3 1 0 .302
1-J.Gomes pr-lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .238
Saltalamacchia c 4 0 2 0 0 1 .266
Middlebrooks 3b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .236
Drewss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .246
Bradley Jr. cf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .186
Victorino cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .295
Totals 32 6 12 5 6 5
Toronto 000 010 0203 10 0
Boston 101 000 31x6 12 2
a-homered for Pillar in the 8th.
1-ran for Carp in the 7th.
E_Drew (8), Middlebrooks (10). LOB_Toronto
9, Boston 8. 2B_R.Davis (16), Pedroia (42), Nava
(29), Saltalamacchia (38). HR_Lind (23), of
Tazawa. RBIs_Lawrie (43), Lind 2 (63), Pedroia
(83), D.Ortiz (97), Carp 3 (42). SB_R.Davis 2 (44),
Middlebrooks (3). CS_Lawrie (5).
Runners left in scoring position_Toronto 4
(Arencibia 3, Lawrie); Boston 5 (Saltalamacchia
2, Pedroia, Drew, Nava). RISP_Toronto 3 for 10;
Boston 5 for 13.
Runners moved up_Lawrie, Nava. GIDP_Gose,
Pedroia, Napoli, Saltalamacchia.
DP_Toronto 3 (DeRosa, Reyes, Jenkins),
(Goins, DeRosa), (Reyes, Arencibia, DeRosa);
Boston 1 (Middlebrooks, Saltalamacchia, Middle-
brooks, Saltalamacchia).
Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
E.Rogers L, 5-82 1-3 3 2 2 5 2 60 4.52
Jenkins 3 1-3 2 0 0 1 1 36 3.07
Loup 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 2.51
Wagner 0 4 3 3 0 0 11 3.75
Jefress 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 1.93
Oliver 1 2 1 1 0 1 23 3.94
Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Lester W, 15-8 7 5 1 1 2 8 123 3.67
Tazawa 1-3 3 2 2 0 0 20 2.96
Uehara S, 20-231 2-3 2 0 0 0 2 26 1.14
Wagner pitched to 4 batters in the 7th.
Inherited runners-scored_Jenkins 3-0, Loup
1-0, Jefress 3-2, Uehara 1-0. IBB_of E.Rogers
(D.Ortiz). WP_E.Rogers.
Umpires_Home, Larry Vanover; First, Manny
Gonzalez; Second, Eric Cooper; Third, Tony Ran-
dazzo.
T_3:26. A_37,215 (37,499).
Rangers 3, Royals 1
Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Kinsler 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .273
Andrus ss 3 1 0 1 1 0 .268
Rios rf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .277
A.Beltre 3b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .317
Pierzynski c 3 0 0 1 0 0 .276
Moreland 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .234
Gentry lf 4 0 3 0 0 0 .269
Dav.Murphy dh 3 0 1 0 0 0 .221
b-Je.Baker ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .282
c-Adduci ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 1 .258
L.Martin cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .260
Totals 33 3 8 3 2 3
Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
A.Gordon lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .267
Bonifacio 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .244
Hosmer 1b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .304
B.Butler dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .290
S.Perez c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .288
Moustakas 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .236
L.Cain rf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .253
a-Lough ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .282
J.Dyson cf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .266
A.Escobar ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .239
Totals 32 1 5 1 1 7
Texas 102 000 0003 8 0
Kansas City 000 000 0011 5 1
a-grounded out for L.Cain in the 7th.
E_L.Cain (3). LOB_Texas 6, Kansas City 5. 2B_
Dav.Murphy (26), A.Escobar (20). 3B_Kinsler (2),
J.Dyson(4). HR_Hosmer (17), ofGarza. RBIs_An-
drus (65), A.Beltre (88), Pierzynski (66), Hosmer
(78). SB_Gentry (18). SF_Pierzynski.
Runners left in scoring position_Texas 4 (Mo-
reland, Kinsler, Pierzynski, L.Martin); Kansas City
2 (A.Escobar, Bonifacio). RISP_Texas 1 for 8; Kan-
sas City 0 for 3.
Runners moved up_Andrus, A.Beltre. GIDP_L.
Martin.
DP_Kansas City 1 (A.Escobar, Bonifacio, Hos-
mer).
Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Garza W, 4-5 8 5 1 1 1 5 97 4.56
Nathan S, 40-43 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 1.51
Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Guthrie L, 14-12 6 7 3 3 2 1 100 4.09
Coleman 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 16 0.32
Bueno 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 9 0.00
Crow 1 0 0 0 0 1 5 3.47
Bueno pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
Garza pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
Inherited runners-scored_Crow1-0.
Umpires_Home, Jim Wolf; First, Ed Hickox;
Second, SamHolbrook; Third, Jef Nelson.
T_2:36. A_36,575 (37,903).
Mets 5, Phillies 4, 6 innings,
NewYork AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
E.Young lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .246
Dan.Murphy 2b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .284
D.Wright 3b 3 2 2 1 1 0 .313
Duda 1b 1 1 0 0 1 1 .231
Lagares cf 3 1 1 2 0 0 .249
den Dekker rf 3 0 0 0 0 3 .231
T.dArnaud c 3 0 2 1 0 0 .186
Quintanilla ss 2 0 1 0 1 0 .229
Gee p 3 0 0 0 0 3 .138
Totals 25 5 7 5 4 8
Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
C.Hernandez cf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .314
Rollins ss 3 1 1 1 0 1 .252
Utley 2b 3 1 1 0 0 0 .279
Ruiz c 3 0 0 1 0 0 .277
D.Brown lf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .273
Ruf 1b 3 0 2 0 0 0 .260
Asche 3b 1 0 0 1 0 0 .261
Mayberry rf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .226
Cloyd p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .118
E.Martin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Savery p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 23 4 7 3 0 3
NewYork 000 104 05 7 0
Philadelphia 010 003 x4 7 0
LOB_NewYork6, Philadelphia2. 2B_T.dArnaud
(3), C.Hernandez (5), Rollins (31), Utley (25).
3B_Lagares (5). HR_D.Wright (18), ofCloyd; Dan.
Murphy (12), of Cloyd. RBIs_Dan.Murphy (73),
D.Wright (57), Lagares 2 (32), T.dArnaud (5), Rol-
lins (39), Ruiz (37), Asche (22). SB_Quintanilla
(2). SF_Asche.
Runners left in scoring position_New York 3
(E.Young 3). RISP_New York 2 for 7; Philadelphia
2 for 3.
Runners moved up_Ruiz. GIDP_D.Wright,
C.Hernandez.
DP_New York 1 (Duda, Quintanilla); Philadel-
phia 1 (Rollins, Utley, Ruf).
NewYork IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Gee W, 12-10 6 7 4 4 0 3 84 3.54
Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Cloyd L, 2-6 5 6 5 5 2 5 83 5.40
E.Martin 1 1 0 0 1 3 24 6.43
Savery 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 12 3.86
Cloyd pitched to 4 batters in the 6th.
Inherited runners-scored_E.Martin 1-1. HBP_
by Cloyd (Duda). WP_Gee. Balk_E.Martin.
Umpires_Home, Mark Ripperger; First, Phil
Cuzzi; Second, Ron Kulpa; Third, Chris Guccione.
T_2:00. A_36,650 (43,651).
Pirates 4, Reds 2
Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
D.Robinson cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .242
B.Phillips 2b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .260
Votto 1b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .307
Ludwick lf 3 0 2 1 1 1 .261
Bruce rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .266
Cozart ss 4 1 1 1 0 0 .255
Hannahan 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .219
Hanigan c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .200
H.Bailey p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .161
Duke p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000
Hoover p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
a-H.Rodriguez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .167
Simon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .143
S.Marshall p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 29 2 5 2 4 12
Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Tabata lf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .283
1-S.Marte pr-lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .279
N.Walker 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .249
McCutchen cf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .321
Morneau 1b 2 1 0 0 2 1 .274
Byrd rf 3 0 1 1 0 0 .288
P.Alvarez 3b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .229
R.Martin c 3 1 1 2 0 0 .230
Barmes ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .215
A.J.Burnett p 1 0 0 0 1 0 .073
b-Snider ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .217
Morris p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200
Ju.Wilson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Grilli p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 27 4 5 4 5 3
Cincinnati 110 000 0002 5 2
Pittsburgh 020 002 00x4 5 0
a-struck out for Hoover in the 7th. b-grounded
out for A.J.Burnett in the 7th.
1-ran for Tabata in the 7th.
E_Votto (14), H.Bailey (1). LOB_Cincinnati 4,
Pittsburgh 5. HR_Cozart (12), of A.J.Burnett;
R.Martin (15), of H.Bailey. RBIs_Ludwick (12),
Cozart (63), Byrd (84), P.Alvarez (94), R.Martin 2
(55). SB_S.Marte (37). SF_Byrd.
Runners left in scoring position_Cincinnati
2 (Bruce, Cozart); Pittsburgh 1 (McCutchen).
RISP_Cincinnati 1 for 3; Pittsburgh 1 for 2.
GIDP_Votto, Bruce 2, McCutchen, Byrd.
DP_Cincinnati 2 (Hannahan, B.Phillips, Votto),
(Cozart, B.Phillips, Votto); Pittsburgh 3 (N.Walker,
Barmes, Morneau), (Barmes, Morneau),
(N.Walker, Barmes, Morneau).
Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
H.Bailey L, 11-115 2-3 3 4 2 4 3 91 3.40
Duke 0 1 0 0 0 0 6 7.00
Hoover 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 2.83
Simon 1 1 0 0 1 0 15 3.07
S.Marshall 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 2.00
Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
A.J.Burnett W, 9-117 4 2 2 3 12 107 3.39
Morris H, 7 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 9 3.63
Ju.Wilson H, 14 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 2.13
Grilli S, 31-33 1 1 0 0 0 0 10 2.79
Duke pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
Inherited runners-scored_Duke 1-1, Hoover 1-0,
Ju.Wilson 1-0. WP_A.J.Burnett.
Umpires_Home, Gerry Davis; First, Dan Ias-
sogna; Second, BrianKnight; Third, Mark Carlson.
T_3:01. A_39,425 (38,362).
Cardinals 7, Brewers 2
St. Louis AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
M.Carpenter 2b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .322
Beltran rf 4 1 1 0 1 0 .297
Holliday lf 5 2 2 0 0 1 .298
Ma.Adams 1b 4 2 2 2 0 1 .284
Y.Molina c 2 1 0 1 2 1 .315
Jay cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .268
Freese 3b 4 0 1 2 0 2 .265
1-Kozma pr-ss 0 1 0 0 0 0 .218
Descalso ss-3b 3 0 1 2 1 1 .235
Lynn p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .078
Choate p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
b-Chambers ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .150
Maness p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200
Siegrist p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Totals 34 7 9 7 4 9
Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Aoki rf 5 0 2 0 0 0 .285
Gennett 2b 5 1 2 0 0 0 .319
Lucroy c 3 1 2 0 1 0 .280
C.Gomez cf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .282
K.Davis lf 4 0 1 2 0 1 .281
Bianchi ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .240
Halton 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .253
Y.Betancourt 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .209
Gallardo p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .218
a-Gindl ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .252
Wooten p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Figaro p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250
c-J.Francisco ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .228
d-Maldonado ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .170
Totals 33 2 7 2 4 8
St. Louis 200 000 0507 9 0
Milwaukee 100 000 0102 7 1
a-walked for Gallardo in the 7th. b-fied out for
Choate in the 8th. c-was announced for Figaro in
the 9th. d-popped out for J.Francisco in the 9th.
1-ran for Freese in the 8th.
E_Gennett (5). LOB_St. Louis 5, Milwaukee 9.
2B_M.Carpenter (54), Descalso (23), Gennett
(10), Lucroy (23), K.Davis (10). HR_Ma.Adams
(16), of Gallardo. RBIs_Ma.Adams 2 (50),
Y.Molina (71), Freese 2 (59), Descalso 2 (42),
K.Davis 2 (25). SB_Jay (10), Gennett (2). S_Lynn,
Gallardo.
Runners left in scoring position_St. Louis 4
(M.Carpenter, Beltran, Lynn, Chambers); Milwau-
kee 7 (Bianchi 2, Aoki, K.Davis, C.Gomez, Gennett,
Halton). RISP_St. Louis 3 for 10; Milwaukee 2 for
13.
Runners moved up_Aoki, K.Davis, Bianchi.
GIDP_Holliday.
DP_Milwaukee 1 (Bianchi, Gennett, Halton).
St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
LynnW, 14-10 6 1-3 4 1 1 4 7 101 4.09
Choate H, 13 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 8 2.36
Maness 1 1-3 2 1 1 0 1 22 2.39
Siegrist 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 8 0.48
Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Gallardo L, 11-10 7 4 2 2 2 7 101 4.23
Wooten 2-3 4 5 5 1 2 33 4.38
Figaro 1 1-3 1 0 0 1 0 19 4.31
Inherited runners-scored_Choate 1-0, Figaro
2-2.
Umpires_Home, Alfonso Marquez; First, Ted
Barrett; Second, Mike DiMuro; Third, Scott Barry.
T_3:12. A_35,008 (41,900).
Novas gempowers Yankees
The Associated Press
NEW YORK Ivan
Nova pitched a six-hitter
for his second career shut-
out, Eduardo Nunez hit
a two-run homer and the
New York Yankees kept
pace in the AL wild-card
chase Saturday with an
6-0 victory over the San
Francisco Giants.
Alfonso Soriano con-
nected for the second
straight day and Robinson
Cano had an RBI single in
a three-run third against
Ryan Vogelsong (3-6),
helping New York win for
just the third time in eight
games.
New York entered three
games behind Cleveland
for the second AL wild card
with three teams ahead.
The Yankees have seven
games remaining, includ-
ing three against the wild-
card leading Tampa Bay
Rays.
A day before New York
honors retiring closer
Mariano Rivera in a pre-
game ceremony, Nova (9-5)
gave the Yankees bullpen a
rest.
Rays 5, Orioles 1
ST. PETERSBURG,
Fla. Desmond Jennings
drove in four runs, Alex
Cobb took a three-hit shut-
out into the ninth inning
and the Tampa Bay Rays
beat the Baltimore Orioles
in a matchup of exhausted
teams to maintain their
lead in the AL wild-card
race.
The rst pitch came 10
hours, 56 minutes after the
Rays 5-4, 18-inning win
over Baltimore that ended
at 2:05 a.m., a game that
stretched on for 6:54 a
record time for both teams.
Saturdays game, by com-
parison, seemed to breeze
by in 2:51.
Tampa Bay (85-69)
moved one game ahead of
Cleveland (84-70), which
led for the second wild-
card berth pending its
game against Houston later
Saturday. The Orioles (81-
73) dropped three games
behind the Indians and now
have three others teams in
front of them.
Blue Jays 4, Red Sox 2
BOSTON Clay
Buchholz lost for the rst
time this season, and the
AL East champion Boston
Red Sox fell to Mark
Buehrle and the Toronto
Blue Jays.
A day after the Red Sox
clinched the division title,
they lost for just the sixth
time in 21 games.
Buchholz (11-1) gave
up two earned runs on six
hits and two walks in six
innings. He had pitched
11 scoreless innings in his
previous two starts, his
rst since spending three
months on the disabled list
with a strained neck.
Buchholz was the rst
Boston pitcher to start a
season 11-0 in his initial 14
starts since Roger Clemens
went 13-0 in 1986.
Indians 4, Astros 1
CLEVELAND Scott
Kazmir allowed four hits
in seven shutout innings,
Michael Brantley hit a
two-run homer and the
Cleveland Indians main-
tained their hold on an AL
wild-card spot with a win
over the Houston Astros.
Cleveland began
Saturday with a half-game
lead over Texas for the
ALs second wild card. The
Indians, who have won
eight of their last 10, trail
Tampa Bay by a half-game
for the wild-card lead.
The Indians passed
Texas with Fridays rain-
shortened 2-1 win, mov-
ing into a wild-card spot
for the rst time since
before play on Aug. 4.
Following Sundays series
nale, Cleveland hosts the
Chicago White Sox for two
games before closing the
regular season with four
games at Minnesota.
Athletics 9, Twins 1
OAKLAND, Calif.
The Oakland Athletics low-
ered their magic number to
one for clinching their sec-
ond straight AL West title,
beating the Minnesota
Twins behind the pitching
of Jarrod Parker and hitting
of Alberto Callaspo.
The As have won 12 of
15 and are 16 of their last
21, opening a season-high
7-game lead over sec-
ond-place Texas entering
Saturday. Texas was Kansas
City later in the day.
Parker (12-7) allowed
one run and four hits in
six innings, and Callaspo
matched his career highs
with four hits and had three
RBIs. Kurt Suzuki and
Yoenis Cespedes homered
for the As.
The game started after
a two-hour rain delay. The
visiting dugout was ood-
ed and sewage backed up
in the As coaches bath-
room, the third such inci-
dent at the Coliseum this
season.
Rangers 3, Royals 1
KANSAS CITY, Mo.
Matt Garza pitched eight
impressive innings for his
rst victory in six starts
and the Texas Rangers
kept close in the playoff
race, beating the Kansas
City Royals.
The Rangers won for
only the fth time in 19
September games. They
remained a half-game
behind Cleveland for the
second AL wild-card berth.
The Royals, out of the
playoffs since winning
the 1985 World Series,
dropped 3 games in back
of the Indians.
AMERICAN LEAGUE ROUNDUP
Burnett fans 12 as Bucs win
The Associated Press
PITTSBURGH A.J.
Burnett scattered four hits
over seven strong innings
to lead the Pittsburgh
Pirates over the Cincinnati
Reds 4-2 on Saturday night.
Burnett (9-11) struck
out a season-high 12 as the
Pirates moved a game in
front of Cincinnati for the
top spot in the NLwild-card
race. Jason Grilli worked
the ninth for his 31st save,
his rst since going to the
disabled list with a strained
right forearm in July.
Russell Martin hit a two-
run homer and Jose Tabata
added two hits as the
Pirates bounced back from
a late collapse in a loss on
Friday night.
Zach Cozart hit his 12th
home run of the season
for Cincinnati and Ryan
Ludwick added an RBI
but Homer Bailey (11-11)
ended a winning streak at
six straight decisions.
Mets 5, Phillies 4,
6 1-2 innings
PHILADELPHIA
David Wright and Daniel
Murphy hit solo home runs
and the NewYork Mets beat
the Philadelphia Phillies in
a game called in the top of
the seventh inning because
of rain.
The teams played in the
rain before the game was
halted, and it was called
after a delay of 1 hour, 28
minutes.
Wright connected for the
third consecutive game,
and second straight day
since returning from a ham-
string injury that sidelined
him for more than a month.
He has the most homers
by any visiting player at
Citizens Bank Park with
19.
Murphy broke a 1-all
tie with a home run in the
sixth. His 12th homer of
the season tied a career
high set in 2009.
Cubs 3, Braves 1
CHICAGO Dioner
Navarro hit a tiebreaking
single in a three-run eighth
inning, and the Chicago
Cubs beat Atlanta to keep
the Braves on the brink of
the NL East championship.
Atlantas magic num-
ber remained at one to
clinch its rst division title
since 2005. Second-place
Washington hosted Miami
later Saturday.
Starlin Casto singled off
Kris Medlen with one out
in the eighth, pinch-hitter
Donnie Murphy singled
against Scott Downs (4-4)
and Anthony Rizzo hit a
tying double down the left-
eld line.
Navarro singled in the
go-ahead run against
David Carpenter, and Nate
Schierholtz added a sacri-
ce y.
Carlos Villanueva (7-8)
got three outs in the eighth,
and Pedro Strop nished
for his rst save in four
chances.
Cardinals 7, Brewers 2
MILWAUKEE Matt
Carpenter broke Stan
Musials team record for
doubles by a left-handed
batter in a season, Lance
Lynn won for the rst time
since early August and the
St. Louis Cardinals beat
the Milwaukee Brewers to
maintain a two-game lead
in the NL Central.
St. Louis would clinch
a playoff spot for the third
straight postseason if the
Washington Nationals lost
to the Miami Marlins later
Saturday in a game delayed
by rain at the start. The
Cardinals have won for the
12th time in 17 games and
improved to 14-4 against
the Brewers this year,
including 8-1 in Milwaukee.
Carpenters fth-inning
double was his 54th of
the season, one more than
Musials total in 1953.
NATIONAL LEAGUE ROUNDUP
K
outdoors
timesleader.com
THETIMES LEADER Sunday, September 22, 2013
PAGE 11C
There are more than just pigeons and stray cats roaming the
wilds of the city, and readers have been noticing. Despite being
an urban landscape, the Wyoming Valley hosts many species of
wildlife that go unnoticed.
Fortunately, these two examples happened to reveal themselves
when a camera was handy. Gary Russell photographed this family
of red foxes in May along the river in South Wilkes-Barre, near
the Barney Farms area. Russell wrote that the adult female fox
had five kits this spring, and while living along the river he wit-
nessed the group feeding on a goose she had killed. Russell said
he and his wife first noticed the foxes in April while riding their
bikes on the dike. In addition to the daily fox sightings, Russell
said he also saw a bald eagle flying over the area.
Lastly, what is becoming a more common example of urban
wildlife lately is the black bear. Kelly Maniskas was traveling on
Eighth Street in Wyoming on July 27, when she photographed
this large bear crossing the street. Maniskas was with her moth-
er, Karen Mazzaccaro, at the time when this large bruin appeared
in the street. Its likely not the last time this bear, or others, will
venture into Wyoming Borough.
Capture anything interesting on your handheld or trail camera? A nice buck, bear,
coyote or anything unique? Wed love to see it. Each week, well run photos from a
readers trail camera on the Sunday Outdoors page. Email your photo, along with
date and area it was taken (township is fine), and any other details to tvenesky@
timesleader.com.
CAuGht on CAmErA
Adeep
woods
encounter
With an elongated body and
a long, bushy tail, the creature
was a mystery the second I
saw it loping out of a hollow
and heading in my direction.
I had just started down a
steep hillside
and stopped to
observe for a
minute when I
first spotted the
dark brown ani-
mal.
The September
woods were still
and silent, and I
knelt beside the
same oak tree
where I sat last
fall and called a
flock of turkeys.
But this animal wasnt a tur-
key.
It was a fisher an elusive,
silent predator whose num-
bers are rebounding across the
state.
My first encounter with a
fisher occurred in 1997, when
I trapped one in a dirthole set
I made for fox. With its sloped
forehead and rounded ears, the
animal resembled a bear cub
from a distance.
I released the fisher
unharmed, never to come face-
to-face with another one until
last week.
As the fisher made its way
up the hillside directly toward
me, I marveled at its length.
Well over three feet long, I
surmised that this particular
fisher was a male. One of the
largest members of the wea-
sel family in Pennsylvania
only the river otter is bigger
fishers are one of the few
predators that can efficiently
prey upon porcupine. They are
also unique in that they can
hunt on the forest floor or in
the trees.
Thats one reason why I
wasnt surprised that the fish-
er I watched traversed the for-
est floor matter-of-factly. After
all, if a fisher doesnt fear a
porcupines quills, there isnt
much likely to stand in its way.
Including me.
I knelt motionless beside
the oak and watched the fish-
er approach closer, pausing
occasionally to peer under a
log or scan the hillside. Its
movements were deliberate
but it overlooked the fact that
a human was nearby, even as it
drew within 20 yards.
I appreciate the secretive
nature of the fisher. It wants to
remain deep in the woods and
be left alone, far removed from
any remnants of civilization.
Its not that much different
than those of us whose main
reason for spending a day in
the woods is simply to get
away from it all.
I thought about that as I
watched the fisher walk on top
of a fallen tree and continue
in my direction. Considering
its a member of the weasel
family some of the most
efficient killers when it comes
to Pennsylvanias predators
I wondered how the fisher
would react if it unknowingly
walked right up to me. So far,
as the distance between us
See ENCOUNTER | 12C
Legislation to
help disabled
veterans
From our wire services
Sen. Lisa Baker (R-20) and
Sen. Scott Hutchinson (R-21)
have introduced legislation to
help more disabled veterans
receive free hunting and fish-
ing licenses.
Baker, who serves as Chair
of the Senate Veterans Affairs
and Emergency Preparedness
Committee, and Hutchinson,
who serves as a member of
that committee, acted as soon
as they learned that many
disabled veterans who are
considered unemployable
under a federal rating system
are being denied free hunting
and fishing licenses, a ben-
efit accorded to 100 percent
disabled veterans under state
law.
Veterans who have served
but who have been injured in
combat face so many barri-
ers, Baker said. Financial
restraints or confusion over
eligibility should never be
a barrier for them as they
endeavor to enjoy the great
outdoors and apply for a ben-
efit they have undoubtedly
earned.
Senate bills 1090 and 1091
clarify that a veteran who is
deemed to be 100 percent
disabled by the U.S. Veterans
Administration due to unem-
ployability will be able to
receive a free hunting and fish-
ing license in Pennsylvania.
These bills are about hon-
oring true American heroes
who, in many cases, have
lost their limbs, their mobil-
ity and their ability to work
while serving our country,
Hutchinson said. Extending
this benefit is another way to
honor those who have sacri-
ficed so much to protect our
homeland.
Game Lands
tours set
From our wire services
As part of the Pennsylvania
Game Commissions efforts to
highlight its ongoing habitat
improvement initiatives, the
public is invited to take part
in upcoming tours of several
state game lands.
The tours are free, and will
be held between Sept. 29 and
Oct. 20.
Game Commission
Executive Director Carl G.
Roe said the tours offer a
glimpse of what state game
lands have to offer.
Were proud of our state
game lands and these tours
not only provide a chance for
us to show them to the pub-
lic, but they also provide the
public an opportunity to come
out and talk with the Game
Commission personnel direct-
ly responsible for managing
and protecting game lands,
Roe said.
With autumn nearly
here, the tours also pro-
vide a chance to see some
of the best scenery the
See GAME LANDS | 12C
Hunting for a healthy season
Check seminar provides guidance
before heading afeld
tomVEnESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
It may sound like a stretch, but the way
Dr. Ammar Abbasi sees it, hunters arent
that different than any other athlete. Much
like a player prepares for a football, hockey
or baseball game, hunters need to do the
same before they head aeld, Abbasi said.
OnThursday, those attending the Hunters
Health Fair at the Hazleton Health and
Wellness Center got a jump on their prepa-
rations for the upcoming seasons. Staff from
the center and the Alliance Medical Group
offered hunters a number of screenings,
including heart-rhythm, cholesterol, vision
and body mass index, and instructed them
on how to prepare for the physical demands
of a hunting season. According to Leigh
Ann Wiedlich, community relations coor-
dinator for the alliance, approximately 85
hunters turned out for the event, which was
being held for the rst time.
It was a very robust turnout for our inau-
gural event, Wiedlich said. We hope to do
it again, and were thinking of holding one
in the spring for the shermen and turkey
hunters.
Aside from the cardio exertion, hunting
can be especially taxing on joints and mus-
cles, said Abbasi, who is a physical medi-
cine and rehabilitation specialist. Archery
hunters can experience signicant shoul-
der pain, the recoil of a rie can be hard on
the shoulder joint and dragging a deer the
wrong way can cause a back injury, he said.
Hunters are out there from dawn to dusk
and a lot of times they may not realize how
physical it is, Abbasi said. There are a lot
of similarities with what other athletes deal
with and what we see from hunting ts right
into the sports-related injuries.
With the start of archery and the small
game seasons a few weeks ago, along with
more than two months before the Dec. 2
start of rie deer season, Abbasi said there
is still plenty of time for hunters to get their
bodies in shape before heading aeld.
Wearing a uorescent orange vest, Abbasi
instructed hunters on steps they can take to
avoid injuries.
When they practice for archery season,
say they use a 60-pound bow and shoot 30
arrows. Thats equivalent to lifting 5,000
pounds, he said. That can cause signi-
cant shoulder pain, as can just releasing the
bow string. Its similar to a baseball pitcher
throwing the ball.
The shoulder also takes the brunt of the
impact when a rie recoils, Abbasi said.
The best protection for your shoulder
joint is to strengthen that muscle, he said.
Do workouts to get it ready for that stress.
Building muscle is the best way to protect
that joint.
Perhaps the biggest cause of pain results
from dragging a deer. Abbasi said if done
improperly it can be extremely painful on
the lower back. To avoid this, he recom-
mended against bending forward when
dragging a deer.
Instead, Abbasi suggested using a rope
and stick behind the back and pulling the
deer that way.
Staying upright is the key, he said.
Dave Bieniek of Evervale took advantage
of the fair as he prepares for the fall hunt-
ing and trapping seasons. Bieniek, 57, said
he has hunted all his life and while his job
requires a lot of heavy lifting, its not the
same as the demands that come with hunt-
ing.
Where I hunt you have to be like a billy
goat, going up and down mountains, and
climbing in and out of treestands, he said.
The older you get, it doesnt get any easi-
er.
Bieniek had a heart-rhythm screen per-
formed at the fair and said he intends on
walking more to improve his cardio system
before hunting season starts.
Imreally glad they did this event because
it makes you aware of what can happen and
gives you the information to prevent it,
Bieniek said.
The cardio demands of hunting are
one of the biggest concerns, according
to Gail Malloy, trauma program man-
ager at the alliance. Hunting is unique,
she said, because it has three factors that
are demanding on the heart steep ter-
rain, cold temperatures and excitement.
Pete G. Wilcox | The Times Leader
Gail malloy, rn, tnCC, LnC, trauma Program manager, Greater hazleton health Alliance, talks about
thursdays hunters health & Informational health Fair at the hazleton health and Wellness Center in
hazleton.
Pete G. Wilcox | The Times Leader
David Allen, northeast region Wildlife Conservation officer, District 5-40-3, talks with hunters Bob and tyler Frederick, and Paul Potucek, all from hazleton,
at thursdays hunters health & Informational health Fair at the hazleton health and Wellness Center in hazleton.
outDoor nEWS
See HEALTHY | 13C
tom
Venesky
Outdoors
Columnist
has to offer, Roe said.
The state game lands
system has a long his-
tory in Pennsylvania.
In 1919, the Game
Commission was grant-
ed authority to purchase
lands for the protec-
tion, propagation and
management of game
and wildlife, and to
provide areas for pub-
lic hunting and trap-
ping. Since that time,
the Game Commission
has acquired more than
1.4 million acres in 65
of the states 67 coun-
ties (Philadelphia and
Delaware counties
being the exceptions).
With few exceptions,
state game lands were
purchased using rev-
enues from hunting and
furtaker license sales;
state game lands timber,
coal, oil, gas and mineral
operation revenues; the
states share of a federal
excise tax on sporting
arms and ammunition,
known as the Pittman-
Robertson Wildlife
Restoration Program;
from Working Together
for Wildlife artwork and
patch sales; and from the
Pennsylvania Waterfowl
Management stamp and
print sales.
Carbon County:
Sunday, Oct. 6, State
Game Lands 141.
Registration will be held
from 8 a.m. until 12:30
p.m. at the large park-
ing lot along state Route
93 in Nesquehoning
Township.
Game Commission
personnel will be on
hand to explain points
of interest, including
projects to improve
wildlife habitat. Four-
wheel-drive vehicles
with high clearance are
required for this nine-
mile, self-guided driving
tour.
The tour will begin at
the large parking area
on the east side state
Route 93 and will travel
east on a game lands
road toward the Lehigh
Gorge State Park, and
back to state Route 93,
exiting at the parking
lot across from the game
lands shooting range.
The tour will pass habi-
tat improvement proj-
ects completed by the
game lands Food and
Cover Corps crew locat-
ed in Carbon County, the
National Wild Turkey
Federation, The Nature
Conservancy, and the
Ruffed Grouse Society.
Representatives from
the Game Commission
and conservation organi-
zations will be on hand
to explain the projects
and answer questions.
Directions: Take state
Route 93 north at the
intersection of state
Route 93 and state
Route 209, proceed 3.5
miles and turn right into
the parking lot. Proceed
through the gate on a
dirt road. Each vehicle
will be provided a map
and brief explanation
of wildlife and habitat
management programs
being carried out on
this magnificent tract of
public hunting land con-
sisting of about 17,050
acres.
Luzerne/Wyomi ng
counties: Sunday, Oct.
13, State Game Lands
57. Registration is sched-
uled from 7:30 a.m. until
12:30 p.m. at the head-
quarters building com-
plex at Ricketts Station
in Forkston Township,
Wyoming County.
Game Commission
personnel will be on
hand to explain points
of interest, including
projects to improve wild-
life habitat. Four-wheel-
drive vehicles with high
clearance are required
for this 14-mile, self-
guided driving tour.
The tour will begin at
the State Game Lands
57 maintenance building
and follows Southbrook,
Shale Pit, Beech Lake
and Mountain Springs
roads back to the build-
ing. The tour will pass
habitat improvement
projects completed by
the game lands Food and
Cover Corps crew, the
National Wild Turkey
Federation, Quality
Deer Management
Association and Ducks
Unlimited.
Representatives from
the Game Commission
and conservation organi-
zations will be on hand
to explain the projects
and answer questions.
Directions: Take Route
487 north at the inter-
section of Route 118 and
proceed 7.5 miles and
turn onto a dirt road near
the state game lands sign
on the right. Travel on
the dirt road one-tenth
of a mile to a Y inter-
section and proceed left
three-tenths of a mile to
the headquarters com-
plex. Each vehicle will be
provided a map and brief
explanation of wildlife
and habitat management
programs being carried
out on this magnificent
tract of public hunting
land, which consists of
nearly 44,600 acres.
PAGE 12C Sunday, September 22, 2013 SPORTS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
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From page 11C
Game Lands
From page 11C
Encounter
decreased, it hadnt
shown any sign that it
was aware of my pres-
ence.
Until it got to within
15 feet and disappeared
behind a tree.
I anxiously waited
for the fisher to make a
move and re-appear on
one side of the tree, but
it didnt. I enjoyed this
up-close encounter with
the fisher while I could
see it, but now I didnt
know what was going
to happen next. Would
it appear somewhere in
the forest canopy above
me? Would it come out
from behind the tree
and approach even clos-
er? How would it act if
startled by my presence?
After a few seconds, I
decided to answer those
questions myself and
slowly leaned my head
to peer behind the tree.
