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9/11 Law Enforcement Sensitive

Foreign Terrorist Tracking Task Force

Original Mission

Homeland Security Presidential Directive-2 (October 29, 2001) required the Attorney
General to create the Foreign Terrorist Tracking Task Force (FTTTF) to ensure that
federal agencies coordinate programs to:
(1) deny entry into the US of aliens associated with, suspected of being engaged in, or
supporting terrorist activity, and
(2) locate, detain, prosecute, or deport any such aliens already present in the US.

HSPD-2 requires that the Director of the FTTTF "maintain direct liaison" with the ENS
Commissioner and consult with the Assistant Secretary of State for Consular Affairs on
visa matters. HSPD-2 authorizes the assignment to the FTTTF of foreign liaison officers
from cooperating countries with the concurrence of the Attorney General and Director of
Central Intelligence.

Previously, FTTTF staff:


worked with ODAG to develop the list of countries and criteria to be used for
Condor visa checks, as well as to develop a supplemental questionnaire
participated in the Condor visa check process until September 2002
identified [individuals who entered the U.S. with possible lost or stolen
passports and referred those cases to INS, FBI and created a system to track lost and
\n passport numbers
• assisted INS in Phase I of Alien Absconder Initiative by developing list of almost
| | high-risk individuals out of 350,000 absconders
worked with INS and EOUSA to develop a list of 5,000 aliens for "Interview
Project"
volunteered to develop a system to perform background checks for flight school
candidates under Section 113 of the Aviation and Transportation Security Act

Congress provided $30 million in reprogrammed funds for FY 2002. The FTTTF
recently received $62 million in appropriated funds for FY 2003,

The former leadership of the FTTTF emphasized the FTTTF's ability to perform "risk
assessments" based on public source and government information. Congress, JMD and
OMB all were under the impression that the FTTTF was moving toward conducting "risk
assessments" based on algorhythms.

Current Mission

Has three units:


(1) Checks names for certain NSEERS registrants from ports-of-entry and informs
ICE whether such registrants are complying with the terms of admission and
whether the INS should monitor the individuals.

OAG015-0035
Law Enforcement Sensitive

(2) Maintains consolidated terrorist list and compares list to immigration records and
. other law enforcement data to detect potential presence in the US of individuals
on list. Refers names and location information to FBI and ICE for further
analysis and follow-up investigation. As of January 2, 2003, FTTTF had received
a list oq Jpossible terrorists for evaluation. Ofthcsj [vere forwarded to the
ICE for action.
(3) Conducts background checks for persons seeking aviation training in planes over
12,500 pounds. An interim process was established in June 2002, and the final rule took
effect March 17, 2003. As of January 30,2003, FTTTF had conducted over 30,000
checks.

At the present time, the FTTTF has access to four public source databases. The FTTTF is
able to search these databases, as well as the FTTTF's own data warehouse, with software
called QJTP. QTIP allows the FTTTF to perform searches of all data without having to
search each database individually.

The FTTTF is not performing risk assessments at this time. On March 17, Bob Casey
stated that there is no "magic" algorhythm that will tell whether an individual is a terrorist
or a threat. The FTTTF, however, is performing limited checks based on factual
information, such as whether an address submitted by an NSEERS registrant or flight
school applicant actually exists. FTTTF is, however, seeking access to additional public
source databases.

Issues:

FTTTF has moved away risk assessments. There is concern from JMD and OMB that
our budget requests and actual funding was based on representations that the FTTTF
would be doing things that they now have no intention of doing. I spoke with Steve
McCraw on March 19 and he disagrees with the lack of effort in this area and plans to
revert back to his previous plan.

Interim assistance to OCDETF for establishing a new automated drug investigative


system. FTTTF had indicated a willingness to assist under prior leadership but has since
expressed reservation about that commitment.

Assistance to BOP in running names of inmates. FTTTF had indicated a willingness to


run the names but last week informed BOP that checks should be done by FBI. On
March 7, Steve McCraw stated that both FTTTF and FBI should run names and FTTTF
has since cooperated with BOP. On March 17, Bob Casey said that FTTTF is
cooperating with the

OAG015-0036
9/11 Law Enforcement Sensitive

J OMB agrees
with that step.
On March 18, OMB decided that it would not allow the FBI to charge a fee for
fingerprint and name checks for this program. OMB noted Ed noted that the amount that
FBI will have to absorb in FY 2003 is less that $1 million. FBI could potentially use a
portion of the $4 million requested in the FY 2004 budget for these checks (the request
was based on FTTTF performing the checks), or include the resources in the upcoming
supplemental being prepared.

Talking Points/Questions

The Section 113 final regulation for full background checks takes effect Monday. How
has implementation gone during the first week?

I understand that the FTTTF is not conducting risk assessments at the current time. Why
not? I am concerned that the Department, OMB and the Congress were under the
impression that we were pursuing that ability, based on representations made be previous
FTTTF officials.

We want the FTTTF to conduct checks for foreign nationals seeking access to
bio-hazardous materials. Do you have a problem with being involved in that process?

I know that OCDETF was interested in modeling a new automated drug investigative
system after the FTTTF's systems. Is the plan still to co-locate the FTTTF with the
OCDETF startup for a short period of time? Doesn't it make sense for OCDETF to learn
from what the FTTTF has done?

I've been informed that the Bureau of Prisons has sought your assistance in running the
names of its inmates against your databases. I understand that you arc working with BOP
to get this accomplished and that BOP will also request that the FBI run the same
individuals against its databases. I strongly support this effort. There is high-level
interest in getting this project completed.

Do you anticipate that issues may arise due to the ENS's transfer from the Department of
Justice to the Department of Homeland Security? Have you had any discussions with
officials from the former INS or from DHS?

In November 2002, JMD issued a White Paper on the FTTTF. Have you implemented
JMD's recommendations that call for action by you?

OAG015-0037
In December 2002 you sent to Stuart a memo outlining your concern that there were other
efforts underway in other agencies that were potentially duplicative of the FTTTF's
mission. You mentioned in the memo that you were taking steps to coordinate with these
other agencies (CIA, OHS, and DOD). Is that effort still ongoing?

I'm concerned that the FTTTF has fallen into a reactive role, rather than coming up with
new initiatives proactively. Do you have any new projects you are developing?

OAG015-0038
9/11 Law Enforcement Sensitive

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OAG015-0039
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August 6, 2002

MEMORANDUM FOR ROBERT S. MUELLER, m


DIRECTOR
FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION

FROM:

SUBJECT: Foreiarf Terrorist Tracking Task Force

The Foreign Terrorist Tracking Task Force (FTTTF) was established by Homeland
Security Presidential Directive-2 (HSPD-2) on October 29,2001, as a premier component of the
President's initiative to combat terrorism. Despite substantial fundine ani logistics challenges,
the FTTTF already has achieved significant success in establishing ani coordinating programs to
deny entry into the United States of aliens associated with, suspected of being engaged in, or
supporting terrorist activity,

In order to sustain and build upon this success, the Departaeni of Justice must continue
to commit the necessary budget and personnel resources in a timely rrjanr.er. To enable the
M I IF to continue its current level of operations through the end of the current fiscal year, 1 am
directing the Immigration and Naturalization Service to reallocate 51C million from its budget for
FY 2002 to the FTTTF as soon as possible. I would like the FBI to ccntr.butc $13 million from
currently available no-year funds to support the f 11 It- FY 2003 fund ing needs (ihe Department
is working with OMB to identify other non-FBI sources for additional FY 2003 requirements).
Please coordinate the allocation of these funds to the FTTTF with the Ooiitrollcr of the
Department of Justice. " —

The FTTTF has been providing vital operational support for th: Bureau's countcrtcrrorism
mission. In that regard, I commend your plan, BJS reflected in "Phase I"" of the FBI's reorganization,
to formally consolidate the FTTiF within the Counterterrorism Diviri :m. Please move forward as
quickly as possible to formalize this element of the reorganization. Cc.nsi stent witfi HSPD-2. the
Director of the FTTTF will conlinuc to report to the Deputy Attorney i jcr .oral as \vell as the FBI
Director.

Finally, it is imperative that we move forward as quickly as po:isib Ic to identify a nc\


Director of the F I'l'l'f in the Wake of Steve McCraw's departure, and lha the Bureau continue to -
assign high-performjni} personnel to the FTTTF to servo in critical positicns. I appreciate your
work toward that objective.

Thank you for your attention to these matters and for your coniimt sd leadership in the war
against terrorism.

OAG015-0040
9/11 Law E n f o r c e m e n t P r i v a c
Cost of Allen Registration and Overstay Prevention for Males 15 - 35
14 High Risk Countries • Limited Entrance and Exit

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t.HS.732 Supoorl IDT 107 tOdihonai Deos
ATM 2U.OM aii.sic KtMC 217454 Support hx t B7 KWtioAal beds
IJOO JZJ.3DO MS.JW *2i3«0 12WCO Transpfltako'v escoti, neaith, ana j^ATS
1.300 487.000 SM.EMO W'.OM sat.MO Removal Cost
M.MO inooo a 1.0*5 111,*'l 3M31J Suppofl lor -*«7 removal cam

2J7i (J7TJSJ I.9U.HO 2.3»!i^ 2.2MM3 rs.ii* Inc'iu* iwgitivt opeiitkms capitiMu 10*457 cam
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OAG015-0041
Cost of Allen Registration and Overstay Prevention for Males 15 35
14 High Risk Countries with Limited Entrance and Exit
Hflffl un* S »runl ear i Cosli Vea»2 Vea-3 Veer 4 vea: S Co^Tera
IMPLEMENTATION
• Immtyaticn Intctclor. OS-'2 9C 138.0X1 S 5 '2.420.00C I H.299.OO 14^1S,SS8 j -.5 21 S 03* ."crease seccrtda-y siaf? at IS arg«pons of er.trylo -a-xne mc'ease^wo'Xoad
iiuptction Awwlwm 4! £3.000 S S 2.385.000 S S SSI .550 ! 730.S87 S £.921.726 Assist wih lirigeryi'it & registration
Communicalion Urwt It '0.000 S •60.000 S • S.GCS S 1 1 .250 ! 8*3 & 703 Connects ports win Service Centers to allow Itr eiscl-orwc iinge-Tsrin: ir*nsmissi
Equttmw* BO 35,000 s 3,150.000 J 7B7..130 S IE6.575 *9.2<D 5 '2.30$ 10 print linflsrpnni equipment lor all ports
E«S FaeMes 11 150.00Q t 2.700.000 S 675.DOC S IM/5C 42.iee S tO.547 Portable 1 0 print machines for seaport inspectors
Tachndxy t O.MO.OOO s 10.000.000 i Z. 500.900 5 fi25.COO I56.2SC S 3D 06,3 Increased technology EOT capacity to hold fingerprints, aid photos ai INS
Secondary Fie*"* 18 1M.COO s 2,700.000 S 2.025.000 £ J, 025. COO 2.32S.OXI I 2025.00(1 Assumes that 60 ot the ports require aoditionai space lor seconflary activates
Steondary Aton Subsist**;* 2.500 15 X 37.300 S 37AOO ( 37,500 37. AM) S 37.50C Provides food and blankets tor aliens as Ihey awail secondary nspedb"
intowievMrs IB 136.000 i 2,446,000 S J.E19.36C i 5.802,71 s 1,999.905 X 3.306,82* Assumes the interview ot 37,500
Cwttrnpu Cterht 5 AG.OOO s 230.000 S 2'6.tDD S 263.327 281.760 t 301.463 Assumes the input ol 170,000 Change ot address cards
A-B* Folder and Sioraq* 100.000 '.0 s l.-XW.OOO 5 1,200.000 t MJO.WO 1,728,000 S 2. 373.605 Assumes that 100,000 A-files wiN neeo to be stared and stored

ENFORCEMENT
Pubic Education Program t 3.300,000 s 3,OOC.COO S 1. 500.000 S 600.00-3 600,030 5 600.00C Launch and rnamlain PR campaign
Dawniion Space 975 10JOO $ 95*5,000 S 9.94SOQO S 93*5.000 9545.000 $ 9.SMS.OOC Detain 1% of subject population (120 day LOS)
OflKrtlon Ertorewnent QHtceo 30 103.MO X 3.101. *00 S 3,316.488 S 3.WC793 3,799,348 S 4.065.303 Support tor 375 acflitiooal beds
Dtponaton Oflfctrt 15 128^27 J 1J38.40S S 2.074.M3 $ 2 J' 9.^50 2.374.628 S 2,S*0.a$4 Support for 375 aOditicrial beds
Dock* CMito B 58.764 $ 470.112 S 503.32C t 5M.231 575.M7 S 61 6.221 Support for 375 additional beds
Omw Pttonvon r«ut*a cwtt 675 veoo $ 1.852.500 S 1,852.500 s i,es2.soo •.B52.SM s < as2.scc Transportation, escort, hearth, £r>d JPATS
fltrowii 875 1.000 s B75.000 S 1.043,250 S 1.0*3.250 1.043,250 S 1 043.250 Removal Cost
136.000 s
L*pal YMhnteMfl* (rcnwwM) 1 66^32 $ 66232 I 70,868 1 76,929 81,137 I B6,«17 Support lor 975 removal cases
invettiMIO* 12 152J71 s 1.627.252 S 1.955.160 I 2.092.021 2.238,462 S £.399.155 increase fugitive operations capabilities !or d?5 cases
irw*Ml9i|ief» Support SUV £ 5fl.764 s 352.5M S 377.265 I 403.673 S 431.H31 S 462, 1C6 increase fugitive operation* capabilities for 975 casas
lnMigiTOAn.ly.tl 1
124.7M $ 124,704 S 1M.-3E S 142,776 S 1S2.T70 S 1634#4 increase fugitive operations capabilities for 975 cases