As I did, I saw the fisher
standing on its hind legs
doing the same thing
with its head to get a bet-
ter look at me. For a brief
second, our eyes met as
the fisher tucked its front
paws into its chest and
shot me an intense glare.
Than it exploded into
a ball of brown fur and
rocketed back down the
hillside, vanishing into
the hollow below.
All that remained
was the stillness of the
woods, and the memory
of a face-to-face encoun-
ter with a truly mysteri-
ous creature.
Tom Venesky covers the
outdoors for The Times
Leader. You may reach
him at 570-970-7230 or
tvenesky@timesleader.
com
DOUG FERGUSON
AP Golf Writer
ATLANTA Henrik
Stenson was so awless that
he built a nine-shot lead at
the turn Saturday in the Tour
Championship.
Four bogeys in the rain on the
back nine at East Lake put him
right back where he started the
day and injected some hope for
Dustin Johnson and a few other
players.
Stenson made two bogeys on
the last three holes he made
a 12-foot par putt on the other
and had to settle for a 1-under
69. That gave him a four-shot
lead over Johnson going in to
the nal day of the PGA Tour
season.
Stenson appeared to have both
wrapped up when he got up-and-
down from a bunker on the par-5
ninth for a tap-in birdie to reach
14 under, nine shots clear of
Johnson. Everything changed as
the rain began to fall.
Stenson pulled his approach
into a corporate hospitality area
to the left of the 10th green. He
hooked a tee shot on the 14th
that ran across a cart path and
under a bush, and he had to
make a 12-foot putt for bogey. He
made bogey from the bunker on
the 16th. What really stung was
a three-putt bogey on the par-3
18th.
I think Ill choose to look at
it from the bright side, even
though the weather is not that
bright at the moment, Stenson
said after setting down a rain-
soaked umbrella. Started the
day with a four-shot lead and I
still got it. So thats all that mat-
ters really.
Johnson made two late birdies
and two solid pars, getting up-
and-down after a close call with
the water on the 17th, and then
making a 30-foot par save on the
last hole for a 67 that put him in
the last group.Johnson was the
last man into the 30-man eld at
East Lake, and he left Chicago
on Monday not sure whether he
would get in. Now he at least has
a shot to start and end the sea-
son with a victory.
Tiger Woods, the No. 1 seed,
didnt make a birdie until he
chipped in on the 14th hole. He
rallied for a 69, the rst time he
has broken par all week.
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER SPORTS Sunday, September 22, 2013 PAGE 13C
OUtDOOR NOtES
the Factoryville Sportsmens Club will hold its
regular monthly meeting on Wednesday, Sept. 25 at
7:30 p.m. in the clubhouse. Nominations for ofcers
and board members will be accepted. Elections will
be held during the October meeting.
the Endless Mountains Rendezvous
Muzzleloader Showwill be held on Oct. 5 and 6 at
the American Legion Post 510 on Route 6 in Black
Walnut (at mile marker 297). The showruns from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on both days and admission is $3
and free to those 16 and younger. Proceeds beneft
The Oldest House. For more information, contact
Robin at 570-499-6758 or visit The Oldest House
on Facebook.
the U.S. Army Corps Engineers Philadelphia
District has announced the Francis E. Walter Dam
has enough water storage for a fnal addition to the
2013 recreation plan.
Wet conditions throughout the summer have allowed
the Corps to add the 10th and fnal increment of the
plan. The details of the fnal increment are listed
below. Water will be released during the period of
Friday, Oct. 11 to Monday, Oct. 14. The ramping up and
down of releases allows for fshing and whitewater
rafting opportunities during the fnal drawdown of the
recreation season.
Friday, Oct. 11 400 cubic feet per second water
release
Saturday, Oct. 12 1700 cubic feet per second
water release
Sunday, Oct. 13 1000 cubic feet per second water
release
Monday, Oct. 14 400 cubic feet per second water
release
The Corps will also release 300 cubic feet per second
of additional water storage every day starting Friday,
Sept 13 as part of the drawdown. To see the plan or
viewupdates, visit: http://www.nap.usace.army.mil/
fewalter.
the United Sportsmens Camp 271 in Huntington
Mills will host a junior pheasant hunt in conjunction
with the Pennsylvania Game Commission from9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 19. There is not cost to the
hunt. Children ages 12-16 that have a Hunter/Trapper
Education certifcation may participate. The deadline
for registration is Sept. 25. Spaces are limited. If you
are interested, call Nick at 570-574-0682 for more
information. Register online at www.register-ed.com/
events/view/35059.
Pheasants Forever local chapter 803, in
conjunction with the Pennsylvania Game
Commission and the Army Corps of Engineers, will
hold a youth mentor pheasant hunt at SGL 119 on
Oct. 12. Participants must be between the ages of 12-
16 and have successfully completed a hunter safety
course to participate.
They are also looking for volunteers/mentors with
hunting dogs. For more details, visit www.nepapf.org
or call Corey Wiesel at 570-282-6346.
Pheasants Forever Chapter 803 meets at 7 p.m. on
the third Wednesday of the month at the Farmers Inn,
Hillside Road in Trucksville.
Nescopeck State Park will host the following
programs in September (For more information or to
register, call 570-403-2006):
Wednesday, Sept. 25 - Guided Hike: Skyline Trail; 9
a.m.
Saturday, Sept. 28 - National Public Lands Day Park
Cleanup; 9 a.m.
Sunday, Sept. 29 - Wild Mushrooms of NEPA; 1-3 p.m.
the Factoryville Sportsmens Club will hold a
3D archery shoot and a blackpowder rife shoot
today. Both events will run from9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The
fee for the archery course is $8 for adults, $6 for
under 18, and 12 and under have no fee. The archery
course features 30 three dimensional targets, with
an opportunity to win cash prizes at the end of the
course. All levels of archers and equipment are
welcome to this open event.
The blackpowder course features multiple life size
animal print targets set at varying ranges. Only
muzzleloading fintlock and percussion rifes are
allowed. Shooter fee is $5. The clubhouse kitchen
will be open for breakfast and lunch. For more
information call Paul at 570-561-3748.
the Pennsylvania Environmental Council is
accepting reservations for the 23rd Annual Evening
for Northeast Pennsylvanias Environment -
Environmental Partnership Awards and Dinner to be
held on Thursday, Oct. 24 at the Woodlands Inn and
Resort.
Allison Tummon Kamphuis, Manager, Procter and
Gamble Childrens Safe Drinking Water Program
will be this years keynote speaker. Mark Volk,
President of Lackawanna College will be the master
of ceremonies. Award recipients include the Earth
Conservancy, Nanticoke Conservation Club and
Catherine Hughes and Rebecca Taylor of Luzerne
County. For more information, call PEC at 570-718-
6507.
AREA bASS
tOURNAMENt
StANDiNGS AND
SChEDUlE
Suskie bassmaster River Series
(Held every Wednesday at 5:30 p.m.)
Sept. 18 results
(38 anglers, 84 percent of the
anglers brought fsh to weigh-in,
average weight of 1.60 pounds):
1. Alan Centi - 2.73 pounds
2. Ray Jones - 2.69 pounds
3. Chet Williams - 2.38 pounds
Small bass pool: David R. McGovern
- .87 pounds
Big Bass Leader (season): John
Centak 3.41 pounds
Angler of the Year (total weight):
Chet Williams - 24.53 pounds
Championship will be held today
from7 a.m. to 3 p.m. The following
30 anglers qualifed to compete:
Rob Rosencrans
Lynda Rosencrans
Chuck Saypack
Ed Mrochko
Lori Mrochko
Frank Slymock
David R. McGovern
David M. McGovern
John Centak
Chet Williams
John Chimola
Paul Smith
John Nealon
JimLacomis
Hunter Lacomis
Chris Ostrowski
Dave Searfoss
Scott Francis
Jeremy Miller
Andy Schweitzer
Larry Fetterhoof
Dan Byorick
Dan Byorick Jr.
Kenneth Phillips
Ray Jones
Allan Centi
Jason Gazda
Michael Pagan
Tony Glazenski
Andy Nealon
Upcoming area bass tournaments
the PA bass Casters will hold an
open bass tournament on Oct. 27 at
Harveys Lake. Launch is at safe light
and weigh-in will be 3 p.m. at the
PFBC boat launch.
the harveys lake Wednesday
Night bass tournament will
continue through the end of October.
The tournament will be held at the
public boat launch every Wednesday
from5:30-8:30 p.m. Entry fee is $20
per angler. For more information, call
Duke Dalley at 570-991-0080.
To submit results or add a
tournament to the schedule, email
themto tvenesky@timesleader.com.
PGC recognizes
retiring dispatcher
Dennis Barney Dobinick, of Sweet Valley, recently retired
after 25 years of service as a dispatcher for the Pennsylvania
Game Commission Northeast Region. The Northeast Region of
the Game Commission consists of 13 counties and 23 individual
Wildlife Conservation Ofcer districts. Dobinick was responsi-
ble for handling wildlife and hunting-related calls from the pub-
lic and directing information to Wildlife Conservation Ofcers
and their deputies. Dobinick was well known for his knowledge
of the game code, emergency-response procedures, and excep-
tional public-relations skills. Shown are Dobinick, left, with PGC
Northeast Region supervisor Daniel Figured.
Photo provided
rates reach dangerous levels.
If you shoot a deer or even if
you miss, your heart races, she
said.
Even a hunters preparations
the morning of a hunt can impact
the heart. Malloy pointed out the
tradition of eating a big break-
fast of eggs, bacon and potatoes,
before hitting the woods. That can
put the heart at risk as more blood
ow is directed to aid digestion,
she said.
The cardio demands were
the main reason why Dr. Joseph
Laureti, a board-certied cardiolo-
gist at the center, was on hand to
conduct free heart-rhythm screen-
ings along with gauging each
hunters risk for heart disease.
While a person may lead an
active lifestyle, Laureti said,
chances are the activity required
by hunting exceeds what their
body is conditioned for.
Most people dont perform
the amount of activity that comes
with hunting on a daily basis,
especially in the cold weather,
he said. The cold combined with
exertion and the extra weight of
dragging a deer can cause things
to manifest.
Hunting season is the time of
year that they go out and do more
than they do at any other time.
During the heart-rhythm
screenings, Laureti monitored
hunters for either a normal or
irregular heartbeat and advised
them if more testing was recom-
mended.
Its good to see hunters come
out here and be pro-active, he
said. This is a starting point.
Gander Mountain and the
Pennsylvania Game Commission
also had informational booths at
the event. Wildlife Conservation
Ofcer Dave Allen said the big-
gest topic that he addressed was
lyme disease.
Over the years, Allen said, he
and other WCOs have assisted
on calls for an injured hunter that
ended up having a heart attack in
the woods.
So many aspects of hunting
are about physical activity and
Ive seen what can happen rst-
hand, Allen said. A lot of the
hunters I spoke to would like to
see this even held again before
the next season, and it denitely
was a good idea. The interest is
there.
From page 11C
healthy
Pete G. Wilcox | The Times Leader
David bieniek of hazle township tests his grip strength as Amanda Sperduto, Exercise Physiologist, hazleton health
and Wellness Center looks on during thursdays hunters health & informational health Fair in hazleton.
Stenson coasts toward the
Tour Championship title
AP photo
Dustin Johnson pumps his fist after
sinking a putt on the 18th hole during
the third round of play in the tour
Championship at East lake Golf Club
in Atlanta on Saturday
Tracks slow to embrace
heralded Air Titan
DAN GElStON
AP Sports Writer
LOUDON, N.H. The
forecast calls for rain at New
Hampshire, potentially soaking
fans for NASCARs second con-
secutive Chase race, and putting
the threat of a Monday nish in
play.
Without lights at the 1.058-
mile track, the rush could be for
jet fuel dryers to wring out the
asphalt and make it safe for driv-
ers to complete at least half of
Sundays race before the sun goes
down.
NASCAR had an idea that
would speed up the interminable
process. It developed a state-of-
the art system that was designed
to blow the water out of every
pesky weeper and reduce track
drying time, perhaps up to 80
percent.
Hailed as NASCARs next
big innovation, NASCAR chair-
man Brian France promised at
a January announcement the
development would revolution-
ize track drying and dramatically
improve the fan experience.
Instead, the Air Titan has been
start-and-parked.
With rain looming, the Air
Titan isnt at New Hampshire
this weekend. Just like it wasnt
at the rain-delayed Chase opener
at Chicagoland. And it wont be at
the third Chase race next week at
Dover. Its stuck in Concord, N.C.
When the rain comes, the
NASCAR tracks will rely on the
same drying methods theyve
used since the 1970s. New
Hampshire has at least a half-
dozen jet dryers and two tankers
of fuel that will be used to dry the
track.
Drivers will retreat to their
motorhomes. Fans at the track
will leave. The ones at home will
tune out.
Noone likes the rain. But tracks
have been slow to embrace the
Air Titan, putting the machine on
a Sprint Cup sabbatical since May
at Talladega.
They hyped it, track owner
Bruton Smith said. But I dont
know anybody that thought it
was effective. If they have enough
jet dryers, they do the job.
NASCARtoutedthe Air Titans
success after it saved Saturdays
Nationwide Series race and a
Sunday nish in the Cup race at
Talladega.
AP photo
Greg biffle leads Matt Kenseth dur-
ing practice for Sundays NASCAR
Sprint Cup race at New hampshire
Motor Speedway on Saturday
Penguins Vokoun has surgery
The Associated Press
PITTSBURGH Pittsburgh
Penguins backup goaltender
Tomas Vokoun had surgery
Saturday to remove a blood clot
from his pelvis and will remain
in the hospital for several days.
General manager Ray Shero
announced the operation after
the Penguins 5-3 preseason loss
to the Columbus Blue Jackets.
He said Vokoun left the
Saturday morning practice at
CONSOL Energy Center after
noticing swelling in his thigh. He
was taken to a local emergency
room, where doctors diagnosed
the blood clot.
The most important thing
right now is Tomas health and
well-being, Shero said. The
clot was dissolved by the proce-
dure, and the doctors tell us that
he will remain in the hospital for
several days. We will continue to
monitor his progress after that.
The 37-year-oldVokounplayed
20 regular-season games for
the Penguins in 2012-13, going
13-4 with a 2.45 goals-against
average. He also appeared in 11
playoff games and was 6-5 with a
2.10 GAA.
Jeff Zatkoff is likely to be
the Penguins backup goalie in
Vokouns absence.
blue Jackets 5, Penguins 3
PITTSBURGH Boone
Jenner scored his second goal of
the game to offset Jussi Jokinens
hat trick and lift the Columbus
Blue Jackets to a victory over
the Pittsburgh Penguins in a pre-
season game.
Jenner notched the winner by
banking a backhander in off of
trafc in front 7:21 into the third
period.
Brandon Dubinsky and Jenner
scored in the rst period and
Cam Atkinson added a goal
in the second before Jokinen
scored three straight goals in a
span of 8:28 in the second to tie
the game.
Derek MacKenzie added an
empty netter with 44 seconds
left in the game.
Marc-Andre Fleury stopped
19 of 23 Columbus shots, while
last seasons Vezina Trophy win-
ner Sergei Bobrovsky made 38
saves.
Caps to host Winter Classic
WASHINGTON The
Winter Classic is moving south
of the Mason-Dixon Line, which
means its time to check the fore-
cast.
Washington Capitals owner
TedLeonsis announcedSaturday
that the Capitals will host the
NHLs annual New Years Day
outdoor game in 2015. Hes been
lobbying for the game for years.
The Capitals were the visiting
team in Pittsburgh for the 2011
Winter Classic, which was post-
poned several hours because of
rain.
The average high temperature
on Jan. 1 in Washington is 44
degrees, with a record of 69 set
in 2005. This seasons Winter
Classic will be held in Michigan,
but a goodlitmus test for outdoor
hockey in a warmer climate will
come Jan. 5 when the Anaheim
Ducks will play the Los Angeles
Kings at Dodger Stadium.
Still to be determined are a
venue and an opponent. NHL
Chief Operating Ofcer John
Collins said the league will
consider Nationals Park, RFK
Stadium and FedEx Field.
Leonsis would prefer to rule out
FedEx Field, which is located
outside the city in Landover,
Md.
Read gets 4-year extension
PHILADELPHIA The
Philadelphia Flyers say they
have signed forward Matt Read
to a four-year, $14.5 million con-
tract extension.
Read, who had 11 goals and
13 assists in 42 games last sea-
son, is now under contract for
ve years. He led NHL rookies
with 24 goals during the 2011-
12 season.
AP photo
Pittsburgh Penguins harry Zolnierczyk (39), right, flies over Columbus blue
Jackets Jack Skille (5) after the two collided Saturday in Pittsburgh.
PAGE 14C, Sunday, September 22, 2013 www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
We Appreciate
Your Business.
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Sitting: Lisa Zavada-Rizzo, Parker J. The Magnicent, Dale Baumes
Providing Insurance
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BUSINESS
timesleader.com
THETIMES LEADER Sunday, September 22, 2013
SECTION D
LEVI SUMAGAYSAY
San Jose Mercury News
From employee perks to the
color of their ofce walls, the old
guard of Silicon Valley is taking
cues from the new.
Google Inc. is famous for its
free food and more, featured over
the summer in the lm The
Internship. But tech companies
that have been around much longer
are evolving as they compete with
younger, seemingly hipper compa-
nies for talent.
Since Conan OBrien did a
bit on Intels gray cubes and gray
walls in 2007, says Gail Dundas,
a communications manager with
the 45-year-old Santa Clara, Calif.,
chipmaker, there has been a sea
change at the company that
includes getting rid of cubicles and
infusing color into the workplace.
Cisco Systems Inc., another
longtime Silicon Valley company,
is also transforming its workspac-
es. Some departments are getting
rid of assigned workspaces, tap-
ping Ciscos own networking tech-
nology that enables employees to
become more mobile. Elsewhere
on the campus, some of the 56
buildings at the companys San
Jose, Calif., headquarters are at
various stages of a remodel, with
new features including lounge
areas with comfy couches, pool
tables and cocoon-shaped chairs.
We want people to come out for
a minute, think outside the box,
said Allan McGinty, director of
workplace design and develop-
ment. As this newspaper toured
Ciscos San Jose campus recently,
McGinty spoke from Raleigh, N.C.,
using WebEx, the companys vid-
eoconferencing system.
Showing that its efforts are
apparently paying off with young
workers, Ciscos interns praise its
culture.
Eric Pomeroy, a 21-year-old
from the University of Michigan,
recently nished his second
Tech companies imitating
younger, hipper competitors
MCT photo
Cisco Systems IT Analyst Interns Sierra Parker, left, and Jeff Barulich work at the Cisco Systems offices in San Jose, California.
See COMPETITORS| 2D
See APPlE| 2D
MCT photo
Cisco Systems Solutions Design Manager Candice Balobeck shows the Community Wall
at the Cisco Systems offices in San Jose, California. The wall contains messages, photos
of new hires, and the Cisco Now electronic billboard.
To attract employees, frms are ofering a host of fringe benefts
MCT photo
From the foreground, Cisco employees JD
Singh and Ron Holst play pool, as Monish
Raut watches in a lounge, at the Cisco
Systems offices in San Jose, California.
Company says new
operating system will
give whole new feel
to iPhone
Apples iOS7
a big change
for users
CHRIS OBRIEN
Los Angeles Times (MCT)
SAN FRANCISCO While
Apples new iPhones have hogged
the spotlight in recent days, a
seemingly more mundane soft-
ware update may be far more cru-
cial to the tech giant.
On Wednesday, Apple Inc.
released a radically redesigned
iOS 7 mobile operating system
that Apple Chief Executive Tim
Cook described as the biggest
change to the iPhone since the
devices introduction in 2007.
Indeed, some analysts say the
iOS 7 represents a bigger depar-
ture for users and developers in
terms of the experience than the
new iPhone 5s and iPhone 5c that
went on sale Friday.
The question now is whether
iOS 7 will reinvigorate the gad-
get that launched the smartphone
revolution but has seen growth
slow this year or will frustrate
users and developers as they try to
learn the softwares interface.
I think people arent antici-
pating how big of a deal the new
iOS 7 will be, said Carl Howe, a
Yankee Group analyst. The soft-
ware is very different than where
theyve been. And the thing that
is going to blow peoples mind is
that its going to make it feel like
theyre getting a new phone.
For that reason, some analysts
have even speculated that iOS 7
could damp new iPhone sales this
weekend. Will people put off an
iPhone purchase because the soft-
ware makes it feel like they just
got a new phone for free?
Analysts will be watching close-
ly for reactions. IOS 7 will be
available as a free download for
most Apple mobile devices: the
iPhone 4 or later; the iPad 2 or
later; the iPad Mini; and the fth-
generation iPod Touch.
The iOS 7 software arrives
almost a year after Cook
announced a management over-
haul that saw Scott Forstall, who
had been in charge of iOS for
years, pushed out.
The development of iOS 7
was overseen by his replace-
ment, Craig Federighi, Apples
senior vice president of software
engineering. The interface of
the new software was created
by a team led by Jonathan Ive,
Apples senior vice president of
design, who saw his role expand
last year to include software
as well as hardware designs.
Getting rid
of student debt
takes real talent
Corey Nelson, 27, graduated from
Michigan State Universitys law
school in 2012 with a plan to work
his way out of six gures in student
loan debt.
His goal was to work in public ser-
vice by getting a job as an attorney
for the government, maybe on the
state or local level,
and qualify for a fed-
eral student loan for-
giveness program to
tackle that debt.
First challenge: get-
ting hired in a govern-
ment job. Its not all
that easy.
Many students
would like to see their
student loans just go
away. But getting rid
of student loans can
take real talent, disci-
pline and some creative solutions.
Many students and parents arent
even aware that some loan forgive-
ness programs exist, though. A fed-
eral consumer watchdog agency is
trying to bring more light to the fed-
eral Public Service loan Forgiveness
program was created by Congress in
2007.
A student loan forgiveness pro-
gram typically rewards graduates for
taking careers in public service, such
as police ofcers, teachers, social
workers and reghters. The college
graduate still makes regular monthly
payments on a student loan but can
look forward to having a good chunk
of debt forgiven in the long run, if he
or she follows specic requirements.
Some individual states have spe-
cic student loan breaks for specic
career choices, too.
As for Nelson? He has a job. But
Nelson has been working for a year
at a small general practice law rm
in Shawano, Wisc. If he kept working
there, he wouldnt qualify for public
service loan forgiveness.
But nally he found a government
job and he just accepted a job offer
from the city of Madison, Wis.
For the debt forgiveness program
to work, hes going to need to keep
making payments for 10 years and
continue working in public service.
The hope obviously is that the
program will still be there, said
Nelson, who pays about $400 a
month in student loans and expects
to save ve gures with loan forgive-
ness.
Sign up for a repayment plan
Tyler Shelton, 23, who just started
graduate school for urban planning
at Wayne State University, said he
had never even heard of loan forgive-
ness programs. But if it works, he
might consider it as an option to
deal with what could end up as much
as $50,000 in student loan debt.
Students need to follow specic
rules to make this work, too.
Many borrowers would need to
sign up for an income-based repay-
ment plan to ensure maximum
savings and make this work. Youd
need to keep track of the necessary
paperwork. An increase in income
would lead to an increase in your
Susan
Tompor
Contributing
Columnist
See DEBT| 2D
Catch those seafood deals before they swim away
Shrimp fans, hurry up and get to Red
Lobster because their $15.99 Endless Shrimp
special will come to an end this week.
But the shrimp fun continues at
Outback Steakhouse where the $14.99
deal that gets you a 6-ounce steak and
all you can eat shrimp still runs for at
least another week.
Speaking of Outback, the end is
near at least for this year for
the Bloomin Newman promotion.
Throughout the NASCAR season,
anytime driver Ryan Newman nished
a race in the top 10, you could go to
Outback on Monday and get a free
Bloomin Onion with any purchase.
The past three Mondays were among 13
so far this season that the freebie was offered.
So pay attention to todays Sylvania 300
at loudon, New Hampshire, and if Newman,
driving the No. 39 car, scores a top 10 nish,
you score the next day. Hes raced at this
track 23 times in his career and has 15
top 10 nishes, so the odds are good that
youll be visiting Outback Monday.
Join me in saying a hearty muy bien
to Gloria J. Potence of Drums who
answered the trivia question from the
Sept. 8 column correctly and was ran-
domly drawn to receive a bag of El
Restaurante Tortilla Chips made by
Snyder of Berlin. She, and more than
two dozen other readers, correctly
responded that Berlin is in Somerset
County.
For a while Ive been touting the ben-
ets of movie/game rental units like Red Box
and Blockbuster Express. And occasionally
Redbox gives out codes that can be entered
at the kiosk to get free or discounted mov-
ies. When I get them, I like to share them, so
heres one that will nab you a free DVD rental:
Use the code MCPC213S at the kiosk today
only. If used on Blu-ray and game rentals the
code will deduct $1.20 off the rental price.
And heres a tip, if you have two credit cards,
you can get two movies today. The code is
good for a one-time use, per credit card. So
perhaps todays a good time for a free double-
feature?
Here are some ways to use the coupons
found in todays Times leader at area stores:
Take the $1 off a Tyson Grilled and
Ready coupon to Shur Save where the items
are on sale for $3.99. Youll pay just $2.99.
Colgate mouthwash is on sale for $3 at
Price Chopper and with the $1 off coupon
you will pay just $2.
No coupons needed for the deal CVS has
this week on some stomach relief. See page 15
of its circular for a list of products included in
a deal that will get you $10 in Extra Bucks if
you spend $20. With the holidays around the
corner, its probably safe to stock up now on
these products so theyre on hand if you need
them at a family gathering.
Rite Aid, not to be outdone, has several
Crest and Oral-B products listed on its circu-
lars front page that you will pay $3 for and get
the full purchase price returned by way of +Up
Rewards. The $3 coupon will be able to be
used on a future store purchase.
Andrew M. Seder, a Times Leader staf writer, may be reached
at 570-829-7269. If you knowof any local steals or deals, email
themto aseder@timesleader.comand followhimon Twitter @
TLAndrewSeder for ofers and news throughout the week.
Andrew
Seder
Steals
& Deals
September 21- 28, 2013
visit us online at bloomsburgfair.com
PAGE 2D Sunday, September 22, 2013 BUSINESS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Corporate Ladder
LEWITH & FREEMAN
Stanley Pearlman has joined the Lewith
& Freeman Sales Team in
the Kingston Ofce. He
specializes in residential
sales. Linda Weber has
joined the Mountaintop
ofce and has successfully
sold both existing and new
residential and commer-
cial real estate throughout
Luzerne County.
MMI PREPARATORY
SCHOOL
Ryan Jastremsky has been hired as
the schools business man-
ager. Jastremsky holds a
Bachelor of Science degree
in Business Administration
from Bloomsburg
University.
Jennifer Novotney and
Nancy Lotz have been
hired as English teach-
ers. Novotney earned a
Master of Arts degree in
English with distinction
from Northern Arizona University and
a Bachelor of Arts degree in journal-
ism, cum laude, from California State
University Northridge. Lotz holds a
Bachelor of Arts degree in English lit-
erature, cum laude, from St. Michaels
College in Winooski, Vt., where she was
an English honors scholar.
R I V E R S I D E
REHABILITATION
Linda Salas-Mamary,
MS, OTR/L, CHT has
been promoted to Sr. Area
Director of Operations
for thirteen outpatient
clinics in Pennsylvania.
Salas-Mamary holds a BS
in psychology and MS in
occupational therapy from
Misericordia University
and is also a certied hand
therapist.
Donna Sokolowski has
been welcomed as a full
time physical therapist. A
graduate of the University
of Scranton, Sokolowski
received a BS in physical therapy.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF
ATTORNEYS GENERAL
Attorney General Kathleen Kane
has been appointed to the Executive
Committee of the National Association
of Attorneys General (NAAG.) NAAG
is a bipartisan association of attorneys
general from all 50 states, plus US ter-
ritories. The Executive Committee is
charged with the leadership of associa-
tion operations, and is comprised of the
four NAAG ofcers, four regional del-
egates, and three presiden-
tial appointees.
RUTHS CHRIS
STEAK HOUSE AT
MOHEGAN SUN
Mark Massetti has been
promoted to general man-
ager. Massetti has been in
the restaurant business for
over 35 years.
FIRST NATIONAL
COMMUNITY BANK
(FNCB)
Stanley Wall has been
appointment mortgage
loan originator for the
Exeter Ofce. He is a
graduate of Wyoming Area
High School and Luzerne
County Community
College.
Sokolowski
Jastremsky
Salas-Mamary
Massetti
pearlman
Wall
Miners Bank was recently
named one of the 2013 Best
Places to Work in Pennsylvania
by Best Companies Group. This
statewide recognition program
is designed to identify, recog-
nize and honor the best places
of employment in Pennsylvania,
which benet the economy,
workforce and businesses. The
2013 Best Places to Work in
Pennsylvania list is made up of
100 employers.
Ruths Chris Steak House at
Mohegan Sun has been named
one of the Top 100 Best Service
Restaurants in the country by
OpenTable Diners.
The Mohegan Sun Ruths Chris
Steak House franchise is one of
just three in the country named
to this list. The distinction is
based on more than ve million
restaurant reviews over the last
year.
Wilkes University has hon-
ored nine faculty and staff mem-
bers for their work teaching and
advising students. The awards
are presented by the Teaching
Recognition and Effectiveness
Committee (TREC).
Honored were: Linda
Gutierrez, assistant professor of
biology, the Carpenter Award for
outstanding teaching for at least
three years. Bridget Turel assis-
tant director and an instructor
in the Sidhu School of Business;
and Godlove Fonjweng, former
director of Global Education
and Diversity Affairs, received
the Academic Support Award
for facilitating classroom or
experiential initiatives and learn-
ing among students. Prahlad
Murthy, a professor of environ-
mental engineering and earth
science, received the Alumni
Mentoring Award for his men-
toring relationships with stu-
dents that continue beyond
the classroom and their time
at Wilkes. Andrew Wilczak,
assistant professor of sociology
and anthropology, received the
Innovative & Nontraditional
Teaching Award for successfully
incorporating innovative or non-
traditional strategies in at least
one class. KarenBeth Bohan,
associate professor of pharmacy
practice, and Mark Stine, asso-
ciate professor and chair of com-
munication studies, received the
Outstanding Advisor Award for
demonstrating excellence in aca-
demic advising based on load,
advising philosophy and testi-
mony by advisees. Kimberly
Ference, assistant professor of
pharmacy practice, received the
Part-Time Teaching Award for
outstanding teaching contribu-
tions. Andrew Miller, associate
professor of political science,
received the Multiculturalism
Award as an outstanding fac-
ulty member who demonstrates
leadership in the advancement
of multiculturalism ideals in the
classroom.
Parente Beard announced
today that three new partners
have been appointed from vari-
ous practice groups in the rms
Northern Pennsylvania region,
effective Oct. 1.
Three new partners have
been appointed to the rm from
various practice groups in the
rms Northern Pennsylvania
region. Karen Larsen is a new
partner within our audit and
accounting practice. Larsen
received her Master of Business
Administration from the
University of New York at Buffalo
and bachelors degree from the
University of Notre Dame.
John Reynolds, accounting
and auditing director in the rms
Northern Pennsylvania region,
holds a bachelors degree fromthe
University of Scranton. Danielle
Shanaberger, a new partner on
the rms healthcare business
services team, holds a bachelors
degree from the Pennsylvania
State University.
the winners of Wilkes Universitys 2013 teaching recognition and effectiveness
awards are pictured at the September 5 awards ceremony. they are pictured,
first row, from left, Kimberly Ference, assistant professor of pharmacy practice,
KarenBeth Bohan, associate professor of pharmacy practice, terese Wignot,
interim senior vice president and provost, Mark Stine, associate professor and
chair of communications studies, patrick Leahy, university president, Godlove
Fonjweng, former director of Global education and diversity affairs and andrew
Wilczak, assistant professor of sociology and anthropology; second row, from
left, Linda Gutierrez, assistant professor of biology, Bridget turel, assistant
director and an instructor in the Sidhu School of Business, prahlad Murthy,
professor of environmental engineering and earth science, and andrew Miller,
associate professor of political science.
HonorS and aWardS
BUSineSS
aGenda
John R. Brandt, CEO
and founder of The MPI
Group, will make two pre-
sentations in Northeastern
Pennsylvania on Oct. 4.
Brandt will address an
audiences at the Towanda
Country Club in Towanda
at noon. His second pre-
sentation later that day at
will be from 5:30 to 8:30
p.m. at the East Mountain
Inn in Plains Township.
Tickets and information
may be obtained by call-
ing NEPIRC at (570) 819-
8966. The events, spon-
sored by the Northeastern
Pennsylvania Industrial
Resource Center com-
memorate National
Manufacturing Day. With
more than 20 years experi-
ence studying leadership
in effective, purpose-driv-
en organizations, Brandt is
an expert on manufactur-
ing and technology. He is a
consultant to Fortune 100
companies throughout the
globe and the former pub-
lisher and editor-in-chief
of IndustryWeek Magazine
and the former president,
publisher and editorial
director of Chief Executive
Magazine.
The Keystone College
Concerts and Lectures
Series will host nation-
al speaker and author
Cheree Warrick at 7 p.m.
on Monday in Brooks
Theatre. The presenta-
tion, free and open to the
public, will explain how
start-up or small busi-
nesses can raise capital.
Warrick is a popular speak-
er known for her nancial
knowledge and person-
able style. The author of
a popular business col-
umn in The Washington
Business Journal, Cheree
is the author of the
book Creating Business
Plans that Actually Get
Financed. She wrote the
book for business owners
to use as a handbook for
creating business plans
that banks, angel investors,
and venture capitalists
actually put money into.
The Wyoming Valley
Real Estate Investors
Association will hold
a presentation entitled
Landlords Helping
Landlords at 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday at the Ramada
Inn in Wilkes-Barre. Cost
for the event is $10. The
evening will be focused on
a roundtable discussion
between members.
Were going to witness
an event almost unprec-
edented in our history when
overnight virtually hun-
dreds of millions of people
download iOS 7 and begin
a fantastic new experience
with their new devices,
Federighi said last week
during Apples iPhone
media event.
The new iOS ditches
some familiar elements,
such as designs meant to
mimic real-world equiva-
lents, like bookshelves with
wood grain. These types of
tricks were intended to cre-
ate a feeling of familiarity
when Apple was introduc-
ing a revolutionary new
device.
But now that smart-
phones are commonplace,
Apple is introducing a new
interface with what is being
called a more modern look
and feel.
On iOS 7, the home
screen has a more three-
dimensional look, with the
applications appearing to
oat far above the back-
ground wallpaper image.
The apps have what is
described as a atter look,
losing some of the fake
lighting effects that made
them appear to be rounded.
Apple has also added
new swipe gestures to allow
quicker access to control
settings. There is a translu-
cent look that lets a user see
through different apps that
might be running simulta-
neously. Apps will automati-
cally update as new versions
become available. And
iOS 7 also includes iTunes
Radio, Apples new stream-
ing music service.
straightsummerinternshipatthecompany.
The managers respect our input
and ideas, he said. The mobile app he
worked on last summer is now used by
employees who need help navigating
around Ciscos huge campus.
Sierra Parker, a University of
Pennsylvania student who at the ripe
old age of 20 has already interned at
the White House, said she wanted to
leave her internship there early because
she worked alone and without adequate
supervision.
This summer was different because she
wanted to stay longer at Cisco, where as
an IT intern she had a chance to work
with people constantly. Telecommuting
is another Cisco selling point, but Parker
says everyone likes to come into the
ofce. And yes, she loved the free pop-
corn in the break room.
But even as the more established com-
panies try to make their workspaces and
culture more inviting, theyre still grap-
pling with challenges that cant help but
affect morale. Cisco announced recently
that it is laying off 4,000 people, about
5 percent of its global workforce. Intel
Corp., too, is trying to expand its hori-
zons amid a slump in its bread-and-butter
PC business
While companies like Cisco and Intel
are trying to catch up to newer rms like
Google, theres a whole new wave of com-
panies that are taking workplace culture
in new directions.
As a startup, its probably no surprise
that Square, the San Francisco payments
company founded in 2009, has never
had cubicles or ofces, according to
spokeswoman Lindsay Wiese. Square
executives often work at stand-up tables,
she said.
So even though the companys ofce
is in an old-school building that houses
an old-school product (the San Francisco
Chronicle, although Square is moving a
few blocks away into its new headquar-
ters in the fall), its workplace was con-
ceived in the age of open and collab-
orative ofces.
And some tech workers are looking for
newer companies than even Facebook or
Google. And smaller.
Some people get tired of the large-
company feel, said Domingo Guerra,
co-founder of startup Appthority. The
2-year-old provider of mobile-application
security management has about 20 staff-
ers, with half coming from larger compa-
nies. Guerra himself worked at Brocade
and Applied Materials.
How did Guerra and his team attract
workers? Theyre well aware of the allure
of San Francisco, so they put their head-
quarters there. Appthority also offers
catered meals a couple of times a week.
And the ofce doesnt have cubicles.
We all hated it at the big companies,
Guerra said. We dont have ofces,
either. We all sit together.
Not only do they sit together at the
ofce, some of them also sit together at
baseball games. The company bought a
few Giants season tickets that its workers
share.
But not only new companies are ock-
ing to San Francisco. Having an ofce
there is also a plus for Adobe Systems
Inc., the San Jose software company that
in December celebrated its 30th anniver-
sary.
But dont call the company old. We
may be an established company, said
Donna Morris, senior vice president,
but were in an emerging area in terms of
products and solutions, such as Adobes
new push to sell its software as a service.
The transformation in its products is
seeping into the culture. Earlier this year,
executives moved to one open oor in
San Jose. It has no ofces, not even for
CEO Shantanu Narayen. Adobes 11,500
employees around the world enjoy perks
such as gyms, oil changes on site, game
rooms.
Theres a rock-climbing wall at its Utah
ofces.
Our culture is very different today,
Morris said. We continue to change.
Competitors
From page 1D
monthly payment under an income-
based repayment plan.
As it takes 10 years of on-time qualify-
ing payments before debt is forgiven,
it will be at least 2017 before the rst
round of federal student loans are for-
given.
No one knows quite how this pro-
gram will work yet, or if Congress may
decide it costs more than they counted
on and change it once they start the
loan forgiveness in 2017, said Val
Meyers, associate director for the Ofce
of Financial Aid at Michigan State
University.
But is a public service job really right
for you? Such as working in public
library services or public interest law
services?
Some other points to consider: Federal
loan forgiveness for public service would
only apply to federal Direct Loans, not
private student loans. Borrowers could
consolidate their federal loans into the
Direct Loan program to qualify, Mark
Kantrowitz of Edvisors.com said.
If you have a Perkins federal student
loan, you might be able to tap into other
benets.
How much can you save?
How much money could college grads
save in forgiven debt?
Travis Comstock, 39, an attorney who
works in state government in Lansing,
said he is projecting that about 70%-75%
of his student debt could be forgiven
in 2019 when hed rst qualify for debt
forgivness.
Comstock, who graduated from law
school at Michigan State University
in 2008 with six gures of debt, said
federal loan forgiveness program allows
him to work in a public service job. He
has lower monthly payments with an
income-based repayment plan that is
based on his salary and family size.
How much could be forgiven does
depend on income.
Kantrowitz offered another example:
Take a public school teacher earning
$35,000 a year but dealing with $70,000
in undergraduate and graduate school
debt. If an income based repayment plan
is used, he or she would be able to have
a low monthly payment that average out
to $285 a month. But the interest keeps
building at a rate of 6.8% and grows
faster than the payments in this case.
Its possible after 10 years of payments
for the teacher in this example to end
up still having $70,000 in principal and
$13,380 in interest to be forgiven.
Susan Tompor is a columnist for the Detroit Free
Press
debt
From page 1D
apple
From page 1D
Give tough new job a chance
Marie G. MCintYre
McClatchy-Tribune News Service
Q: My new job literally makes me cry.
After working as an elementary school
secretary for fteen years, I was trans-
ferred to a high school because of budget
cuts. The environment is so unpleasant
that I am already thinking about leaving.
On the rst day of school, the admin-
istrators here were not welcoming at all.
When I approached them and introduced
myself, I immediately saw the uncaring
look on their faces. I have since conclud-
ed that they are control freaks who enjoy
pointing out employees mistakes.
I am so unhappy at this school that I
would rather work in retail or cleaning.
What do you think I should do?
A: Despite your disillusionment, give
this job a little more time before making
any irrevocable decisions. After a major
life change, the negative aspects can
temporarily blind you to the positives,
so you dont want to jump ship prema-
turely.
One likely source of your discomfort
is a signicant shift in organizational
culture. Elementary and high schools
differ greatly in terms of faculty, stu-
dents, rules, procedures and leadership
style. This disparity undoubtedly took
you by surprise and will require a period
of adjustment.
You might also reconsider your
assumptions about administrators.
Their uncaring rst-day demeanor
may actually have reected a preoccupa-
tion with the myriad demands of a new
school year. And correcting employee
errors is simply a necessary part of their
job.
If you eventually decide to leave, just
be sure to choose your next position
carefully. After a career in education, the
transition to retail or cleaning would be
much more difcult than the one you are
now experiencing.
oFFiCe CoaCH
open For BUSineSS
Sultanas, an international retail store
featuring contemporary gifts and apparel
from Central and Southeast Asia, held its
grand opening Friday.
Owned by William and Gina Z.
Morrison, of Forty Fort, Sultanas is locat-
ed at 170 S. Wyoming Ave. in the United
Penn Plaza in Kingston Its phone number
is 570-288-GIFT. Many of the items have
been handpicked by the owners them-
selves on a recent buying trip to Istanbul,
Kuala Lumpur, Jakarta and Bali.
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER BUSINESS Sunday, September 22, 2013 PAGE 3D
DELUGE
Investors rushed for the exits last month from all sorts of mutual funds that invest in
bonds. They yanked a net $18.2 billion last month from intermediate-term bond mutual
funds, the most popular type of bond fund, according to Morningstar. The departures
were the result of fear about rising interest rates: When interest rates rise, prices of
existing bonds fall, and the yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose above 2.8 percent
in August from 1.6 percent in May.
But interest rates fell last week after the Federal Reserve surprised markets by
holding steady on its bond-buying stimulus program, when many investors expected a
paring back. The 10-year yield dropped below 2.7 percent on Wednesday.
NOT SO HEALTHY RETURNS
Fewer patients are getting admitted to hospitals. While that
may sound encouraging to public health officials, its discour-
aging for investors in hospital stocks. Last month, inpatient
hospital admissions fell between 3 percent and 4 percent,
according to a survey by Citi Research. And of those who
were admitted, more patients lacked insurance to pay for their
bills. That means third-quarter earnings for the industry will
likely depend on hospitals cutting their expenses, rather than
on increases in revenue, says Citi analyst Gary Taylor.
MarketPulse
CLAMPING DOWN
The rush to borrow by companies across the country slowed
down last month. Companies raised $149 billion in August by
issuing bonds, according to Standard & Poors Global Fixed
Income Research. That may seem like a big number, but its the
lowest monthly
issuance since
December 2011. It
also comes after
companies raised
an average of $322
billion monthly from
January through
May. The reason:
Borrowing became
more expensive for
companies after
interest rates rose
during the late
summer.
AP
Net withdrawals from mutual funds, Aug.
in billions
World bond funds
High-yield bond funds
Intermediate-term
bond funds
2.9
1.0
$18.2
Source: Morningstar
Title: CEO Of Eastman
Kodak Co.
His outlook for Kodak:
Recovery, growth and
expansion
Interviewed by Bree Fowler.
Answers edited for content and
clarity.
Antonio Perez
Kodak emerged from bankruptcy
protection this month after
restructuring into a smaller, leaner
company focused on commercial
printing.
The January 2012 filing came
after decades of struggle. In the
1980s and 1990s, Kodak failed
to adequately deal with growing
Japanese competition and more
recently, the company was late
in recognizing the consumer shift
toward digital photography.
Antonio Perez has led the
company as its CEO since 2005
and oversaw its restructuring. He
plans to step down sometime in
the next year after a replacement
is found. Perez said hes proud
of what hes accomplished at the
Rochester, N.Y.-based company.
He is confident Kodak will be able
to compete in the commercial
printing industry, he said, despite
tough competition from already
entrenched companies like
Hewlett-Packard Co. and Xerox
Corp.
Looking back, is there anything
you would do differently?
Had I known what was going to
happen in 2008, maybe I wouldnt
have taken the job. You have to
remember I left La Hoya, Calif.
to come to Rochester, N.Y., so
Im either completely insane or I
thought this was a quest worth get-
ting involved in. If you had known
that film was going to go down that
way, what was going to happen in
2008, no one would have taken
this job. So, we did what we had to
do when those things happened.
They were unpredictable. Look for
a case of a company that had to
go through this kind of excruciating
restructuring and kept innovating.
It just doesnt happen, but weve
done it.
Kodak was criticized for not
innovating and missing out on
the shift to digital photography.
Has that mentality changed?
When youre very successful with
something, you create an immune
system to protect the success. Its
just natural. We all do it. Obviously,
its very easy now to say what the
company should have done, that
we should have done it 15 years
before we did it. The only thing
I will say to those people is why
didnt they say that 20 years ago?
I dont blame managers who were
here before me, because they
thought film was going to last a
long time. It turned out they were
wrong. Why were they wrong?
In part because of that immune
system. It wont let you see what
you need to. Thats life.
Youve taken a lot of flak for your
handling of Kodaks restructur-
ing. Whats your response to
that?
I have a very high threshold for
the opinion of the uniformed.
You should read The Man in
the Arena. Its part of President
Theodore Roosevelts speech
to the Sorbonne. He says that
spectators, theyre entitled to their
opinions. Thats fine, but a lot of
the time theyre uninformed.
On the new
Kodak
InsiderQ&A
AP
Mortgage rates have hovered near historic lows in
recent years, helping make homes more affordable.
Rates have remained low thanks to the Federal
Reserve, which has kept short-term interest rates near
zero since December 2008 and has been buying
billions in mortgage and U.S. Treasury bonds to
encourage more borrowing and spending in a
slow-growth economy.
By buying Treasurys, the central bank drives up the
government bond prices, and makes their yields fall.
But starting in May, the market saw a sell-off in
bonds, after Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke said the
central bank was prepared to cut back its bond-buying
program if the economy looked strong enough.
In the ensuing months, the yield on the 10-year
Treasury note bond has risen as prices have
declined.
Higher Treasury yields tend to drive up
the cost of borrowing on home loans.
Heres a look at how Treasury yields
have affected mortgage
rates in recent years:
Alex Veiga, Jenni Sohn AP
Home loans get pricier
The yield on the 10-year Treasury note
stood at 2.75 percent on Thursday Sept.
19, while the average weekly rate on a
fixed, 30-year mortgage was 4.50 percent.
( Also as of Sept. 19. )
Sources: FactSet, Freddie Mac
May 1, 2013 1.63% 78.5%
Jan. 1, 2013 1.76% 65.3%
Jan. 1, 2010 3.79% -23.2%
Jan. 1, 2008 4.08% -28.7%
10-Year Treasury note yield
DATE YIELD
CHANGE AS OF
Sept.12
May 1, 2013 3.35% 36.4%
Jan. 1, 2013 3.34% 36.8%
Jan. 1, 2010 5.09% -10.2%
Jan. 1, 2008 6.07% -24.7%
30-year, fixed mortgage
DATE YIELD
CHANGE AS OF
Sept.12
Air Products APD 76.78 0111.40 108.57 2.42 2.3 s s 29.2+30.83 2 7.5 23 2.6
Amer Water Works AWK 35.50 6 43.72 39.88 0.59 1.5 t s 7.4 +11.52 3 17.3 19 2.8
Amerigas Part LP APU 37.63 5 50.45 43.18 0.03 0.1 t t 11.5 +9.24 3 12.8 22 7.8
Aqua America Inc WTR 19.25 6 28.12 24.28 0.23 1.0 t s 19.4+28.53 2 12.5 20 2.5
Arch Dan Mid ADM 24.38 9 38.81 37.24 1.02 2.8 s s 36.0+40.58 2 11.0 19 2.0
AutoZone Inc AZO 341.98 8452.19 420.00 4.30 1.0 t s 18.5+13.02 3 26.3 16 ...
Bank of America BAC 8.70 0 15.03 14.44 -0.05 -0.3 t s 24.4+57.56 1-16.8 26 0.3
Bk of NY Mellon BK 22.42 9 32.36 30.85 -0.26 -0.8 r s 20.0+35.68 2 -1.3 18 1.9
Bon Ton Store BONT 9.34 2 22.68 11.18 -0.57 -4.9 t t -8.1 +6.03 4 28.4 ... 1.8
CVS Caremark Corp CVS 44.33 8 62.36 58.53 -1.37 -2.3 s s 21.1+24.17 2 9.5 17 1.5
Cigna Corp CI 46.50 9 84.68 78.59 -5.06 -6.0 t s 47.0+67.51 1 16.4 14 0.1
CocaCola Co KO 35.58 5 43.43 39.40 0.71 1.8 s t 8.7 +4.80 4 10.8 21 2.8
Comcast Corp A CMCSA 34.72 9 46.33 44.40 0.43 1.0 s s 18.8+25.49 2 17.7 18 1.8
Community Bk Sys CBU 25.50 9 34.85 33.69 0.21 0.6 t s 23.1+20.93 3 5.3 17 3.3
Community Hlth Sys CYH 26.33 6 51.29 39.92 -0.40 -1.0 t t 29.9+38.90 2 5.5 17 ...
Energy Transfer Eqty ETE 41.72 9 68.39 63.21 0.51 0.8 t s 39.0+44.71 1 26.5 62 4.1
Entercom Comm ETM 5.98 7 11.00 9.01 0.59 7.0 s t 29.1+33.09 2 7.1 13 ...
Fairchild Semicond FCS 11.14 7 15.75 14.04 0.64 4.8 s s -2.5 .78 4 6.6 ... ...
Frontier Comm FTR 3.71 4 5.15 4.18 -0.17 -3.9 t s -2.3 -4.36 4 -8.1 42 9.6
Genpact Ltd G 15.09 7 21.30 19.19 -0.18 -0.9 t t 23.8 +11.83 3 13.5 24 ...
Harte Hanks Inc HHS 5.14 7 10.12 8.58 0.19 2.3 t t 45.4+27.79 2 -2.8 16 4.0
Hershey Company HSY 68.09 9 98.00 93.60 2.02 2.2 t s 29.6+32.53 2 19.9 29 2.1
Lowes Cos LOW 28.85 0 49.17 47.84 0.98 2.1 s s 34.7+61.67 1 14.5 24 1.5
M&T Bank MTB 93.03 7119.54 111.53 -0.40 -0.4 t s 13.3+21.19 3 3.0 13 2.5
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 7103.70 96.90 -0.45 -0.5 s t 9.9 +7.33 4 11.3 18 3.3
Mondelez Intl MDLZ 24.50 0 33.08 32.30 0.75 2.4 s s 26.9+20.04 3 9.4 24 1.7
NBT Bncp NBTB 18.92 9 23.25 22.59 0.56 2.5 t s 11.4 +3.86 4 -4.7 16 3.5
Nexstar Bdcstg Grp NXST 8.99 0 39.75 38.55 3.43 9.8 s s 264.0+277.03 1 63.1 57 1.2
PNC Financial PNC 53.36 9 77.93 74.05 0.80 1.1 t s 27.0+15.20 3 -0.3 11 2.4
PPL Corp PPL 27.74 5 33.55 30.11 0.11 0.4 t s 5.2+10.01 3 -0.2 12 4.9
Penna REIT PEI 13.25 7 22.54 19.44 1.03 5.6 s s 10.2+24.78 2 0.3 ... 3.7
PepsiCo PEP 67.39 8 87.06 81.74 1.42 1.8 s s 19.5+17.84 3 4.7 19 2.8
Philip Morris Intl PM 82.10 6 96.73 90.47 2.69 3.1 s s 8.2 +1.89 4 15.0 17 4.2
Procter & Gamble PG 65.83 9 82.54 79.39 0.34 0.4 t s 16.9+17.48 3 4.9 21 3.0
Prudential Fncl PRU 48.17 9 83.67 78.24 -1.45 -1.8 t s 46.7+42.05 2 -0.3 27 2.0
SLM Corp SLM 15.56 9 26.17 25.07 0.30 1.2 s s 46.4+55.80 1 10.8 8 2.4
SLM Corp flt pfB SLMBP 49.00 9 74.46 69.51 -0.99 -1.4 t s 31.2 ... 0.0 ... 3.0
TJX Cos TJX 40.08 0 57.16 56.60 2.40 4.4 s s 33.3+26.46 2 29.1 21 1.0
UGI Corp UGI 30.15 7 43.24 39.02 0.78 2.0 t s 19.3+28.69 2 10.9 16 2.9
Verizon Comm VZ 40.51 6 54.31 47.78 0.02 0.0 s t 10.4 +9.56 3 13.0 98 4.4
WalMart Strs WMT 67.37 7 79.96 75.83 1.47 2.0 s s 11.1 +3.86 4 6.8 15 2.5
Weis Mkts WMK 37.65 9 51.92 49.26 0.59 1.2 s s 25.8+19.29 3 7.8 16 2.4
52-WK RANGE FRIDAY $CHG%CHG %CHG%RTN RANK %RTN
COMPANY TICKER LOW HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE YLD
Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns
annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over prior four quar-
ters. Rank classifies a stocks performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (far-left box) to bottom 20 percent (far-right box).
LocalStocks
Getting
healthy
Stock
Screener
*1=buy; 2=hold; 3=sell Data through Sept. 20 Source: FactSet
Covidien (COV) $63.05 $49 $64 16.2% 2.0% 1.2
Alexion Pharmaceuticals (ALXN) 113.65 82 126 -0.1 n/a 1.3
Cardinal Health (CAH) 53.44 37 54 38.6 2.3 1.3
Pfizer (PFE) 28.97 24 31 18.7 3.3 1.4
AbbVie (ABBV) 47.84 33 48 n/a 3.3 1.5
CLOSE
AVG. BROKER
RATING*
DIVIDEND
YIELD
1-YR PRICE
CHANGE COMPANY
Health care stocks have been
the markets best this year, and
some on Wall Street expect the run
to keep going.
Biotechnology companies,
device makers and other health
care companies in the Standard &
Poors 500 index have jumped 29
percent in 2013. Thats the best
performance of the 10 sectors that
make up the market, and its well
above the 19.9 percent rise for the
index.
Even after its big gain, strate-
gists at Morgan Stanley say they
are more optimistic on health care
than any other sector. They say it
has a lower price-to-earnings ratio
than telecoms, utilities and other
sectors that have steady earnings.
A lower ratio indicates the sector is
cheaper.
Morgan Stanley also says
forecasts are lower for health-care
stocks future profit margins than
for other sectors, which means
they have an easier hurdle to beat
expectations.
This screen shows stocks that
Morgan Stanley says generate
large amounts of cash and have
Overweight ratings from its
analysts.
52-WK
LOW HIGH
American Funds BalA m ABALX 23.05 +.35 +3.6 +15.1/A +8.6/A
American Funds BondA m ABNDX 12.45 +.12 +.9 -1.5/C +4.8/D
American Funds CapIncBuA x CAIBX 56.79 +.41 +3.5 +11.1/B +6.3/C
American Funds CpWldGrIA x CWGIX 42.90 +.70 +5.0 +20.6/C +6.7/C
American Funds EurPacGrA m AEPGX 46.40 +1.10 +5.3 +18.0/D +5.6/A
American Funds FnInvA m ANCFX 48.79 +.79 +4.8 +21.8/B +8.2/C
American Funds GrthAmA m AGTHX 42.31 +.65 +5.6 +24.4/A +8.5/C
American Funds IncAmerA m AMECX 19.81 +.33 +3.4 +13.5/B +8.2/B
American Funds InvCoAmA m AIVSX 36.23 +.41 +4.2 +20.5/C +8.2/C
American Funds NewPerspA m ANWPX 36.93 +.85 +5.2 +21.4/B +8.9/A
American Funds WAMutInvA x AWSHX 37.50 +.40 +3.9 +21.1/C +8.3/B
BlackRock GlobAlcI MALOX 21.64 +.29 +2.9 +10.8/B +7.0/B
Dodge & Cox Income DODIX 13.55 +.10 +.9 +.5/A +7.1/A
Dodge & Cox IntlStk DODFX 41.07 +.85 +5.7 +25.9/A +6.4/A
Dodge & Cox Stock DODGX 153.35 +1.57 +3.2 +27.9/A +8.9/A
Fidelity Contra FCNTX 94.15 +1.80 +5.1 +19.3/C +9.7/B
Fidelity GrowCo FDGRX 120.05 +2.24 +7.1 +23.3/B +12.8/A
Fidelity LowPriStk d FLPSX 46.71 +.35 +2.7 +26.5/B +12.3/A
Fidelity Spartan 500IdxAdvtg FUSVX 60.87 +.79 +3.7 +19.7/C +8.8/B
Fidelity Spartan 500IdxInstl FXSIX 60.87 +.79 +3.7 +19.7/C NA/
FrankTemp-Franklin Income C m FCISX 2.37 +.03 +2.1 +10.0/A +9.1/A
FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA m FKINX 2.35 +.03 +2.2 +10.7/A +9.6/A
FrankTemp-Mutual Euro Z MEURX 24.95 +.12 +3.4 +23.0/C +7.3/B
FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondA m TPINX 13.13 +.19 +3.1 +4.8/A +9.8/A
FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondAdv TGBAX 13.09 +.19 +3.2 +5.1/A +10.1/A
Harbor IntlInstl HAINX 70.31 +1.98 +4.7 +18.8/C +6.1/A
Oakmark Intl I OAKIX 26.39 +.76 +5.1 +38.6/A +12.7/A
PIMCO AllAssetI PAAIX 12.26 +.12 +3.0 +2.6/D +7.6/A
PIMCO LowDrIs PTLDX 10.28 +.07 +.6 -.1/D +5.1/A
PIMCO TotRetA m PTTAX 10.77 +.14 +1.2 -1.4/C +7.1/B
PIMCO TotRetAdm b PTRAX 10.77 +.14 +1.2 -1.3/C +7.3/A
PIMCO TotRetIs PTTRX 10.77 +.14 +1.2 -1.0/C +7.5/A
T Rowe Price EqtyInc PRFDX 31.72 +.37 +3.0 +21.7/C +8.0/B
T Rowe Price GrowStk PRGFX 47.19 +.96 +7.1 +22.0/B +11.4/A
T Rowe Price HiYield d PRHYX 7.05 +.07 +1.7 +8.5/A +10.9/B
T Rowe Price NewIncome PRCIX 9.39 +.08 +1.0 -1.9/D +5.7/C
Vanguard 500Adml x VFIAX 157.56 +1.26 +3.7 +19.7/C +8.8/B
Vanguard 500Inv x VFINX 157.57 +1.30 +3.7 +19.5/C +8.7/B
Vanguard EmerMktId x VEIEX 26.22 +.43 +8.0 +2.0/D +5.3/C
Vanguard HltCrAdml VGHAX 76.94 +.55 +3.7 +30.9/D +13.8/B
Vanguard InstIdxI VINIX 157.32 +2.05 +3.7 +19.7/C +8.8/B
Vanguard InstPlus VIIIX 157.33 +2.04 +3.7 +19.7/C +8.8/B
Vanguard InstTStPl VITPX 39.33 +.53 +3.9 +21.6/B +9.4/A
Vanguard IntlGr VWIGX 22.29 +.54 +6.2 +21.5/B +6.6/B
Vanguard MuIntAdml VWIUX 13.74 +.16 +1.5 -1.1/B +4.9/B
Vanguard PrmcpAdml VPMAX 92.69 +2.00 +5.8 +30.2/A +9.9/B
Vanguard STGradeAd VFSUX 10.69 +.04 +.3 +1.1/B +4.4/B
Vanguard TgtRe2020 VTWNX 26.41 +.36 +3.0 +11.5/A +7.1/A
Vanguard Tgtet2025 VTTVX 15.29 +.22 +3.4 +13.2/B +7.2/A
Vanguard TotBdAdml VBTLX 10.61 +.08 +.8 -1.9/D +5.1/D
Vanguard TotBdInst VBTIX 10.61 +.08 +.8 -1.8/D +5.1/D
Vanguard TotIntl x VGTSX 16.29 +.32 +5.8 +16.3/D +4.3/C
Vanguard TotStIAdm x VTSAX 43.19 +.38 +3.9 +21.4/B +9.3/A
Vanguard TotStIIns x VITSX 43.20 +.38 +3.9 +21.5/B +9.3/A
Vanguard TotStIdx x VTSMX 43.18 +.39 +3.9 +21.3/B +9.2/A
Vanguard WellsIAdm VWIAX 60.78 +.67 +1.8 +6.5/B +9.1/A
Vanguard Welltn VWELX 37.95 +.40 +2.4 +14.1/B +8.8/A
Vanguard WelltnAdm VWENX 65.55 +.69 +2.4 +14.2/A +8.9/A
Vanguard WndsIIAdm VWNAX 62.55 +.53 +2.6 +21.2/C +8.5/B
Wells Fargo AstAlllcA f EAAFX 13.89 +.21 +3.3 +9.4/ +6.7/
MutualFunds
FRIDAY WK RETURN/RANK
GROUP, FUND TICKER NAV CHG 4WK 1YR 5YR
Dow industrials
+0.5%
+2.9%
Nasdaq
+1.4%
+3.2%
S&P 500
+1.3%
+2.8%
Russell 2000
+1.8%
+3.3%
LARGE-CAP
SMALL-CAP
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
+17.9%
+25.0%
+19.9%
+26.3%
Mortgage rates fall
Mortgage rates fell this week amid signs of a
slowing economic recovery. The average rate on
the 30-year fixed loan dipped to 4.50 percent
from 4.57 percent. Economists expected the Fed-
eral Reserve to decide to start reducing bond
purchases, which have kept rates low. That didnt
happen; the Fed cited economic weakness.
InterestRates
MIN
Money market mutual funds YIELD INVEST PHONE
3.25
3.25
3.25
.13
.13
.13
PRIME
RATE
FED
FUNDS
Taxablenational avg 0.01
Invesco MMF/Cash Reserve Shares0.09$ 1,000 min (800) 659-1005
Tax-exemptnational avg 0.01
Invesco Tax-Exempt Cash Fund/Cl A0.10$ 1,000 min (800) 659-1005
Broad market Lehman 2.42 -0.17 t s 0.68 2.68 1.56
Triple-A corporate Moodys 4.66 -0.07 t s 1.11 4.73 3.33
Corp. Inv. Grade Lehman 3.36 -0.17 t s 0.49 3.59 2.58
FRIDAY
6 MO AGO
1 YR AGO
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
U.S. BOND INDEXES YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
Municipal Bond Buyer 5.14 -0.08 t s 0.91 5.34 3.89
U.S. high yield Barclays 5.99 -0.29 t t -0.17 6.97 4.95
Treasury Barclays 1.64 -0.17 t s 0.64 1.91 0.89
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
TREASURYS YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
3-month T-Bill 0.01 0.00 t t -0.09 0.12
1-year T-Bill 0.13 -0.01 t t -0.07 0.22 0.12
6-month T-Bill 0.04 0.03 t t -0.10 0.15 0.01
2-year T-Note 0.33 -0.11 t t 0.07 0.52 0.20
5-year T-Note 1.48 -0.22 t s 0.79 1.83 0.60
10-year T-Note 2.74 -0.14 t s 0.97 2.99 1.55
30-year T-Bond 3.76 -0.08 t s 0.81 3.92 2.72
Money fund data provided by iMoneyNet Inc.
Rank: Funds letter grade compared with others in the same performance group;
an A indicates fund performed in the top 20 percent; an E, in the bottom 20 percent.
PAGE 4D Sunday, September 22, 2013 BUSINESS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Name That Company
Founded in 1970 and based
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online
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I was founded in Arkansas in 1935 by a guy whose name I bear. He began
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Where Do Dividends
Go?
Q
I recently noticed that a certain
mutual funds top holdings
included some solid dividend-paying
companies. Would you please
explain where those quarterly divi-
dends go? Do the companies pay
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A
When a mutual fund owns
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to reflect the departure of accumu-
lated dividends.
So dont be alarmed if you see a
fund suddenly drop in value one day
it might simply mean that a large
distribution was made.
***
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Fools School
Stocks Are for Kids
What better gift can you give
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play and learn together:
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2012 THE MOTLEY FOOL/DIST. BY UNIVERSAL UCLICK 9/19
Senate passes bill to avert heliumshortage
MATTHEW DALY
Associated Press
WASHINGTON
Congress is moving
to avert an impending
shutdown of the federal
helium reserve, a key
supplier of the lighter-
than-air gas used in a
products ranging from
party balloons to MRI
machines.
The Federal Helium
Program, which pro-
vides about 42 percent
of the nations helium
from a storage site near
Amarillo, Texas, is set to
shut down Oct. 7 unless
lawmakers intervene.
The shutdown is a
result of a 1996 law
requiring the reserve to
pay off a $1.3 billion debt
by selling its helium.
The debt is paid, but
billions of cubic feet of
helium remain.
Closing the reserve
would cause a worldwide
helium shortage an
outcome lawmakers from
both parties hope to
avoid.
The Senate approved
a bill Thursday, 97-2, to
continue the helium pro-
gram, following action in
the House this spring.
Preserving access to
the federal helium sup-
ply prevents a shock to
the health care sector and
other critical industries
that depend on helium,
Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore.,
chairman of the Senate
Energy Committee, said.
Protecting Americas
manufacturing base, its
research capabilities,
its health care system
and its national security
by temporarily extend-
ing the life of the (fed-
eral) helium program
is just common sense.
Rep. Mike Simpson,
R-Idaho, said thousands
of high-tech manufactur-
ing jobs in the United
States depend on a reli-
able supply of helium.
If the federal govern-
ment stops selling helium
to private entities, a sig-
nificant delay might not
just slow the production
of computer chips, but
the computers, life-sav-
ing medical devices and
weapons systems that
they power, Simpson
said.
Micron Technology,
a Boise-based semicon-
ductor manufacturer,
is among companies
that depend on helium,
Simpson said.
The computer chip
industry employs a quar-
ter-million people nation-
wide, Simpson said.
The Senate bill
approved Thursday dif-
fers slightly from a bill
approved in the House in
April. President Barack
Obama favors the Senate
version.
A statement by the
White House called heli-
um an essential resource
for the aerospace indus-
try and production of
computer chips and opti-
cal fiber, as well as medi-
cal uses including MRI
machines and medical
lasers.
Helium also is used in
national defense appli-
cations such as rocket
engine testing and purg-
ing, surveillance devices
and scientific balloons.
The impending
abrupt shutdown of this
program would cause a
spike in helium prices
that would harm many
U.S. industries and dis-
rupt national security
programs, the White
House said.
7
9
7
1
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www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER BUSINESS Sunday, September 22, 2013 PAGE 5D
LORRAINE MIRABELLA
The Baltimore Sun
Liz Derubertis browsed
stores recently at Arundel
Mills mall in Hanover,
Md., in search of a dress
to wear to a wedding. The
26-year-old bartender and
University of Maryland-
Baltimore County student
never shops for clothes
online.
Imtoo particular about
the t, and I dont want
to take the time to send
it back, said Derubertis
of Ellicott City, Md. I
like being out, being in
the crowds and perusing
and seeing whats being
offered and people-
watching.
Just as video did not
kill the radio star, the
Internet wont kill the
shopping mall anytime
soon. The shopping hab-
its of Generation Y show
why.
Buying almost anything
online may be as much
second nature as texting
for many in the rst gen-
eration to have grown
up with e-commerce,
but millennials still do
most of their shopping in
stores, especially those
that keep their offerings
fresh and make the expe-
rience social, according to
research from the Urban
Land Institute.
There are 80 mil-
lion consumers between
18 and 35 nationwide.
Collectively they spend
$200 billion a year across
all categories. Its little
wonder Generation Y has
become a key segment
for retailers and shopping
center developers alike.
Theyre hugely impor-
tant, the largest demo-
graphic in American histo-
ry bigger than the baby
boomers, said Maureen
McAvey, senior resident
fellow for retail for ULI.
The fact that theres
simply so many of them
makes them important.