ImrrJgnbor. JudgM (nmovaMl 1 300.COO $ 200.000 S 21 '.000 S 22B.BW) S 243.0C9 $ 252. 1S8 Support tor 975 removal cases

( 50.312.242

tTolal Years 1-5: J 239 ,722,9791

AssumOhonc:
Estimated 97,500 Aliens and 20.000 Crwv Iromlhete Countries
IretMCtor PtaHnmt auunw mai S ew office's win b« aisled in each c' :^. iR (liira
a***""'**** «•«*•"« % el the cubj«d poputmo'-

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TIM tuN yav COBU ol Ingeiprtni chKU and sut»«ivm
A 20% mciMse MCTI year In *f*t to den and t«n»g«
A10% mMUcnanck con tor ttpKtiM
A 25% MCW ra»tous«fl te accommodate Ofiu «nd f*pla

OA6015-0042
ESTIMATED FIVE YEAR COSTS OF ALIEN REGISTRATION AND OVERSTAY PREVENTION
ASSUMING 14 HIGH RISK COUNTRIES - MALES 15-35
.5% Enforcement on 1% Enforcement on
14 High Risk Countries 14 High Risk Countries
Males 15-35 Males 15-35

Nonimmigrant Admissions 77.500 77,500


Crew Admissions 20,000 20,000
Total Population 97.500 97.-500

Implementation
Inspection 98,073,317 98,073,317
Registration 22,842,079 22,842,079
sub-total 120,915,396 120,915,396

Enforcement
Public Education Campaign S 5,100,000 S 6,300,000
Investigation $ 12,535,668 $ 12,535,668
Intelligence $ 1,055,088 S 1,055,088
Detention $ 44,934.972 S 90,673,595
Removal Proceedings S 3,095,232 $ 3.095,232
Removal _$ 2.571,360 _$ 5,148,000
sub-total S 69,292,320 S 118,807.582

TOTAL COSTS OVER FIVE YEARS 190,207,716 239,722,979

Notes:
Nonimmigrant Admissions Source - INS Nonimmigrant Information System. FY 2000.
Crew is estimated. By law, crew is admitted tor no longer than 29 days.
Approximately 38% of the subject populations remain in the U.S. after 30 days.

OAG015-0043
U.S. Department of Justice
Justice Management Division
Management^and Planning Staff For Official Department of Justice Use Only

White Paper:

Management Review of the


Foreign Terrorist Tracking Task Force

Draft

November 13, 2002


•&-
*-,

For Official Department of Justice Use Only

OAG015-1001
Table of Contents
Page

Executive Summary i

Background 1

Mission and Functions 1

Organizational Placement and Structure 5

Staffing 9

Information Resources 14

Administrative Management 17

Summary List of Recommendations 22

Appendix - Sample Charters 27

OAG015-1002
Executive Summary

MISSION AND FUNCTIONS

• The FTTTF mission as set forth in Homeland Security Presidential Directive-2 is very
broad arid encompasses many functions that cut across multiple Federal agencies. A
challenge for FTTTF has been to find a niche that would complement and not duplicate
other efforts.

• The FTTTF mission that still is being refined is: to become and serve as the premier
information center/clearinghouse (i.e., build the data warehouse) for accessing, sorting,
and mining large datasets (public source, proprietary, law enforcement, and select 1C) and
then using the data warehouse in order to develop and disseminate critical information
about known or potential terrorists who may already be within, or seek entry into, the
United States. This information serves many purposes, including support of ongoing CT
investigations, development of new leads for CT investigations (within the U.S.),
development of intelligence collection targets (outside the U.S.), and the production and
dissemination of lookout lists to deny entry.

• The preponderance of Fl'lTF work thus far has been to develop information that permits
FBI and INS law enforcement elements to initiate or support investigations and prevent
potential terrorist acts, and the State Department and INS to identify and deny entry to
known or potential terrorists.. Because collection, sorting and dissemination of massive
amounts of information lies at the core of FTTTF's work, a strong and ever-improving IT
capability must be present.

Key Recommendations:

• Develop a charter that clarifies FTTTF's mission, operations, staffing, etc. (see samples)
• Establish an FTTTF Policy Advisory Board to advise on and guide Fl'lll1 activities.
— Continue innovative IT development and implementation.

ORGANIZATIONAL PLACEMENT AND STRUCTURE

• FTTTF initially was an independent entity reporting to the Deputy Attorney General, but
on August 6,2002 was placed within the FBI, specifically its Counterterrorism Division.
This caused concern by some that the FTTTF would be less efficient in this context and
that other important agency participants might leave, undermining FTTTF's mission
accomplishment.

• The FBI is changing rapidly, logically and positively to meet its new terrorism mission
and that the FTTTF, in fact, while continuing to be a national Counterterrorism asset, fits
well into the organization that has the clear Counterterrorism enforcement mandate. In
addition other FBI headquarters and field elements with which FTTTF will be linked
already have extensive participation of other agencies; FTTTF complements these efforts
with its unique information.

-i-

OAG015-1003
• The internal FTTTF organizational/management structure currently does not support the
FTTTF mission well. The report examines several areas, e.g, administrative
management, that need to be strengthened.

Key Recommendations:

• FTTTF continue to be a national counterterrorism asset but remain in FBI CTD.


• FTTTF Director continue to have direct communication and reporting lines to both FBI
and DOJ leadership, with quick access to any DOJ or FBI level on urgent matters.
„ FTTTF Director quickly complete his internal review and change the
organization/staffing as necessary to meet the mission.

STAFFING

• Sustained, effective leadership is critical to FTTTF's future effectiveness. The Director,


Deputy Director and CIO positions are the key slots, and recent departures from this
leadership core have negatively impacted FTTTF's operations and staff.

• FTTTF must maintain a high-level ENS link and staff presence, factors thus far ensured by
the detailed INS manager encumbering the Deputy Director position.

• The recent departure of the "fill-in" CIO position has disrupted FTTTF's efforts to
implement its initial systems design/developmental work. Recruiting a high-level
systems manager to oversee making the vision operational is a priority need.

• Interagency participation is critical and will be ensured if agencies perceive a "value-


added" aspect to their participation. Thus far, funding uncertainty, lack of adequate
space, and undefined roles have caused understaffing and led to some degree of employee
frustration. Once resources are made available, FTTTF should be able to attract other
participants more readily. The tie-in with FBI leverages other agency participation there.

Key Recommendations:

Ensure that there is a strong recruitment and selection process for key leadership positions
(Director, Deputy Director, CIO), and that leadership service gaps are avoided.
Require that: (1) the FTTTF Director be a senior-level agent who is jointly selected by
DOJ and FBI management and agrees to serve for a minium of two years;
(2) the Deputy Director be a senior-level INS official, also with a two-year commitment,
and (3) FBI and DOJ CIO confer on how best to select a permanent, senior-level CIO
who has expertise in the development of large-scale state-of-the-art systems for the law
enforcement and intelligence communities.
Articulate general approach/criteria for interagency participation in the FTTTF charter
and have the new Policy Board endorse a staffing plan that ensures key agency
representation, e.g., from INS, DBA, NDIC, 1C member agencies.

-11-

OAG015-1004
INFORMATION RESOURCES

- Access to and manipulation of information (made possible by the large computing


capacity and state-of-the-art tools) lies at the heart of what FTTTF does and is what
makes the FTTTF such an important national and FBI asset. The FTTTF is in the early
stages of locating the best available up-to-date investigative, intelligence, public source,
and proprietary data derived from a broad range of government and non-government
sources. This information already has proven very useful to initiate and support
investigations.

- FTTTF continues to expand its data collection and mining capabilities and has been
especially successful in accessing and mining public source information, combining this
information with key FBI/INS law enforcement information, and using link analysis tools
to identify known and potential terrorists within the United States. FTTTF has been very
responsive to taskings in this regard and seems to be well on its way to developing a
unique capability to develop and share critical information in support of CT enforcement.

- FTTTF's IT capabilities must always be cutting-edge/state-of-the-art. In part, to achieve


a quick and efficient capability during start-up, FTTTF tied into DOD's Counter
Intelligence Field Activity(CIFA)/Joint Counterintelligence Assessment Group (JCAG)
for technology assistance and technical support. This relationship appears to be
flourishing, but may require stronger FTTTF management and oversight.

Key Recommendations:

Establish a permanent FTTTF IT unit reporting to the CIO.


- Maintain and continue to leverage CIFA/JCAG support.
- Develop a long term IT acquisition plan and ensure that it is funded appropriately.
Ensure coordination and fit with the FBI Enterprise Architecture.
- Continue innovative research and development and share lessons learned.

ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGEMENT

- Most of the administrative management functions at FTTTF are being performed as


collateral duties, often by staff who were brought to FTTTF to perform other duties. For
example, an intelligence research specialist is doing budget formulation, the operations
chief is handling personnel, and the Chief of Staff is trying to do various other activities.
As a general rule, whomever is willing and has sufficient skill may be asked to assist,
even if it is not their area of expertise or interest.

Key Recommendations:

- Hire an Executive or Administrative Officer


- - Establish *n FTTTF Administrative Unit with appropriate expertise, specifically
personnel, budget/finance, and procurement (COTR-qualified) jr_; ;jj£
- Explore need for legal counsel and permit those not needed to return to home agencies
---- ' '"#.

-111-

OAG015-1005
Background

In response to the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the President decided to pursue many initiatives aimed
at preventing additional terrorist attacks. One was promulgated by Homeland Security
Presidential Directive 2 (HSPD-2) dated October 29, 2001, which states: "By November 1,
2001, the Attorney General shall create the Foreign Terrorist Tracking Task Force (FTTTF)
with assistance from the Secretary of State, Director of Central Intelligence, and other officers
of the government, as appropriate."

The FTTTF was stood up quickly and during its first year of operations already has achieved
many successes in the war on terrorism. Recently, however, questions and concerns have
surfaced regarding its current and future status, as key managers have departed to assume other
duties and the FTTTF has been placed organizationally within the Federal Bureau of
Investigation (FBI).

The Office of the Attorney General asked the Management and Planning Staff (MPS), Justice
Management Division (JMD), to conduct a quick, top-to-bottom management review of the
FTTTF to assess its current management status and to make recommendations to further
improve its role as a national asset in the war on terrorism. MPS formed an interdisciplinary
team with general management, information systems, personnel, and security knowledge to
conduct mis review. The team performed an extensive review of pertinent FTTTF policy and
management documents, observed FTTTF work being done on-site, and interviewed
approximately 60 officials from within FTTTF, the Department, the FBI, and others in the
Intelligence Community, i.e., Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA), and National Security Agency
(NSA). This report presents the team's independent findings and recommendations based on
this work.

The report is divided into 5 topic areas: 1) mission and functions; 2) organizational placement
and structure, 3) staffing-, 4) information resources; and 5) administrative management.
Recommendations are presented at the end of each section and there is a composite list
attached to the end of the report.

Mission and Functions

The FTTTF mission articulated in HSPD-2 is to: "ensure that, to the maximum extent permitted
by law, Federal agencies coordinate programs to accomplish the following:
1) deny entry into the United States of aliens associated with, suspected of being engaged in, or
supporting terrorist activity; and 2) locate, detain, prosecute, or deport any such aliens already
present in the United States."