Beyond that, theyre in the
household formation part
of their lives. Baby boom-
ers are starting to down-
size. Theyve acquired so
much stuff, and they dont
buy as much. Gen Yers are
just starting to get out of
their parents houses and
forming their own house-
holds.
ULIs report, based on
an online survey of 1,251
Gen Y members and a
focus group at Columbia
Universitys Graduate
School of Business,
found that nearly half
of Gen Yers enjoy going
out shopping, while 37
percent said they love to
shop. Only 4 percent said
they hate shopping. The
research showed millen-
nials are multi-channel
shoppers, visiting retail-
ers online and in person,
with no real preference for
one type of store or shop-
ping center over another.
Melissa Johnson, 30,
who was shopping at
Arundel Mills with her
husband, said she often
comparison-shops online,
then goes to a store such
as Best Buy that promises
to beat competitors pric-
es, and shows the cashier
the online retail price on
her smartphone. Beyond
that though, going out to
a mall or shopping center
just appeals to the couple.
We spend so much time
on the computers; we like
to get out to the stores,
said Johnson, who works
as an intelligence analyst
for a government contrac-
tor.
ULIs research showed
more than half of millen-
nials go at least once a
month to discount depart-
ment stores (91 percent),
neighborhood shopping
centers (74 percent), malls
and department stores
(64 percent) and chain
apparel stores (58 per-
cent), though 45 percent
spend more than an hour a
day looking at retail web-
sites. Pedestrian-oriented
developments appeal to
Gen Y, and 70 percent of
the women and half the
men consider shopping
a form of entertainment.
Almost two-thirds of the
survey respondents visit
enclosed malls at least
once a month.
They shop online,
in stores, they shop in
every kind of store you
can imagine, whether
free-standing or in a mall
or a discount big box or
specialty, McAvey said.
And young men shop as
much as young women.
Shopping is seen as part
of their social life.
One of the things
retailers are nding is
they have to change their
storefronts and their
offerings much more fre-
quently, she said. This is
a stimulus-oriented gener-
ation, and theyre used to
change.
Some millennial shop-
pers say nothing beats
being able to pick up a
product off a shelf or com-
pare it to other merchan-
dise nearby.
You have to pick it
up and touch it, to have
something to compare
it to, to read the labels,
said Danielle Andrefsky,
35, who was buying hair
products at Target in
Aberdeen, Md., during a
lunch break. Thats hard
to do online.
I always think theres
more selection in a store.
It takes a lot of your time
to hunt for something
(online) compared to
when there are 10 things
on shelves.
Caila Ochs, 18, of
Pasadena, Md., who
works as a receptionist
at a health club, said she
goes to malls to window
shop.
I shop online more for
technology and come out
for the rest of it, clothes,
jewelry, whatever catches
my eye, said Ochs as
she wandered around
Arundel Mills with friend
Sean Blum, 19, also of
Pasadena.
I like to look at what
Im buying before I buy it,
added Blum, a student at
Anne Arundel Community
College.
Retailers are beginning
to see that Gen Y shop-
pers differ from their
older counterparts in a
few key ways, said Jamie
Gutfreund, chief strategy
ofcer for Los Angeles-
based The Intelligence
Group, a consumer insight
and strategy consultant
with a focus on consumers
ages 10 to 40.
Gutfreund describes
them as vocal consum-
ers who were raised to
believe their thoughts
are valuable and who fre-
quently voice those opin-
ions through social media.
They are more likely to
buy a product because
they believe in what the
company stands for and
stop buying it if the com-
pany does something that
offends them, she said.
(Theres a mobile applica-
tion, Buycott, that lets
users look at a companys
track record on measures
such as how environmen-
tally friendly it is.)
They expect to have
a relationship with the
brands they support
because their lives are so
visible, Gutfreund said.
Everyone knows what
everyone else is doing.
They also believe that
shopping is a new activ-
ism. If theyre going to
buy something, its a vote.
They believe they are
investing in a brand and
expect the same level of
recognition and acknowl-
edgment a company would
give to a shareholders.
Often, young consum-
ers want to customize and
personalize their prod-
ucts, prompting some
retailers to revamp logos
to play down the brand, a
step taken by Aeropostale,
and others to dream up
new concepts, such as
Nikes new store concept
Salvation, where consum-
ers can design their own
image for their Nike and
Converse footwear.
Gen Ys desire for
instant gratication
hasnt been lost on retail-
ers, as online behemoth
Amazon.com builds more
warehouses to increase
same-day shipping, retail-
ers encourage shoppers
to place online orders on
in-store computers to pre-
vent them from feeling
theyve left empty-handed,
and online sellers allow in-
store pickup and returns.
This is a generation
that has been I dont
want to say coddled, but
had great attention paid
to it by parents and dot-
ing aunts and uncles,
McAvey said The
thought that they would
order something and not
be sure that they really
like it and wait a week for
it to come is not as appeal-
ing to them.
Katie Furtado, 28,
who was shopping with
her 2-year-old-daugh-
ter, Sophie, at Target in
Aberdeen, described her-
self as just that type of
consumer. The desire to
get the stuff she wants
and needs fast keeps her
mostly ofine.
I never shop online.
I have no patience,
Furtado said. Besides,
added the stay-at-home
mom and business admin-
istration student, I cant
stand having to pay for
shipping when I can drive
a few miles. Id rather get
out of my house.
Her husband once
ordered diapers online,
but she got tired of wait-
ing for delivery and went
to the store herself.
Gutfreund expects
retailers to cater more and
more to Gen Y. Many will
integrate their online and
physical channels to give
consumers a more seam-
less experience, such as
Nordstrom, which high-
lights items in stores that
are featured on photo-
sharing website Pinterest,
and Lululemon, which
offers an app that directs
customers to an areas
yoga classes.
She also expects retail-
ers will make greater
use of data to customize
consumer marketing and
place greater emphasis on
service as consumers rely
more heavily on online
reviews.
Retailers are keeping a
close eye on millennials
buying habits because its
becoming clear that they
are not just a younger ver-
sion of their elders, but
a different shopper alto-
gether, McAvey said.
Many people specu-
late this is going to be
the sharing generation,
more apt to rent a Zipcar
or ride a bicycle than buy
a car or use a tie-sharing
service rather than having
a closet full of the accesso-
ry, she said. Its not clear
that they wish to acquire
as much stuff as their par-
ents did, and retailers are
very interested in what
theyre going to do.
Some Gen Y shoppers still prefer in-store experience
MCT photo
Liz DeRubertis, 26, strolls through the Arundel Mills Mall in Hanover, Md. The shopping habits of
Generation Y show a preference for the brick-and-mortar experience.
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Is America crazy?
Twelve people killed at a secure naval
installation virtually on the front porch of
the federal government, eight others hurt,
the shooter shot to death, and its just
another manic Monday, another day in
the life of a nation under the gun. So, yes,
maybe its time we acknowl-
edged that gorilla in the back
seat, time we asked the pain-
fully obvious.
Is America crazy?
You know, dont you, that
Muslims watched this unfold
with a prayer on their lips:
Dont let him be a Muslim.
Dont let him be a Muslim.
Please dont let him be a
Muslim. Because they know
the last 12 years have force-
fully taught them how the
actions of a lone madman can be used to tar
an entire cause, religion or people.
In the end, almost as if in refutation of
our ready-made narratives and practiced
outrage, the shooter turns out to be a
black Buddhist from Texas. It is a uniquely
American amalgam that defies our love of
easy, simplistic categories.
As we are thus deprived of ready-made
cultural blame, the story will likely fall
now into a well-worn groove. Someone will
disinter Wayne LaPierre of the NRA from
whatever crypt they keep him in between
tragedies and he will say what he always
does about how this could have been avoid-
ed if only more people in this secure mili-
tary facility had been armed.
And we will have the argument we always
have about a constitutional amendment
written in an era when muskets were state
of the art and citizen militias guarded the
frontier. And politicians will say the things
they always say and nothing will change.
Is America crazy?
Infoplease.com, the online version of the
old Information Please almanac, maintains
a list of school
shootings and
mass shootings
internationally
since 1996.
Peruse it and
one thing leaps
out. Though
such tragedies
have touched
places as far-
flung as Carmen de Patagones, Argentina,
and Erfurt, Germany, the list is absolutely
dominated by American towns: Tucson,
Memphis, Cold Spring, Red Lake, Tacoma,
Jacksonville, Aurora, Oakland, Newtown.
No other country even comes close.
In 1968, when Robert Kennedy became
the victim of the fifth political assassina-
tion in five years, the historian Arthur
Schlesinger famously asked a question:
What sort of people are we, we Americans?
Today, we are the most frightening people
on this planet.
Forty-five years later, we might or might
not still be the most frightening.
But we are surely among the most fright-
ened.
Indeed, for all our historical courage, we
are in many ways a terrified people. Scared
of the face at the window, the rattle at the
door, the Other who wants to take our stuff.
Scared of the overthrow of one of the most
stable governments on earth.
So we arm ourselves to the tune of a
reported 300 million guns in a nation of 316
million souls no other country has more
guns per capita.
Americans, you see, dont just like and
use guns.
We worship guns,
mythologize guns, fetishize
guns. Cannot conceive of
ourselves without guns.
Thus, the idea of restrict-
ing access to them threat-
ens something fundamen-
tal. Apparently, wed rather
endure these tragedies
that repeat themselves that
repeat themselves that repeat themselves as
if on some diabolical loop, than explore rea-
sonable solutions.
Is that a quantifiable malady, a treatable
disorder?
Is America crazy?
Earlier this month, the Des Moines
Register reported that the state of Iowa
issues gun carry permits to blind people.
And people began debating this on grounds
of constitutionality and equal access as if
the very idea were not absurd on its face.
Is America crazy?
Look at those people fleeing the Navy
Yard, look at the Senate on lockdown, look
at the blind man packing. Ask yourself:
Does that look like sanity to you?
Leonard Pitts Jr.is a columnist for the Miami Herald, 3511
N.W. 91 Ave., Doral, Fla. 33172. Readers may reach himvia
email at lpitts@miamiherald.com.
PAGE 6D Sunday, September 22, 2013 EDITORIAL www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
OUR OPINION: VOTING
Theres still time left
to register to vote
This is the number
that shows most Luzerne
County residents have no
right to grumble about
local government: 19.79
percent.
Thats the pathetic per-
centage of people 18 or
over in Luzerne County
who voted in Mays pri-
mary election. It was an
historic low.
So 80 percent four-
fifths of those old
enough to vote did not.
Sure, a chunk of them
were registered but not
with the two major par-
ties and thus ineligible
to vote in Pennsylvanias
closed primary. And sure,
others had legitimate rea-
sons for not voting.
But there arent enough
mitigating factors in the
county to make that turn-
out anything but shame-
ful.
And while the general
municipal election is still
a bit more than six weeks
away, heres another
important number at the
core of increasing voter
participation: 11 week-
days.
Thats how long you
have to register to vote in
time for the Nov. 5 elec-
tion.
If youre not registered
by Oct. 7, youre not vot-
ing.
You can download a
registration form from
the Luzerne County
Bureau of Elections at
luzernecounty.org, and
mail or take it to:
Luzerne County
Bureau of Elections
Voter Registration
Division
20 N. Pennsylvania
Ave., Suite 207,
Wilkes-Barre, PA.
18701-3505
If you are registered
to vote, study the candi-
dates for your local offic-
es and for county and any
other offices on your bal-
lot.
Find your voting poll
location (also available
on the county website),
and get to the polls and
vote.
If you are not regis-
tered, get online or head
to the election bureau as
soon as you can.
Take care of this vital
right.
Dont buy the argu-
ments that you cant
make a difference, or that
none of the candidates
merits your vote, or that
it doesnt matter who
gets in because they all
end up the same.
None of that is true if
voters take their respon-
sibility seriously and use
the right to vote wisely
and consistently.
But when fewer than
20 percent of those old
enough to vote do so, this
is no longer a democracy.
Its a travesty.
OTHER OPINION: MEDICAID
Corbetts health plan
gets cautious support
We want to give full
and hearty applause to
Gov. Tom Corbett, who
announced Monday that
he has a plan to reform
Medicaid and expand
health coverage for the
poor. His office has made
clear, though, that he is
not embracing the fed-
eral Medicaid expansion,
as many hoped. So, right
now, our applause will be
less than hearty.
Under the Affordable
Care Act, the feds have
encouraged states to
expand Medicaid partici-
pation; in exchange, the
feds will cover 100 per-
cent of the cost of expan-
sion for the states for two
years, and 90 percent in
subsequent years.
Corbett has maintained
that the swelling roles
of Medicaid recipients
would make the cost of
even the subsidized plan
too expensive for the
state.
So far, 24 states have
accepted the expansion,
although few Republican
governors have. Their
refusal is one of their
weapons in their fight
against ObamaCare.
So Corbetts willingness
to address Medicaid is
encouraging.
Rather than the fed-
eral expansion, though,
Corbett is proposing a
plan that he says would
reform Medicaid. It
would use Medicaid
expansion dollars to pay
for new participants to
get private insurance. It
would require partici-
pants to contribute to
the cost $25 to $35
monthly and set up
requirements such as job
searches and job training
for people to be covered.
There are few concrete
details so far, and it is
subject to federal approv-
al. Arkansas and Iowa
have similar proposals,
still pending approval.
We have concerns
about key aspects of the
plan, outlined in a white
paper from Corbetts
office.
First, Medicaid
isnt broken. Many
Republicans have called
for reform and like to
refer to it as a broken
system. The bottom-line
cost $400 billion in
2011 is huge, but, in
point of fact, Medicaid
is widely regarded as
a cost-effective way to
provide health care to
low-income people, as
well as the disabled, the
elderly and children. (In
Pennsylvania, 81 percent
of Medicaid recipients
are in the latter three cat-
egories.)
Corbetts plan stresses
personal accountabil-
ity. He not only requires
participants to pay a
premium, but suggests
that discounts on premi-
ums would be given for
healthy behaviors and
choice.
Beneficiaries should
have a strong role in
their own individual
health outcomes, his
reform paper states,
thereby increasing per-
sonal responsibility.
We wont argue with
encouraging healthy
behaviors, but we do have
a problem tying medical
coverage to health out-
comes.
Health relies on many
factors, only some of
which people can con-
trol. Encouraging healthy
choices is one thing; mak-
ing poor, disabled and
elderly people account-
able for their health has
the potential to be far
worse than any death
panel that Sarah Palin
imagined in her vision of
health reform.
Corbetts insistence
on adding a job search/
job training requirement
to health coverage is
unlikely to pass federal
muster, but the implica-
tion in this requirement
is disturbing, suggesting
that the poor are lazy or
want a free ride.
We hope that Corbetts
plan leads to more people
getting good health care.
Thats the only outcome
that matters.
Philadelphia Inquirer
COMMENTARY: LEONARD PITTS JR.
Leonard
Pitts Jr.
Contributing
Columnist
Time to ask: Is America Crazy?
COMMENTARY: BOB DOLE AND TOM DASCHLE
Politics and hunger dont mix
One of the biggest pieces of business
Congress has yet to resolve is the farm bill,
legislation that has enjoyed bipartisan sup-
port for decades. Unfortunately, the process
to reauthorize this crucial bill has taken a
sharp and disheartening turn
this year. The Senate and the
House are in a standoff over
extremely different versions of
it with a deadline looming this
month.
At stake is the ability of mil-
lions of Americans who still
struggle in our economy to
provide adequate and healthy
meals for their children and
families. In an unprecedented
move, the House stripped
the Supplemental Nutrition
Assistance Program, or SNAP
(formerly known as food stamps), from the
bill with an intention to pass a separate nutri-
tion bill, one with signicant cuts to programs
that ght hunger.
There have always been disagreements
between our parties over the farm bill, but for
decades we have reached across the aisle to
tackle the concerns on both sides. We proudly
count ourselves among a series of bipartisan
teams of legislators who worked past those
differences to address hunger through provi-
sions in the farm bill.
We are a country with ample resources,
especially the plentiful supply of food pro-
duced by our farms.
As Americans, we have always used this
abundance to help those who are hungry, both
here and abroad. For generations, the United
States has welcomed new Americans escaping
famine and hunger in their homelands.
All of us benet from the efciency of our
farmers and ranchers. We enjoy a safe and
plentiful food system for less than 10 percent
of our disposable income. In fact, Americans
spend a smaller percentage of
our disposable income on food
than people in any other coun-
try. As a nation blessed with a
bounty of food, we are a nation
with a duty to ght hunger.
The special relationship in
the legislative process between
agriculture and those who need
a s s i s -
t a n c e
from the
S N A P
program
is also
built on this tradi-
tion. In the modern
era, funding for this
vital program has been
extended as part of the
farm bill with relatively
little partisan bickering until now. By strip-
ping the nutrition title from the legislation
this year, the House has severed the vital tie
that helps connect our food system with those
who struggle with hunger in our own back-
yard.
Over time, we have worked hard to improve
the programs efciency and effectiveness.
In 2011, SNAP lifted 47 million people out
of poverty, and 72 percent of its participants
were families with children.
The error rate the combined rate for
underpayments and overpayments has
been on a steady decline since the 1990s.
And a 2008 Moodys Analytics study shows
that every $1 spent to help reduce hunger has
resulted in $1.70 in economic activity.
Tackling our nations hunger issues has
always resulted in a win-win situation for
farmers, low-income families and our econo-
my. The latest proposal from the House is an
about-face on our progress ghting hunger. It
would eliminate food assistance for 4 million
to 6 million Americans.
If Congress lets this bill fall victim to the
misguided and detrimental partisan politics
we face today, the results for families and chil-
dren chal-
l e n g e d
with hun-
ger will be
severe.
In a
c o u n t r y
struggling
to emerge
from the
w o r s t
economi c
recession since the Depression, this is no time
to play politics with hunger.
As friends and colleagues, we hope that
the House will do the right thing and follow
the Senates lead in passing a farm bill with
adequate funding for food assistance. Our
nations future depends on it.
Bob Dole is a former Senate majority leader, R-Kan., and was
the 1996 Republican nominee for president.
Tom Daschle is a former Senate majority leader, D-S.D., and
is a distinguished senior fellowat the Center for American
Progress. They wrote this for the Los Angeles Times
Bob
Dole
Contributing
Columnist
Tom
Daschle
Contributing
Columnist
Indeed, for all our historical courage,
we are in many ways a terrified peo-
ple. Scared of the face at the window,
the rattle at the door, the Other who
wants to take our stuff. Scared of the
overthrow of one of the most stable
governments on earth.
All of us benefit from the efficiency of
our farmers and ranchers. We enjoy a safe
and plentiful food system for less than 10
percent of our disposable income. In fact,
Americans spend a smaller percentage of our
disposable income on food than people in
any other country.
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER PERSPECTIVES Sunday, September 22, 2013 PAGE 7D
In the liberal remake of
Casablanca, the police
captain comes upon the
scene of the shooting and
orders his men to round
up the usual weapons.
Its always the weapon
and never
the shooter.
T w e l v e
people are
m u r d e r e d
in a ram-
page at the
Washington
Navy Yard,
and before
s u n d o w n
U.S. Sen.
D i a n n e
F e i n s t e i n
has called for yet another
debate on gun violence.
Major opprobrium is
heaped on the AR-15, the
semiautomatic used in
the Newtown massacre.
Turns out no AR-15 was
used at the Navy Yard.
And the shotgun that was
used was obtained legally
in Virginia after the buyer,
Aaron Alexis, had passed
both a state and federal
background check.
As was the case in
the Tucson shooting
instantly politicized into
a gun-control and (fabri-
cated) tea-party-climate-
of-violence issue the
origin of this crime lies
not in any politically
expedient externality
but in the nature of the
shooter.
On Aug. 7, that same
Alexis had called police
from a Newport, R.I.,
Marriott. He was hearing
voices.
Three people were fol-
lowing him, he told the
cops.
They were sending
microwaves through
walls, making his skin
vibrate and preventing
him from sleeping.
He had already twice
changed hotels to escape
the men, the radiation,
the voices.
Delusions, paranoid
ideation, auditory (and
somatic) hallucinations:
the classic symptoms of
schizophrenia.
So here is this panic-
stricken soul, psychotic
and in terrible distress.
And what does modern
policing do for him? The
cops tell him to stay
away from the individuals
that are following him.
Then they leave.
But the three individu-
als were imaginary, for
Gods sake. This is how
a civilized society deals
with a man in such a state
of terror?
Had this happened
35 years ago in Boston,
Alexis would have been
brought to me as the psy-
chiatrist on duty at the
ER of the Massachusetts
General Hospital.
Were he as agitated
and distressed as in the
police report, I probably
would have administered
an immediate dose of
Haldol, the most power-
ful fast-acting antipsy-
chotic of the time.
This would generally
relieve the hallucinations
and delusions, a blessing
not only in itself, but also
for the lucidity it brought
on that would allow him
to give us important diag-
nostic details psychiat-
ric history, family history,
social history, medical
history, etc.
If I thought he could
be sufficiently cared
for by family or friends
to receive regular oral
medication, therapy and
follow-up, I would have
discharged him.
Otherwise, Id have
admitted him. And if he
refused, Id have ordered
a 14-day involuntary com-
mitment.
Sounds cruel? On the
contrary.
For many people living
on park benches, com-
mitment means a warm
bed, shelter and three hot
meals a day.
For Alexis, it would
have meant the beginning
of a treatment regimen
designed to bring him
back to himself before
discharging him to a
world heretofore madly
radioactive.
Thats what a compas-
sionate society does. It
would no more abandon
this man to fend for him-
self than it would a man
suffering a stroke.
And as a side effect,
that compassion might
even extend to potential
victims of his psychosis
in the event, remote
but real, that he might
someday burst into some
place of work and kill 12
innocent people.
Instead, what hap-
pened?
The Newport police
sent their report to the
local naval station, where
it promptly disappeared
into the ether.
Alexis subsequently
twice visited VA hospital
ERs, but without any flor-
id symptoms of psychosis
and complaining only of
sleeplessness, the diag-
nosis was missed. (He
was given a sleep medica-
tion.)
He fell back through
the cracks.
True, psychiatric care
is underfunded and often
scarce.
But Alexis had full
access to the VA system.
The problem here was not
fiscal but political and,
yes, even moral.
I know the civil liber-
tarian arguments. I know
that involuntary commit-
ment is outright paternal-
ism.
But paternalism is
essential for children
because they dont have
a fully developed rational
will.
Do you think Alexis was
in command of his will
that night in Newport?
We cannot, of course,
be cavalier about commit-
ment.
We should have layers
of review, albeit rapid.
But its both cruel and
reckless to turn loose peo-
ple as lost and profoundly
suffering as Alexis, even
apart from any potential
dangerousness.
More than half of those
you see sleeping on
grates have suffered men-
tal illness. Its a national
scandal.
Its time we recalibrated
the pendulum that today
allows the mentally ill to
die with their rights on
and, rarely but unfor-
givably, take a dozen
innocents with them.
Charles Krauthammers email ad-
dress is letters@charleskrautham-
mer.com.
Mental health system
failed in D.C. shooting
I know the civil libertarian arguments. I
know that involuntary commitment is out-
right paternalism. But paternalism is essen-
tial for children because they dont have a
fully developed rational will. Do you think
Alexis was in command of his will that night
in newport?
Charles
krauthammer
Contributing
Columnist
CoMMEnTARY: CHARLES kRAUTHAMMER
CoMMEnTARY: MITCHALBoM
AnoTHER vIEw
Photo by Aimee Dilger
and words by Mark Guydish
|
Haunting, mystic, compelling, romantically eerie, starkly beautiful
You neednt travel as far as you think to fnd it.
What will they say about
you when youre gone?
I attended a funeral this
month of a woman named
Sarah Lewis, the widow of
my childhood rabbi, Albert
Lewis. A 92-year-old pillar
of her community, she was
eloquent, bril-
liant, devoted
and religious.
The service
was sparse
and simple.
First, several
of her grand-
c h i l d r e n
spoke, fol-
lowed by her
two daugh-
ters and her
son.
Each of
them mentioned something
they had learned from their
mother or grandmother. A
life lesson indelibly etched
in their hearts.
One grandson spoke
about her kindness and how
she lent him money to buy
a car on very favorable
terms meaning when
he could afford to pay her
back.
Her eldest daughter
spoke about how her moth-
ers wonderful and devoted
marriage set an example for
the next generation.
Her youngest daughter
laughed at how she used
to get, as a gift, a book of
stamps, because, her moth-
er said, they will come in
very handy when you send
letters.
And her son told poi-
gnant stories of how his
mother bravely broke up
neighborhood ghts, made
him wear a coat even on a
75-degree day in the winter
because its a winter 75
degrees! and insisted he
clap! at a neighborhood
parade, to show recogni-
tion for those marching,
warning him that TV was
turning his generation into
passive observers.
He also told of how his
father, early in his parents
marriage, had a bout with
cancer and began to with-
draw from the family, fear-
ing he was dying and not
wanting the kids to miss
him when he was gone. And
how his mother rmly but
lovingly reminded her hus-
band, How do you want us
to remember you? as a
kind and caring patriarch,
or a distant, removed one?
By the end of the service,
everyone had laughed and
cried. It was clear a life
had been well-lived, had
touched countless others
and had left behind warm
and comforting memories.
Contrast that with an
obituary that recently ran
in the Reno (Nev.) Gazette-
Journal:
Marianne Theresa
Johnson-Reddick born Jan.
4, 1935, and died alone on
(Aug.) 30, 2013. She is sur-
vived by her 6 of 8 children
whom she spent her life-
time torturing in every way
possible.
The obituary, submitted
by her children, went on to
blast the woman as mean
and abusive:
Everyone she met, adult
or child, was tortured by
her cruelty and exposure to
violence, criminal activity,
vulgarity and hatred of the
gentle or kind human spirit.
Far from the tears shed
at the funeral I attended,
this womans offspring were
glad she was gone:
We celebrate her pass-
ing from this earth and
hope she lives in the after-
life reliving each gesture of
violence, cruelty and shame
that she delivered on her
children. Her surviving chil-
dren will now live the rest
of their lives with the peace
of knowing their nightmare
nally has some form of clo-
sure.
Wow. I guess may she
rest in peace is out of the
question.
You wonder how awful
this woman had to be to
be memorialized this way.
According to an Associated
Press account, the children
had been removed from her
care in the 1960s and had
been estranged for more
than 30 years. Their case
was so awful that it helped
lead to legislation in Nevada
allowing children to sever
ties to abusive parents.
Everything in there was
completely true, Patrick
Reddick told the AP. He
called his mother a wicked,
wicked witch and said that
while the main purpose of
the obituary was to bring
attention to child abuse, it
was also to shame her a
little bit.
Still, this was three
decades since theyd had
to deal with her. The social
norm when someone dies is
to shout the good and whis-
per the bad or at least,
say nothing part of what
is suggested by the term
paying your respects.
But as Johnson-Reddick
proves, that doesnt govern
every death. Or every life.
And the abuse you dish out
might come back to you.
Most of what we do in
this world is a rehearsal
for our funeral. No matter
how much you say, write or
decree, in the end, you are
summed up in speech and
print by others, their memo-
ries, their impressions.
What will they say about
you after youre gone? The
only similarity between
these two mothers is that
they were eulogized not by
a list of accomplishments,
but by how they treated
others. Something to keep
in mind if youre thinking
about your legacy.
Mitch Albomis a columnist for the
Detroit Free Press. Write to himat:
Detroit Free Press, 600W. Fort St.,
Detroit, MI 48226, or via email at
malbom@freepress.com.
Dont leave a nasty obituary
Mitch
Albom
Contributing
Columnist
YoUR opInIon: LETTERS ToTHE EDIToR
River Common
deserves funding
I thankThe Times Leader and
Luzerne County Councilman
Edward Brominski for bringing
attention to the Wilkes-Barre
River Common.
As chairman of the
Riverfront Parks Committee,
the nonprot organization
that has been working in the
parks on both sides of the
Susquehanna River since
1991, I wanted to share a dif-
ferent perspective.
The Riverfront Parks
Committee raises private
funds and uses volunteers for
Earth Day events, river clean-
ups, RiverFest, Dragon Boat
Racing, concerts, ChalkFest,
Hydromania and many other
family-oriented events, and
receives no county funding for
any of them.
We do, however, work close-
ly with the Luzerne County
Flood Protection Authority
and its staff who make sure
the River Common is looking
good for these events. They
have repaired the fountain
numerous times before our
events and recently had to
step into action to wash geese
droppings off the amphithe-
atre before an evening jazz
concert.
They also have utilized
county inmates to clean the
park following ooding before
scheduled events. Over the
years, I have had the pleasure
to work with Mr. Brozena,
Mr. Gibbons, and now Mr.
Belleman to coordinate events
on the River Common.
There are many of us who are
concerned the River Common
is being neglected, but it isnt
the weeds that concern us.
Annually, volunteers par-
ticipating in the United Way
Day of Caring spruce up the
River Common and its plant-
ing beds.
In May of this year, more
than 100 volunteers from PA
American Water, Mondelez
Foods and Sallie Mae spent
the day weeding the ower
beds by hand, because mulch-
ing, weed fabric or herbicides
would not have solved the
problem.
The phlox, daylilies and
potentilla all owered and
looked great this spring.
Vandalism, however, contin-
ues to impact the park.
This summer there was
more than $40,000 in vandal-
ism to lighting, portal doors,
sandstone walls and concrete
benches and planters.
This damage can be pre-
vented in several ways, includ-
ing patrolling and enforce-
ment of park rules and the
creation of a skate/bike park.
The Millennium Circle is not
a skate park, but it seemingly
has become one.
Another concern is the lack
of funds to maintain (and pro-
gram) this wonderful com-
munity park that was funded
predominately by federal and
state funds.
Just as the concrete was dry-
ing on the new River Common,
the economy took a downturn.
The county cut recreation dol-
lars completely out of its bud-
get, closed Moon Lake Park
and did not fully allocate the
funds that were requested to
care for the River Common
and levee trails.
If you want to see what hap-
pens when a community park
is neglected, just visit Moon
Lake.
I can remember swimming
in the pool at Moon Lake and
now there are no working toi-
lets, because it was closed and
then vandalized.
I am glad to hear that
Councilman Brominski and
others are concerned about
the River Common becoming
neglected.
One suggestion might be
to allocate the more than
$500,000 in funding that
Luzerne County has received
from states Marcellus Legacy
Funds, specically designat-
ed for recreation, trails and
open spaces into a recreation
line item in the 2014 Luzerne
County Budget.
Other surrounding counties
are using those funds for rec-
reation, and Luzerne Countys
parks (including the River
Common) can certainly use
some nancial help.
As chairman of the
Riverfront Parks Committee
and a volunteer who pulls
weeds, shovels ood mud,
removes litter and ood
debris, and organizes commu-
nity events such as RiverFest
and ChalkFest, I will do all
that I can to make sure the
River Common remains an
asset to the community.
However, I cannot prevent
the River Common from becom-
ing like Moon Lake Park with-
out the help of Luzerne County
Council, the Flood Protection
Authority, the City of Wilkes-
Barre as well as area business-
es, colleges, organizations and
residents who can help sponsor
events, use the park and volun-
teer to help maintain it.
Vincent Cotrone
Chairman, Riverfront Parks
Committee
www.riverfrontparks.org
Lobby now to
end horse killing
Each year more than 100,000
American horses are transport-
ed to their deaths in inhumane
and barbaric foreign slaughter-
houses, while our own elected
ofcials are paving the way to
slaughter these defenseless ani-
mals here at home. In fact, in
2007, the Cavel International
slaughterhouse in DeKalb, Ill.
closed its doors for good as the
last facility in the United States.
Congress, under intense pres-
sure from the wealthy and inu-
ential proponents of American
horse slaughter, has decided
to remove the prohibition on
spending our much-needed tax
dollars to inspect horse slaugh-
ter plants.
This reverses six years of
humane government policy that
ended the slaughter of horses in
the United States. To stop this
tragedy, and to permanently
end the slaughter of American
horses, animal welfare advo-
cates are working tirelessly to
persuade all of our represen-
tatives and senators to pass
the Safeguard American Food
Exports (SAFE) Act, SB541/
HB 1094.
Once the animals arrive at the
slaughter plants, the suffering
only intensies as they are
viciously beaten, prodded and
whipped. Horses are skittish
by nature, making them dif-
cult to stun. They often endure
repeated blows during attempts
to render them unconscious
and sometimes remain alive
and kicking during dismember-
ment.
The Humane Society
Legislative Fund is the lobbying
arm of the animal protection
movement, working hard in
Washington, D.C., in state capi-
tals and in local communities to
pass laws for the protection of
animals.
Call your U.S. senators, at
202-244-3121, and your repre-
sentative, 202-224-3121, and
ask them to co-sponsor the
SAFE Act.
PAGE 8D Sunday, September 22, 2013 PERSEPCTIVES www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Much of the world is
demanding greater pres-
sure on Syria following
a United Nations inspec-
tors report hinting that
Syrian strongman Bashar
al-Assad used chemical
weapons in his coun-
trys civil war, but
amazingly Venezuela
and some of its Latin
American allies are still
passionately
d e f e n d i n g
Syrias dic-
tator.
Last week,
after U.N.
S e c r e t a r y
General Ban
K i - m o o n
p r e s e n t e d
the U.N.
i nspect ors
report con-
cluding that
there is clear and con-
vincing evidence that
chemical weapons were
used in an Aug. 21 inci-
dent on the outskirts of
Damascus, Venezuelan
President Nicolas
Maduro lashed out
against the U.N. chief for
allegedly siding with the
enemies of the Syrian
people.
Why is the U.N. sec-
retary general lending
himself (to plans to
attack Syria,) as if he
were a prosecutor and
judge of the worlds peo-
ple, putting himself at
the service of the strat-
egy of war, instead of
being at the service of
peace? Maduro asked in
a speech Monday in the
state of Miranda.
In a speech last month
more than a week after
the Aug. 21 attack with
chemical weapons,
Maduro said, Venezuela
is with Syria, and with
President Bashar al-
Assad, and with the
Syrian people.
A day later, on Aug. 31,
Maduro issued an official
statement stating that
Venezuela stands by the
Syrian people in their
fight against unjustified
war-mongering aggres-
sions.
Venezuelas govern-
ment-run media, mean-
time, has turned Assad
into a hero and is blam-
ing the United States
and Israel for allegedly
trying to invade Syria.
A cartoon in
Venezuelas state-run
daily Correo del Orinoco
last week shows a plane
dropping hearts over
Syria with the legend to
the Syrian people from
the people of ALBA.
ALBA, which stands for
the Bolivarian Alliance
for the Peoples of Our
Americas, is an organiza-
tion formed by Venezuela
that is it made up of nine
Latin American and
Caribbean countries.
Venezuelas daily Vea,
which like other govern-
ment-backed newspapers
often publishes anti-
Semitic cartoons, ran a
cartoon on May 9 show-
ing a black-robed skel-
eton representing death,
with a star of David
and this legend: Since
we got tired of killing
Palestinians, we are now
going to finish with the
Syrians.
Whats most amaz-
ing about the pro-Assad
statements in Venezuelas
official media is that
they are still appearing
after the U.N. inspectors
report which clearly
suggests, without saying
so explicitly, that Assads
forces were responsible
for the Aug. 21 chemical
gas attack.
While it doesnt offi-
cially take sides, because
that wasnt within the
inspectors scope, the
U.N. report shows that
the rockets that carried
sarin gas are weapons
that are not in the hands
of Syrias rebels, and
that they were launched
from several govern-
Despite evidence, Venezuela keeps rooting for Syria
COMMENTARY: ANDRES OPPENHEIMER
THERE IS disappointment that more coun-
tries (in the region) would not have put out
stronger statements condemning the Assad
governments use of Sarin gas, and support-
ing the Geneva U.S.-Russia agreements.
Roberta Jacobson,
U.S. State Department official
Andres
Oppenheimer
Contributing
Columnist
ment-controlled points.
Although less strenu-
ously, Venezuelan allies
such as Cuba and Bolivia
also have come out in
support of Assad even
after the U.N. findings.
Most other Latin
American countries have
supported the Geneva
agreement between
the United States and
Russia to demand that
Syria destroy its chemi-
cal weapons.
But U.S. officials say
major Latin American
countries such as
Mexico and Brazil have
been late in joining the
international communi-
tys demands that Syria
comply with the Geneva
agreement.
Roberta Jacobson,
the top U.S. State
Department official
in charge of Latin
American affairs, told
me Wednesday that
there is disappointment
that more countries (in
the region) would not
have put out stronger
statements condemning
the Assad governments
use of Sarin gas, and sup-
porting the Geneva U.S.-
Russia agreements.
Jacobson added
that countries in the
Western Hemisphere
want to be, and increas-
ingly are, global actors.
(But) If countries want
to be global players, they
should step up and con-
front challenges to the
international commu-
nity.
My opinion: Its entire-
ly legitimate for Latin
American countries to
oppose a unilateral U.S.
intervention in Syria, or
even a U.S. intervention
with dozens of allied
countries but with-
out the blessing of the
United Nations.
I myself have seri-
ous doubts about the
wisdom of an interven-
tion to stop Syrias war
crimes without some
sort of U.N. cover.
But defending a dicta-
tor who has massacred
a sizable part of the
100,000 people who have
died in Syrias civil war,
and who according to
all available evidence is
responsible for the Aug.
21 attack with chemical
weapons, is outrageous.
Maduro might be
over-reacting on Syria
because he needs to keep
his Chavista radical base
behind him after his
dubious and narrow elec-
tion victory April 14.
His almost daily
blunders, alongside
Venezuelas steep eco-
nomic decline, are seri-
ously weakening his gov-
ernment.
And his adoration for
dictators may explain
his natural sympathy for
Assad.
Still, Venezuelas
enthusiastic support
for the Syrian regime
after the Aug. 21 attack
with chemical weapons
should be denounced by
everybody for what it
is: an open defense of
crimes against humanity.
Andres Oppenheimer is a Latin
America correspondent for The
Miami Herald, 3511 N.W. 91 Avenue,
Doral, FL 33172; email: aoppen-
heimer@miamiherald.com.
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Real Estate Briefs
Prepared by The Times Leader Advertising Department
Linda Weber Joins
Lewith & Freeman Real Estate
Virginia Rose,
President of
Lewith &
Freeman Real
Estate is pleased
toannounceLinda
Weber recently
joined the Lewith
& Freeman
Mo u n t a i n t o p
OIfce. Linda is
an experienced
Realtor and has
successfully sold both existing and new
residential and commercial real estate
throughout Luzerne County. 'Linda`s
extensive experience and knowledge of
real estate makes her a incredibly valuable
member oI our sales team. stated Virginia
Rose.
Linda began her Real Estate Career in
1988 and attained the designation of
Seller Representative Specialist (S.R.S)
in 2007. Linda`s hard work has also
been recognized numerous times as the
recipient of such awards as: Outstanding
Sales Achievement, Million Dollar Club
and Executive Club. All oI which are
testament to her outstanding commitment
to quality service and dedication to
customer satisIaction. Linda also holds a
B.S. degree Irom NY State University and
an R.N. designation Iromthe Wilkes-Barre
General School oI Nursing.
Linda is an active member of her
community, supporting the American
Heart Association and Children`s Miracle
Network and enjoys home staging and
promoting health and wellness in her free
time. Linda resides in Mountaintop with
her husband Fred, and has two sons Ryan
&Nicholas. Linda is undoubtedly a perIect
ft with the benchmark oI excellence
and commitment to professional, quality
service that Lewith & Freeman has
established since 1921.
To experience real estate at its best,
contact Linda at
(570) 715-9329 or
lindaweber@lewith-freeman.com
PAGE 4E Sunday, September 22, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Houses For Sale
COURTDALE
Corby Road
NEWON THE MARKET!
TRANQUILITY!
Scenic wooded lot with beautiful
view in the Fall & Winter. Private
and secluded great for building
your dream, camping and has ac-
cess for hunting .Seller Negoti-
able.
MLS#13-3739
$ 15,000
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Please call Michele Hopkins
570-540-6046
Houses For Sale
DALLAS
VIEWMONT ACRES
All this 2.8+ acre lot needs is
your vision for your dream
home. Located i n a qui et
country setting, this partially
cleared lot has a great view of
t he mount ai ns. Sept i c i s
already on site and ready for
building.
MLS #13-1705
Only $65,000
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
570-696-3801
Houses For Sale
DALLAS
Newberry Estate
The Greens
4,000 sq. ft. condo with view
of ponds & golf course. Three
bedrooms on 2 floors. 5 1/2
baths, 2 car garage & more.
New Price $399,000.
MLS# 12-1480
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
DALLAS
Beautifully decorated, open
floor plan, excellent location,
this home features gorgeous
Amish wood floors, tile floors
in kitchen & baths, huge fam-
ily room built for entertaining,
inviting deck & yard.
MLS #13-3665
$299,000
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
Houses For Sale
DALLAS
NEW LISTING!
45 OLD GRANDVIEW AVE.
Make your new home a me-
ticulously maintained bi-level
in the Dallas Sch. Dist. This
property offers 3BRS, 2 mod-
ern baths, modern kitchen,
LR, and formal DR. For relax-
ation and entertaining there is
a 3-season room off the kit-
chen and a large FR in the LL
wi th Berber carpet and a
wood-burning fireplace. All
appliances and window treat-
ments remain, so it is truly
move-in ready. Call today
for your private showing.or
more details and to view the
phot os onl i ne, go t o:
www.prudenti al real estate.com
and enter PRU3J2D2 in the
Home Search.
MLS #13-3552
$196,500
Walter or Mary Ellen
Belchick
696-6566
696-2600
Houses For Sale
DALLAS TWP.
Convenient location for your
business in high traffic area.
MLS 13 645
$169,900
Jennifer Atherholt
903-5107
718-4959
Houses For Sale
DALLAS
20 Westminster Drive
Attractive brick ranch in good
location, close to schools and
shopping. 9 rooms, 4 bed-
rooms and 2 baths, 3 season
porch overlooking large level
rear yard. Hardwood and wall
to wall carpeting. Gas heat.
Two car garage. New roof.
MLS#13-3473
5('8&(' 35,&(
$169,000
Call Sandra Gorman
570-696-5408
570-696-1195
Houses For Sale
DRUMS
6 SEVEN IRON DRIVE
PRICE REDUCED!
Great price on this Mountain
Top home on Blue Ridge Golf
Course. 4 bedrooms, 4 bath
layout with a beautiful finished
wal k- out basement . Re-
modeled kitchen with all appli-
ances i ncl uded. Screened
porch, deck and patio all look
out to a large back yard. This
is a great opportunity to ac-
quire a home in this location.
Call Paul 760-8143 to sched-
ule a showing. Open house on
Sun. October 6 from 1:00 to
3:00. Directions: On Alber-
deen Road t urn i nt o Bl ue
Ridge Trail GC. Through stop
sign then right on 6 Seven Iron
Drive.
#13-2917
$399,000
PAUL PUKATCH
760-8143
696-2600
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Sunday, September 22, 2013 PAGE 11E
Houses For Sale
EXETER
Just listed!
This charming ranch home
has hardwood floors, semi-
modern kitchen & bath, car-
port & a full basement ideal
for addition living space. Pay-
ments less than typical rent.
$59,500.00
Call Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
570-288-6654
WYOMING/FRANKLIN TWP.
PRICE REDUCED!
1705 W. 8TH ST.
This charming home in the
Dallas Sch. Dist. is waiting for
new owners to settle in and
celebrate the upcoming holi-
days with family and friends.
Relax on the deck and watch
t he l eaves change col or
around your large country lot.
Plan for great times next sum-
mer in your 40x20 heated in-
ground pool. This well main-
tai ned 2-story has 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 modern baths, a
modern kitchen with break-
fast nook, formal DR, large
LR and an added FR with
vaulted ceiling and fireplace.
2-car detached garage. De-
t a i l s a n d p h o t o s a t :
www.pruentialrealestate.com.
Ent er PRU7W7A3 i n t he
SEARCH f i el d.
MLS#13-2539
$219,900
Walter or Mary Ellen
Belchick
696-6566
696-2600
WYOMING
Room for your business & 2
incomes from the apartments
upstairs. first floor commer-
cial space is updated beauti-
ful l y wi th 4-5 offi ces, ki t-
chenette & lower level confer-
ence room. Plenty of parking.
MLS #13-3565
$135.900
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
WYOMING
Completely redone 3 bed-
room Cape Cod in lovely
neighborhood. Beautiful
woodwork throughout. Cent-
ral air, new windows,new car-
pet with hardwood floors un-
derneath, new electrical, new
hot water heater, the list goes
on! Nothing to do but
move in and enjoy.
$135,000
Call Christine
(570) 332-8832
570-613-9080
Houses For Sale
YATESVILLE
7 Paiges Dr.
$169,900
Custom 3 bedroom town-
home with all the bells and
whistles. LR, Dr, kitchen with
all appliances, 2 1/2 baths,
OSP, garage and driveway.
MLS #13-3646.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Call Phil Semenza
570-313-1229
YATESVILLE
$129,900
617 Willowcrest Dr.
End unit. 2 bedroom townhome
with master bath on 2nd floor.
Needs a little TLC.
MLS 13-569
Call Tom
570-262-7716
YATESVILLE
$119,000
15 Pittston Ave.
Two bedroom bi-level with
very private rear yard, new
vinyl windows, split system
a/c unit. Enjoy the serenity of
this home while being
conveniently located in a
desirable neighborhood.
Search for this listing with
additional photos on
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS #13-3771.
Call Charlie
Land (Acreage)
DALLAS
NO CLOSING COSTS
NO TIME FRAME TO BUILD
DALLAS SCHOOL DISTRICT
10% DOWN FINANCING
LOTS OF ELBOW ROOM
FOR PRIVACY
2 ACRES with view $29,900
7 ACRES with view $79,900
Call 570-245-6288
DALLAS TOWNSHIP
63 acres with about 5,000
road front on 2 roads. Al l
wooded. $385,000. Cal l
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
DORRANCE TWP.
Well located 58.84 acre parcel
with 36.62 acres zoned com-
mercial. Great views. Ideal for
recreational type business. Ad-
ditional land available.
$339,000
Call Dave Hourigan
570-715-7750
570-474-6307
Earth Conservancy
Land For Sale
Price Reduction
61 +/- Acres Nuangola
$88,000
46 +/- Acres Hanover Twp.
$69,000
Highway Commercial KOZ
Hanover Twp. 3+/-
Acres 11 +/- Acres
Wilkes-Barre Twp. Acreage
Zoned R-3
Sugar Notch Lot $11,800
See Additional Land for Sale
at:
www.earthconservancy.org
Call: 570-823-3445
EXETER TOWNSHIP
VACANT LAND
Build your dream home on
this lot of almost 1 acre in a
small quiet development on
Bodle Road. $29,900.
MLS#13-3803
Call John Piszak
570-313-8586
Gilroy Real Estate
570-288-1444
Land (Acreage)
LAFLIN
$32,900
Lot#9 Pinewood Dr
Build your new home in a great
neighborhood. Convenient loc-
ation near highways, airport,
casino and shopping
156 x 110 x 150 x 45
DIRECTIONS Rt 315 to laflin
Rd; make left off Laflin Rd onto
Pinewood Dr. Lot is on corner
of Pinewood Dr. and Hickory-
wood Dr. MLS 13-23
atlasrealtyinc.com
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
LAKE
NUANGOLA LAND
FOR SALE
(#3 Summit Street and
2 adjacent lots):
Half acre of ideally located
mountaintop corner lots w/
lake views and shared dock.
Asking $74.9k;
no reasonable offer refused.
Call Jennifer at
570-760-1622
for serious offers only.
NEWPORT TWP.
lots - lots-lots
1 mile south of L.C.C.C. Estab-
lished development with under-
ground utilities including gas.
Cleared lot. 100 frontage x
158. $30,500.
Lot 210 frontage 158 deep on
hill with great view $30,500.
Call 570-736-6881
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Seneca Drive
Central water, Prime Loca-
tion. 100 Feet of Lake Front!
Great view!
MLS# 11-1269
$159,900
Call Dale Williams
Five Mountains Realty
570-256-3343
WYOMING/EXETER
BUILDING LOTS
FOR SALE
$35,000 - $39,900
Build your new home here. 2
new developments, prices
range from $35,000 to
$39,900. Public water sewer
& gas available. NOT in flood
zone. Lot sizes range from
50x100 to 80x105. www.at-
lasrealtyinc.com
CALL CHARLIE
Lots
BACK MOUNTAIN
1/2 ACRE LOTS
In an upscale development,
with public sewer, gas and
underground utilities.
Privacy and great views.
10 minutes to Kingston on
Hillside Road. Starting at
$47,900. 570-283-0547
EAGLE ROCK RESORT/
NEAR CHOCTAW LAKE
99 Chestnut Drive
Wooded level buildable lot in
Four Seasons resort. All amen-
ities are transferred with deed.
Amenities include, golf, eques-
trian, etc. Within walking dis-
tance of Choctow Lake. An
amazing quick sale price of
$11,500. MLS#13-1426.
Call Vieve Zaroda
570-715-7742.
570-474-6307
HANOVER TWP
Slope St.
Nice building lot with utilities
available. Ideal home site. Af-
fordable at $10,900
TOWNE & COUNTRY
REAL ESTATE CO.
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
Lot For Sale
PLAINS TWP.
(Behind VA Hospital) Iroquois
Ave. 80-150 Cleared Lot,
Ready to Build. Asking
24,900. Assessed at $26,000
570-472-7243
NUANGOLA
Gay Ave.
Wooded building lot 150' road
frontage, 200' deep, near I-81,
Nuangola Exit. Public sewers.
Lot will require well. Turn right
at Rice Elem., left at stop sign,
quick right on Gay Ave., prop-
erty on left (lots 8, 9 & 10).
Recently surveyed.
MLS# 13-3195
$30,500
Call Vieve Zaroda
570-715-7742.
570-474-6307
Lots
NUANGOLA
Raeder Ave.
Private 90 x 200 wooded lot.
Recent l y sur veyed. Di r :
Naungola Rd., right on Lake
Ave., left on Raeder Ave. Lot
is 50 ft past last house on left
& at end of paved road. You'll
see sign 50 ft in woods on left
.Call to walk land or for addi-
tional info.
MLS 13-3194
$29,500
Call Vieve Zaroda
570-715-7742.
570-474-6307
PRINGLE
LOT FOR SALE
92'X120' Valley View Drive
Last Available lot on
Developed Street
High and Dry, Sewer hook-up.
$45,000. 570-287-1322
YATESVILLE
$49,900
Prime lots read for the right
builder. Apx 100x150 priced
to sell.
www.atlasrealyinc.com
Call Phil Semenza
570-313-1229.
Apartments /Townhouses
ASHLEY
2 bedroom. Water included.
$550 + utilities,
security & lease. No pets.
570-472-9494
ASHLEY
1st floor, 2 bedroom apart-
ment, freshly painted, wall to
wall carpeting, appliances,
washer/dryer hook-up, large
yard, front and side porches,
off-street parking. Sewer and
garbage included. Utilities by
tenant. No Pets. $450.
Security and 1st months rent.
570-474-5505
AVOCA
3 rooms, wall to wall carpeting,
a p p l i a n c e s , c o i n - o p
washer/dryer, off street park-
ing, $420+ security. No pets.
570-655-1606
BACK MOUNTAIN
Two 2 bedroom, 1 bath
apartments with all appli-
ances, $650 & $795/month +
security & utilities. Credit
check. 570- 696-5417
cEdAr
VIllAGE
Apartment Homes
fAll sPEcIAl
$500 Off
1st MONTHS RENT
fEAturInG
- Washer & Dryer
- Central Air
- Fitness Center
- Pet Friendly
- Easy Access to I-81
newly renovated
sundeck Pool
mon fri. 9 5
44 Eagle court
Wilkes-barre, PA 18706
(off route 309)
call for a special app't
570-823-8400
cedarvillage@
affiliatedmgmt.com
DALLAS
2nd floor, 1 bedroom. Includes
heat, water & garbage. Off street
parki ng. No pets/no smoki ng.
$600/month + 1 month security.
570-690-1591
DALLAS
mEAdoWs
APArtmEnts
220 Lake St.
Housing for the elderly &
mobility impaired; all utilities
included. Federally subsid-
ized program. Extremely low
i ncome persons encour-
aged to apply. Income less
than $12,450. 570-675-6936
TDD 800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Handicap Accessible
DALLAS
Newberry Estates
Furnished or Unfurnished
Carriage House, 1 bedroom
washer, dryer. Country club
amenities included. No pets,
no smokers. $925/month.
210-542-0635
DALLAS
2nd floor Municipal Road
$550. Mo. Electric heat, NO
Pets. 1 bedroom plus 1 smal-
ler bedroom, laundry, kitchen,
living and dining room.
570-332-3562
Apartments /Townhouses
DALLAS
MULTI-LEVEL LUXURY
TOWNHOUSE
IN NEWBERRY ESTATES
3 bedroom, 3.5 baths in a quiet
country setting. Includes cent-
ral air & vacuum, 2 car garage,
refrigerator, range, dishwash-
er, water & trash & all exterior
maintenance. Amenities in-
clude golfing, swimming & ten-
nis. $1,475 month. + utilities.
Call Bernie 655-4815
ROTHSTEIN
REALTORS
888-244-2714
EDWARDSVILLE
2 Bedroom, recently
remodeled, hardwood floors
throughout, microwave, dish-
washer, washer, dryer, stove,
refrigerator. Water included.
No Pets. $550/month.
570-709-5178. Bit Keller LLC
EDWARDSVILLE
2 bedroom double with re-
cently updated kitchen & bath.
Fenced in yard and off street
parking. $675/month.
Call Crystal Banfield
570-715-7741
570-474-6307
FORTY FORT
Newly renovated. Great neigh-
borhood. Non-smoking. Oak
composite floors, new wall to
wall carpeting in bedrooms,
new windows. 3 paddle fans,
bath with shower. Stove, refri-
gerator, dishwasher. OSP.
Coin-op laundry. $600/mo. +
gas, electric & water. Refer-
ences required. No pets.
Available Oct. 1st!
570-779-4609
570-407-3991
FORTY FORT
1 bedroom, 1 bath, 2nd floor +
attic, new stove & refrigerator,
wash/dryer hook-up, off-street
parking. Water & heat in-
cluded. No pets. No Smoking.
1 year lease, $485/mo + secur-
ity, credit & background check.
570-947-8097
FORTY FORT
All utilities included. Clean, 4
room, 2nd floor. Appliances.
Covered parking. Non
smoking, cat considered,
starting at $700/month.
570-714-2017
FORTY FORT
Newly renovated 2 bedroom,
large living room with hard-
wood floors, off street parking,
washer / dryer hookup. Sun
porch. No pets. $700/month +
security & references.
570-760-2362
FORTY FORT
Very nice 2nd floor apt in good
neighborhood. 1 bedroom, liv-
ing room, kitchen & tile bath.
Hi gh cei l i ngs & hardwood
fl oors. 1 year l ease. $750
month + security & references.
Tenant pays electric & gas. No
smoking. No Pets.
570-313-9955
GLEN LYON
KEN POLLOCK APARTMENTS
41 Depot Street
Low and Moderate Income Eld-
erly Rentals Include:
* Electric Range &
Refrigerator
* Off Street Parking
* Community Room
* Coin Operated
Laundry
* Elevator
* Video Surveilance
Applications Accepted
by Appointment
570-736-6965
8:00 a.m. - 4 p.m.
TDD Only,
1-800-654-5984
Voice Only,
1-800-654-5988
Handicap Accessible
Equal Housing Opportunity
HANOVER TWP
NEWLY REMODELED. 1st
floor efficiency. 1 bedroom,
living room, kitchen, bath &
l aundry. New carpet & ti l e
f l oors. St ove, ref ri gerat or,
washer & dryer included. Non
smoki ng. No pet s. 1 year
lease. $550 month + security &
references. Tenant pays elec-
tric & gas. 570-313-9955
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
WEST END ROAD
One bedr oom. Heat , wat er ,
garbage sewer & appliances in-
cluded. Off street parking. No pets,
non smoking, not Section 8 ap-
proved. References, security, 1st &
last. $550/month. 570-852-0252
HANOVER
TWP.
3029 S. Main st.
2nd floor very large
3 bedrooms, wall to wall
carpeting central air, eat in
kitchen with appliances. Off
street parking. Washer &
dryer hookup. Heat & cook-
ing gas included. Tenant
pays electric & water. $695
plus security. No Pets.
570-814-1356
Apartments /Townhouses
HARVEYS LAKE
1 & 2 bedroom, Lake Front
Apartments. Lake rights, off-
street parking. No Pets. Lease,
Security and References.
570-639-5920
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
1st fl oor. Located i n qui et
neighborhood. Kitchen, living
room, dining room, sun room,
bath, 3 bedrooms; 2 large & 1
small. Lots of closets, built-in
linen closet & hutch. Hard-
wood & carpeted floors. Fire-
place. Storage room. Yard.
Washer/dryer, stove/fri dge.
Heat & hot water included. 1
year lease + security. $950.
570-283-4370
KINGSTON
Pierce Street
3rd floor, 1-2 bedroom, 1 bath.
Newly remodeled building, off
street parking, all appliances,
including washer/dryer. $575 +
utilities. No pets, no smoking.
570-814-3281
KINGSTON
Spacious 2nd floor, 2 bed-
room. 1 bath. Newly re-
modeled building, Living room,
Dining room, eat-in Kitchen,
private front balcony, off street
parking, all appliances, includ-
ing washer/dryer. Available
now. $675+ utilities. No pets,
no smoking. 570-814-3281
KINGSTON
2 BR, range, refrigerator, wall-
to-wall washer/dryer hook up,
walk up attic. Concrete cellar,
2 porches. Very clean. Must
see. No pets. $450 + utilities &
security. 570-574-1276 or
570-288-4860
KINGSTON
2nd floor, 1 bedroom, 1 bath,
kitchen,living room,washer &
dryer. Next to post office, off
street parking. $500 + utilities,
water & sewer included, 1 year
lease, security & references,
no pets, no smoking.
Call 570-822-9821
KINGSTON
3 r d f l o o r . 1 b e d r o o m.
$600/month, everythi ng i n-
cl uded. NO smoki ng. Very
unique! 570-814-3859
KINGSTON
Deluxe, quiet, airy
3 bedroom, 2nd floor, 1.5
baths & office. All appliances,
washer/dryer in unit. Wall-to-
wall, C/A, garage, attic,
no pets/no smoking, lease.
570-287-1733
KInGston HousE
Nice, clean furnished room, starting at
$340. Efficiency at $450 month fur-
nished with all utilities included. Off
street parking. 570-718-0331
KINGSTON
69 Price St.
Nice and cozy 3rd floor. 1
bedroom living room and kit-
chen. lots of closets, and 2
enclosed porches. Includes
heat, hot water, stove, fridge
and off street parking. no
pets, non smoker. $495/mo
security deposit. 1 year lease.
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
KINGSTON
SDK GREEN
ACRES HOMES
11 Holiday Drive
A Place To Call Home
Spacious 1, 2 & 3
Bedroom Apts.
Gas heat included
FREE
24 hr. on-site Gym
Community Room
Swimming Pool
Maintenance FREE
Controlled Access
Patio/Balcony
and much more...
570-288-9019
www.sdkgreen acres.com
Call today for
move-in specials.
Kingston
West Bennett St.
Twinkle in Kingstons Eye, 2nd
floor, 1000 sq. ft. 2 bed,
Central Air, washer/dryer and
appliances. No pets. Non-
smoking. 1 car off street park-
ing. $750/month + gas, elec-
tric, 1 year lease & security.
570-814-1356
KINGSTON
West Union St.
In 2 family house, 1 unit - 4
bedroom for rent.
570-223-2937
LUZERNE
1st floor studio $415/month.
No Pets, Electric heat, Kitchen
& bath. Laundry room in base-
ment. 570-332-3562
Apartments /Townhouses
KInGston
NEW
1 bedroom apt. 1st floor. Ar-
chitecturally designed. Cent-
ral air. Off street parking.
Quiet residential neighbor-
hoods, utilities & heat by ten-
ant, no pets, no smoking. 1
month security, 1 year lease.
call rosewood realty
570-287-6822
LUZERNE
276 Bennett Street
1st floor, 1 bedroom, tiled bath,
kitchen with refrigerator and
stove, off-street parking, water
& sewer paid. $470 + utilities &
security. No pets/smoking.
References. 570-288-7309.
Leave message.
LUZERNE COUNTY
RENTALS
Available Now!
2 bed and 3 bed
$550, $650, $675 and $850.
Call 570-901-1020
MINERS MILLS
1 & 1/2 bedrooms, completely
redone, washer/dryer hook up,
heat & water included. Quiet
neighborhood with yard and
screened in back porch. No
pets. $575/month + security. 1
year lease. 570-430-0175
MINERSMILLS
2 bedroom, 1st floor, $550/
month plus $550 security. Pay
your own utilities. Gas heat.
Fridge & stove. background &
credit check. NO PETS.
570-825-2306
mountAIn toP
1 bedroom apartments with
media rooms, recently ren-
ovated, New carpeting & ap-
pliances From $550 & up.
570-854-8785
mountAIn toP
ImmEdIAtEly
AVAIlAblE 2nd
floor unIt!
1 bedroom apartments for elderly,
disabled. Rents based on 30% of
ADJ gross income.
Handicap Accessible.
Equal Housing Opportunity.
TTY711
or 570-474-5010
This institution is an equal
opportunity provider & employer.
mountAIn toP
oAK rIdGE
IMMEDIATELY AVAILABLE
2ND FLOOR UNIT! 1 bed-
room apartments for elderly,
disabled. Rents based on 30%
of ADJ gross income. Handi-
cap Accessible. Equal Hous-
ing Opportunity. TTY711 or
570-474-5010 This institution
is an equal opportunity pro-
vider & employer.
NANTICOKE
2 males looking for 3rd room-
mat e t o share 3 bedroom
apartment. $85/week. Call
570-578-2644
NANTICOKE
Large 1 bedroom. Hardwood
floors, full kitchen, large dining
room. No pets, no smoking.
$465. Water, sewer & trash in-
cluded. 570-262-5399
nAntIcoKE
lExInGton
VIllAGE
2 bedroom, 1 bath apartments.
Refrigerator, stove,
dishwasher &washer/dryer
provided.
Attached garage.
Pet friendly.
Water, sewer &
trash included.
59 Agostina Drive
570-735-3500
PITTSTON
1st floor, large 1 bedroom
apartment. Newly renovated,
off street parking, washer/
dryer hook up. $700 heat, wa-
ter and sewer included.
570-443-0770
Get all the
advertising
inserts
with the
latest sales.
Call
829-5000
to start your
home delivery.
PAGE 12E Sunday, September 22, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Immediate efficiency occupancy
Located near shopping & transportation. Temple Apartments
offers efficiencies & one bedroom apartments for income quali-
fied individuals ages 62 or older and/or needing the features of
a mobility impaired unit.
Apartment amenities include:
Accessible features-fully equipped kitchen-Wall to wall carpet-
ing-Ceramic tiled baths-On-site management-On-site mainten-
ance with 24-hour emergency response-On-site laundry-Inter-
com entry system-Social services coordinator on-site
Leasing office located at:
5 Heisz Street- Edwardsville, PA 18704
T: 570-283-2275-TDD 1.800.545.1833 x646
PENNROSE
IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE
1 BEDROOM APARTMENTS AVAILABLE
Martin D. Popky Apartments
61 E. Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
Affordable Senior Apartments
Income Eligibility Required
Utilities Included! Low cable rates;
New appliances; Laundry on site;
Activities! Curbside Public Transportation
Please call 570-825-8594
D/TTY 800-654-5984
HEATHER HIGHLANDS
A Quality Manufactured Housing Community
New and Pre-Owned Homes for Sale!
Rentals Available
Select Homes for Lease with Option to Purchase
Financing Available to Qualified Buyers
109 Main Street, Inkerman
Jenkins Twp., Pa 18640
Rental Office: 570-655-9643-Sales Office: 570-655-4301
www.umh.com
Licensed by the Pa. Dept. of Banking NMLS 200331
Classifeds
Continued on
Page 30
Apartments /Townhouses
PITTSTON
Large 2 BR, 2nd floor apart-
ment. Newly painted with new
window blinds, eat in kitchen,
built in hutch. Includeds refri-
gerator, range, washer/dryer
hook up & sewage. $500 + se-
curity.
Call Bernie Madrack
655-4815
Rothstein Realtors
888-244-2714
PITTSTON
3 bdrm., 2nd floor, Eat in kit-
chen. Washer/dryer hook up.
Storage area. Small yard &
rear deck. $850/month + se-
curity. Heat & sewer included.
Call 570-650-7265
Apartments /Townhouses
PITTSTON
Brand new 2 bedroom, 2 bath
apartment on 2nd floor. Over-
size bay windows, hardwood
floors, granite counters, stain-
less appliances. All tile &
stone showers. Central air,
gas heat. Washer & dryer.
Water & garbage included. No
dogs. $1,250/month.
570-760-7326
PITTSTON
Immaculate 1 bedroom, large
kitchen, enclosed patio, wash-
er/dryer hookup. Brand new
carpeting. Off street parking.
Yar d. $500/ mo wat er &
garbage included. 1 block to
park. 570-362-0581
Apartments /Townhouses
PLAINS
Clean ground level 1 bedroom.
Stove, fridge, sewer & water
included. Freshly painted, new
rugs, security & references. No
smoking. No pets. $465/mo.
570-693-1468
PLAINS
Modern 2 bedroom, 1 bath,
2nd floor apartment. Kitchen
with appliances. New carpet.
Conveni ent l y l ocat ed. No
smoki ng - no pet s.
$600 PER MONTH.
Call Rae
570-899-1209
LEWITH & FREEMAN
288-9371
PLYMOUTH
Newly remodeled, 2 bedroom.
Water included. $600.
570-239-3950
PLYMOUTH
$500.00
Excellent apt. One bed-
room, 1 bath. Included sew-
er, water, off street parking,
kitchen appliances. Close
to WVW H.S. We are look-
ing for clean tenants to rent
clean living space.
570-855-3329.
PLYMOUTH
Cozy 3 bedroom on 2 floors.
$650/mo. 570-760-0511
PLYMOUTH
Nice, clean 2 bedroom apart-
ment . Cl ean ki t chen, r e-
modeled bath. Quiet neighbor-
hood. 105 Davenport St. $495
per month plus security and
utilities. Vacant now. Please
call night or day at 674-3120.
Marilyn K Snyder
Real Estate
570-825-2468
WEST PITTSTON
GARDEN
VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
221 Fremont St., Housing for
the elderly & mobility im-
paired; all utilities included.
Federally subsidized pro-
gram. Extremely
low income persons encour-
aged to apply. Income less
than $12,450.
570-655-6555
TDD 800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm
Monday-Friday.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Handicap Accessible
WEST PITTSTON
MAINTENANCE
FREE!
One block to
elementary School
(WY Area).
2 Bedrooms. Off-Street
Parking No Smoking.
$565. + utilities,
security, last month.
570-885-4206
Apartments /Townhouses
WEST PITTSTON
$595 a month. Heat, Water
and Sewer included. 1 bed-
room, living room, dining
room, wall to wall carpeting,
washer/dryer, refrigerator and
stove. Modern kitchen and
bath. 2nd floor. 1 month se-
curity with 1 year lease. Ref-
erences required, No Pets.
570-446-7682
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
1, 2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright open
floor plans
- All major appliances
included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term leases
available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflowercrossing.com
Certain Restrictions Apply*
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedroom, 1.5 bath, kitchen
appliances, washer/dryer
hook-up. $550/month + utilit-
ies and security. One month
security. No Pets.
570-647-5053
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedroom, 2 bath,
washer/dryer hook-up, central
air and heat. Built in garage.
$700/month+utilities. A month
and half security. No Pets.
570-647-5053
WILKES-BARRE
LAFAYETTE
GARDENS
SAVE MONEY THIS YEAR!
113 Edison Street
Quiet neighborhood. 2 bedroom
apartments available for immediate
occupancy. Heat & hot water in-
cluded.
1 Bedroom $550.
2 Bedroom $650.
Call Jazmin 570-822-7944
WILKES-BARRE
WILKES UNIV
CAMPUS
1, 2, 3, or 4 bedrooms. Wood
floors, no pets, starting $450.
all utilities included.