.&,
-1-

OAG015-1006
In addition, HSPD-2 elements suggest a strong coordinative role for the FTTTF. For example,
it requires: 1) the establishment of the FTTTF to involve the Secretary of State, Director of
Central Intelligence and others; 2) the AG appoint a senior level official to be full time FTTTF
Director, 3) the FTTTF Director report to DAG, serve as a Senior Advisor to the Assistant to
the President for Homeland Security, and maintain direct liaison with the INS Commissioner;
and 4) the FTTTF Director consult with the Assistant Secretary of State for Consular Affairs
on visa matters. This underscores the need for FTTTF to be positioned organizationally to
provide effective leadership/coordination, even with regard to visa matters. (See organizational
placement and interagency participation discussions later in this report)

The mission, which seems simple and direct, encompasses many complex activities that cut
across multiple organizations. For example, other agencies, such as the Department of State,
the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS), and the U.S. Customs Service
(USCS), have longstanding important responsibilities with regard to ensuring that aliens who
pose threats, terrorist or otherwise, are denied entry into the United States at borders and ports
of entry. The identification of persons abroad who may be terrorists or pose a terrorist threat is
an ongoing intelligence responsibility of the many 1C agencies, including the CIA, the DIA, the
NSA, and the FBI.. The FBI also has the law enforcement (LE) responsibility related to
counterterrorism. In addition, other law enforcement agencies/entities, such as the Drug
Enforcement Administration and the Organized Crime and Drug Enforcement Task Forces
(OCDETFs) also have information useful to the war on terrorism,

The FTTTF is not itself responsible for certain actions/outcomes stated in HSPD-2. Instead, it
may assist others in achieving these. For example, Border Patrol and INS/Customs Inspectors
located at our borders and ports deny entry and make arrests. ENS investigators across the
U.S. search for and arrest illegal aliens and "absconders." The FBI performs international and
domestic terrorism investigations and make arrests. The U.S. Marshals Service (USMS), INS,
and Bureau of Prisons detain those arrested for terrorism or related charges. The U.S.
Attorneys and INS Attorneys prosecute ten-orisnVirnmigration-related cases. The INS
deports illegal aliens who might be involved in terrorist activities. FTTTF information may lead
to these outcomes, but FTTTF is not responsible for them.

Presumably, the FTTTF efforts must be able to address anyone who could pose a potential
terrorist threat The FBI has extensive experience in and responsibility for counterterrorism
enforcement functions, thus making FTTTF's placement there logical.

Further complicating FTTTF's role definition is the fact that there are so many multi-agency
centers (for counterterrorism, countertintelligence and counterdrugs) across government
involving the same or similar law LE and 1C players. While these increase the potential to
collect, disseminate and act upon valuable information, they also increase the potential for
duplication of effort, stretch thin the resources available to support the various agency goals

-2-

OAG015-1007
and objectives, and reduce the overall efficiency of the counterterrorism effort. Linking FTTTF
to the evolving CT systems architecture of the FBI, which already has strong 1C participation
and will include links among the FBI's intcragency headquarters/field enforcement entities
(JTTFs), will reduce information redundancy and enhance information collection/sharing
potential to protect the nation against terrorists.

Some interviewees were concerned that the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) may
duplicate FTTTF's work. Discussions of the DHS structure/role thus far center on: border and
transportation security; emergency preparedness and response; chemical, biological,
radiological, and nuclear countermeasures; and information analysis and infrastructure
protection. FTTTF activities have centered on supporting counterterrorism enforcement
activities, e.g., identifying and investigating individuals within the U.S. who have been involved in
terrorist activities and/or who may pose a terrorist threat. The President has indicated that
counterterrorism law enforcement will remain within the FBI. While certain current/proposed
FTTTF activities (e.g., visa applicant reviews/bioterrorism-related foreign student reviews) may
relate to proposed DHS activities), the preponderance relate to the counterterrorism law
enforcement mission of the FBI. To the extent FTTTF can assist in projects and coordinate
activities with DHS it certainly should, but generally the evolving missions of DHS and FTTTF
seem to be separate, distinct and complementary.

A major challenge for FTTTF within the current complex and fluid environment has been to
define and pursue a clear and unique mission that would be viewed as providing value to the
various agencies performing or supporting counterterrorism functions. The Department's
strategy was to apply DOJ's uniquely suited staff and information resources to the FTTTF
mission. Specifically, DOJ identified the FBI's mandate for counterterrorism
prevention/investigations/enforcement, the INS' responsibility for denying entry of illegal aliens,
and the case/intelligence information potentially available from each as the starting point for
setting up FTTTF operations.

The FTTTF mission that still is being refined is: to become and serve as the premier information
center/clearinghouse (i.e., build the data warehouse) for accessing, sorting, and mining large
datasets (public source, proprietary, law enforcement, and select 1C) and then using the data
warehouse in order to develop and disseminate critical information about known or potential
terrorists who may already be within, or seek entry into, the United States. This information
serves many purposes, including support of ongoing CT investigations, development of new
leads for CT investigations (within the U.S.), development of intelligence collection targets
(outside the U.S.), and the production and dissemination of lookout lists to deny entry.

Using powerful computing capacity and state-of-the-art computer software tools (e.g., to
perform searches, sorts and link analyses), FTTTF is able to: 1) identify known/suspected
terrorists and their links, to potential others within (and outside) the United States by running

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OAG015-1008
9/11 Law Enforcement Sensitive

names of individuals and groups against available databases; and 2) prepare and regularly
update/run algorithms against available databases to identify potential terrorists. Among the
results of these efforts may be: special reports for DOJ leadership, leads/investigative
' information sent to FBI headquarters and field elements (N/JTTFs), lookout reports for INS
^adquarters and field units, foreign leads to be worked by the 1C, and various reports to the
Department of State.

Twomajor functions evident in the FTTTF briefing materials and organizational chart are: 1)
detection, tracking and arrest/removal of known/potential terrorists; and
2) developing risk/threat assessments related to known/potential terrorists.

i The FTTTP is intended to receive tasks from various sources, including the Offices of the
Aitpniey General and the Deputy Attorney General, the FBI's Counterterrorism Division, the
Joint Terrorisni Task Forces, Field Offices and others. Requests range from a basic name
check to more in-depth requests for tracking and the completion of risk assessments (See
Figure 1). Since becoming operational, the FTTTF has provided significant information derived
from a broad range of government and non-government data sources including the identification
and referral to the FBI o J Iknown and suspected terrorists who entered the United States
undetected. Iff addition, it has assisted the INS in utilizing its investigative resources by
\identirying,oveiCI3ndividuals from 26 countries of .interest, and others who warranted
priority attention due to their criminal histories and other factors. The individuals identified were
developed from a list of ™"-rl lahsconders suspected of remaining in the United States
following their final order of deportation deadlines. This ongoing absconder project has
resulted in nverf Ihieh risk absconders being arrested, of whichQare still in INS custody
ar j have been removed from the United States. The FTTTF also has processed over
21,000 flight training candidate checks in accordance with Section 113 of the Aviation and
Transportation Security Act and vetted State Department Security Advisory Opinion visa
applications.

A key function that should continue to be performed at the FTTTF is its innovative, ongoing
research and development activities. This allows FTTTF to continue to experiment with cutting
edge technology so that a state-of-the-art system can be developed and maintained which
provides for large scale data storage and exploitation. The FTTTF is dealing with staggering
amounts of data. The FTTTF must keep abreast of new expert tools to apply to the data
warehouse in order to more effectively detect patterns and undiscovered knowledge in
databases.

Recommendations:

1 DOJ FBI and FTTTF leadership should work with other participating agencies to develop
and adopt by signature a formal charter (see examples at Appendix A) that clearly sets forth _

-4-

OAG015-1009
n fl if 111 u y u B 11 if 1111 if i B B B H «i H i H 11 a
FTTTF TASKINGS

Offices of the
Other Federal
Attorney
Participating
General /Deputy
FTTTF Clearinghouse Agencies
Attorney General
(for name checks, tracking
requests, and risk
assessments)

Counterterronsm
Division

National Joint
Strategic
National Joint Assessments
Terrorism Task ;<« and Warning
Joint
Force Section
Terrorism
Task Forces
Figure 1

OAG015-1010
the FTTTF mission, functions, and broad operating parameters. Such a document would help
emphasize the priority of FTTTF's work and clarify the coordinative role that it is expected to
play with other agencies, especially those engaged in intelligence collection activities. The
charter could also address: the FTTTF's policy coordination role, if any, relative to HSPD-2;
the duration of service required of the FTTTF Director and inter agency detailees; and the
reporting relationships/responsibilities of the FTTTF Director.

2. Given the interagency nature of FTTTF's role and its status as a national counterterrorism
asset, the charter should include the creation of an FTTTF Policy Advisory Board, chaired by
the Deputy Attorney General, with participation of the FBI Director, Executive Assistant
Director for Counterterrorism/Counterintelligence, the Assistant Director for
Counterterrorism, the FTTTF Director, and any other interagency participation designated by
the Deputy Attorney General and the FBI Director. Its role would be to oversee the
continuing process of bringing FTTTF to full operational status. The Board could advise on
all remaining start-up activities, determine future requests/allocation of funds, advise on
selection of the Director and Deputy Director, give guidance on establishment of major
ongoing functions/key taskings, and address interagency issues.

3. Because information management (e.g., collection, sorting, and dissemination) lies at the
core of the FTTTF mission and functions, FTTTF should continue with its innovative, ongoing
research and development activities to ensure that systems and tools remain cutting edge in
support of the FTTTF's unique counterterrrorism enforcement mission.

Organizational Placement and Structure

Recent Placement and Attorney General Policy Direction

From inception to August 6, 2002, FTTTF operated as an independent entity reporting to the
Deputy Attorney General (DAG) . On August 6, 2002, the Attorney General issued a
memorandum to the FBI Director supporting consolidation of the FTTTF within the FBI
Counterterrorism Division (CTD), and asking that this occur "as quickly as possible." It also
stipulated: "Consistent with HSPD-2, the Director of the FTTTF will continue to support the
Deputy Attorney General as well as the FBI Director."

Several FTTTF participants have expressed skepticism and concern about whether the FTTTF
can retain its vitality/effectiveness/responsiveness/clout ("nimbleness" was a word often used) if
organizationally placed within the FBI. Generally, these considered the FBI too
stovepiped/hierarchical in its management and too bureaucratic/lumbering in its administrative
management support. They fear that access to top DOJ managers will be reduced and that
external perceptions of a diminished role will cause non-Justice agency participants to pull out.

-5-

OAG015-1011
They also are concerned that this might lead to organizational or physical separation from
CIFA/JCAG, which they view as detrimental to the growing IT/IRM foundation upon which
FTTTF's mission is based.

Others considered placement within the FBI a potential benefit, since it could afford more
consistent and stable management oversight, economies of scale through administrative
management infrastructure support (e.g. .budget, personnel, etc.), access to broader
information/analytical resources at FBI headquarters and the field (NJTTF, JTTFs, 1C), a
clearer and more stable source of staff/funds, and perhaps a clearer command structure for
taskings.

• Some employees did not care so much about organizational placement so long as the mission
was clear and being met effectively and efficiently; however, most indicated that it was time to
move beyond the somewhat chaotic management approach that had characterized FTTTF for
the past year during its "start up" phase. Most of these seemed to want top management
stabilized (since there has been much leadership turnover recently), their own roles and
responsibilities clarified, and for FTTTF to retain certain operational freedom/independence
(e.g., to retain CIFA/JCAG relationship for IT/IRM support).

Merger into FBI - Actions Thus Far

The FBI clearly is the lead agency and has the mandate by law and Presidential Directive to
perform the counterterrorism enforcement mission.

The FBI has acted upon the Attorney General's direction and the FTTTF now is placed
organizationally within the FBI's Counterterrorism Division (CTD). The review team found that
the FBI is reorganizing its entire headquarters CTD and field infrastructure to better perform the
counterterrorism mission. Also, the FBI's Information Resources Division (IRD) is being
completely revamped by the FBI Chief Information Officer to better support counterterrorism
and to assure interoperability and connectivity among FBI and 1C systems within a new
enterprise architecture. At the same time, forward-thinking FBI agents/managers are being
placed in key counterterrorism positions at CTD, FTTTF, and the Office of the CIO. The
review team considers these changes a positive sign for the future of the FTTTF within the FBI
context They signal anew direction and strong commitment to ensuring that to the extent
possible, terrorist acts are prevented in the future and that if they occur, investigations are
properly supported and can proceed expeditiously and successfully.

DOJ and FBI leaders interviewed regarding FTTTF were clear that they continue to consider
the FTTTF an important, national-level, interagency asset that must be responsive to
Department leadership and to the FBI Director. They recognize its unique independent
role/mandate, as articulated by the President, but they also consider it a key element ("the fourth

-6-

OAG015-1012
leg of the table") within the context of the FBI information management architecture focused on
counterterrorism.

A recent iteration of the CTD organization chart shows FTTTF as a stand-alone, operational
support entity to be tied to other CT system nodes within FBI, e.g., the National Joint
Terrorism Task Force (NJTTF) and the field-based Joint Terrorism Task Forces (JTTFs).
These links are critical to the national interest and to carrying out the investigative mandate
contained within the second part of the HSPD-2 mission statement They also will provide
FTTTF an opportunity to leverage the LE and 1C resources already present in the FBI
structure, without duplicating their efforts.

Several Department-level interviewees pointed out that it does not make sense for AG/DAG
staff to act as line managers, especially over an entity intended to directly support operational
activity. AG/DAG staff typically do not do this. However, to ensure responsiveness to
Department leadership needs and better coordinate and communicate regarding FTTTF
taskings and activities, they were supportive of regular FTTTF meetings with, and status reports
provide to, the Office of the DAG (ODAG).