570-826-1934
Apartments /Townhouses
WILKES-BARRE
-1 bedroom
water included
-2 bedroom
water included
-3 bedroom,
single
HANOVER
-1 bedroom
LUZERNE
-1 bedroom,
water included.
PITTSTON
-Large 1 bed
room water
included
OLD FORGE
-2 bedroom,
water included
PLAINS
-1 bedroom,
water included
McDermott & McDermott
Real Estate Inc. Property
Management
570-675-4025
(direct line)
Mon-Fri. 8-7pm
Sat. 8-noon
WILKES-BARRE
/KINGSTON
Efficiency 1 & 2 bedrooms. In-
cludes all utilities, parking, laundry.
No pets. From $390 to $675.
Lease, securi ty & references.
570-970-0847
WILKES-BARRE
142 s. franklin St
2nd floor, 1 large bedroom
w/office, fireplace, off street
parking, 14' ceilings, hard-
wood & tile floors. Stove, D/W,
microwave, garbage disposal,
washer/dryer, 24 hour main-
tenance & security cameras.
$900/month + security, utilities
& 1 year lease. Call Janice at
570-706-6010
WILKES-BARRE
3 bedroom, off street parking,
washer & dryer hook up.
freshly painted No pets. $575
+ utilities & security.
570-822-7657
Wilkes-Barre
3 bedrooms, 2nd
floor, modern, new flooring, re-
frigerator stove, washer/dryer
hookup, water included.
$650 + electric. Section
8 Accepted. 570-301-8200
WILKES-BARRE
307-309 South Street East
2 bedroom apartment on 1st
floor. New floors & carpets,
bi g ki tchen, 6 x 8 covered
porch , large yard. Landlord
p a y s w a t e r & h e a t .
$650/month, $1,000 security
No hook ups. NO PETS.
Call Manny 917-295-6254
718-946-8738
WILKES-BARRE
447 S. Franklin St.
1 bedroom with study, off street
parking, laundry facility. Includes
heat and hot water, hardwood
floors, appliances, Trash removal.
$580/month. Call (570) 821-5599
Apartments /Townhouses
WILKES-BARRE
425 S. Franklin St.
APTS FOR RENT!
For lease. Available immedi-
ately, washer/dryer on
premises, no pets. We have
studio, 1 & 2 bedroom apart-
ments. On site parking. Fridge
& stove provided. 24/7 secur-
ity camera presence & all
doors electronically locked.
1 bedroom - $450. 2 bedroom
- $550. Water & sewer paid 1
month security deposit. Email
obscuroknows@hotmail.com
or Call 570-208-9301
after 9:00 a.m. to schedule an
appointment
WILKES-BARRE
72. W. River St.
Newly refurbished, large &
very charmi ng 3 bedroom
dwelling in Historic Mansion in
a beaut i f ul nei ghborhood.
Central Air & Heat. Off-street
parking, Hardwood floors, new
kitchen & appliances. Hot wa-
ter included. $1,240 + security.
570-991-1619
WILKES-BARRE
BEAUTIFUL 6 ROOM
1st floor, 1-2 bedrooms, living
room with wall to wall carpet
thru-out, modern bath & kit-
chen with electric stove, laun-
dry room with gas or electric
dryer hookups, private porch,
off street parking, no pets, no
smokers, lease, security de-
posi t, references, credi t &
background check, utilities by
tenant. $595/month.
570-824-4884
WILKES-BARRE
Duplex, 2nd floor apartment. 1
bedroom. Heat & hot water in-
cluded. No smoking. No pets.
$500 + security.
Call 570-823-6829
WILKES-BARRE
Hazle Street
Large 1 bedroom, 2nd floor.
Appl i ances, no pets, OSP.
$650 includes all utilities. Se-
curity. 570-822-3991
WILKES-BARRE/Heights
Townhouse type apartments. 2
bedrooms, stove, fridge, wash-
er/ dryer hookup. Off-street
parking. Utilities by tenant. No
pets or smoking. $500/month.
570-825-8355, 6 t o 8 pm
ONLY
WILKES-BARRE
HISTORIC WHEELMAN
439 S. Franklin St.
Two apartments available.
(1) 1 bedroom, hardwood floors,
A/C, marble bath. security system,
laundry, off street parking. $675
(1) Unique studio. Sun porch, hard-
wood floor, security system and
laundry. Off street parking. $550
570-821-5599
WILKES-BARRE
Near Kings, 2 BR heat & wa-
ter included. $650/month. No
pets. 570-693-0285
WILKES-BARRE
Near Wilkes University
1 & 3 bedroom apartments.
$400 & $600/month +
utilities & 1 month security.
Section 8 OK. No pets.
570-606-9432
Apartments /Townhouses
WILKES-BARRE
North Main Street
Wi l kes-Barre near General
Hospital. Freshly painted 3
room apartment. Spacious eat-
in kitchen includes stove and
refrigerator. Bedroom fea-
tures 2 full size closets. Large
13 x 21 living room. Water
and sewer included. Electri-
city by tenant. Washer and
dryer available in laundry area.
Off street parking in private lot.
No pets. Security, application,
lease required. $485.00 per
month. Call 814-9574.
WILKES-BARRE
STUDIO-Short Term Available
Excellent Wilkes University
neighborhood, wood floors, park-
ing. $425, all utilities included.
570-826-1934
WILKES-BARRE
Studio on 3rd floor of historical
building at 281 S. Frankllin St.
Includes kitchenette, bath, &
off street parking. Heat, water,
& garbage removal included
$425/month rent. Call 570-333-
5471 with references.
WYOMING
2 bedrooms, sun porch, wall to
wall carpeting, gas heat, off
street parking. $500/mo + utilit-
ies. Application & background
check required. lease, security
& references. No Pets.
570-430-8527
WYOMING
BLANDINA APARTMENTS
Deluxe 2 bedroom. Wall to wall
carpet. Some utilities by ten-
ant. No pets. Non-smoking.
El derl y Communi ty. Qui et ,
safe. Off street parki ng.
570-693-2850
Commercial
EDWARDSVILLE
612-616 Main St.
REDUCED!
OWNER FINANCING
AVAILABLE!!
LEASE PURCHASE OPTION.
Unlimited potential in this once
Iconic location. Space can be
used as restaurant, (coolers &
equipment on site) bar & grill,
including office & living space
the possibilities are endless!
Call agent to make an appoint-
ment & a deal!
MLS 13-2445 $75,500
John Shelley
570-702-4162
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
Get all the advertising inserts
with the latest sales.
Call 829-5000 to start your home delivery.
PAGE 14E Sunday, September 22, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
RN SUPERVISOR
Per Diem: Eve & Night Shift
RN: UNIT MANAGER
Full Time: 7a-3:30p
LPN
PT (Day) & PRN (Eve, Night)
CNA
FT, PT, Per Diem: All Shifts Available!
(PA License/Certification Req.)
*Competitive Pay Rates*
Jump Start Your Career Today!
Contact 877-339-6999 x1 for information
Email resumes to Jobs@horizonhrs.com
Or apply in person at:
Birchwood Nursing & Rehab Center
395 Middle Rd
Nanticoke, PA 18634
LPN
PT: Day & Per Diem: All Shifts
CNA
FT, PT, Per Diem: All Shifts
(PA License/Certification Req.)
*Competitive Pay Rates*
Jump Start Your Career Today!
Contact 877-339-6999 x1 for information
Email resumes to Jobs@horizonhrs.com
Or apply in person at:
Birchwood Nursing & Rehab Center
395 Middle Rd
Nanticoke, PA 18634
TRANSPORT AIDE
(Per Diem- Day)
Skilled Nursing Facility is seeking a friendly and
enthusiastic individual with current Nurse Aide
Certification to escort residents to Medical
appointments. Must be willing to work flexible
hours with a varying schedule. Candidate will
accompany residents, NOT drive. Some evening
work may be required.
Contact 877-339-6999 x1 for information
Email resumes to Jobs@horizonhrs.com
Subject Line: ATTN-Birchwood
Or apply in person at:
Birchwood Nursing & Rehab Center
395 Middle Rd
Nanticoke, PA 18634
FOSTER PARENTING
HAVE YOU
CONSIDERED IT ?
SIBLING GROUPS
CALL CONCERN 800-654-6180
www.concern4kids.org
CNC/MACHINIST
Experiences individual to program, setup and operate CNC
Turning Center. Must be able to read and work with blueprints.
Job shop type work.
MILLING MACHINE OPERATOR
Experienced individual to setup and operate Milling machine.
Must be able to read and work will blueprints.
Job shop type work.
WELDER/FABRICATOR
Experienced individual to perform duties in MIG, TIG and Stick
Type Welding. Must be able to read and work with blueprints.
Job shop type work.
LATHE MACHINE OPERATOR
Experienced individual to setup and operate Lathe
Machine. Must be able to read and work with blueprints.
Job shop type work.
Medical insurance coverage, vacation, paycheck protection
Dupont Tool & Machine Co.
311 Elm Street, Dupont, Pa.
570-655-1728/ 570-655-6161
Get all the advertising inserts
with the latest sales.
Call 829-5000 to start
your home delivery.
Executive Director for Economic & Entrepreneurial
Development and Special Projects
The Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Business and Industry is seeking an Executive Director
for Economic & Entrepreneurial Development and Special Projects.
This dynamic individual will be responsible for assisting the CEO and the Board of Directors in
orchestrating an economic development vision promoting a strong and diverse economic base,
encouraging retention and expansion of existing businesses, planning and implementing steps
to encourage new businesses, and representing the organization with and before the
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development. He or
she will have a true passion for entrepreneurship and leverage that passion to develop a
strategic plan to attract, retain and grow businesses as part of our Incubator initiative.
We are looking for a self-starter with a love for economic development and community progress;
and an individual who desires to leave a lasting impact on our wonderful community; someone
whose entrepreneurial skills and creativity will be the keys to success in this position. This high
energy individual will take ownership of projects, drive tactical and strategic plans and become a
visible and respected leader in our community.
The successful candidate will be ready to take on any and all challenges and will have a
thorough knowledge of economic development practices and principals: finance; real estate;
applicable tax issues; marketing; communications; statistics; workforce issues and common
policies and practices; or a combination of training and experience that demonstrates the
requisite skills and abilities required for this job.
Applicants wishing to apply should meet the following requirements: Hold a Bachelor Degree in
Public Administration, Business, or Finance or a related field. 3 5 years of experience in
economic development is required; other marketing experience is a plus. Strong organizational,
communications and interpersonal skills a must. Must have the ability to work well with
committees and business owners and operators. Preference may be given to a Certified
Economic Developer (CED).
Salary range: $60,000 - $75,000 with comprehensive benefits. Relocation assistance may be
available.
Please send resume and a cover letter including salary requirements to:
Mr. Riley
c/o Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Business and Industry
2 Public Square
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18710-5340
riley@wilkes-barre.org
Absolutely no phone calls or walk-ins.
The deadline for submitting applications is September 30, 2013.
Get all the advertising inserts
with the latest sales.
Call 829-5000 to start
your home delivery.
Medical/Health
RN Unit Manager
Full Time, Day Shift
Occasional weekends &
holidays
The Jewish Home of Eastern
PA is an elegant nursing
facility specializing in skilled
nursing & rehabilitative care.
Conveniently located & easily
accessible from Interstate 81.
A BSN qualification &
supervisory experience is
preferred. Experience in long
term care & working with
dementia patients is
preferred.
An outstanding benefit
package is available includ-
ing health insurance, fully
paid employee dental, vision
& Life Insurance.
Apply online at jhep.org
or send resume to:
Prashanta Priest,
Nursing HR Coordinator
The Jewish Home
1101 Vine St. Scranton, PA
18510
EEO
Other
BODY SHOP
HELP NEEDED
Call
570-574-9877
Production/Operations
MACHINIST
Local firm has immediate
opening for CNC Lathe
Operator. Experience pre-
ferred, but will train the right
applicant. 2nd shift - 4 day
work week.
Excellent benefits.
R&H Mfg., Inc.,
Woodward Hill,
Edwardsville, PA,
570-288-6648
STRUCTURAL STEEL
FABRICATOR
Looking for experienced welders,
overhead crane operators, blue-
print reading, machine operators &
steel stud wall framers. Steady
work. Excellent opportunity. Health
insurance, vacation, holidays and
401K. Wages based on skill level.
Apply at: Luzerne Iron Works
300 Sly Street
Luzerne, PA 18709
Restaurants
BEST WESTERN PLUS
EAST MOUNTAIN INN
HAS THE FOLLOWING
PART TIME POSITIONS:
*Experienced Housekeepers
*Experienced Housekeeping
Inspector
*Houseperson/Van Drive
valid PA drivers license req'd.
*Dishwasher
*Banquet Prep/Line Cook
Uniforms & meals provided
Weekends & Holidays A Must!
APPLY IN PERSON
NO PHONE CALLS
OFF OF ROUTE 115
WILKES-BARRE, PA
Immediate
Positions Available at
Franks Pizzeria
Experienced Hand Tossed
Pizza Man and
Short Order/Line Cook
Apply in Person
198 S. Main St. Wilkes Barre.
GROTTO PIZZA
outside The Wyoming Valley
Mall, NOW HIRING ALL
POSITIONS. Part time, Full
Time, Nights & Weekends.
Servers, cooks, bakers,
buss persons and more!
Apply in person.
No phone calls!
Sales/Business Development
In Home Sales
Scranton
Wilkes Barre
$85k to 100k++ 1st yr.
Commissions
advanced - no wait.
Paid Training
Paid benefits &
incentives
Confirmed and
preset appointments
Exclusive
BATH FITTER Product
401K plus profit
sharing
Contact SIMEON
at 570-360-7235
timesleader.com
Get news
when it
happens.
WELL HELP YOU
MOVE THAT
STUFF
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OR VISIT TIMESLEADER.COM 24/7 TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD
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as an Independent Contractor
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at 570-970-7450
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Sunday, September 22, 2013 PAGE 15E
timesleaderautos.com
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PAGE 16E Sunday, September 22, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Supplier Development and Performance Manager
Playworld Systems, Inc., an international manufacturer of recreational
equipment, is seeking a Supplier Development and Performance Manager
for their corporate headquarters in Lewisburg. The position requires a
minimum of 5 years of purchasing experience and materials management in
a lean manufacturing environment. Our Ideal candidate will have a
Bachelors degree in Business Management or related field or 15 years of
experience in a related discipline. Highly developed interpersonal, technical,
analytical and computer skills are a must. Proven competencies in the
following disciplines which will prove beneficial for consideration:
Leadership and development of a team in pursuit of operational
excellence
Excellent communication skills and mentoring ability
Managing buyers and the purchasing process
Sourcing of raw materials, components, finished goods, and services
consistent with quality, delivery, and cost metrics
Supplier training and relationship initiatives to create beneficial business
partnerships
Demonstrated ability to understand and utilize lean tools to drive
continuous improvement
Implement conversion from MRP system to kanban system
Playworld Systems, Inc. offers a competitive benefits package, including but
not limited to paid vacation, health insurance, 401(K) and profit sharing
plans. Information may also be found on our web site:
www.playworldsystems.com
Qualified candidates only please apply through our website at
www.playworldsystems.com/careers; through PA Career Link;
or mail resume, references, and salary requirements to: Playworld Systems,
Inc., Attn: Human Resources, 1000 Buffalo Road, Lewisburg, PA 17837
Deadline to apply is October 1, 2013.
No phone inquiries please.
REFERENCE CHECKS AND PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG TESTING
WILL BE CONDUCTED
Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer
Women, minorities, veterans and disabled persons encouraged to apply
SALES
REPRESENTATIVE
AN INVITATION TO JOIN OUR
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING SALES TEAM!
ARE YOU A TELEPHONE PROFESSIONAL?
The Times Leader a Civitas Media property has a full time
Inside Advertising Sales opportunity available in our
Classified Department. Qualified applicant will be:
Customer oriented
Goal oriented
Able to work within daily deadlines
Have solid computer and internet knowledge
Superior verbal and written communication skills
Excellent typing and grammar skills
A high energy level and an eagerness to learn.
Compensation includes base pay plus monthly commission
If you meet these requirements and want to start an excit-
ing new career send your resume:
by October, 1, 2013 to
lbyrnes@civitasmedia.com
AUTO BODY TECHS NEEDED
Are you an experienced auto body tech and
looking for a career opportunity that offers top salary for your
quality work? If so, we would like to talk to you. We have an
extremely busy shop and are currently in need of
2-experienced techs to complete our staff. You will enjoy a
great salary and benefit package that includes health insur-
ance, retirement, and paid vacation. We reward quality work
and you can earn as much as $75,000/year. To learn more,
stop by and apply in person to:
Ray King, Manager
Pompey Collision & Auto Body
338 Pierce St., Kingston, PA 18704
570-288-6576
email: pdautobody@epix.net
E.O.E.
Mid-Atlantic Youth Services in Pittston
has openings for:
PERMANENT FULL TIME SCIENCE
TEACHER
PA Certification in grades 7-12 science or biology is required.
PERMANENT F.T. MATH TEACHER
PA Certification in grades 7-12 required.
CLINICAL SUPERVISOR
Masters Degree required.
MAYS is an EOE
Please submit resume to:
dbosque@midatlanticyouth.com
Get all the advertising inserts
with the latest sales.
Call 829-5000 to start your home delivery.
JOB FAIR!
Bring your resume and please join us:
Tuesday, September 24th
The Hilton Garden Inn
242 Highland Park Boulevard, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
3:00pm 7:00pm
Become part of the world-class team at Genpact!!
Genpact is a global leader in business process and
technology management with over 65,000+ employees
worldwide. Our focus is on improving client processes and
driving business impact.
Current openings for:
Business-to-Business (B2B) Collections Specialist
B2B Accounts Receivable & Deductions Analysts
B2B Bi-Lingual Accounts Payable Analysts
Mortgage Document Verification Analysts
*Several positions have the potential to be Work from Home*
Full-time Employees enjoy a very competitive
compensation package, including:
Generous Paid Time Off benefits
Quarterly performance-based bonuses
Up to 11 Paid Holidays
Blue Cross health care coverage plus vision & dental
401k with fantastic employer match
Rewards & Recognition Program and more!
Hiring Managers will be present!!!
DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS
MEDICAL CENTER
1111 EAST END BOULEVARD
WILKES-BARRE, PENNSYLVANIA
Nurse Practitioner
HBPC
The Wilkes-Barre VAMC is currently accepting applications for 2
full-time Nurse Practitioners for Home Based Primary Care (HBPC)
with a speciality in either Geriatrics and Extended Care or Primary
Care. Minimum of three Years Experience in Geriatrics and/or Home
Care Preferred. We offer an excellent benefit package to include:
health and life insurance, sick/vacation leave, 10 paid holidays per
year, continuing education funds, and an attractive retirement
package.
Interested applicants must apply for this position in USA Jobs at the
following website: www.usajobs.opm.gov ,
using the Vacancy Announcement 693-13-CA-959199.
Applications will be accepted through October 3, 2013.
THE VA IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
timesleader.com
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THAT STUFF
CALL 800-273-7130
OR VISIT TIMESLEADER.COM
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STARTINGAT
PAGE 18E Sunday, September 22, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Travel Entertainment
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Autos Under $5000
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MERCURY SABLE 2002'
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Autos For Sale
ACURA 12' TL-SH AWD
9,800 miles, Black on Black, all
available options, lease
buy-out, $33,000 including
taxes. 570-574-5020
$ BUYING $
JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
Highest Prices Paid Free Pickup
CA$H PAID 570-288-8995
Autos For Sale
ACME
AUTO
SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD CREDIT,
NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
AUTOS
11 AUDI S5 CONVERTIBLE
SPRINT blue/ black / brown
leather interior, navigation,
7 spd auto turbo, AWD
10 CHEVY IMPALA LT silver
59k miles
08 NISSAN AKTIMA SL
grey, grey leather, sunroof
07 BUICK LUCERNE CXL silver,
grey leather
06 AUDI A6 3.2
AVANT/STATION WAGON
black, tan leather
navigation, AWD
06 CADILLAC DTS silver, black
leather, chrome alloys
06 VW JETTA GLS blue, auto,
sunroof
06 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS grey,
auto, 4 cyl
05 CHEVY MONTE CARLO LT
white V6
05 CHEVY MONTE CARLO LS
gold
02 VW BEETLE GLS lime green
5 speed, 4 cylinder
73 PORSCHE 914 green & black,
5 speed, 62k miles.
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4s
08 LIBERTY SPORT
Silver, V6 4x4
08 CHRYSLER T&C TOURING
Blue, entertainment center
7 passenger mini van
08 JEEP COMMANDER SPORT
dark grey, 3rd seat, 4x4
08 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT black,
4 cylinder, 5 speed 4x4
08 FORD EDGE SE white V6 AWD
07 CHRYSLER ASPEN LTD
dark grey, 3rd seat, 4x4
07 DODGE CARAVAN SXT green,
07 GMC YUKON DENALI
electric blue, black leather,
navigation 4x4
06 SUBARU FORESTER
silver, V6, 4x4
06 DODGE DAKOTA QUAD
CAB TRUCK
silver, 4 door, V6, 4x4
06 NISSAN MURANO SE
white AWD
06 MERCURY MARINER silver,
V6, AWD
06 HONDA PILOT EX silver, 3rd
seat, 4x4
06 CHEVY 1500 SILVERADO REG
CAB truck red, 4x4
06 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB
Black, V8, 4x4 truck
05 NISSAN PATHFINDER SE
off road, grey, 3rd seat, 4x4
05 BUICK RENZVOUS CXL
Light grey, tan leather AWD
05 NISSAN XTERRA
black, V6, 4x4
05 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER white,
V6, 4x4
05 CHEVY COLORADO CLUB
CAB grey 4x4 truck
05 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY TOURING blue,
7 passenger mini van
05 FORD ESCAPE XLT Red,
V6 4x4
05 HYUNDAI TUSCON LX green
auto, AWD
04 HYUNDAI SANTE FE GLS
Black, V6, 4x4
04 CHEVY 1500 SILVERADO
CREW CAB white, 4 door,
4x4 truck
04 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT
QUAD CAB black
4 door 4x4 truyck
04 GMC ENVOY
black, V6, 4x4
04 FORD EXPLORER XLT
silver V6
3rd seat, 4x4
04 CHEVY AVALANCHE LT
green, grey leather, 4 door
4x4 truck
03 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD
grey black leather sunroof 4x4
03 FORD EXPEDITION XLT silver,
3rd seat, 4x4
02 MITSUBISHI MONTERO XLS
Silver, V6, 3rd seat 4x4
02 FORD F150 SUPER CREW
red & tan 4 door. 4x4 truck
01 CHEVY TRACKER LT
white V6 4x4 54k miles
01 DODGE DAKOTA CLUB CAB
SPORT blue, V6, 4x4 truck
01 FORD EXPLORER SPORT
silver, 2 door, 4x4
98 DODGE RAM 1500
QUAD CAB
V8, 4x4 truck
99 FORD F 150 SUPER CAB
silver 4x4 truck
97 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD
4x4
CADILLAC '07 DTS
Pearl white/tan leather,
heated & cooled seats.
43k miles. Warranty.
$17,995.
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
CADILLAC '00
SEVILLE
Grey/beige leather, heated
seats. 70k miles.
Two owners, local trade.
Excellent Condition
Extended Warranty
$5,495.
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
CHEVY '03 IMPALA
Power windows, locks, seats,
moonroof. GORGEOUS
BLACK! $4,925.
570-825-7577
State inspected & warrantied.
Fi nanci ng avai l abl e. CAR
FAX GUARANTEED
Autos For Sale
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
CHEVY 10 IMPALA LT
V6, Auto, all power, cruise,
CD. Very clean. Balance of
GMs Warranty.
SPECIAL $11,995
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
KIA '11 RIO LX
27,000 miles, automatic, air,
power steering & brakes,
CD/Sirius radio
Balance of Factory Warranty
Like New. Special $9.995
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
CHRYSLER '05
PT CRUISER
Excellent condition!
Warranty $4,995.
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
CHRYSLER '06
300 TOURING
Gold with beige leather,
heated power seats, alloys,
68k. Local Trade, Like New!
$11,995.
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
DODGE '10 JOURNEY
Light grey, 4 cylinder, all
power, cruise, tilt, alloys,
Sirius radio, 56k. Balance of
factory warranty. Very
clean..very economical.
SALE PRICE $12,995.
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
FORD TAURUS SE 05'
Low Miles, 35K. Runs great,
New Tires. $5,000
570-779-9976
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
FORD '11 ESCAPE XLT
4 cyl., all power,
AM/FM/CDE, Siriusn radio,
alloys, cruise, tilt. EXTRA
CLEAN. SPECIAL $13,995
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
FORD '05 TAURUS SEL
Power windows, locks, seat,
air. 59k. EXCELLENT $6,850.
570-825-7577
State inspected & warrantied.
Fi nanci ng avai l abl e. CAR
FAX GUARANTEEDe.
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
FORD 12
FUSION SE
Auto, all power, cruise, tilt,
alloys. Black. Economical.
Like new. Sporty.
SALE PRICE $12,995.
Full Notary Service Tags &
Title Transfers
HONDA '07
ACCORD EXL
6 cylinder, leather, 24,500
miles. Garage kept. Newer
tires. $16,599. 570-655-4736
HONDA '10 CIVIC EX
4 door sedan, blue/grey
cloth, alloy wheels,
sunroof, 20k miles.
Factory Warranty
$14,995.
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
HONDA '06 CIVIC LX
Power windows, locks, air.
SHARP! $7,950
570-825-7577
State inspected & warrantied.
Fi nanci ng avai l abl e. CAR
FAX - ONE OWNER
HYUNDAI '04 TIBURON
6 speed, Power windows,
locks, air. Moonroof.
SPORTY! $5,500.
570-825-7577
State inspected & warrantied.
Fi nanci ng avai l abl e. CAR
FAX GUARANTEED
Autos For Sale
LEXUS '06 ES 330
Silver/grey leather, moon
roof, heated seats. Excel-
lent condition. 82k miles.
Extended Warranty
$13,995.
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
MERCURY '07 MILAN
Power windows, locks, seat,
air. 75k.
MUST SEE & DRIVE! $8,575.
570-825-7577
State inspected & warrantied.
Fi nanci ng avai l abl e. CAR
FAX GUARANTEED
MITSUBISHI '02
GALANT GTZ
Power windows, locks, air,
moonroof. MUST SEE!
$3,975.
570-825-7577
State inspected & warrantied.
Fi nanci ng avai l abl e. CAR
FAX GUARANTEED
OLDSMOBILE '00 ALERO
Power windows, locks, air.
ECONOMICAL!
$3,450.
570-825-7577
State inspected & warrantied.
Fi nanci ng avai l abl e. CAR
FAX GUARANTEED
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
SATURN '07 ION
4 cylinder. 5 speed. REAL
SHARP CAR! $3,995.
570-696-4377
SCION XD 11'
Good condition, new brakes.
Navy Blue. 40,000K. Interior
is in good shape.
$10,800. Call Kristen
570-704-6022
TOYOTA '07 HIGHLANDER
V6 3.3 l i tre, 4WD 100,000
MILES. Auto. Black. Inspected
u n t i l 6 / 1 4 . l e a t h e r ,
EVERYTHING POWER, Sun-
roof . Cl ean i nsi de & out .
$14,500 OBO. 570-417-9974
TOYOTA '08
CAMRY LE
Red. Very good condi ti on.
Never in an accident. Well
mai nt ai ned, prof essi onal l y
cleaned & buffed. Used as
church car for pastor. 97,000
miles. $8,795. Contact
William Smalt @ 570-881-2165
TOYOTA '06
COROLLA LE
Power windows, locks, seat,
air. 65k.
SHARP! 8,950.
570-825-7577
State inspected & warrantied.
Fi nanci ng avai l abl e. CAR
FAX GUARANTEED.
VOLVO ' 06 S80
TURBO
AWD, silver/silver, sunroof,
GPS, runs & looks great,
128,000 miles. $7,400.
Contact John
570-479-3955
Volvo 98' V70 Wagon
Turbo, 4 Wheel drive, Leather
interior. Good condition in and
out! $5,000. 347-693-4156
VW '03 JETTA GLS
Red with black cloth,
heated seats, alloys, 108k.
Extended Warranty $6,200.
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
VW '03 PASSAT WAGON
Power windows, locks, air.
ECONOMICAL!
$4,995.
570-825-7577
State inspected & warrantied.
Fi nanci ng avai l abl e. CAR
FAX GUARANTEED
VW '04 PASSAT GL
Power windows, locks, air.
81k. SHARP! $7,400.
570-825-7577
State inspected & warrantied.
Fi nanci ng avai l abl e. CAR
FAX GUARANTEED
Autos For Sale
VW '10 BEETLE GLS
Red/black leather, heated
seats, moon roof. 19k
miles. Factory Warranty.
PRICE REDUCED $15,395.
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
Motorcycles
STRATUS 17'
Pleasure/
Fishing Boat
150HP Johnson motor, new
canopy Trolling motor, also.
Moving , Must Sell! 570-
498-9599
RVs / Campers
Mini Winnebago 86'
18', new inspection. Sleeps 4.
Sink, stove, refrigerator and
bathroom with shower. All in
working condition. $2,900.
570-779-3639
Mini Winnebago 86'
18', new inspection. Sleeps 4.
Sink, stove, refrigerator and
bathroom with shower. All in
working condition. $2,900.
570-779-3639
Trucks / SUVs / Vans
CHEVY '94 S10 PICK UP
4X4, automatic, extras too nu-
merous to mention. $2,000.
570-288-3053
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
CHEVY '02 BLAZER
4X4. V6. BARGAIN PRICE
$3,995.
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
CHEVY '02
SILVERADO XCAB
4X4 Sharp, Sharp truck!
$6,995
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
CHEVY '06
TRAILBLAZER
4X4. V6. EXTRA SHARP!
$5,995.
570-696-4377
LEO'S AUTO
SALES
93 Butler Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
CHEVY '93 BLAZER
2 door, 6 cylinder auto, 4x4,
new tires, radiator, tune-up,
& oil change.
$1,250
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
LEO'S AUTO
SALES
93 Butler Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
CHEVY '97 BLAZER
4 door, 6 cylinder auto, 4x4,
very good condition.
$1,750
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
DODGE '07 CARAVAN
V6, 1 owner. CLEAN VAN!
$4,995
570-696-4377
FORD '00 EXCURSION
LIMITED 4 X 4
Well maintained, runs great,
many extras & new parts.
$5,000. 570-574-3881
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
FORD 00
WINDSTAR SEL
Leather, LIKE NEW! $2,495.
570-696-4377
Ford Ranger
Pickup 94'
4 Cyl., 5-Speed, good
condition. $2,200.
570-825-4261
Trucks / SUVs / Vans
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
FORD '05 ESCAPE
4X4. Leather. Sunroof.
CLEAN SUV! $5,995.
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
GMC ENVOY 03
4X4, 3rd row Seat, SHARP
SUV!
$5,995. 570-696-4377
LEO'S AUTO
SALES
93 Butler Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
GMC '96 JIMMY
2 door, 6 cylinder, auto, 4x4.
Very Good Condition
$1,750
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
HONDA '08 PILOT SE
AWD, V6, burgundy/grey
cloth, power seat, sunroof,
63k miles. Warranty
$17,895.
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
Laredo 2005
PRICE REDUCED!
82,000 miles, Well main-
tained, excellent condition.
Beige in color, $10,500. 570-
654-7451 or 570-466-4669
JEEP '12 LIBERTY LIMITED
4x4, V6. white/tan leather,
heated seats, 33k miles.
Factory Warranty
$20,500.
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
LEXUS '04 RX330
AWD, V6, light blue/black
leather, heated seat, sunroof,
92k miles. sharp, like new.
$14,995.
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
MAZDA '03 TRIBUTE
Leather, sunroof, 4x4. Good
Miles! $4,995
570-696-4377
TOYOTA '06 HIGHLANDER
AWD, V6, silver/grey cloth,
sunroof, 3rd row seat,
90k miles.
Extended Warranty.
$12,995.
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
Auto Services
WANTED
Cars & Full Size Trucks.
For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto Parts 477-2562
Antiques & Collectibles
$ ANTIQUES $
$ BUYING $
Old Toys, Model Kits,
Bikes, Dolls, Guns,
Mining Items, Trains
& Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
BARBERS CHAIR vi ntage
Koken St. Louis Mo. orig. black
leather, very good condition,
hydraulics work B-3688 orig.
head rest, l eather strap &
clothes brush $750. 570-779-
4228 or 570-262-1032
BASEBALL CARDS 91 Up-
per Deck 800 cards $5. '93
Topps 800 cards $5. '04 Topps
800 cards $5. 570-313-5214 or
570-313-3859
Appliances
DISHWASHER portable, Ken-
more black with butcher block
top $175. Back Mountain.
570-239-5254
REFRIGERATOR Frigidaire
side by side, bisque, ice & wa-
ter on door, 26 cu. ft. $300.
570-696-5204
REFRIGERATOR white 18.2
cu. ft. $100. GE electric stove
white, glass top burners $75.
GE electric dryer white $100.
Mini refrigerator $20. 902-
9363
Appliances
REFRI GERATOR whi t e, 7
year old Roper, side by side,
ice/water dispenser & humidity
control crispers $295. Dish-
washer white, full size, Fri-
gidaire Galley Series, 5 cycles,
3 options $245. 570-287-0362
WASHER & DRYER Kenmore
less than 2 years old, perfect
condition, will sacrifice $500.
Brand new bike seats Schwinn
& Roadmaster $15. ea. Brand
new Harmony electric guitar
$50. All priced firm.
570-947-0032
Building Materials
DECONSTRUCTED bar n-
wood planks 2" thick range
7.5" to 12"w % 5'6" tp 6"-0 ap-
prox 55 pieces. Misc. shorter
pieces 2" planks. many full
2"x4" boards. $510. 570-779-
1256 or 570-855-2506
Clothing
COAT ladies black leather 3/4
length sz 14. Skirt & jacket
suits navy size 6; caramel sz
8. $7. ea. Boys winter boots
(2) Spiderman & Cars design
$4. & $3. Girls boots sz 13
navy/red trim & high silver boot
$3. ea. 570-288-0060
JACKET bl ack motorcycl e
type, size 40, good condition
$125. 570-287-5640
SNEAKERS boys size 4 Youth
Under Armour; bl ack wi t h
green, worn once $20.