The review team is aware of comments by senior congressional Appropriations staff that there
are mixed views regarding whether FTTTF can be effective within the FBI. However, the
FTTTF counterterrorism enforcement support mission, successful activities thus far, and plans
being pursued to tie FTTTF to FBI operational and systems elements, all suggest that FTTTF
belongs in the FBI and will add significant value to our nation's counterterrorism prevention and
enforcement efforts.

Recommendations:

4. Although FTTTF will continue to be a national asset with interagency participation and use,
it should remain organizationally placed within the FBI's Counterrorism Division (CTD) where
it can be linked functionally and operationally to the FBI headquarters National Joint
Terrorism Task Force (NJTTF) and the field-based Joint Terrorism Task Forces (JTTFs).
This will: (1) ensure clear command, control and coordination over counterterrorism
enforcement assets; (2) guarantee FTTTF system interoperability and interconnectivity to the
FBI's national systems architecture being developed to support counterterrorism; and (3)
avoid duplication of effort in counterterrorism enforcement support activities.

5. Pursuant to the August 6th memorandum, a dual communication/reporting arrangement will


need to be worked out to ensure that the FTTTF Director: (1) keeps both the Office of the
Deputy Attorney General and the Assistant Director, CTD, apprised of FTTTF activities; and
(2) receives and controls taskings from the ODAG and FBI. Specifically, the FTTTF Director
and FBI Assistant Director for CTD together should meet with, and report regularly to, die

.7- f

OAG015-1013
ODAG, where a single point of contact (e.g., the DAG Chief of Staff) should serve as the DOJ
executive-level information/tasking conduit The specific expectations and responsibilities
involved in this arrangement should be articulated in a memorandum from the DAG to the
FBI Director.

6. The FTTTF Director should have direct access to any level of the FBI (including the
Director), as well as to the Deputy Attorney General, when circumstances (e.g., information
is uncovered pertaining to a major, immediate threat) demand quick communication/response
to protect the national interest or the lives of U.S. citizens, or in response to urgent taskings
assigned by the Attorney General or Deputy Attorney General.

Internal Management Structure

The FTTTF organizational structure has evolved along with the mission/functions and it has not
yet stabilized. This is typical of "start-up"organizations.

FTTTF provided the team an "Interim FTTTF Organizational Chart"showing an August


iteration of the evolving structure and staffing (see next page). The chart, which is now under
review by the new Director, does not seem to accurately describe current operations nor does
it appear to support the mission well. For example, the "Chief of Staff/Deputy Director for
Policy and Law" is shown as the official to whom all FTTTF staff report. The bifurcated
functions of this position are divergent, and the wide variation and quantity of duties being
performed are simply too broad for one individual.

The chart shows Chief of Staff, Special Assistant, Executive Assistant, and Administrative
Officer staff. Based upon our interviews, the delineation of these responsibilities and the
rationale for their separation is unclear. In addition, the role and functions of the agency liaisons
and their integration into the actual work supporting the mission is not evident from how FTTTF
is operating nor from the chart. Administrative management functions, such as budget/finance,
personnel, and security, usually are overseen by an Executive Officer or Administrative Officer
and comprise a single organizational unit. The FTTTF chart shows these as separate,
independent entities. Finally, the great importance of the IT/IRM function and its heavy reliance
on JCAG suggests that perhaps a CIO with IT/JCAG personnel reporting or connected to it,
would be warranted.

Recommendation:

7. The new FTTTF Director needs to complete his ongoing management assessment and
establish an organizational structure that supports the FTTTF mission and functions and
clarifies employee roles, responsibilities and reporting relationships. He should work with
other agency representatives to agree upon a structure that both effectively and efficiently
-J-ST-:
^ - V
., ? ^ 0 ..-
;

-8-

OAG015-1014
IJIIJIiillllllllflllHIIIIIIIIIIII. 111
Interim FTTTF Organizational Chart

OAG015-1015

3 11 La J
E n f o r c e m e n t Privacy
accomplishes the mission and meets their needs and expectations. The structure should be
flexible enough to cover the range of functions to be performed now and in the foreseeable
future, and changed as appropriate to meet new needs or requirements. The review team
defers to the FTTTF Director and managers to determine what structure best supports the
mission; however, five organizational/functional/staffing issues need to be addressed soon: (1)
role, duration, representation (e.g., continued ENS) and responsibilities of the Deputy
Director, (2) role and placement of the Chief of Staff; (3) the need for an administrative unit
headed by an executive or administrative officer; (4) the need for a full-time CIO/IT unit to
oversee/coordinate systems development; and (5) role and potential greater integradon of the
liaison staff into the core FTTTF work.

Physical Location

• Initially, FTTTF was physically located within INS space and was to be principally supported
by INS. Subsequently, the first FTTTF Director determined that the INS systems development
and support infrastructure was not adequate to respond quickly to the urgent FTTTF needs in
the wake of 9/11. He also was familiar with the FBI systems capabilities at that time and
considered them inadequate to meet the mission. So, he decided to partner with the
Department of Defense's CIFA/JCAG for this support, which by all accounts, has been a great
success. CIFA/JCAG wanted access to information likely to be resident at FTTTF, and in
return, was willing to invest its own resources in FTTTF hardware/software, provide
procurement/systems expertise, and share/provide office space. Virtually all interviewees have
indicated that the relationship to CIFA/JCAG is critical and must continue if FTTTF is to be
successful.

FTTTF already has begun on the buildout of space uj jnear to CEFA/JCAG,


although construction is currently delayed pending new resources. Based on team interviews,
JCAG IT support is an essential part of FTTTF's operation.

Recommendation:

8. Although FTTTF is organizationally placed within the FBI, its collocation with CIFA/JCAG
should continue and it should move into the new space ln| Joncc funding is
available and construction is completed.

Staffing

The most critical leadership positions within the FTTTF are the Director, Deputy Director, and
CIO. Recently, the first Director departed and a new one was hired, the Deputy Director from

-9-

9/11 Law Enforcement Sensitive


OAG015-1016
INS is rumored to be leaving, and the CIO returned to her home FBI office in Tucson, AZ,.
Stable, sustained leadership is imperative for ensuring FTTTF effectiveness over the long term.

Directorshio

Relative to the Director position, HSPD-2 says: "The Attorney General shall appoint a senior
official as the full-time Director of the Task Force. The Director shall report to the Deputy
Attorney General, serve as a Senior Advisor to the Assistant to the President for Homeland
Security, and maintain direct liaison with the Commissioner of the Immigration and
Naturalization Service (INS) on issues related to immigration and the foreign terrorist presence
in the United States. The Director shall also consult with the Assistant Secretary of State for
Consular Affairs on issues related to visa matters."

The August 6 memorandum from the Attorney General to FBI Director Mueller states: ".. .it is
imperative that we move forward as quickly as possible to identify a new Director of the
FTTTF in the wake of Steve McCraw's departure, and that the Bureau continue to assign high
performing personnel to me FTTTF to serve in critical positions."

DOJ, FBI, and FTTTF interagency staff said that FTTTF Director McCraw had the right
leadership qualities-e.g., vision, energy, drive and outreach-^o get FTTTF started quickly. He
brought a good mix of people and skills together and established a partnership with the Defense
Department's Counterintelligence Field Activity (CIFA)/ Joint Counterintelligence Assessment
Group (JCAG) to provide systems development and procurement support. In addition, he was
very responsive to leadership requests for information/projects. He also was not hesitant to
deal with DOJ, FBI, or other agency leaders at any level to meet the HSPD-2 mandate. Since
his departure, there has been a leadership vacuum at FTTTF.

Mr. Bob Casey, recently the Assistant Special Agent in Charge of the FBI's Miami Field
Office, was selected as Mr. McCraw's successor to the FTTTF Director position. In addition
to understanding the FTTTF mission vision and its unique FBI/interagency role, Mr. Casey
brings strong management and administration skills which now need to be applied to help
stabilize and prepare FTTTF for long-term operations. As an FBI agent manager, he also is
said to have strong ties/direct access to senior FBI and other agency officials with whom he
must work as FTTTF Director.

The review team interviewed/interacted with both FTTTF Directors extensively-over 3 hours
with each-and we feel confident that the new FTTTF Director is a good selection and will have
a positive, stabilizing impact on FTTTF management and operations. At this stage, he is only
beginning to assess the current organizational and management environment, meeting with key
DOJ, FBI and interagency players, and working to understand in detail the important mission
and ongoing activities of the FTTTF:

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OAG015-1017
Recommendations:

9. The FTTTF charter should specify that its Director be an SES-level career FBI agent,
jointly selected by FBI and DOJ management

10. The FTTTF Director should be required to serve a minimum of two years, with potential
to extend this period of service, with the advice of the proposed FTTTF Policy Advisory
Board.

11. Given the nature and importance of the FTTTF Director position, the FBI should ensure
careful succession planning that includes some overlap in service to avoid any leadership gaps
such as occurred recently. This will give new Directors a chance to learn and become
familiar with the FTTTF work and to be introduced to key DOJ, FBI and interagency officials
who interact with, and participate in, FTTTF.

Deputy Director

The current Deputy Director is assigned from the Immigration and Naturalization Service's
Intelligence Office. He has been part of the FTTTF since its inception and has been
instrumental in providing leadership and guidance through the transition period between
Directors. He has been especially important to building the information base for the data
warehouse which continues to evolve at FTTTF. As a senior INS representative, he also
ensures FTTTF access to INS information needed to identify known/potential terrorists,
engages appropriate INS enforcement officials when appropriate, and communicates through
INS channels information aimed at denying entry as articulated in the mission. Thus, it is very
important for the FTTTF to maintain a strong INS leadership and significant staff presence.

Recommendation:

12. The FTTTF charter should specify that the Deputy Director be a senior-level (GS-15 or
above) INS official who commits to a minimum two-year tenure (possibly extended with Board
approval) and who has direct access to the INS Commissioner and field units when
circumstances/information dictate immediate action by the INS. Similar to the Director
position, appropriate succession planning and overlap of tenure should occur. (Note: if the
intelligence/enforcement elements of INS are integrated into DHS, the team recommends that
DOJ/FBI work with DHS to continue having an FTTTF Deputy be assigned from there.)

Chief Information Officer

The person designated FTTTF CIO recently departed to return home after an extended
rotational assignment with FTTTF. Although trained as a lawyer and assigned to the FBI
•f.t. '- r -- - _ --

-11-

OAG015-1018
Office of the General Counsel, she also had experience planning and working with information
systems. She was instrumental in getting FTTTF systems under way, working closely with
CIFA/JCAG staff who had extensive information systems procurement and development
expertise, hi addition, she was relied upon to address complex legal issues related to systems
design and use of information.

• Because everything that FTTTF does revolves around access to and manipulation of large
amounts of information (e.g., dataset development/access, data mining, link analysis, data
warehousing, reporting, dissemination), a highly-skilled CIO is needed to oversee the continuing
evolution of FTTTF systems. The CIO must grasp the myriad needs that must be met, set the
continuing vision and plans for the internal FTTTF architecture, and ensure that the FTTTF
system fits well with the overall FBI enterprise architecture. The CIO will have to work closely
with the FTTTF Director/Deputy, FBI IT staff, and interagency staff to ensure that FTTTF
systems perform well in support of the FTTTF mission.

Unlike the Director and Deputy Director positions, the CIO needs to be a long-term senior
level FTTTF position to ensure continuous oversight and continuity of system development
efforts. This person also needs to have extensive experience developing and working with TT
contracts and contractors, and with defense elements such as CIFA/JCAG, to obtain quickly
and efficiently IT products and services needed to support FTTTF. CIO/IT staff also should
be hired to assist the CIO in planning systems and serve as Contracting Officer Technical
Representatives (COTRs) for contract activities within the FTTTF.

Recommendation:

13. The FBI and DOJ should confer on how best to hire a highly skilled, long-term senior
level CIO to oversee all information systems planning and development activities. This
person should have experience in developing major, large-scale, state-of-the-art systems for
the LE and Intel Communities. They should also understand how to overcome the challenges
of obtaining, controlling and sharing sensitive LE and intelligence information, and have
specialized experience in connecting disparate systems/data so that analysts can perform
needed functions at their desktops.

Intcragencv/Intereovernmental Participation

HSPD-2 also specifies that "The Task Force shall be staffed by expert personnel from the
Department of State, the INS, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Secret Service,
the Customs Service, the Intelligence Community, military support components and other
Federal agencies as appropriate to accomplish the Task Force's mission.

-12-

OAG015-1019
9/11 Law Enforcement Sensitive

Finally, HSPD-2 says: "With the concurrence of the Attorney General and the Director of
Central' Intelligence, foreign liaison officers from cooperating countries shall be invited to serve
as liaisons to the Task Force, where appropriate, to expedite investigation and data sharing."

Implicit in the mission are myriad potential activities involving many organizations, but the clear
major players are: the Attorney General as the chief law enforcement official responsible for
enforcement policy in the United States; the FBI as the Jead agency responsible for
counterterronsm enforcement; and the INS as the kcy.enforcer at U.S. entry points and within
our interior of laws related to immigrant entry and exit. At a minimum, FBI and INS need to
continue to be the LE partners within the FTTTF to meet the mission.