570-603-1195
Computer Equip. & Software
COMPUTER Windows 7, ex-
cellent condition, works good
on internet $50. 570-824-7354
Exercise Equipment
TREADMILL $40.
GAZELLE EXERCISER $60.
SMALL REFRIGERATOR $25.
570-287-6427
TREADMILL Expanse 600,
Space saver design. Excellent
condition $75. 570-654-5141
TREADMI LL, PRO- FORM
Crosswalk, safety key, fan,
multi programs, hardly used,
excellent condition. Paid $500,
will sell for $275.
570-696-2169, leave message.
WEIGHT BENCH & cast iron
weights over 300 lbs. Dumb-
bells & barbells $300.
570-855-3113
Firewood
Firewood-All Hardwood
Cut, Split, Delivered &
Stacked. 570-443-8986
Furnances & Heaters
HEAT YOUR ENTIRE
HOME water, and more
wi t h a n OUTDOOR
WOOD FURNACE from
Central Boiler. B & C Out-
door Wood Furnace, LLC.
570-477-5692
STOVE Dickson coal burning
stove, older model, suitable for
heating & cooking, gray with
large oven & 6 lids plus top
warming oven. Very good con-
dition $300. 570-288-0204
Furniture & Accessories
BED FRAME ki ng/ queen
heavy duty, new in bix $50.
OBO. 570-788-32388
BED frame with brass head-
board, full $75. French Provin-
cial sofa, soft gold & white,
$100. Matching chair & otto-
man $75. 2 White end tables-2
shelves, $35. ea. Oval coffee
table, glass/brass $75.
70.655.6290
BED queen size tubular steel,
no mattress $175. Anti que
brown wood desk, 7 drawers
$300. Bookcase, 2 gl ass
doors, 3 shelves $300. Ban-
quet folding tables 3 for $150.
570-654-4440
BED/twin with built in 4 draw-
ers under & shelves, light in
headboar d. pai d $800 6
months old, asking $250. Kit-
chen table with leaf, 4 chairs
solid wood, used Asking $75.
570-690-3760
BEDROOM FURNITURE 8 pc
mahogany, chest, dresser with
mirror, vanity with mirror, van-
ity bench, small mahogany
chair, extra mirror for chest.
$400. Lazyboy red all leather
sofa approx. 88" l, 3 cushion
attached back $525. 331-0533
BEDROOM SUITE 7 pc. oak,
full/queen footboard & head-
board, dresser wi th mi rror,
desk with hutch top, chest with
hutch top, solid wood, all good
condition $400. 570-235-1315
COMPUTER CHAI R ad-
justable height & back, brown
good condition. $25. 570-819-
2793
COUCH Olive color, very good
condition. $200. Call Nancy
570-479-0021
COUCH, loveseat, oversized
chai r, Contemporary styl e,
beige in color $400. Kitchen ta-
bl e 54", 6 padded chai rs,
brown $300. Coffee & end
tabl es Mi ssi on oak $200.
570-693-1454
DINING ROOM SET, l arge
chi na cabi net wi th l i ghted
shelves, 3 drawers & 2 cabin-
ets, table with 3 12" leafs serv-
er & 6 uphol stered chai rs
$1200. Tiffany lamp, large size
for over table, neutral color
$100. Brass chandelier $50.
Dog crate medium size $50.
570-823-9467 after 6pm
DRY SINK Very nice wood
&accents. Has a shelf inside.
Use as a dry sink or make a
bathroom vanity out of it with a
modern bowl si nk ? $150.
Cash or Paypal in Hanover
Twp. 735-2661
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
Sauder, oak, 2 shelves for
component s, st or age f or
DVDs, CDs or VHS will fit 27"
or most 32" flat screen, very
good condition $30. 570-675-
5622 timesleaderautos.com
Find Your Next
Vehicle Online.
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STK# N22430
M O DEL# 12112
V IN# 756446
M SRP $19,420
2 A T TH IS 2 A T TH IS
P R IC E! P R IC E!
SA VE $3000O FF M SR P !
B U Y FOR
$
16,420
*
+ T/T
OR
$
18 9
*
L EAS E FOR
P ER
M O.
W / $20 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
2012N IS S A N
ROGUE S FW D
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL ,
Cru is e, T ilt, S p la s h Gu a rd s ,
F lo o rM a ts & M u ch M o re!
*$199 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $12,908;
m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $2000 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s
regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50. $1000 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed .
STK# N21596
M O DEL# 22112
V IN# 274973
M SRP $23,050
7 A T TH IS 7 A T TH IS
P R IC E! P R IC E!
SA VE $4000O R M O R E
O N A LL 2012 R O G U ES!!
B U Y FOR
$
18 ,995
*
+ T/T
OR
$
199
*
L EAS E FOR
P ER
M O.
W / $150 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
O NLY 50
2012 R O G U ES
R EM A IN
H U R R Y !
2013N IS S A N
A L TIM A 2.5S E DA N
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C,
PW , PDL , T ilt,
Zero Gra vity
S ea ts , F lo o rM a ts
& M u ch M o re!
*$259 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles
p eryea r; Res id u a l= $11,837.80; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru
NM AC @ T ier1; $2000 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s
regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50.
STK# N22468
M O DEL# 13013
V IN# 125432
M SRP $22,410
2 A T TH IS 2 A T TH IS
P R IC E! P R IC E!
B U Y FOR
$
20 ,410
*
+ T/T
OR
$
259
*
L EAS E FOR
P ER
M O.
2012N IS S A N
P A THFIN DE R S 4X4
V6, Au to , A/ C, PW ,
PDL , Cru is e, T ilt,
AM / F M / CD, Allo ys ,
F lo o rM a ts
& M u ch M o re!
*$259 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles
p eryea r; Res id u a l= $15,834.35; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru
NM AC @ T ier1; $2500 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s
regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2702.50. $1750
Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te & $1000 S ep tBo n u s Ca s h in clu d ed .
STK# N22166
M O DEL# 25012
V IN# 625154
M SRP $32,315
6 A T TH IS 6 A T TH IS
P R IC E! P R IC E!
B U Y FOR
$
25,8 15
*
+ T/T
OR
$
259
*
L EAS E FOR
P ER
M O.
W / $250 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H & $10 0 0 S EP T B ON U S CAS H
SA VE $6000O R M O R E O N A LL
2012 M U R A NO S IN STO C K!!
W / $20 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H & $50 0 S EP T B ON U S CAS H
2012N IS S A N M A XIM A
3.5S L IM ITE D E DITION
V-6, CVT , A/ C, S u n ro o f,
Bla ck W heels , F lo o r
M a ts , AM / F M / CD,
M u ch, M u ch M o re!
*$289 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $19,627.95;
m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $2000 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s
regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2,202.50. $1000 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed .
STK# N22368
M O DEL# 16112
V IN# 861635
M SRP $34,435
5 A T TH IS 5 A T TH IS
P R IC E! P R IC E!
B U Y FOR
$
27,435
*
+ T/T
OR
$
28 9
*
L EAS E FOR
P ER
M O.
W / $350 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
H U R R Y ! H U R R Y !
WERE
SCHOOLING
THE
COMPETITION
2012N IS S A N A L TIM A
2.5S COUP E
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, L ea ther, Prem iu m Pa cka ge, F o g L ights ,
M o o n ro o f, Bo s e S o u n d , Cn v. Pkg, & M u ch M o re!
*$299 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l=
$16,710.90; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $2000 ca s h d o w n o r
tra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50.
STK# N22155
M O DEL# 15112
V IN# 260196
M SRP $31,530
2 A T TH IS 2 A T TH IS
P R IC E! P R IC E!
B U Y FOR
$
26,530
*
+ T/T
OR
$
299
*
L EAS E FOR
P ER
M O.
W / $150 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
SA VE $5000O FF M SR P !
2012N IS S A N XTE RRA
S 4X4
V6, Au to , A/ C, Va lu e Pkg, AM / F M / CD, PW ,
PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, Allo ys , & M u ch M o re!
*$299 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l=
$15,873; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $2500 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e
eq u ity. (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2702.50.
STK# N21979
M O DEL# 24212
V IN# 513857
M SRP $30,525
6 A T TH IS 6 A T TH IS
P R IC E! P R IC E!
B U Y FOR
$
26,525
*
+ T/T
OR
$
299
*
L EAS E FOR
P ER
M O.
W / $150 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
SA VE $4000O R M O R E O N A LL
2012 XTER R A S IN STO C K!!
SA VE $$$
O N TH E NEW
A LTIM A !!!
*Tax and Tag additional. Prior Sales Excluded. Not Responsible for Typographical Errors. All rebates &incentives applied. ** 0%APR in lieu of rebates. Ask for details.
**As per NISSAN Montly Sales Volume Report as of August 2013. All Prices based on immediate delivery iin stock vehicles only. All ofers expire 9/30/13.
WERE
SCHOOLING
THE
COMPETITION
2014 NISSAN
VERSANOTE SVHATCHBACK
STK# N23864
MOD# 11614
VIN# 356442
MSRP $17,115
4 Cyl., CVT, A/C, PW, PDL, Cruise,
Tilt, Floor Mats and Splash
Guards and much more!
2 AT THIS
PRICE! ONLY 24 MONTH LEASE @$189 PLUS TAX
BUY FOR
$
16,995
*
+T/T
OR
LEASE FOR
$
189
*
PER
MO.
*189 per month plus tax, 24 month lease; 12,000 miles per year; Residual=$12,151.65; Must be approved thru NMAC @Tier 1;
$800.50 cash down or trade equity. (+) plus registration fees; total @ delivery=$1000.00. $425 NISSAN Lease Rebate included.
2013 NISSAN
SENTRAS SDN
STK# N24035
MOD# 12013
VIN# 753002
MSRP $18,960
4 Cyl., CVT, Alloys, Bluetooth,
PW, PDL, Floor Mats, Splash
Guards and much more!!
SIMILAR SAVINGS ON ALL NEW 2013
NISSAN SENTRAS IN STOCK ONLY!!
BUY FOR
$
17,495
*
+T/T
OR
LEASE FOR
$
219
*
PER
MO.
*219 per month plus tax, 36 month lease; 12,000 miles per year; Residual=$10,996.80; Must be approved thru NMAC @
Tier 1; $0 cash down or trade equity. (+) plus registration fees; total @ delivery=$0. $900 NISSAN Lease Rebate included.
3 AT THIS
PRICE!
W/ $500 NMAC CAPTIVE CASH
2013 NISSAN
ALTIMA2.5S SDN
STK# N23628
MOD# 13113
VIN# 547941
MSRP $24,645
4 Cyl., CVT, A/C, PW, PDL,
Tilt, Zero Gravity, Seats, Floor
Mats and much more!
2 AT THIS
PRICE!
BUY FOR
$
19,999
*
+T/T
OR
LEASE FOR
$
249
*
PER
MO.
*249 per month plus tax, 36 month lease; 12,000 miles per year; Residual=$14,540.55; Must be
approved thru NMAC @Tier 1; $0 cash down or trade equity. (+) plus registration fees; total @
delivery=$0. $375 NISSAN Lease Rebate and $600 Equipment Allowance Applied.
W/ $1000 NISSAN REBATE. $500 NMAC CAPTIVE
CASH & $600 NISSAN EQUIPMENT ALLOWANCE.
SIMILAR SAVINGS ON ALL NEW 2013
NISSAN ALTIMAS IN STOCK ONLY!!
2013 NISSAN
ROGUE SVAWD
STK# N24025
MOD# 22413
VIN# 652557
MSRP $25,220
4 Cyl., CVT, A/C, Alloys, Bluetooth,
Roof Rails, Rear Tinted Glass, Power
Seat and much more!!
BUY FOR
$
21,520
*
+T/T
OR
LEASE FOR
$
259
*
PER
MO.
*259 per month plus tax, 39 month lease; 12,000 miles per year; Residual=$13,871.00; Must
be approved thru NMAC @Tier 1; $0 cash down or trade equity. (+) plus registration fees; total
@ delivery=$0. $2,250 NISSAN Lease Rebate included.
SIMILAR SAVINGS ON ALL NEW 2013
NISSAN ROGUES IN STOCK ONLY!!
2 AT THIS
PRICE!
W/ $1000 NISSAN REBATE &$500 NMAC CAPTIVE CASH
2013 NISSAN
MURANOSVAWD
STK# N22962
MOD# 23413
VIN# 302925
MSRP $37,905
V-6, CVT, A/C, Bluetooth, Navi,
Bose Sound, PWR, Liftgate and
much, much more!!
BUY FOR
$
29,905
*
+T/T
OR
LEASE FOR
$
379
*
PER
MO.
*379 per month plus tax, 39 month lease; 12,000 miles per year; Residual=$19,710.60; Must be approved thru
NMAC @Tier 1; $0 cash down or trade equity. (+) plus registration fees; total @ delivery=$0. $1500 NISSAN
LEASE REBATE INCLUDED & $1000 CUSTOMER BONUS + $2450 EQUIPMENT ALLOWANCE APPLIED.
W/ $500 NISSAN REBATE, $500 NMAC CASH, $1000
CUSTOMER BONUS CASH &$2450 EQUIPMENT ALLOWANCE.
5 AT THIS
PRICE!
SIMILAR SAVINGS ON ALL NEW 2013
NISSAN MURANOS IN STOCK ONLY!!
SAVE
$8000
OFF MSRP!
V-6, CVT, Leather, Rear DVD, PW,
PDL, Cruise, Tilt, Alloys and much,
much more!
BUY FOR
$
37,999
*
+T/T
OR
LEASE FOR
$
489
*
PER
MO.
*489 per month plus tax, 36 month lease; 12,000 miles per year; Residual=$22,960.20; Must be approved thru
NMAC @Tier 1; $1800 cash down or trade equity. (+) plus registration fees; total @ delivery=$2000. NISSAN
LEASE REBATE INCLUDED.
SIMILAR SAVINGS ON ALL NEW 2013
NISSAN PATHFINDERS IN STOCK ONLY!!
2 AT THIS
PRICE!
W/ $1000 NISSAN REBATE &$500 NMAC CAPTIVE CASH
SAVE
$7000
OFF MSRP!
2013 NISSAN
PATHFINDER
PLATINUM
4x4
STK# N23225
MOD# 25613
VIN# 637981
MSRP $45,020
2013 NISSAN
FRONTIER SVC.C. 4X4 6 speed
STK# N23428
MOD# 32463
VIN# 722605
MSRP $28,835
V-6, 6 Speed, A/C, PW, PDL,
Cruise, Tilt and much, much
more!
3 AT THIS
PRICE!
BUY FOR
$
25,835
*
+T/T
OR
LEASE FOR
$
299
*
PER
MO.
*299 per month plus tax, 39 month lease; 12,000 miles per year; Residual=$16,724.30; Must be approved thru NMAC
@Tier 1; $0 cash down or trade equity. (+) plus registration fees; total @ delivery=$0. $500 NISSAN CUSTOMER
BONUS CASH INCLUDED.
SIMILAR SAVINGS ON ALL NEW 2013
NISSAN FRONTIERS IN STOCK ONLY!!
W/ $500 NISSAN REBATE, $500 NMAC CAPTIVE CASH &
$500 CUSTOMER BONUS CASH.
2013 NISSAN
TITANSVC.C. 4X4
V-8, AUTO, Value Truck Package, Alloys,
Rear Camera, Tow Hitch, Blue Tooth,
Satellite Radio and much, much more!
BUY FOR
$
30,905
*
+T/T
SIMILAR SAVINGS ON ALL NEW 2013
NISAN TITANS IN STOCK ONLY!!
2 AT THIS
PRICE!
W/ $2500 NISSAN REBATE, $500 NMAC CAPTIVE
CASH & $2350 CUSTOMER BONUS CASH
SAVE
$9000
OFF MSRP!
STK# N23331
MOD# 36413
VIN# 300071
MSRP $39,905
OVER
360
NEWNISSANS
AVAILABLE
HUGE
SAVINGS
ON ALL
NEW 2013
NISSANS

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Sunday, September 22, 2013 PAGE 19E


PRE-OWNED SUPER CENTER
Route 309 Hazleton 570-454-2414 962 Wyoming Ave Exeter 570-602-0226
Mon-Thurs 8:30-8, Fri 8:30-5, Sat 9-4:30 Mon-Thurs 9-8, Fri 9-6, Sat 9-4
Route 309 Hazleton
570-454-2414
962 Wyoming Ave.
Exeter 570-602-0226
Mon-Thurs 8:30-8: Fri 8:30-5, Sat 9-4:30 Mon-Thurs 9-8, Fri 9-6, Sat 9-4
Sale Ends September 30, 2013. (T) All vehicles plus tax, tags, doc and registration fees. Trades accepted at cash value.
MSRP
$
28,195
Ford Rebate 1,000
Barber Discount 1,195
Ford Credit Retail
Bonus Cash 500
Ford Competitive
Lease Rebate 1,000
College/Military
Rebate 500
(4) Plus tax, tags, license & dealer doc fees w/ approved credit. 10,500
miles/yr. $2500Down (cash or trade). Add $645 Acquisition Fee; first
payment due at signing; no security deposit.
Auto, 1.6L EcoBoost, Sync Voice
Activated #7657
$
189/mo
4
for 24 months
Lease
It For
2011
$
19,980
T
NOW!
Auto,
PW, PL,
Tilt, A/C,
Cruise
#7522A
NOW!
PRE-OWNED SUPER CENTER
Barber Ford Auto Loan Center
602-0226
Call Mickey
C
re
d
it
C
o
n
c
e
rn
s
?
at
the
All applicatons will
be processed.
See dealer for details.
602-0226
Barber Ford Auto Loan Center
Factory-backed warranty Free vehicle history report
172-point inspection by factory-trained technicians
(2) Plus tax, tags, license & dealer doc fees w/ approved credit. 10,500
miles/yr. $2500Down (cash or trade). Add $645 Acquisition Fee; first
payment due at signing; no security deposit.
Auto, Comfort Package
#3746
2014 FORD FIESTA SE
for 24 months
Lease
It For
$
139/mo
2
$
23,544
T
NOW! NOW!
2014 FORD FOCUS SE
(4) Plus tax, tags, license & dealer doc fees w/ approved credit. 10,500
miles/yr. $2500Down (cash or trade). Add $645 Acquisition Fee; first
payment due at signing; no security deposit.
2013 FORD FUSION SE
Auto, A/C, Sync Voice
Activated, Advancetrac #3694
$
19,880
3
$
169/mo
4
for 24 months
Lease
It For
2013 FORD FUSION SE
MSRP
$
25,200
Ford Rebate 1,320
Barber Discount 1,500
Ford Competitive
Lease Rebate 1,000
Ford Credit Retail
Bonus Cash 1,000
College/Military
Rebate 500
Financing for
60 months with
approved credit
6
2012 NISSAN VERSA
NOW!
FWD,
Auto,
A/C,
PW, PL
#P3354A
NOW!
2012 HYUNDAI ACCENT GLS HATCHBACK
$
14,280
T
Auto,
A/C,
PW, PL,
Tilt
#P3366A
NOW! NOW!
$
13,900
T
$
5,320
in
Savings!
Bring in your vehicle to Barber Ford today!
See dealer for details.
w
e
w
i
l
l
top
dollar car car w
e
o
f
f
e
r
f
o
r
y
o
u
r
Whether or not you buy fromus
www.barberautogroup.com
0
%
Financing
60 Months
for
on select models with approved credit
6
Financing
60 Months
0
%
for
make
an offer
w
e
o
f
f
e
r
f
o
r
y
o
u
r
top
dollar
make
an offer
vehicle
o
n
y
o
u
r
w
e
w
i
l
l
o
n
y
o
u
r
vehicle
2013 FORD C-MAX HYBRID SEL
MSRP
$
32,370
Ford Rebate 1,000
Barber Discount 1,570
Ford Competitive
Lease Rebate 1,000
College/Military
Rebate 500
302a Package, Power Liftgate, Rear
View Camera, Moonroof, Navigation,
Sync Voice Activation #7594T
$
4,070 in
Savings!
Now
at
Barber
Ford
BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY AMERICAN AMERICAN AMERICAN AMERICAN AMERICAN
Sale ends 09/30/13. (1) (2) (3) (4) All vehicles plus tax, tags, license and dealer doc fees with approved credit. College Student Rebate applies to a full-time college student, recent college or current graduate school student. Military Rebate applies to active military personnel. (2) (4) $2,500 Down (cash or trade). (3) (4) To qualify for Ford Lease
Renewal, customer must be returning a Ford Lease. Ford Credit Retail Bonus Cash requires financing with Ford Credit. (6) Must finance through Ford Credit. 0% Financing for 60 months with approved credit in lieu of rebates. (3) (4) (8) (9) Ford Competitive Lease Rebate customer is required to trade-in or terminate their lease of a 95 or
newer non-Ford vehicle for added lease and retail incentives when purchasing a new Ford vehicle.
2013 FORDMUSTANGCOUPE
$
18,800
T
NOW!
3.7L V6,
PW, PL,
Cruise, Tilt,
A/C
#P3327A
NOW!
2014 Ford Explorers and
2014 Ford Escapes are
here and in stock!
2014 Ford Explorers and
2014 Ford Escapes are
here and in stock!
(4) Plus tax, tags, license & dealer doc fees w/ approved credit. 10,500
miles/yr. $2500Down (cash or trade). Add $645 Acquisition Fee; first
payment due at signing; no security deposit.
MSRP
$
31,990
Ford Rebate 2,750
Barber Discount 1,190
Ford Credit Retail
Bonus Cash 500
Ford Competitive
Lease Rebate 1,000
College/Military
Rebate 500
$
189/mo
4
for 24 months
Lease
It For
$
26,050
3
2013 FORD EDGE SE AWD
Sync Voice Activated,
Advancetrac #7654
0
%
Financing for 60
months +
$
1750
Ford Bonus Cash with
approved credit
6
$
13,900
T
3 C-MAX at
Similar Savings!
2010 ACURA RDX
3.6L V6,
PW, PL,
Tilt, A/C,
Leather
#7606A
2009 CADILLAC SRX
$
14,280
T
2012 MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER SPORT
$
18,680
T
NOW!
Auto,
PW, PL,
Tilt, A/C,
Cruise
#P3338B
NOW!
$
19,980
T
2012 FORDFOCUS SEL
$
15,680
T
Auto, A/C,
Cruise,
Tilt,
PW, PL
#P3380A
NOW! NOW!
2010 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT
$
16,280
T
NOW!
3.7L V6,
PW, PL,
Tilt,
A/C
#P3337B
NOW!
2011 KIA SORENTOLX
$
17,680
T
NOW!
3.5L V6,
PW, PL,
Cruise, Tilt,
A/C, 4WD
#P3307B
NOW!
2014 FORD FOCUS SE
0
%
MSRP
$
17,630
Ford Rebate 325
Barber Discount 500
College/Military
Rebate 500
2014 FORD FIESTA SE
(2) Plus tax, tags, license & dealer doc fees w/ approved credit. 10,500
miles/yr. $2500Down (cash or trade). Add $645 Acquisition Fee; first
payment due at signing; no security deposit.
Auto, Comfort Package
#3759
$
17,000
1
for 24 months
Lease
It For
$
149/mo
2
$
3,405
in
Savings!
0
%
Financing for
60 months with
approved credit
6
MSRP
$
20,405
Ford Rebate 2,000
Barber Discount 905
College/Military
Rebate 500
2013 FORD EDGE SE AWD
MSRP
$
35,880
Ford Rebate 3,750
Barber Discount 1,980
Ford Competitive
Lease Rebate 1,000
Ford Credit Retail
Bonus Cash 750
College/Military
Rebate 500
PW, PL, Sync Voice Activated,
Heated Leather, Power Moonroof,
Rear View Camera #3733
A/C, PW, PL, Sync Voice Activated,
Advancetrac, Heated Leather,
Moonroof #3744
3 Taurus at
Similar Savings!
2013 FORD C-MAX HYBRID SEL
$
139
$
17,000
$
149
$
189
$
19,880
$
169
$
26,050
$
189
$
15,680
T $
18,800
T
$
17,680
T
$
16,280
T
$
23,544
T
$
18,680
T
$
5,940
in
Savings!
$
28,300
3
$
28,300
$
16,305
1
$
1,325
in
Savings!
0
.9
%
$
16,305
2014 FORD ESCAPE SE 4WD
$
24,000
3
$
4,195
in
Savings!
Financing for 60
months +
$
1000
Ford Bonus Cash with
approved credit
6
2014 FORD ESCAPE SE 4WD
0
%
Financing for 60
months +
$
500
Ford Bonus Cash
with approved credit
6
$
27,900
3
$
27,900
2014 FORD TAURUS SEL AWD
$
7,980
in
Savings!
2014 FORD TAURUS SEL AWD
Financing for 60 months
+
$
750 Ford Bonus Cash
with approved credit
6
0
.9
%
MSRP
$
35,085
Ford Rebate 1,000
Barber Discount 1,930
Ford Competitive
Lease Rebate 1,000
Ford Credit Retail
Bonus Cash 500
College/Military
Rebate 500
$
30,155
3
10 Fusions at
Similar Savings!
$
30,155
2014 FORD FUSION TITANIUM AWD
$
4,930
in
Savings!
2014 FORD FUSION TITANIUM AWD
Financing for 60 months
+
$
500 Ford Bonus Cash
with approved credit
6
0
.9
%
$
24,000
PAGE 20E Sunday, September 22, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
339 HIGHWAY 315, PITTSTON, PA 1-800-223-1111
*ALL PRICES PLUS TAX, TAGS, & FEES. ART WORK FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY. DEALER NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. 3 YEAR / 100,000 MILE
LIMITED POWERTRAIN WARRANTY ON 2008 MODELS AND NEWER WITH LESS THAN 75,000 MILES. 90 DAY / 3,000 MILE LIMITED POWERTRAIN WARRANTY ON 2004 MODELS AND
NEWER WITH LESS THAN 100,000 MILES. SALE ENDS 9/28/2013.
www.KenPollockCertified.com
PLATINUM CERTIFIED HIGHLINE VALUE VEHICLE OUTLET
3 Year/100,000 Mile Warranty
125-Point Inspection Full Service Dealership Body
Shop Parts Accessories Service Sales
PLATINUM
CERTIFIED:
A Higher Standard Of Pre-Owned Vehicle
SPEND LESS AND GET MORE...
The Right VehicleFor You And Your Budget!
1.54% Financing With Millions To Lend and
FREE On All Vehicles
$
52,993*
2013 GMC YUKON DENALI AWD
NAVIGATION, HEATED LEATHER, MOONROOF,
BUCKETS, 1-OWNER, STOCK # P15244
$
6,999*
2007 FORD TAURUS SEDAN
AUTOMATIC, POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS,
ALLOYS, STOCK # P15300
FLEET PURCHASE
SPECIALS!!!
2013 HYUNDAI
SONATA GLS SEDANS
POWER WINDOWS &LOCKS,
CD, 1-OWNER, AUTO,
STOCK# P15238
ONLY4LEFT
STARTING@$15,996*
$
35,989*
2013 VOLVO C70
HARDTOP CONVERTIBLE
NAVIGATION, HEATED LEATHER, ONLY 4K
MILES!!! STOCK # P15227
$
36,498*
2012 ACURA MDX
AWD SUV
NAVIGATION, 3RD ROW SEATING, HEATED
LEATHER, MOONROOF,
STOCK # V1014A
$
9,999*
2010 SUZUKI SX4 HATCHBACK
AUTOMATIC, POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS, CD,
1-OWNER, STOCK # P15236
FLEET PURCHASE
SPECIALS!!!
2013 SUBARU
LEGACY SEDANS
1-OWNER VEHICLES, COLD
WEATHER PKGs WITHHEATEDSEATS,
AUTOS, STOCK# P15250
10AVAILABLE
STARTING@$19,993*
$
8,999*
2005 VOLVO S40 AWD
ALL WHEEL DRIVE, AUTOMATIC, ALLOYS,
STOCK # V1155A
$
11,995*
2008 CHEVROLET
IMPALA SEDAN
ONLY 30K MILES, 1-OWNER, POWER
WINDOWS AND LOCKS,
STOCK # P15164
$
12,487*
2012 NISSAN
VERSA SEDAN
AUTOMATIC, POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS,
1-OWNER, STOCK # P15302
$
12,827*
2012 DODGE
AVENGER SXT SEDAN
CHROME WHEELS, AUTOMATIC, PW, PL,
1-OWNER, STOCK # P15093
$
12,996*
2012 TOYOTA
CAROLLA SEDAN
LE PACKAGE, POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS,
1-OWNER, STOCK # P15097
$
13,930*
2009 HYUNDAI
AZERA SEDAN
LEATHER, MOONROOF, ALLOYS, POWER SEAT,
STOCK # P15137
$
13,993*
2008 NISSAN
XTERRA S 4X4
ALLOYS, AUTOMATIC, ROOFRACK, PW, PL,
STOCK#P15188A
$
1 3,994*
2012 SUZUKI
SX4 CROSSOVER AWD
ALL WHEEL DRIVE, ALLOYS, 1-OWNER,
LOW MILES, STOCK # P15150
$
16,794*
2012 FORD
FOCUS SEDAN
LEATHER, MOON ROOF, AUTO, 1-OWNER,
STOCK # P15246
$
1 7,997*
2013 KIA
OPTIMA
LX PACKAGE, POWER WINDOWS &
LOCKS, AUTOMATIC, 1-OWNER, STOCK #
P15203
$
19,998*
2012 HYUNDAI
SANTA FE AWD
ALLOY WHEELS, AUTOMATIC, POWER
WINDOWS & LOCKS, STOCK # P15249
2011 CHEVROLET
CAMARO COUPE
LT PACKAGE, MOON ROOF, AUTOMATIC, ONLY
11K MILES, STOCK # P15146
$
20,991*
$
20,899*
2012 NISSAN
XTERRA 4X4
ALLOYSWHEELS, POWERWINDOWS&LOCKS,
AUTOMATIC, STOCK#P15178
$
25,934*
2013 DODGE RAM 1500
QUAD CAB 4X4
SLT PACKAGE, POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS,
ALLOYS, 1-OWNER, STOCK # P15128
$
22,899*
2010 LEXUS HS200H
SEDAN
HYBRID, NAVIGATION, MOON ROOF,
HEATED LEATHER, STOCK # P15119A
$
9,999*
2004 AUDI A4 CONVERTIBLE
AUTOMATIC, LEATHER, STOCK # P15251A
$
42,994*
2012 CHEVROLET
TAHOE LT 4X4
NAVIGATION, DVD, BUCKET SEATS, 3RD
ROW, LOW MILES, STOCK # P15177
$
17,893*
2010 NISSAN
ROUGE AWD
KROM EDITION, ALLOYS, LOW LOW
MILES, 1-OWNER, STOCK # P15235
$
21,999*
2009 HONDA
PILOT EX-L 4WD
LEATHER, MOONROOF, 3RD ROW,
4-WHEEL DRIVE, STOCK # P15218
$
20,690*
2013 JEEP
COMPASS AWD
LATITUDE EDITION, 1-OWNER, ALL WHEEL
DRIVE, MOONROOF, STOCK # P15201A
$
10,898*
2005 JEEP
GRAND CHEROKEE 4WD
LAREDO, V6, PW, PL, ALLOY WHEELS,
STOCK # P15267A
$
10,999*
2012 TOYOTA
YARIS SEDAN
POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS, AUTOMATIC,
A/C, STOCK # P15056
$
12,993*
2012 SUZUKI
SX4 SPORTBACK
ALLOY WHEELS, AUTOMATIC, PW, PL,
1-OWNER, STOCK # P14741
$
12,994*
2004 FORD
F150 SUPERCAB 4X4
XLT PACKAGE, V8, POWER WINDOWS &
LOCKS, STOCK # P15217A
$
19,999*
2009 BMW 328XI
SEDAN
ALL WHEEL DRIVE, HEATED LEATHER,
MOONROOF, STOCK # V1064A
$
7,997*
2006 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4
POWER WINODWS & LOCKS, AUTO,
STOCK # P15176A
$
12,899*
2011 CHEVROLET
MALIBU
1-OWNER, LOW MILES, POWER
WINDOWS & LOCKS, STOCK # P15148
$
12,997*
2012 CHEVROLET
IMPALA SEDAN
ALLOY WHEELS, 1-OWNER, POWER
WINDOWS & LOCKS, STOCK # P15206
$
14,999*
2010 NISSAN
SENTRA SL SEDAN
NASVIGATION, HEATED LEATHER,
MOONROOF, AUTO, STOCK # P15187
$
15,246*
2008 VOLVO
S40 SEDAN
AUTOMATIC, ALLOYS, LOW MILES,
PW, PL, STOCK # V1153A
$
16,128*
2011 CHRYSLER
SEBRING SEDAN
TOURING PKG, MOONROOF, ALLOYS,
LOW MILES, STOCK # P15161A
$
16,758*
2011 MITSUBISHI
ENDEAVOR AWD
ALLOYS, POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS,
CD, STOCK # P15271
$
16,998*
2012 JEEP
LIBERTY SPORT 4X4
ALLOY WHEELS, AUTOMATIC, TINTED
WINDOWS, STK #P15174
$
16,989*
2008 HYUNDAI
VERACRUZ SUV AWD
HEATED LEATHER, MOONROOF, ALLOYS,
1-OWNER, STOCK # V1168A
2010 VOLKSWAGEN
CC
SPORT PACKAGE, RARE MANUAL TRANS,
PW, PL, STOCK # P15193A
$
16,999*
$
19,864*
2011 JEEP
WRANGLER 2DR 4X4
ALLOYWHEELS, POWERWINDOWS&LOCKS,
1-OWNER, STOCK#P15144
$
27,999*
2013 NISSAN
TITAN CREW CAB 4X4
SV PACKAGE, ALLOY WHEEL, SIDE
STEPS, PW, PL, STOCK # P15265
$
30,694*
2013 INFINITI G37X
SEDAN
ALL WHEEL DRIVE, REAR CAMERA,
HEATED LEATHER, MOONROOF, STOCK
# P15263
$
8,493*
2008 KAWASAKI VULCAN
NOMAD MOTORCYCLE
ONLY 2,600 MILES, TWO-TONE PAINT, HARD SADDLE
BAGS, 1-OWNER, STOCK # P15226A
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Sunday, September 22, 2013 PAGE 21E
PAGE 22E Sunday, September 22, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Stk# ED532788
MSRP -
$24,865
Lease is based on 24 monthly payments at 10,000 miles per year with $2,495
due at delivery which includes $595 Acquisition Fee plus tags, title, and dealer
processing fee due at signing. With approved credit thru Chrysler Capital.
Payment is plus tax, Includes $1,000 Rebate, $1,000 Lease Loyalty/Conquest
Rebate, $500 Military $500 Jeep Celebration Bonus
NEW 2014 JEEP PATRIOT LATITUDE 4x4
Lease For
As Low As
$
176/24 mo
PLUS TAX
Stk#DN754926
MSRP -
$31,285
Lease is based on 27 monthly payments at 10,000 miles per year with
$2,495 due at delivery which includes $595 Acquisition Fee plus tags, title,
and dealer processing fee due at signing. With approved credit thru Chrysler
Capital. Payment is plus tax, Includes $1,500 Lease Cash Rebate, $500
Military Rebate $1,000 Bonus Cash, $1,000 Returning Lease
NEW 2013 CHRYSLER 200 LIMITED SEDAN
Stk#1351001
MSRP -
$50,620
Includes all rebates
NEW 2013 CHRYSLER 300C LUXURY SERIES AWD
Stk#EC262756
MSRP -
$33,490
Lease is based on 36 monthly payments at 10,000 miles per year with
$2,495 due at delivery which includes $595 Acquisition Fee plus tags, title,
and dealer processing fee due at signing. With approved credit thru Chrysler
Capital. Payment is plus tax, Includes $1,000 Lease Loyalty/Conquest
Rebate, $500 Military, $500 Jeep Celebration Bonus
NEW 2014 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 4x4
BLUETOOTH
ALUMINUM WHEELS
REAR AIR & HEAT
Stk#DR754027
MSRP -
$28,380
Includes $2,000 Rebate, $1,000 Returning Leasee, $500 Military,
$500 Owner Loyalty
NEW 2013 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT
Sale Price
Now As Low As
$
22,600
Tax, Documentation Fee and Registration Fee are extra. Chrysler Group retains the right to change incentives/rebates without prior notice. Lease Bonus Rebate is for eligible customers currently leasing
a Chrysler Group Vehicle or returning from a Chrysler Group Vehicle Lease, Restrictions Apply. Military Rebates are for Military Members currently serving or retired Military Members with 20 years
of prior service. Rebates are in lieu of low nance options such as 0% Ally (except on select models, see sales consultant). All prior sales offered excluded. All rebates have been applied to prices.
Ally/Chase Rebates require nancing thru Ally or Chase. All Subject to prior sales. Photos of vehicles are for illustration purpose only. Exp. Date 7-20-13. Some restrictions apply.
888-323-6924
TUNKHANNOCK AUTO MART
888-323-6924
9/28/13
www.TunkAutoMart.com
TUNKHANNOCK AUTO MART
Stk#ED623194
MSRP -
$25,665
Lease is based on 24 monthly payments at 10,000 miles per year with
$2,495 due at delivery which includes $595 Acquisition Fee plus tags, title,
and dealer processing fee due at signing. With approved credit thru Chrysler
Capital. Payment is plus tax, Includes $1,000 Rebate, $1,000 Return Lease,
$500 Jeep Celebration Bonus, $500 Military
NEW 2014 JEEP COMPASS LATITUDE 4x4
Lease For
As Low As
$
205/24 mo
PLUS TAX
Lease For
As Low As
$
173/27 mo
PLUS TAX
Lease For
As Low As
$
275/36 mo
PLUS TAX
6 SPEED AUTOMATIC
BLUETOOTH
REMOTE START
LEATHER SEATING
V6
POWER SUNROOF
6 SPEED AUTOMATIC
REMOTE START SYSTEM
SIRIUS SATELLITE RADIO
NEW SHIPMENT OF
JEEP GRAND CHEROKEES
JUST ARRIVED
DUAL PANE
PANORAMIC SUNROOF
AND
SAFETYTECH
Stk#DD322667
MSRP -
$22,020
Includes $1,000 Returning Leasee, $500 Military Rebate
NEW 2013 DODGE DART SXT SPECIAL EDITION
Sale Price
Now as Low as
$
18,900
Sale Price
Now as Low as
$
41,400
6 SPEED AUTOMATIC
BLUETOOTH
RALLYE APPEARANCE
GROUP
SIRIUS XM SATELLITE
RADIO
$2,495 Due at delivery, Payment is plus tax. 10,000 miles per year.
Includes $2,500 Lease Cash Rebate,
$750 Bonus Cash. $500 Fast Start Bonus Rebate
NEW 2013 CHRYSLER 300 MOTOWN EDITION
Lease For
As Low As
$
245/36 mo
PLUS TAX
Last 2013 4 Door
Sale Price
$
27,700
JEEP WRANGER UNLIMITED SPORT 4X4
Dealer Demo
Save Save Save
ALL WHEEL DRIVE
HEMI V8,
Beats Audio by Dr. dre
NEW 2013
Stk#DL641849
MSRP -
$29,970
Includes $500 Military and $1,000 Returning Leasee rebate.
4 DOOR
HARD TOP
Stk#DD327113
MSRP -
$24,730
Lease is based on 36 monthly payments at 10,000 miles per year with
$2,495 due at delivery which includes $595 Acquisition Fee plus tags, title
and dealer processing fee due at signing. With approved credit thru Chrysler
Capital. Payments is plus tax, Includes 1,000 Returning Leasee, $500 Military
NEW 2013 DODGE DART LIMITED
Lease For
As Low As
$
290/36 mo
6 SPEED AUTOMATIC,
BLIND SPOT & REAR CROSS
PATH DETECTION,
9 ALPINE SPEAKERS
NAPPA
LEATHER
SEATING
Stk#DL664940
MSRP -
$27,170
Includes $1,000 Returning Leasee, $500 Military
NEW 2013 JEEP WRANGLER SPORT 4X4
Sale Price
Now as Low as
$
24,600
Air Conditioning
V6
Aluminum Wheels
Fog Lamps
NEW SHIPMENT
OF 2 DOOR AND
4 DOOR WRANGLERS
JUST ARRIVED!
NEW SHIPMENT
OF DARTS
JUST ARRIVED
NEW SHIPMENTS OF
JEEP WRANGLERS
ARRIVING DAILY
Stk#DH731366
MSRP -
$38,525
VERY
LIMITED
EDITION
200 SUPER
S GROUP INSPIRED
BY EMINEM
DUAL PANORAMIC
SUNROOF, MOTOWN POWER
& SOUND GROUP,
NAVIGATION
LEATHER
SEATING
NAVIGATION
DUAL DVD
BLUE-RAY
ENTERTAINMENT
SYSTEM
Stk#DR816385
MSRP -
$37,260
NEW 2013 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING-L
Lease For
As Low As
$
219/27 mo
PLUS TAX
Lease is based on 27 monthly payments at 10,000 miles per year with $2,495 due at
delivery which includes $595 Acquisition Fee plus tags, title, and dealer processing
fee due at signing. With approved credit thru Chrysler Capital. Payment is plus tax,
Includes 1,500 Lease Cash, $1,000 Owner Loyalty, $500 Lease Bonus, $500 Military,
$1,000 Returning Leasee
HEAVY DUTY
SNOW PLOW
PREP GROUP
6 SPEED
AUTOMATIC
CUMMINS
DIESEL
Stk#DG563802
MSRP -
$43,745
NEW 2013 RAM 2500 CUMMINS DIESEL TRADESMAN 4x4
Sale Price
Now as Low as
$
35,400
Includes $2,000 Rebate, $1,000 Returning Leasee Rebate,
$1,000 Chrysler Capital Rebate, $500 Military Rebate
NEW 2013
NEW 2013
NEW 2014
RAM 2500 CUMMINS DIESEL CREW CAB
Ram 1500 EXPRESS 4x4
Sale Price
Now as Low as
Sale Price
Now as Low as
Sale Price
Now as Low as
$
38,500
$
25,800
$
27,900
Heavy Duty
Snow Plow
Prep Group
6 Speed
Manual
MSRP -
$47,090
Includes $2,000 Rebate, $1,000 Chrysler Capital Bonus Rebate,
$1,000 Returning Lease Rebate, $500 Military Rebate
Diesel
Stk#DG561143
Includes $500 Rebate, $1,000 Trade Assist Rebate, $500 Tradesman Bonus Rebate,
$500 Military Rebate, $1,000 Returning Leasee Rebate
Stk#DG555752
MSRP -
$31,200
V6, 8 Speed
Automatic,
Power Windows
& Locks
$500 Rebate, $1,000 Truck Bonus, $500 Military, $1,000 Returning Leasee,
$1,000 Trade Assistance
MSRP -
$32,200
Stk#DG585361
HEMI, V8,
TRAILER BRAKE
CONTROL,
FOG LAMPS
DODGE CHALLENGER
MSRP -
$32,040
Stk#EH120990
Includes $1,000 Rebate, $1,000 Returning Leasee, $500 Military
RALLYE REDLINE
APPEARANCE GROUP
VIEW PHOTOS
ON OUR WEBSITE
LEATHER HEATED
SEATS, BLUE TOOTH
STREAMING AUDIO
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Sunday, September 22, 2013 PAGE 25E
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Sunday, September 22, 2013 PAGE 27E
PUBLIC AUCTION
HIGH END ESTATE AUCTION
Sunday, Sept. 29, 11:00AM
396 E. State Street, Nanticoke, PA 18634
Collectibles, Fine Furnishings
Please No Previews!
Visit our website for Photos & Listings
L.A.G. AUCTION SERVICVES
570) 883-1276 or
www.lagauctions.com
Lic.# AU002629L BUYER'S PREMIUM
Furniture & Accessories
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER,
excellent condition, glass side
storage for stereo, bottom cab-
inets, asking $75. 239-6011
BEDROOM SET twin, maple
complete with night stand &
mirrored dresser $300.
570-696-5204
KITCHEN SET beautiful, wood
with cushions for chairs $100.
ELECTRIC FIREPLACE new,
never used with receipt 4200.
STAI NLESS STEEL wat er
cooler $45. Old porch ROCK-
ING CHAIR, wood $40.
570-824-3507
KITCHEN TABLE & chairs.
FREE Call Monday - Thursday
after 6pm 570-288-6214
LIVING ROOM SET rattan, 2
sofas, 1 end table, 1 coffee ta-
ble with glass top $450. Rock-
er/recliner, dark green $50. Ex-
cellent condition.
570-654-4112
PATIO CHAIRS metal frame,
brown, 2, like new $35. ea.
Outdoor lounge chairs brown,
metal frame, 2, like new $35.
ea. 570-735-7619
RECLI NER / ROCKER by
Lane made in USA slate blue,
very good condition, can help
with delivery. 570-905-7427
SOFA Lazyboy brown leather,
2 reclining seats paid $2300.
sell for $999. 570-474-9122
Landscaping & Gardening
STRAWBERRY PLANTS by
the bucket, fill yur 5 gallon
bucket wi th ever bl oomi ng
plants for $20. Very hardy. A
wide variety of flowers & trees
FREE. Bring your own contain-
ers. 570-823-3030 for app't
TILLER Yard Machine 3.5HP,
new condition $90. Craftsman
lawnmower 5HP self propelled
with bag runs good $90. Shen-
nodaha coal stove, barrel type,
good condition $200.
570-655-3197
Miscellaneous
ANNUITY.COM
Guaranteed Income For Your
Retirement
Avoid market risk & get guar-
anteed income for retirement!
Call for FREE copy of our
SAFE MONEY GUIDE Plus
Annuity
Quotes from A-Rated
companies! 800-423-0676
BOOK Egyptian book 1800's
$10. Harry Potter Scene It
game DVD $10. 2 Gem Trees
Paudshell Amethyst & Agate
$5. ea. Unique picture of ship
made of wood & string $10. 2
beautiful framed pastel pic-
tures $20. ea. 209-1909
BOOKS chi l dr en' s books
Thomas the Tank 13 books $5.
570-603-1195
CANADA DRUGS:
Canada Drug Center is your
choice for safe and affordable
medications. Our licensed
Canadian mail order phar-
macy will provide you with sav-
ings of up to 75 percent on all
your medications needs. Call
today 1-800-341-2398 for
$10.00 off your first prescrip-
tion and free shipping.
CANDLES / YANKEE (53)
new 22 oz fall & Christmas
scents $10. ea. 14.5 oz new
fall scents 2 jars $6. ea. 25
Woodwick candles 21 oz new
assorted scents $10. ea.
570-693-2329
CANES & WALKING STICKS.
25 available. Made from slip-
pery maple trees. Many differ-
ent shapes & sizes. $5 to $6
dollars ea. 570-735-2081
CARBOYS 5 gallon glass $15.
ea. ideal for wine or beer brew-
ing. Corkers floor model Portu-
giese $75. Airlocks $1 ea. Jet
bottle washer brass $7.
570-678-7634
CHANDELIER 3 tier, all glass
$25. MICROWAVE oven cart
$20. PURSES $5. & up. KIDS
BOOKS $1. & up.
570-855-8764
CHANDELIER Victorian brass,
5 lights. Cost 4300. asking
$50. 570-779-3653
CHANDELI ERS gol d wi t h
white globes $25. each. Stone-
ware service for 8 $50. Kit-
chen cabinet hardware gold -
29 handl es, 11 knobs $2.
each. 2 king size comforters
$15 each. 570-825-2888
DISH:
DISH TV Retailer. Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.) &
High Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where avail-
able.) SAVE! Ask About
SAME DAY Installation! CALL
NOW! 1-800-734-5524
DUMMY MTH unit ENG $315.
Oak wall phone 1907 $290. 2
gallon brown jug Pittston,PA
$25. Marx tin doll house with
furniture $50. Hess '02 in box
$20. Gulf truck in box $15.
Maple glider chair, new $75.
570-735-1589
DVD Gong Show movie $10. 5
storm windows $10. ea. Goo-
d y e a r W r a n g l e r t i r e
P205/75R15 $25. 1 205/75R14
$20. 8' 4" PVC pipe $10. '88
caprice taillights $20. Chevy
V8 350 bearing set $15. 18"
tires $80. 570-740-1246
BOOKCASE, white, 2 shelves
$15. Bedroom chest white, 5
drawers, $20. Bedroom dress-
er white, 9 drawers $40. DR
$60. DR cabinet $50. Shed
Rubbermaid 8'x10' $25. 2 deck
boxes $25 ea. 570-902-9363
GARAGE DOOR OPENER
Raynor 1/3 HP with remote
$50. 570-824-1020
GUITAR electric Pro Custom
by Cart wi th amp & stand
$250. Pro Tech 10" miter saw
on Skil contractors stand $125.
Everlast Power Core station
stand with heavy bag & speed
bag $150. Braun shaver 360
$75. 7.5' pre lighted Christ-
mas tree $50. Sit up bench
$10. 570-406-2507
Miscellaneous
FREE AD
POLICY
The Times Leader will
accept ads for used private
party merchandise only for
items totaling $1,000 or
less, maximum 8 lines for
7 days. All items must be
priced and state how many
of each item. Your name,
address, email and phone
number must be included.
No ads for ticket sales ac-
cepted. Pet ads accepted if
FREE ad must state FREE.
You may place your ad
online at timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com
SORRY NO PHONE
CALLS.
HANDBAGS 3 Etienne Aigner
burgundy shoulder strap also 1
Stone Mountain black shoulder
strap $10. each. 570-693-4483
MEDICAL GUARDIAN:
Medical Alert for Seniors - 24/7
monitoring.
FREE Equipment. Free
Shipping. Nationwide Service.
$29.95/Month CALL Medical
Guardian Today
855-850-9105
MY COMPUTER WORKS:
My Computer Works
Computer problems? Viruses,
spyware, email, printer issues,
bad internet connections - FIX
IT NOW! Professional, U.S.-
based technicians.
$25 off service. Call for
immediate help.
1-888-781-3386
OMAHA STEAKS:
ENJOY 100% guaranteed,
delivered-to-the-door
Omaha Steaks!
SAVE 74% PLUS 4 FREE
Burgers - The Family Value
Combo - Only $39.99.
ORDER Today
1-888-721-9573,
use code 48643XMD - or
www.OmahaSteaks.com/mbff6
9
READY FOR MY QUOTE
CABLE:
SAVE on Cable TV-Internet-
Digital Phone-Satellite. You've
Got A Choice! Options from
ALL major service providers.
Call us to learn more!
CALL TODAY.
888-929-9254
REEL HOSE & hose $15. 3
fluorscent lights single 30 watt
lights included $18. Chinon
3000 GL movi e proj ect or
8m/super 8 $40. Craftsman
snowblower 4.5 elec. start $40.
Deneis Austin primerider $35.
Hedge trimmer $70. 825-5564
TIRES 2 Wi nterforce snow
tires, 175/70R/13 mounted on
'92 Geo Prizm rims, both rims
& tires like new $100. 570-825-
8438 after 6pm
TIRES" Run Flat Bridgestone
235/55R 18 Removed from 13
Toyota Sienna Van XLe. Sell 2
for $325. or all 4 for $575.
Less than 250 mi l es wear.
New cost $213 each. Call 570-
868-6357 and leave message.
Musical Instruments
CLARINET Leblanc Vito B flat,
ol der model , good worki ng
condition, excellent for begin-
ner $150. 570-814-2773
Personal Electronics
LAPTOP Toshiba full screen
satellite C655, touch pad with
multi touch control, DVD super
multi drive, Windows 7 & En-
ergy star $300. 570-417-1502
Pools & Spas
POOL 21'x52" high, includes
Hayward sand filter & pump,
ladder, solar cover. Will help
dismantle $900. 570-902-9363
Sporting Goods
BOW CASE SKB like new.
New was $259. sell for $100.
570-824-5588
COMPOUND BOW Alpine Colt
seri al #31490, draw 16-20
wei ght 25, Tune 16. Great
starter bow. Used i n great
shape $50. Red/silver sparkle
browning MicroMidas 5-3728
c o mp o u n d b o w, s o me
scratches $100. 570-499-8068
FISHING GEAR LOT 2 large &
2 small tackle boxes - lures,
hooks, etc, 6 poles, 4 reels all
for $50. 570-735-6638
GOLF CLUBS Hogan Edge 3
thru Sandwedge. Like new.
$125. 570-262-7318
TREE STANDS 16" ladder for
hunters $300. OBO. 570-347-
0593 after 7 pm
Toys & Games
TOYS Step2 Lifestyle Party
Time kitchen, 30 pc access.
set $80. Doll 10 pc care center
$30. Radio flyer steer/stroll
trike $30. F.P. living family
dream dollhouse, furnished
$60. Vtech MobiGo pink touch
learning sytem $25. 333-0470
Want To Buy
Old Items Wanted.
Pay in Cash. For old cup-
boards, mining items, books,
magazines, advertising, radios,
fountain pens, old clocks,
glassware, furniture, toys,
cameras, guns and swords,
Rail Road items, coins, silver
bars, jewelry. 570-881-5202
or 570-925-5466
WANTED TO BUY
Old car books, brochures,
catalogs & paint chip binders.
$$Cash Paid! 570-516-9953
GET
IT TO
GO
Search the app store
and install The Times Leader
mobile app now for when you
need your news to go.
GET ALL THE
ADVERTISING INSERTS
WITH THE LATEST SALES.
Call 829-5000 to start your home delivery.
PAGE 28E Sunday, September 22, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
CALL AN
E
X
P
E
R
T
To place an ad call
829-7130
Appliances
A.R.T.
APPLIANCE
REPAIR
We service all brands.
All repairs guaranteed
570-639-3001
EDKIN
APPLIANCE REPAIR
Serving NEPA
Credit Cards Accepted
Repairs Guaranteed
570-606-4323
Building & Remodeling
1ST. QUALITY
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding, gutters,
insulation, decks, additions,
windows, doors, masonry &
concrete. Ins. & Bonded. Sr.
Citizens Discount! State Lic.
# PA057320 570-606-8438
ALL OLDER HOMES
SPECIALIST
570-825-4268.
Windows, Doors and Roof
Home Repair
HOME SHOW
March 7, 8 & 9
at the
New Mohegan Sun
Hotel and
Convention Center
At Pocono Downs
Call for Details and
Reservations.
Building Industry
Association Of NEPA
411 MAIN ST.,
KINGSTON, PA 18704
Contact:
Janet Campis
By E-mailing Office Manager:
officemanager@bianepa.com
Or Call:
570-287-3331
For All of Your Remodeling Needs.
Will Beat Any Price!
Bathrooms, Kitchens, Roofing,
Siding, Decks, Windows, etc.
25 Yrs. Experience
References. Insured
Free Estimates. (570) 332-7023
Building & Remodeling
SHEDLARSKI
CONSTRUCTION
Home Improvement Specialist
Licensed, insured & PA
registered. Kitchens, baths,
vinyl siding & railings, replace-
ment windows & doors, addi-
tions, garages, all phases of
home renovations. Free Est.
570-287-4067
Chimney Service
A-1 ABLE CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair Chimneys. All
types of Masonry. Liners In-
stalled, Brick & Block, Roofs &
Gutters. Licensed & Insured
570-735-2257
CHIMNEY REPAIRS
Springhill Chimney Service
Parging, Brick Work, Stainless
Steel Chimney Liners,
Chimney Sweep.
New Location!
296 Main Street, Dupont.
570-471-3742
CHRIS MOLESKY
Chimney Specialist
New, repair, rebuild, liners installed.
Cleaning. Concrete & metal caps.
Small masonry jobs. 570-328-6257
Cleaning & Maintenance
CONNIE'S CLEANING
15 Years Experience
Bonded & Insured-Residential
Cleaning-Gift Certificates
Available-570-430-3743
Connie does the cleaning!
DEB & PATS
CLEANING SERVICE
We Are Bonded & Insured
Free Estimates
570-235-1840
570-793-4773
EcoHousekeeping
Residential & Commercial
All Natural Products Included
Experienced, Reliable, Insured
570-878-3188
Lacy Rice Owner/Operator
Concrete & Masonry
A STEP-UP MASONRY
Specializing in All Types of
Masonry. Stone, Concrete
Licensed & Insured Free
Estimates Senior Discount
PA094695-570-702-3225
Concrete & Masonry
Chimneys / Repairs
Chopyak Masonry
Sidewalks, Steps, Concrete
Free Estimates. Fully Insured
570-674-7588
D. PUGH CONCRETE
All phases of masonry &
concrete. Small jobs welcome.
Senior discount. Free est.
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
D. PUGH CONCRETE
All phases of masonry &
concrete. Small jobs welcome.
Senior discount. Free est.
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
NEPA MASONRY, INC.
Masonry, Concrete,
Stucco, Chimneys
Fall Special
Chimney Inspection $45.
570-466-2916
570-954-8308
STESNEY CONCRETE
& MASONRY
Brick, Block, Stucco, Stone,
Steps, Sidewalks, Driveways,
Foundations, Floors, Chim-
neys etc. Lic. & Ins. Call 570-
328-1830 or 570-283-1245
Construction & Building
FLOORING
INSTALLATION
PROFESSIONALS
15 years experience. Carpet,
vinyl, tile, wood, laminate in-
stallation & repairs. If you walk
on it, we know how to install it!
All Work Guaranteed
Fully Insured. 574-8953
GARAGE DOOR
Sales, service, installation
and repair. FULLY INSURED
HIC# 065008 CALL JOE
570-735-8551 Cell 606-7489
Kenzie Construction
Licensed & Insured. PA# 087026
Roof & Siding, Bathrooms,
Kitchens and Remodeling.
FREE ESTIMATES!
570-793-1391
Construction & Building
NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION
All Types Of Work
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-406-6044
Electrical
RNI ELECTRIC, LLC
Licensed & Insured
Retired Veteran. Panel upgrades.
New & old work. 25 Yrs. Exp.
570-814-8979
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes & Replacements.
Generator Installs.
570-868-4469
Excavating
All Types Of Excavating,
Demolition & Concrete Work.
Lot clearing, pool closing
& retaining walls, etc.
Large & Small Jobs. FREE EST.
(570) 760-1497
Gutter Repair & Cleaning
GUTTER CLEANING
Window Cleaning
Pressure Washing.
Insured. 570-288-6794
GUTTER
RESTORATION &
ROOF REPAIRS
Clean, Seal, Refinish
10 Year Warranty
570-417-1538
PJs Window Cleaning &
Janitorial Services
Windows, Gutters, Carpets,
Power washing and more.
INSURED/BONDED.
pjswindowcleaning.com
570-283-9840
Handyman
DO IT ALL
HANDYMAN SERVICE
Licensed & Insured
570-704-8759
Hauling & Trucking
ALL KINDS OF HAULING
& JUNK REMOVAL
TREE/SHRUB REMOVAL
Demolition - Estate Cleanout
Attics, Basements, Yards, etc.
Free Estimates 24 hour service
Small and large jobs!
570-823-1811 570-239-0484
AA CLEANING
A1 Always hauling, cleaning attics,
cellar, garage, one piece or whole
Estate, also available 10 & 20
yard dumpsters.
655-0695, 592-1813 or 287-8302
AAA CLEANING
A1 General Hauling
Cleaning attics, cellars, garages,
Demolitions, Roofing & Tree
Removal. Free Est. 779-0918 or
542-5821; 814-8299
BOB & RAY'S HAULING
We Haul Everything!
Cheap, fast, clean & respectful
Free Estimates.
570-655-7458. 570-926-8090
$ BUYING $
JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
Highest Prices Paid Free Pickup
CA$H PAID 570-288-8995
Mikes $5-Up
Hauling Junk & Trash from
Houses, Garages, Yards, Etc.
826-1883 704-8846
Will Haul Anything
Clean cellars, attics, yards & metal
removal. Call Jeff
570-735-3330 or 570-762-4438
Landscaping
BRIZZY'S ARBOR CARE &
LANDSCAPING
Hedge & Tree trimming, prun-
ing & removal. Stump grind-
ing, Cabling. Retaining walls &
repair. Free Est. Fully Ins.
570-542-7265
Foltz Landscaping
Small Excavating New landscapes,
retaining walls/patios. Call:
570-760-4814
Landscaping
KELLER'S
LAWN CARE
Fall Cleanups, Leaf Removal,
Landscaping, Snow Plowing
Commercial & Residential.
570-332-7016
Tough Brush
Tree pruning. Fall cleanup.
Fully Ins. Free Est.
570-829-3261
Miscellaneous
Movers
BestDarnMovers
...your Moving Helpers!
www.BestDarnMovers.com
Free Quotes.
We Make Moving Easy.
Check us out on AngiesList
and Yelp. 570-852-9243
Painting & Wallpaper
A & N PAINTING
FALL SPECIAL
Get Ready for the Holidays.
$120, average size room +
materials. 18 years experience
Interior Painting
570-820-7832
JOHNS PAINTING
Reliable, Neat, Honest,
Working with Pride. Insured.
570-735-8101
M. PARALIS PAINTING
Int/ Ext. painting, Power
washing. Professional work at
affordable rates. Free estimates.
570-288-0733
Paving & Excavating
EDWARD'S ALL
COUNTY PAVING
*DRIVEWAYS
*PARKING LOTS
*ROADWAYS
*HOT TAR & CHIP
*SEAL COATING
Licensed & Insured.
Call Today For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
Plumbing
D.M. PLUMBING & HEATING
Specializing in boilers,
furnaces & water heaters.
10% Sr. discount. Licensed,
insured & 24 hour service
570-793-1930
Roofng & Siding
CORNERSTONE
CONSTRUCTION
Roofing Siding Carpentry
40 yrs. experience
Licensed & Insured
PA026102
Call Dan: 570-881-1131
Jim Harden
570-288-6709
New Roofs & Repairs, Shingles,
Rubber, Slate, Gutters,
Chimney Repairs.
Credit Cards Accepted
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed-Insured
EMERGENCIES
JO Home Improvement
Roof, siding, painting, gutters.
Fully Ins. Free Est. PA100512.
570-829-3261 or 57-817-2548
SPRING ROOFING
McManus Construction
Licensed, Insured. Everyday Low
Prices. 3,000 satisfied customers.
570-735-0846
Tree Service
APEX TREE AND EARTH
apextreeandearth.com
Serving Wyoming Valley,
Back Mountain &
Surrounding Areas.
570-550-4535
timesleader.com
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GARAGE
SALE AD
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OR VISIT TIMESLEADER.COM 24/7 TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD
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BEFORE YOU GET RID OF HIM
WELL HELP YOU
Plus a FREE BREAKFAST
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8 LINES
STARTING AT
PAGE 30E Sunday, September 22, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Classifeds
Continued From
Page 12
Commercial
EDWARDSVILLE
35-37 Rice Ave.
Double block in very good
condition. Live in one side
and let the other side pay the
mortgage. Newer roof and
furnace, 3 years old. Very
clean and in move-in
condition. A Must See!
MLS#13-2618. $79,000
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
EXETER
OFFICE SPACE
Newly remodeled, 120 sq. ft.
all utilities included, except
phone. Pav ed par k i ng.
$200/month. 1 month free. Call
570-602-1550 for details
KINGSTON
BUSINESS PARK
Large equipmen/storage yard
available. $850/month. Utilit-
ies available. 570-947-3292
KINGSTON
COMMERCIAL GARAGE
1250 sq. ft., 12' ceilings,
10' garage door. $550/month
+ utilities.
570-947-3292
KINGSTON
STORAGE/WORKSHOP
665 sq. ft., bathroom, office.
$350/month
570-947-3292
PITTSTON TWP.
$1,750/MONTH
3002 N. Twp Blvd.
Medical office for rent on the
Pittston By-Pass. Highly vis-
i bl e l ocati on wi th pl enty of
parking. $1,800 sq. ft. of beau-
tifully finished space can be
used for any type office use.
$1,750/ mo. plus utilities.
MLS 13-098
Call Charlie
Commercial
PITTSTON
COOPERS CO-OP
Lease Space Available.
Light manufacturing, ware-
house, office, includes all
utilities with free parking.
I will save you money!
ATLAS REALTY
829-6200
SEEKING PROFESSION-
AL LONG TERM TENANT
Two 2,000 sq. ft. units avail-
abl e. Owner occupi ed. off
street parking. Alarm. Renov-
ated. Wilkes-Barre near high
traffic area. 570-829-1518
AMERICA REALTY
RENTALS
1 Month Free Rent
(Qualified Applicant)
FORTY FORT RETAIL
(GLASS FRONT) STORE.
WYOMING AVE. $850. month.
2 YEARS SAME RENT.
A MONTH FREE RENT
(QUALIFIED) APPLICATION
REQUIRED. DETAILS CALL
570-288-1422
WYOMING
322 Wyoming Avenue
300 sq. ft. ideal for barbershop,
small convenience store, appli-
ance repair, locksmith, eBay
outlet, accounting office, travel
agency, designer, broker, con-
sultant, general office space.
Air, heat, garbage, sewer, hot
water & all maintenance in-
cluded. Street parking. Down-
t own Wyomi ng l ocat i on,
30,000 passing cars a day.
$350/month. Call
570-693-3492 for appointment.
Houses For Rent
BEAR CREEK
2 bedroom ranch, hardwood
floors, great sun room, 1,400
sq. ft. fireplace & wood burner,
great deck. county setting. 2
car attached garage. No pets.
Al l ut i l i t i es by t enant .
$970/ mont h 570-760-5095
DALLAS/LEHMAN TWP.
Lovely 2 bedroom, one bath
house in the country. Spa-
cious kitchen/living/dining room
combination. No smoking, no
exceptions. One small pet
considered. References, se-
curity deposit & credit check
required. $1,250/month + utilit-
ies. 570-899-8432
Houses For Rent
FORTY FORT
AMERICA REALTY
RENTALS
1st MONTHS RENT FREE
(Qualified Applicants)
EXCELLENT REMODELED
PROPERTIES
CALL 570-288-1422
HOME Gorgeous 1.5 baths,
fireplace, mantle, 2 enclosed
porches, all appliances, kit-
chen Colonial - center island,
$900/mo + utilities.
APT: Victorian finished, re-
modeled 1st floor, oak kitchen,
appliances, tiled fireplace as-
t het i c, 1 bedr oom, mor e.
$600/mo + utilities. Details!
FORTY FORT
AMERICA REALTY
570-288-1422
EXTRAORDINARY
GEORGIAN PILLARED
COLONIAL
(Qualified / Inquiries)
FORTY FORT - Wyoming Ave.
Over 3,200+ approximate sq.
ft. of excellent quality splendor!
3/4 bedroom, tiled 1 & 3/4
baths, cherry cabinet, break-
fast room, kitchen appliances
& (W/D). 2nd floor enclosed
porch, dining room, gas fire-
place, hardwood, appliances
(W/D) 1 stall garage. $3,000 +
utilities. No pets, sincere ap-
plicants, credit, employment,
occupancy date to be determ-
ined. Professional office suite
may be future rental.
HARVEYS LAKE
NOXEN AREA
Country raised ranch with 2-3
bedrooms, full basement, huge
wrap around deck. 1 bay gar-
age. Lake Lehman School Dis-
trict. $900 month + 1st & last
month's rent. 570-298-2523
LARKSVILLE
Pace Street
5 room single family home with
2 + b e d r o o ms , 1 b a t h ,
washer/dryer, deck & yard.
$660/month + utilities.
Call Barbara Mark
570-696-5414
696-1195
LARKSVILLE
Recently updated. 2 bedroom,
living rm., dining rm. Off street
parking. Fenced yard. $750/mo
+ utilities. 570-650-0010
LUZERNE
6 room single family home. All
gas. $650/month + security.
Call 570-650-4628
Houses For Rent
EXETER TWP.
Single family home. Mount
Zion Rd. 6 rooms & bath. No
pets/no smoking. $700/month
+ utilities & security.
570-388-2675 570-388-6860
MOUNTAIN TOP
Walden Park
4 bedroom, 3 bath home with
appliances included. 1 year
lease & security deposit re-
quired. No pets. $1,400/month.
Call