Other agencies also need to be represented for FTTTF to achieve its majtirnum potential.
Recently, FBI, INS, Civil Division, Criminal Division, Coast Guard, State, Customs, ATF,
Transportation Security Agency, Social Security Administration, NSA, DIA and thej____J
1 ""frave been represented, but some of these are now rotating out with
no clear plans for their replacement Absent is the CIA, which is playing a direct role at FBI
headquarters and in the FBI's field-based JTTFs. The CIA needs to join the FTTTF for it to
be fully effective.

Prdblems potentially impeding participation are shortage of staff due to other commitments, lack
of understanding by external agencies of the FTTTF mission/services/capabilities relative to
other centers, desire to wait for DHS role to be clarified to avoid duplication. The review team
believes that the FTTTF's national role in the organizational/functional context of the FBI is
beginning to solidify and that DOJ and FTTTF leadership must keep pressing forward with
current plans.

A principle articulated by several interviewees that continues to apply is that if the information
and product is valuable to the war on terrorism and, if participants can obtain information that
furthers their own missions, then others will want to participate, no matter where FTTTF is
placed organizationally. The review team agrees and already has observed this as other LE and
1C members already participate at FBI HQ, JTTFs, DEA HQ, EPIC, NDIC, CDX, etc.

While having the FTTTF Director and Deputy Director remain FBI and INS positions
respectively, staffing of other FTTTF management positions as defined in the new organization
could be open to other agency officials as appropriate, perhaps as an additional incentive for
their participation. Currently, there are several positions identified as performing domestic,
international, and intel community liaison functions. However, management positions/functions
throughout FTTTF need to be clarified at this point to ensure a rational staffing/skills approach
is followed to meet the mission.

-13-

OAG015-1020
Recommendation:

14. The FTTTF charter should articulate the general approach/broad criteria for interagency
participation at FTTTF. At a minimum, FTTTF, FBI and Department leaders should ensure
that the federal law enforcement, the Intelligence Community and the Department of State
continue to participate in order to meet the HSPD-2 mandates. The FTTTF Director and
Deputy also should develop and present to the Policy Board an interagency staffing plan
(including agencies that should be represented, the number and types of staff needed, and the
proposed duration of their details) to meet the FTTTF mission over the long-term.
Appropriate memoranda of understanding or interagency agreements should be developed to
effect appropriate participation.

15. The FTTTF should better articulate the skills sets needed from the candidate agency to
best complement its overall effort To support this, FTTTF should upgrade/update its current
powerpoint briefing to present the FTTTF capabilities and potential participants. It should
accurately and clearly describe FTTTF's mission, role in the national context, structure,
accomplishments, capablities, future plans. This material should, be flexible enough to be
easily updated and adapted for use in multiple settings and for various audiences, including
policy makers, new employees, and potential participants. Such a tool would be very helpful
in getting the word out to others about FTTTF and achieving broader understanding of and
support for its activities.

16. The FTTTF Director should visit and meet regularly with executives from DOJ and non-
DO J participating agencies to ensure their satisfaction with their continuing role and product
out of FTTTF. The Director must participate in and perhaps develop other interagency fora
to foster communication and information sharing. Interagency relationships need to be
nurtured to ensure continued buy-in and participation of agencies that are key contributors.

Information Resources
With regard to information sharing, HSPD-2 says: "The Attorney General and the Director of
Central Intelligence shall ensure, to the maximum extent permitted by law, that the Task Force
has access to all available information necessary to perform its
mission, and they shall request information from State and local governments, where
appropriate.

It also says: "Other Federal entities, such as the Migrant Smuggling and Trafficking in Persons
Coordination Center and the Foreign Leads Development Activity, shall provide the Task
Force with any relevant information they possess concerning aliens suspected of engaging in or
supporting terrorist activity.
]*£'&
-14-

OAG015-1021
Access to, and manipulation of, information lies at the heart of what FTTTF does. The large
computing capacity and state-of-the-art tools and technology, along with access to the data
most critical to the war on terrorism, are what make the FTTTF such an important national and
FBI asset.

In order to carry out its vital mission and fill gaps in existing government efforts relating to the
prevention of terrorist activities, the FTTTF is locating the best available up-to-date
investigative, intelligence, public source, and proprietary data derived from a broad range of
government and non-government sources.

The FTTTF has established a technical partnership with the Department of Defense,
CIFA/JCAG to assist the FTTTF in achieving its mission. CIFA/JCAG has a complementary
mission to the FTTTF (i.e., the identification of foreign terrorists and their supporters is mission
critical to CIFA in relation to critical infrastructure protection). CIFA/JCAG has technical
expertise in developing systems to facilitate analytic support processes and performing data
analysis.

dFA/JCAG/DOD is designing, developing, and implementing a data warehouse and a suite of


automated analytical tools and threat assessment techniques needed to support the Fi IMF's
mission. The data warehouse will provide the capability to integrate law enforcement,
intelligence, public, and private source data into a common repository for the analyst to query.
A summary of the current contents of the data warehouse is provided in Figure 2. The data
warehouse permits analytical modeling based on mathematical algorithms that query large data
sets using unique criteria developed by the FTTTF. In addition to the data warehouse, the
FTTTF is responsible for the development of the Flight Training Candidates Check Program
(FTCCP) system which automates the application process and risk assessment process for
foreign individuals who desire to take flight training for the first time and foreign nationals who
are licensed pilots seeking recurrent training as required by Federal Aviation Administration
regulations. The FTTTF must continue to leverage the knowledge and technical expertise of
CIFA/JCAG/DOD in order to ensure the successful completion of these IT efforts.

The build-out plan for the FTTTF assumes that there will be three systems delivered to each
desk:

*• JWICS, which will provide access to the data warehouse as well as any other JWICS
system for which an individual should have access
* NTPRNET, which will continue to provide access to internet e-mail as well as news and
public source connectivity
> REACHBACK, which will provide access to an individual's home agency system (e.g.,
FBI, INS, Department of State, U.S. Customs Service) so that each

-15-

OAG015-1022
1111111 i i fl 11111 i i B 11 R u D 1 1 1 1 1 D 1 1 1
CURRENT FTTTF DATA
WAREHOUSE CONTENTS

FIGURE!

OAG015-1023
1
individual can remain in contact with their home agency without having to travel to
another office.

The development of the data warehouse and the FTCCP system is highly technical work which
is being completed by the CEFA/JCAG IT contractors. These IT contractors require oversight
and direction from the FTTTF personnel with expertise in the areas of knowledge management,
visualization tools, system security, telecommunications, and relational databases. Currently, the
FTTTF does not have a permanent IT staff with the requisite knowledge to effectively inspect
and monitor FT contractor performance to assure technical proficiency and compliance.
Permanent IT staff who are certified as contracting officers' technical representatives (COTRs)
must be hired by the FTTTF to better manage its IT development efforts.

The continued success of the FTTTF depends on its ability to collocate the critical data
available from law enforcement, intelligence, public, and proprietary sources. The FTTTF has
acquired data sets from a variety of sources. However, much more data must be acquired,
especially intelligence data from the Central Intelligence Agency, the Defense Intelligence
Agency, and the National Security Agency. The FTTTF needs to strategize its data needs and
develop apian for the acquisition of the necessary data.

The FTTTF has achieved major accomplishments despite minimal funding and mostly
borrowed facilities and technology. The FTTTF has provided leads to the FBI about persons
who are identified as terrorists and appear to have entered the United States undetected. It has
assisted with identifying the whereabouts of several hundred convicted felons, foreign nationals
who have evaded deportation orders. Also, it has assisted the FBI with the review of
thousands of visa requests referred by the Department of State and appears to have identified
persons who are the subject of terrorism investigations and persons who are known terrorists.
While organizations traditionally seek funding for new projects based upon predictions of
performance, the FTTTF has heeded the call of urgency and has produced results by available
means. The FTTTF has proven its capabilities and needs to be fully funded to ensure continued
success. The lack of funding especially in the area of IT is a major impediment towards the
FTTTF achieving full operational capability. In FY 2002, the FTTTF received $20 million, of
which $17 million is for IT and collection and dissemination requirements. The Department
currently has a $62 million budget amendment/reprogramming pending for FY 2003, of which
$59 million is for IT and collection/dissemination requirements. In addition, a $10 million
reprogramming is pending which includes $9 million for IT.

The FTTTF strategy is to provide investigative support to the JTTFs. The FTTTF will need to
communicate with the JTTFs through the FBI's Enterprise Architecture. Because of this, the
FTTTF must ensure that its major IT development efforts are coordinated with the Enterprise
Architecture Group in the Office of the FBI's Chief Information Officer to ensure the "free
flow" of data between the FTTTF and the JTTFs.

-16-

OAG015-1024
The FTTTF's data warehouse is the next evolutionary step in information technology and
knowledge management. The FTTTF has experimented with a variety of data mining
techniques to manipulate data including batch match, fuzzy match, multi-variable search, entity
extraction, links, exploitation, and visualization. Other DOJ components that have similar
requirements to manipulate and mine large amounts of data could benefit from the techniques
used by the FTTTF. The FTTTF needs to share their techniques with other DOJ components.

Recommendations:

17. Because of its close working relationship with CIFA/JCAG, the FTTTF should continue to
leverage the technical expertise of CIFA/JCAG for its current system development efforts
and future technology efforts wherever relevant in order to achieve economies of scale.

18. The FTTTF should establish an IT unit reporting to the proposed CIO (see
Recommendation 7), and hire into this unit permanent IT staff with technical expertise in the
areas of knowledge management, visualization tools, system security, telecommunications,
and relational databases. The permanent IT staff should be certified as COTRs.

19. The FTTTF should develop a long term plan for the acquisition of law enforcement,
intelligence, public source, and proprietary data for the data warehouse. Due to limited
resources, the FTTTF should also prioritize its data warehouse requirements.

20. The Department must ensure that adequate IT funding is provided to the FTTTF to
complete its system development efforts in a timely and cost-effective manner.

21. The major IT development efforts at the FTTTF that will be institutionalized should be
coordinated with the FBI's Enterprise Architecture Group to ensure compliance with the
overall FBI's Enterprise Architecture and FT standards as well as the Department's IT
standards.

22. The FTTTF needs to share then' lessons learned and data mining techniques with other
DOJ components.

Administrative Management

• Most of the administrative management functions at FTTTF are being performed as collateral
duties, often by staff who were brought to FTTTF to perform other duties. For example, an
intelligence research specialist is doing budget formulation, the operations chief is handling
personnel and the Chief of Staff is trying to do various other activities. As a general rule,

OAG015-1025
whomever is willing and has sufficient skill may be asked to assist, even if it is not their area of
expertise or interest.

Recommendation:

23. FTTTF should have (or the FBI assign) an experienced Executive Officer or
Administrative Officer to oversee and coordinate activities of a small administrative unit (see
Recommendation 7) that would perform functions critical to sustaining FTTTF operations.
Specifically, the unit should have three staff with expertise in personnel, budget/finance, and
procurement The head of this unit also would establish relationships and ensure liaison with
the FBI on other administrative matters to maximize potential economies using the existing
FBI infrastructure.

General Personnel Management

• FTTTF employees are detailees and most, reportedly, were hand picked by the first FTTTF
Director. Currently, there are about 45 FTTTF staff, about half of whom are FBI employees.

It is understandable that while operating as a "start-up" organization totally reliant on detailees,


FTTTF has not yet established a clear personnel/staffing strategy or any infrastructure to
actively provide human resources planning and development Staff brought on board to
provide one skill or service often have ended up working in a variety of areas and performing
multiple jobs to meet the mission. For example, Intelligence Research Specialists are
performing budget and personnel functions in addition to doing their regular analytical work.
While all acknowledged die value of being part of this important effort initially, sustained long
work hours and performance of tasks outside of their areas of expertise or interest now are
leading some to job burnout and frustration.

• Many key staff are leaving FTTTF as their details expire, e.g., the CIO who had
overseen/coordinated IT activities returned to her home office. Since its inception, there has
been no sense of permanence or structure to the basic processes of recruiting and retaining the
best personnel available.

• There is some confusion among staff regarding information flow and assignments. Certain staff,
recruited by the previous Director for a certain purpose, were not fully utilized for those tasks.
It appears there is no real "chain of command" for making assignments, with the result that a
few "star performers" receive the bulk of the work.

• The FTTTF needs to stabilize its management of human resources. The review team found that
there appears to be no system in place yet that: (1) identifies the specific positions/skills sets
needed (e.g., optimum mix of agents, analysts, admin, othejrs); (2) clarifies employee work
* -"i --
-18- ..,..

OAG015-1026
responsibilities and performance requirements/expectations (e.g., no position descriptions or
performance planning/review process; (3) establishes and articulates recruitment, hiring or
succession plans and strategy; (4) establishes detailee commitment time frames and ensures
backfilling of detailee positions; (5) sets criteria for employee award/recognition.

• The FTTTF has operated without the benefit of human resources personnel on site or clear HR
support from DOJ or FBI. The new FTTTF Director has indicated his desire to review and
better define staff roles and reponsibilities to ensure that staff are treated fairly and used
efficiently and effectively to support the mission.

Recommendations:

24. The FTTTF should have (or the FBI assign) a full-time human resources specialist to
support the FTTTF. This person would help the new Director ensure that current FTTTF staff
are assigned appropriate duties and that new staffdetailees have appropriate
background/skills to address the mission requirements and are placed appropriately within the
organization.

25. The human resources specialist should work closely with FTTTF managers to develop
position descriptions and performance standards and plans. He/she would also implement an
overall hiring plan/strategy for FTTTF that covers both permanent and rotational detailee
positions, and career ladders/succession planning. FBI and FTTTF managers should adopt
any available incentives to attract the highest quality recruitment candidates, for both its
permanent and detailee positions.

Budeet/Financial Management

For FY 2002, FTTTF was provided a total of $20 million for startup costs and initial
operations.

• Because of the timing of the directive establishing the FTTTF and the planning activities
necessary for its activation, operational resources for the FTTTF were not included in the
President's FY 2003 budget request. For FY 2003, the Department is seeking a budget
amendment and reprogramming that would add $62 million in no-year money ($13 million via
reprogramming of FBI resources). There is also a $10 million reprogramming pending on the
Hill which is intended to complete the build-out of space, security and IT requirements.

Recommendation:

26. The FTTTF should have (or the FBI assign) a person to work full-time at the FTTTF on
budget/financial matters, considering*the anticipated growth level of such activity. This

-19-

OAG015-1027
person would be responsible for FTTTF budget formulation and execution, as well as ongoing
financial planning and management related to FTTTF activities. This person also would be
directly involved in setting up any reimbursable agreements that might be necessary with
participating agencies for information or other services.

Procurement Management

• FTTTF relies heavily on its relationship with CIFA/JCAG to handle the administrative
requirements of its procurement activity. There has been some concern raised that the
placement of FTTTF in the FBI will undercut FTTTF's ability to procure services in an
expedited manner to complete urgent taskings. FBI managers have expressed sensitivity to
these concerns and appear willing to set up whatever mechanisms (e.g., designating a
procurement specialist to handle FTTTF requirements) are most appropriate to ensure
responsiveness.

Recommendation:

27. FTTTF should have (or FBI assign) a procurement specialist familiar with requirements
of major systems acquisitions (e.g., systems often encountered in IT/IC work) and put in place
suitable mechanisms to meet FTTTF's unique procurement requirements. The FBI should
ensure that FTTTF has available to it the necessary flexibility to meet these types of
requirements.

Legal Counsel

• There are 4-5 lawyers assigned to the FTTTF. The Interim FTTTF Organizational Chart
shows a Chief Counsel and 3 attorneys reporting to him. In addition, as mentioned earlier, the
CIO was an attorney and so is the Chief of Staff/Deputy Director Policy and Law. This seems
like an excessive number of attorneys to provide legal counsel, and in fact, interviews suggested
that, like other staff, these also were performing FTTTF developmental/start up/management
duties unrelated to their skills.

• At the same time, the team found that there are significant legal issues that need to be addressed
related to the loosened information sharing rules under the USA PATRIOT Act and the
Attorney General's Guidelines on Information Sharing, as well as to address Privacy Act and
other requirements. Continuing legal advice is likely to be needed, but the number of attorney
staff on board seems excessive.

• With the potential for many of the management/administrative functions now performed by the
Chief of Staff/Deputy Director Policy and Law to be performed in the future by an
Executive/Administrative Officer and the Administrative Management Unit, it may be desirable

-20-

OAG015-1028
for the incumbent of this position to become the FTTTF legal counsel. The FTTTF legal
counsel should coordinate their efforts through the FBI's General Counsel.

Recommendation:

28. The FBI General Counsel should ensure that FTTTF receives its required level of
continuing legal counsel services, and assist in making a determination of which such services
should be provided on site.

-21-

OAG015-1029
Summary List of Recommendations

Mission and Functions

1. DOJ, FBI and F1TT*' leadership should work with other participating agencies to develop
and adopt by signature a formal charter (see examples at Appendix A) that dearly sets forth
the FTTTF mission, functions, and broad operating parameters. Such a document would help
emphasize the priority of FTTTF's work and clarify the coordinative role that it is expected to
play with other agencies, especially those engaged in intelligence collection activities. The
charter could also address: the FTTTF's policy coordination role, if any, relative to HSPD-2;
the duration of service required of the FTTTF Director and interagency detailees; and the
reporting relationships/responsibilities of the FTTTF Director.

2. Given the interagency nature of FTTTF's role and its status as a national counterterrorism
asset, the charter should include the creation of an FTTTF Policy Advisory Board, chaired by
the Deputy Attorney General, with participation of the FBI Director, Executive Assistant
Director for Counterterrorism/Counterintelligence, the Assistant Director for
Counterterrorism, the FTTTF Director, and any other interagency participation designated by
the Deputy Attorney General and the FBI Director. Its role would be to oversee the
continuing process of bringing FTTTF to full operational status. The Board could advise on
all remaining start-up activities, determine future requests/allocation of funds, advise on
selection of the Director and Deputy Director, give guidance on establishment of major
ongoing functions/key taskings, and address interagency issues.

3. Because information management (e.g., collection, sorting, and dissemination) lies at the
core of the FTTTF mission and functions, FTTTF should continue with its innovative, ongoing
research and development activities to ensure that systems and tools remain cutting edge in
support of the FTTTF's unique counterterrrorism enforcement mission.

Organizational Placement and Structure

4. Although FTTTF will continue to be a national asset with interagency participation and use,
it should remain organizationally placed within the FBI's Connterrorism Division (CTD) where
it can be linked functionally and operationally to the FBI headquarters National Joint
Terrorism Task Force (NJTTF) and the field-based Joint Terrorism Task Forces (JTTFs).
This will: (1) ensure clear command, control and coordination over counterterrorism
enforcement assets; (2) guarantee FTTTF system interoperability and inter-connectivity to the
FBI's national systems architecture being developed to support counterterrorism; and (3)
avoid duplication of effort in connterterrorism enforcement support activities.

-22-

OAG015-1030
5. Pursuant to the August 6th memorandum, a dual communication/reporting arrangement will
need to be worked out to ensure that the FTTTF Director: (1) keeps both the Office of the
Deputy Attorney General and the Assistant Director, CTD, apprised of FTTTF activities; and
(2) receives and controls taskings from the ODAG and FBI. Specifically, the FTTTF Director
and FBI Assistant Director for CTD together should meet with, and report regularly to, the
ODAG, where a single point of contact (e.g., the DAG Chief of Staff) should serve as the DOJ
executive-level information/tasking conduit The specific expectations and responsibilities
involved in this arrangement should be articulated in a memorandum from the DAG to the
FBI Director.

6. The FTTTF Director should have direct access to any level of the FBI (including the
Director), as well as to the Deputy Attorney General, when circumstances (e.g., information
is uncovered pertaining to a major, immediate threat) demand quick communication/response
to protect the national interest or the lives of U.S. citizens, or in response to urgent taskings
assigned by the Attorney General or Deputy Attorney General.

7. The new FTTTF Director needs to complete his ongoing management assessment and
establish an organizational structure that supports the FTTTF mission and functions and
clarifies employee roles, responsibilities and reporting relationships. He should work with
other agency representatives to agree upon a structure that both effectively and efficiently
accomplishes the mission and meets their needs and expectations. The structure should be
flexible enough to cover the range of functions to be performed now and in the foreseeable
future, and changed as appropriate to meet new needs or requirements. The review team
defers to the FTTTF Director and managers to determine what structure best supports the
mission; however, five organizational/functional/staffing issues need to be addressed soon: (1)
role, duration, representation (e.g., continued INS) and responsibilities of the Deputy
Director, (2) role and placement of the Chief of Staff; (3) the need for an administrative unit
headed by an executive or administrative officer; (4) the need for a full-time CIO/IT unit to
oversee/coordinate systems development; and (5) role and potential greater integration of the
liaison staff into the core FTTTF work.

8. Although FTTTF is organizationally placed within the FBI, its collocation with CIFA/JCAG
should continue and it should move into the new space in Crystal City once funding is
available and construction is completed.

Staffing

9. The FTTTF charter should specify that its Director be an SES-level career FBI agent,
jointly selected by FBI and DOJ management

10. The FTTTF Director should be required to serve a minimum of two years, with potential

-23-

OAG015-1031
to extend this period of service with the advice of the proposed FTTTF Policy Advisory
Board.

11. Given the nature and importance of the FTTTF Director position, the FBI should ensure
careful succession planning that includes some overlap in service to avoid any leadership gaps
such as occurred recently. This will give new Directors a chance to learn
and become familiar with the FTTTF work and to be introduced to key DOJ, FBI and
interagency officials who interact with, and participate in, FTTTF.

12. The FTTTF charter should specify that the Deputy Director be a senior-level (GS-15 or
above) INS official who commits to a minimum two-year tenure (possibly extended with Board
approval) and who has direct access to the INS Commissioner and field units when
circumstances/information dictate immediate action by the INS. Similar to the Director
position, appropriate succession planning and overlap of tenure should occur. (Note: if the
intelligence/enforcement elements of INS are integrated into DHS, the team recommends that
DOJ/FBI work with DHS to continue having an FTTTF Deputy be assigned from there.)

13. The FBI and DOJ should confer on how best to hire a highly skilled, long-term senior
level CIO to oversee all information systems planning and development activities. This
person should have experience in developing major, large-scale, state-of-the-art systems for
the LE and Intel Communities. They should also understand how to overcome the challenges
of obtaining, controlling and sharing sensitive LE and intelligence information, and have
specialized experience in connecting disparate systems/data so that analysts can perform
needed functions at their desktops.

14. The FTTTF charter should articulate the general approach/broad criteria for interagency
participation at FTTTF. At a minimum, FTTTF, FBI and Department leaders should ensure
that the federal law enforcement, the Intelligence Community and the Department of State
continue to participate in order to meet the HSPD-2 mandates. The FTTTF Director and
Deputy also should develop and present to the Policy Board an interagency staffing plan
(including agencies that should be represented, the number and types of staff needed, and the
proposed duration of their details) to meet the FTTTF mission over the long-term.
Appropriate memoranda of understanding or interagency agreements should be developed to
effect appropriate participation.

15. The FTTTF should better articulate the skills sets needed from the candidate agency to
best complement its overall effort. To support this, FTTTF should upgrade/update its current
powerpoint briefing to present the FTTTF capabilities and potential participants. It should
accurately and clearly describe FTTTF's mission, role in the national context, structure,
accomplishments, capablities, future plans. This material should be flexible enough to be
easily updated and adapted for-use in multiple settings and for various audiences, including

-24-

OAG015-1032
1
policy makers, new employees, and potential participants. Such a tool would be very helpful
in getting the word out to others about F i l l * and achieving broader understanding of and
support for its activities.

16. The FTTTF Director should visit and meet regularly with executives from DOJ and non-
DO J participating agencies to ensure their satisfaction with their continuing role and product
out of FTTTF. The Director must participate in and perhaps develop other interagency fora
to foster communication and information sharing. Interagency relationships need to be
nurtured to ensure continued buy-in and participation of agencies that are key contributors.

Information Resources

17. Because of its close working relationship with CIFA/JCAG, the FTTTF should continue to
leverage the technical expertise of CIFA/JCAG for its current system development efforts
and future technology efforts wherever relevant in order to achieve economies of scale.

18. The FTTTF should establish an IT unit reporting to the proposed CIO (see
Recommendation 7), and hire into this unit permanent IT staff with technical expertise in the
areas of knowledge management, visualization tools, system security, telecommunications,
and relational databases. The permanent IT staff should be certified as COTRs.

19. The FTTTF should develop a long term plan for the acquisition of law enforcement,
intelligence, public source, and proprietary data for the data warehouse. Due to limited
resources, the FTTTF should also prioritize its data warehouse requirements.

20. The Department must ensure that adequate IT funding is provided to the FTTTF to
complete its system development efforts in a timely and cost-effective manner.

21. The major IT development efforts at the FTTTF that will be institutionalized should be
coordinated with the FBI's Enterprise Architecture Group to ensure compliance with the
overall FBI's Enterprise Architecture and IT standards as well as the Department's IT
standards.

22. The FTTTF needs to share their lessons learned and data mining techniques with other
DOJ components.

Administrative Management

23. FTTTF should have (or the FBI assign) an experienced Executive Officer or
Administrative Officer to oversee and coordinate activities of a small administrative unit (see
Recommendation 7) that would perform functions critical to sustaining FTTTF operations. -

-25- (*£-•! f- t
f *: f 1

OAG015-1033
Specifically, the unit should have three staff with expertise in personnel, budget/finance, and
procurement The head of this unit also would establish relationships and ensure liaison with
the FBI on other administrative matters to maximize potential economies using the existing
FBI infrastructure.

24. The FTTTF should have (or the FBI assign) a full-time human resources specialist to
support the FTTTF. This person would help the new Director ensure that current FTTTF staff
are assigned appropriate duties and that new staff/detailees have appropriate
background/skills to address the mission requirements and are placed appropriately within the
organization.

25. The human resources specialist should work closely with FTTTF managers to develop
position descriptions and performance standards and plans. He/she would also implement an
overall hiring plan/strategy for FTTTF that covers both permanent and rotational detailee
positions, and career ladders/succession planning. FBI and FTTTF managers should adopt
any available incentives to attract the highest quality recruitment candidates, for both its
permanent and detailee positions.

26. The FTTTF should have (or the FBI assign) a person to work full-time at the FTTTF on
budget/financial matters, considering the anticipated growth level of such activity. This
person would be responsible for FTTTF budget formulation and execution, as well as ongoing
financial planning and management related to FTTTF activities. This person also would be
directly involved in setting up any reimbursable agreements that might be necessary with
participating agencies for information or other services.

27. FTTTF should have (or FBI assign) a procurement specialist familiar with requirements
of major systems acquisitions (e.g., systems often encountered in IT/IC work) and put in place
suitable mechanisms to meet FTTTF's unique procurement requirements. The FBI should
ensure that FTTTF has available to it the necessary flexibility to meet these types of
requirements.

28. The FBI General Counsel should ensure that FTTTF receives its required level of
continuing legal counsel services, and assist in making a determination of which such services
should be provided on site.

-26-

OAG015-1034
APPENDIX - SAMPLE CHARTERS

-27-

OAG015-1035
of tijelitarneg
t. 18. (120530

Order No. 2059-96

NATIONAL DRUG INTELLIGENCE CENTER CHARTER

I. Mission Statement. Consistent with section 9078 of Pub. L. No. 102-396, this

order formally establishes within the Department" of Justice the National Drug Intelligence

Center (NDIC). NDIC's mission shall be to coordinate and consolidate strategic

organizational drug intelligence from national security and law enforcement agencies, in

order to produce requested assessments and analyses regarding the structure, membership,

finances, communication, transportation, logistics, and other activities of drug trafficking

organizations.

n. Organization. NDIC shall be organized as follows:

A. . Director. NDIC shall be headed by a Director, who shall be selected by, and

report directly to, the Deputy Attorney General and shall be a member of the Senior

Executive Service. The Director's responsibilities are described in paragraph ffl below.

B. -Executive Advisory Board (EAB). The EAB, which shall meet no less

frequently than twice each year, shall further refine NDIC's mission and ensure the

appropriate execution of that mission, including matters related to the security and privacy

aspects of information held and disseminated by NDIC. Membership in the EAB shall

include the heads, or their senior representatives, of law enforcement and intelligence

OAG015-1036
agencies that actively participate in NDIC's activities. Representatives of federal law

enforcement and intelligence agencies not participating in NDIC, and representatives of other

appropriate federal entities, may also be invited to attend EAB meetings.

C. Intelligence Priorities Board (IPS). The IPB, which shall meet at least

quarterly, shall assist the Director in the prioritization of NDIC's activities, provide agency

dissemination approval, and serve as a forum to resolve problems that may arise during the

data gathering and analysis activities of NDIC. The IPB shall adhere to the procedures for

initiating and accomplishing IPB projects, as approved by the EPB on August 15, 1995.

D. Senior Management. Senior management positions within NDIC shall be

•established in grades consistent with the responsibilities associated with such positions and

shall be filled by NDIC or detailed personnel, as appropriate. Assignment of detailees tov

senior management positions shall take account of all relevant factors, which may include

such matters as individual experience in law enforcement and intelligence analysis, seniority,

and appropriate representation of agencies participating in NDIC.

E. NDIC Employees. NDIC shall consist of personnel directly assigned to

NDIC, personnel detailed from the federal law enforcement and intelligence agencies

participating in NDIC's efforts, and personnel detailed from the Department of Defense or

other federal agencies for purposes of technical or other support

HI. Responsibilities of the Director. The Director of NDIC shall be responsible for

the following:

A. The Director shall report to the Deputy Attorney General, at least on a

monthly basis, concerning NDIC's activities.

- 2 -

OAG015-1037
B. The Director shall report to the EAB regarding the significant activities and

accomplishments of NDIC, and the current and projected assignments and projects of NDIC.

C. Consistent with the provisions of paragraph LLC above, in consultation with

the EAB, and subject to the approval of the Deputy Attorney General, the Director shall

establish the organizational structure of the IPB.

D. Consistent with the provisions of paragraphs n.D and n.E above, in

consultation with the EAB, and subject to the approval of the Deputy Attorney General, the

Director shall establish the organizational structure of NDIC.

IV. Agreements with Non-Department 6f Justice Agencies. In conjunction With the

heads, or their senior representatives, of all non-Department of Justice federal law

enforcement and intelligence agencies that maintain intelligence on drug trafficking, NDIC

shall determine the assistance that such agencies can provide NDIC in maximizing the

accomplishment of its mission. Such assistance may include, but not be limited to, making

available to NDIC, on appropriate terms and conditions, data, data systems, personnel, and

other support. Based on such determinations, NDIC and these other agencies shall determine

whether it is appropriate to enter into a Memorandum of Understanding, or other appropriate

documentation, to facilitate the fullest appropriate participation of such agencies in the work

of NDIC.

V. Document Exploitation OX)CE?O. NDIC shall maintain the personnel and

technical resources to provide timely support to federal drug law enforcement authorities to

conduct DOCEX of materials seized in domestic law enforcement actions. NDIC shall also

OAG015-1038
seek to maximize compatibility of its DOCEX products with appropriate database and

exploitation programs of other federal entities.

VI. National Drug Intelligence Library (NDID. NDIC shall maintain the -personnel

and technical resources to manage the NDIL, an electronic collection of drug intelligence

documents not classified beyond the "Law Enforcement Sensitive" level from participating

agencies and from open sources that are readily accessible to the public. NDIC shall

disseminate a catalogue of information in the NDIL to federal law enforcement and

intelligence authorities.

VII. Protection of Sensitive Information... The Director, EAB, IPB, and ail NDIC

management and employees shall meet established requirements for the appropriate handling,

protection, and dissemination of sensitive information, including, but not limited to,

information subject to classification for reasons of national security, information subject to

protection for reasons of law enforcement sensitivity, and information subject to protection

for reasons of personal privacy. NDIC shall not disseminate information provided by

participating agencies to any other agency, and participating agencies shall not disseminate

information provided by NDIC, without respective approval from the agency originating the

information.

Date
nn Janet Reno
Attorney General

- 4 -

OAG015-1039
EPIC C H A R T E R (REVISED)

U.S. D E P A R T M E N T OF J U S T I C E

DRUG E N F O R C E M E N T A D M I N I S T R A T I O N

EL PASO INTELLIGENCE CENTER

EL PASO, TEXAS

PARTICIPATING AGENCIES:

Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco & Firearms

U.S. Coast Guard

U.S. Customs Service

Drug Enforcement Administration

Federal Aviation Administration

Federal Bureau of Investigation

Immigration & Naturalization Service

Internal Revenue Service

U.S. Marshals Service

U.S. Secret Service

EPIC CHARTER NOVEMBER;198J

OAG015-1040
H I S T O R I C A L BACKGROUND

M a r c h 4, 1974, in response to a request from the O f f i c e of


anagement and Budget ( O M B ) , the D e p a r t m e n t of Justice
b m i t t e d to OMB a paper e n t i t l e d , "A Secure Border: An
A n a l y s i s of Issues A f f e c t i n g the U.S. D e p a r t m e n t of J u s t i c e . "
Biis paper d e t a i l e d c u r r e n t narcotics and b o r d e r
e n f o r c e n e n t strategy and p r o g r a m s , made recommendations for
improved operational posture, and proposed changes in
Tegislation to augment the recommendations. Recommendation
Jg of this paper suggested the establishment and direction
of a Southwest Border Intelligence Service Center by the
_ Enforcement Administration (DEA) to be s t a f f e d by
representatives of I m m i g r a t i o n & N a t u r a l i z a t i o n Service
BNS), DEA and Customs ( U S C S ) . As a r e s u l t of subsequent
consultation, the El Paso Intelligence Center (EPIC) was
eated. A representative of DEA was selected as Director
of E P I C and a representative of INS Border Patrol was
lected as Deputy D i r e c t o r .
nee the creation of EPIC, it has developed into a fully
functioning, coordinated intelligence facility supported by
Aie respective data bases of the participating agencies.
Drug Enforcement Administration, Immigration & Naturalization
Hervice, U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Customs, Bureau of Alcohol,
obacco & Firearms, Federal Aviation Administration, U.S.
rshals Service, Internal Revenue Service, Federal Bureau
f Investigation, and U.S. Secret Service have become
4 articipating member agencies of the Center. The National
Intelligence Officer for Narcotics also participates on the
PIC Advisory Board. Consistent with national policy'of
Incouraging the participation of all possible law enforcenent
ssets in combating the international and domestic traffic
In narcotics, participating and associate memberships with
PIC have been made available to Federal, state and local
nforceaent organizations under guidelines established by
he EPIC Advisory Board.
..e historical orientation of the Intelligence Center was
ocused on the Mexican border with the primary priority
igainst traffickers of Hexican heroin and illegal aliens,
he utilization by traffickers of medium and long range
ircraft as well as seagoing vessels has extended the focus
f EPIC beyond the Hexican border area and has made it
orld-wide in scope. In addition DEA, mandated to support
tate and local enforcement elements with narcotics
ntelligence, and with the concurrence of the EPIC Advisory
card, established EPIC as a means to improve intelligence
fupport to the state and local elements. By 1985 all 50
tates, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and Guam had
ntered into agreements with EPIC.

PIC CHARTER (2) NOVEMBER 1987

OAG015-1041
MISSION OF EPIC

The p r i m a r y mission of E P I C is to p r o v i d e a c o m p l e t e and
a c c u r a t e intelligence p i c t u r e of drug m o v e m e n t by land, sea,
and air t h r o u g h o u t the w o r l d . Major e m p h a s i s is focused on
t r a f f i c k i n g organizations whose narcotics and illegal aliens
are d e s t i n e d for the United States. Direct tactical
intelligence support is p r o v i d e d to p a r t i c i p a t i n g agencies.
The EPIC mission is accomplished by the accumulation of raw
intelligence, analysis of data and the provision of tactical
and operational intelligence to agencies having direct or
related statutory law enforcement responsibilities. In the
process of the analysis of raw data from participating and
associated agencies, trafficking organizations Mill be
identified, intelligence gaps will be filled, and analytical
reports w i l l be prepared and disseminated.
A. T A C T I C A L SUPPORT - The support by EPIC to operational
elements of participating and associated agencies is through
"real-time" response to queries of field agents of the
respective agencies supported by EPIC using the data bases
available to it (DEA M-204, TECS, etc.). EPIC also provides
special purpose tactical intelligence support such as name,
vehicle, vessel, and aircraft lookouts for narcotics
interdiction purposes. EPIC is an intelligence support
activity with a sophisticated communications capability to
accommodate its basic mission requirements. A users guide
describing EPIC support and procedures for support has been
prepared and will be periodically updated.

B. OPERATIONAL/STRATEGIC SUPPORT - EPIC possesses the


capability to perform operational and strategic intelligence
analysis using EPIC Watch activity and EPIC data bases. The
EPIC Advisory Board will periodically review EPIC analysis
activity, priorities, and products disseminated, etc., to
ensure maximum responsiveness of EPIC support. Requirements
for EPIC products may be identified by EPIC management and
member agencies.

C. PARTICIPATING AGENCY SUPPORT - It shall be the policy


of EPIC to provide continuing narcotics intelligence and
related support to participating agencies to which EPIC can
make a contribution--such as support to interdiction and
alien smuggling prevention.-. A '"participating agency" la •« m
defined as a Federal a gene/ directly supporting the national Jl|
effort in the coordinated narcotics intelligence process
within the El Paso Intelligence Center by furnishing
intelligence and related resources to the Center. EPIC can
also make a unique contribution to special projects. If the

EPIC CHARTER (3) NOVEMBER 1987!

OAG015-1042
EPIC support is significant (magnitude, resources, policy,
e t c . ) , the Special Agent in C h a r g e of E P I C or the r e q u e s t i n g
agency will refer the request to the EPIC Advisory Board for
coordination and approval.

D. A S S O C I A T E D AGENCY S U P P O R T - It s h a l l be the p o l i c y of
E P I C to p r o v i d e t a c t i c a l and o p e r a t i o n a l narcotics intelligence
to s u p p o r t f o r e i g n , s t a t e , and local p o l i c e agencies in
t h e i r e f f o r t s against t r a f f i c k e r s at all levels. An
"associated agency" is defined as a F e d e r a l , s t a t e or local
criminal j u s t i c e agency d i r e c t l y or i n d i r e c t l y involved in
narcotics or criminal investigation and enforcement, not
h a v i n g r e p r e s e n t a t i o n in the C e n t e r , a s s i s t i n g the narcotic
intelligence mission through the i n t e r c h a n g e of intelligence,
c o n s u l t a t i o n , and c o o r d i n a t e d o p e r a t i o n a l support. Support
to associated agencies w i l l be c o n s i s t e n t w i t h guidelines
established by the EPIC Advisory Board.

A D V I S O R Y BOARD

The EPIC A d v i s o r y Board is established to p r o v i d e direction


to EPIC and to coordinate participating agency requirements.
The Board will establish goals, priorities, and requirements
and will develop and implement national policy for mutually
e f f e c t i v e operation of the Center.
The Chairman of the Board shall be DCA's Deputy Assistant
Administrator for Intelligence. Each participating member
agency shall have one Board member appointed by the head of
that agency, and authorized to make policy and management
decisions on behalf of that agency. At the invitation of
the Chairman, Board meeting attendance will be broadened on
an ad hoc basis to ensure full coordination of Federal
activity in narcotics intelligence. Interagency agreements
between p a r t i c i p a t i n g agencies that affect EPIC will be
I reviewed and coordinated by the Advisory Board. Additional
'responsibilities of the Board shall be to provide guidelines it
dr
I for the u t i l i z a t i o n of various data bases consistent with
' the provisions of the Privacy Act. The Board shall also
I ensure that member agencies' participation in the Center is
supported in their respective budget and planning activities*'
' T o effect periodic evaluation of ongoing EPIC activities,
I the Board will meet at least semi-annually. Furthermore, an
annual EPIC .report will be prepared and forwarded to the
iheads of all participating agencies for appropriate review.
|Any revisions to the EPIC Charter are to be reviewed by the
Advisory Board and passed on to participating agencies for
I r a t i f i c a t i o n . w i t h an Advisory Board .recommendation.

EPIC CHARTER NOVEMBER 1987

iii
OAG015-1043
EPIC MANAGEMENT

The El Paso Intelligence Center is managed by a Special


Agent in Charge (SAC) assigned from DEA and appointed by the
Administrator of OCA.
The Assistant Special Agent in Charge (ASAC) position will
be filled on a rotating basis by U.S. Customs, U.S.
Immigration & Naturalization Service, and U.S Coast Guard,
The ASAC position will be filled for an original three-year
term with an additional option year upon agreement by the
SAC and the respective parent agency. Extensions beyond
four years must be approved by a majority vote of the EPIC
Advisory Board. Should the ASAC position be vacated for any
reason prior to the end of the original terms, it shall be
filled by the next agency in rotation.

The Chief, Watch Operations; the Chief, Analysis; and the


Chief, Program Development are designated as EPIC management
positions and will be filled by participating EPIC agencies.
As vacancies occur in these positions they will be filled by
interested agencies subject to approval by the Advisory
Board which will determine an equitable management presence
commensurate with existing EPIC resource commitments. These
positions shall be filled on a three-year rotation basis
with an additional option year upon agreement between the
SAC and the respective parent agency. Any extensions beyond
four years must be approved by the EPIC Advisory Board.

All personnel assigned to the EPIC Watch A c t i v i t y will be


under the supervision of the Chief, Operations, regardless
of their agency affiliation. When not directly working the
Watch, officers may be assigned to special projects by their
respective agency program coordinators.
All personnel assigned to the EPIC Intelligence Analysis
activity will be under the supervision of the Chief,
Analysis, regardless of agency affiliation. The Chief will
supervise and review preparation and finalization of
analytical products.
EPIC supervisory personnel, regardless of parent organization,
will exercise complete technical and functional supervision
over all personnel including the authority to release raw
intelligence information and intelligence products.
Performance appraisals will be prepared by the first-line
EPIC supervisor in coordination with the appropriate agency
program coordinator.

EPIC CHARTER (5) NOVEMBER 1967

lid

OAG015-1044
PROGRAM C O O R D I N A T O R S

Program Coordinators are Senior Representatives assigned by


the heads of participating agenc.ies. They will assure that
their respective agencies are properly represented within
EPIC and that their mission objectives are being fully
supported by EPIC and are consistent with EPIC's mission.
They will be responsible for maintaining direct liaison with
both their headquarters and operational field elements.
Supervisory responsibility over their parent agency employees is
limited to personnel administrative areas (discipline, grievance,
etc.). They will consult with the SAC, A S A C , and Chiefs as
appropriate on policy, plans, and program areas. Program
Coordinators are not considered part of the functional management
of EPIC. All products prepared by Program Coordinators and
developed utilizing the EPIC data bases will be reviewed and
approved by EPIC Management prior to dissemination. All ..'Jj!
J.l!$
correspondence relating to the management of EPIC will be
forwarded through EPIC management for review and comment.

EPIC CHARTER (&) ' ; NOVEMBER 1987

OAG015-1045
ephen E. Higgins (Date) William S. S e s s i o n s ( D a t e }
mmissioner Director -.
reau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Federal Bureau of Investigation
Firearms

ml A. Yost, Jr. (Date) Alan C. N e l s o n ( D a t e )


miral Commissioner
«=*
ited States Coast Guard
mreandant
I m m i g r a t i o n and N a t u r a l i z a t i o n
Service

liam v o n R a a b ( D a t e ) Lawrence B. Gibbs (Date)


mnissioner Commissioner
nited States Customs Service Internal Revenue Service

n C.L a w n ( D a t e ) Stanley E. Morris (Date)


•inistrator Director
ug Enforcement Administration United States Marshals Service

Allan HcArtor (Date) John R . S i m p s o n : ( D a t e )


ministretor Director
Federal Aviatfon Administration United States Secret Service

1C CHARTER (7) NOVEMBER 1987

OAG015-1046
General Counleidnig Intelligence Plan (GC1P) February 2000

Section A:
National Counterdrug Intelligence Coordination

Introduction

The central theme confronted in the White House Task Force (WHTF) Review was the
need for clear, consistent intercommunity and interagency coordination of the
counterdrug intelligence effort. A concern most often echoed was, "No one is in charge."
The Review established that it was neither possible nor appropriate for any one person or
component to be "in charge" in a monolithic coordinating body. The law enforcement
and intelligence communities each have very distinct and legitimate legal and operational
authorities that must be preserved in the joint management of counterdrug investigative
and intelligence activities.

What is possible and appropriate, however, is the establishment of a strengthened inter-


component coordinating mechanism that fosters and facilitates both greater information
sharing and operational coordination between the law enforcement and intelligence
counterdrug communities. This mechanism recognizes and optimizes the capabilities,
equities, and authorities of all Federal departments engaged in this effort, and also
strengthens the important counterdrug partnership among the Federal, state, and local law
enforcement communities.

The coordinating structure defined below forms the core of a three-tiered coordination
mechanism designed to specifically meet the above objectives. The centerpiece of this
collaborative coordinating structure is the new Counterdrug Intelligence Coordinating
Group (CDICG), with its supporting staff, the Counterdrug Intelligence Executive
Secretariat (CDX). The CDICG will draw its policy guidance from the President's
Council on Counter-Narcotics and from the five goals and supporting objectives of the
National Drug Control Strategy and derives its ability to resolve issues through the
authorities and prerogatives of its respective members from the law enforcement and
intelligence communities. x

National Counterdrug Intelligence Coordination


*> •

I. PURPOSE. The coordinating structure for carrying out the functions and for
implementing the recommendations contained in this General Counterdrug Intelligence
Plan (GCIP) is set forth below. This structure is intended to maximize timely
information sharing, intelligence exchange, and operational coordination—fully within
statutory limitations—among the poljcymaking, military, law enforcement, and
Intelligence Community components that collectively make up our national counterdrug
intelligence architecture. The new architecture will build on the important progress that
has been made over the past decade, and provide a framework that promotes even further

19

OAG015-1047
General Counlerdrug Intelligence Plan (GC1P) February 2000

counterdrug intelligence coordination and information flow, at the Federal, state, and
local levels, in the 21st Century.

II. THE PRESIDENT'S COUNCIL ON COUNTER-NARCOTICS.

The Council, originally established by Executive Order, was given statutory authorization
under section 709 of the Office of National Drug Control Policy Reauthorization Act of
1998 (21 U.S.C. 1708). With the Director of ONDCP serving as Executive Director, this
cabinet-level Council advises and assists the President in providing direction and
oversight for the National Drug Control Strategy, and in ensuring coordination among
departments and agencies of the Federal Government concerning implementation of the
National Drug Control Strategy. Consistent with those responsibilities, the Council shall
serve as the preeminent body for providing oversight on all issues relating to drug
intelligence policy. There is established within the Council an eight-member body (the
Attorney General, the Director of Central Intelligence, the Director of ONDCP, the
Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of Transportation, the
Secretary of State, and the Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs) known
as the Counterdrug Intelligence Executive Committee, whose purpose is to provide a
focal point for all counterdrug intelligence policy issues within the PCCN. Other PCCN
members may attend meetings of this Executive Committee as appropriate to the issues
under consideration. Through existing counternarcotics fora noted in Section III, below,
and subordinate bodies prescribed in Sections IV and V, below, the Council will monitor
implementation of the GCIP, and, more particularly, it will oversee the development and
dissemination of law enforcement and intelligence requirements to meet the goals and
objectives of the National Drug Control Strategy.

III. COUNTERDRUG INTERAGENCY POLICY AND PROGRAM


COORDINATION.

The interdepartmental bodies listed below meet to identify and coordinate counterdrug
issues. Each focuses on a distinct area of the counterdrug arena, described below, and
may provide input into the CDICG or CDX, as appropriate. While the Counter-Narcotics
Interagency Working Group deals exclusively with policy guidance issues, the remaining
entities deal primarily with operational and programmatic issues.

A. The Counter-Narcotics Interagency Working Group (CN-IWG), chaired by


ONDCP, is the principal interagency, senior working-level forum for coordinating
policy guidance related to counterdrug issues. As described below, it is also a
principal forum for identifying counterdrug intelligence-related requirements and
taskings that may cross jurisdictional lines or involve multiple components within
the Federal law enforcement community and the Intelligence Community.

B. The Southern Frontiers Committee is chaired by the Attorney General and


provides operational focus and direction to law enforcement organizations

20

OAG015-1048
General Countadnig Intelligence Plan (GCIP) February 2000

regarding operations along the Southwest Border and the Caribbean and the Gulf
of Mexico.

C. The Interdiction Committee (TIC), which is currently chaired by the


Commissioner, U.S. Customs Service, provides advice to the U.S. Interdiction
Coordinator (USIC) in support of his role of overseeing the adequacy and
optimum use of Federal interdiction assets. Additionally, the TIC provides a
forum for coordination and optimization of border interdiction and promotes
seamless and effective integration of interdiction efforts in support of the National
Drug Control Strategy.

D. The J-3/USIC Quarterly Counterdrug Conference, which is co-chaired by the


Department of Defense Joint Staff Director for Operations and the U.S.
Interdiction Coordinator, promotes coordination between military counterdrug
support efforts and the needs of interdiction organizations.

E. The Committee on Narcotics Intelligence Issues (CNII) is chaired by the


Director, DCI Crime and Narcotics Center, and promotes counterdrug
coordination within the Intelligence Community.

Whenever these or other Federal counterdrug-related interagency committees and


working groups identify counterdrug intelligence-related issues, requirements, or taskings
that are cross-jurisdictional,' such matters may be referred to the CDICG, described in
Section IV, below, for attention and necessary action. Matters that cannot be resolved by
the CDICG will be referred to the Council.

FV. COUNTERDRUG INTELLIGENCE COORDINATING GROUP.

A. ESTABLISHMENT. There is established under the Council an interagency


group known as the Counterdrug Intelligence Coordinating Group, or CDICG.

B. MEMBERSHIP.
1. COMPOSITION. The CDICG shall be composed of 13 members, of
whom:
a. 1 will be designated by the DCI;
b. 1 will be designated by the Attorney General;
c. 1 will be desighated by the Secretary of the Treasury;
d. 1 will be designated by the Secretary of Transportation;
e. 1 will be designated by the Director of ONDCP;
f. 1 will be designated by the Secretary of Defense;
g. 1 will be designated by the Secretary of State;

s/Vs used here and elsewhere in the GCIP, the term "cross-jurisdictional" refers (o counterdrug intelligence issues that -
affect or involve both the law enforcement community and the Intelligence Community, or, within the law enforcement
community, that affect or involve more than one department, or that affect both the U.S. Government and state and/or
local officials.

21 •I*
i!

OAG015-1049
General Countcrdmg Intelligence Plan (GCIP) February 2000

h. 1 will be designated by the Assistant to the President for National


Security Affairs;
i. 1 will be designated by the Administrator of the Drug Enforcement
Administration;
j. 1 will be designated by the Director of the Federal Bureau of
Investigation;
k. 1 will be designated by the Commissioner of the United States
Customs Service;
1. 1 will be designated by the Commissioner of the Internal Revenue
Service; and,
m. 1 will be designated by the Commandant of the United States Coast
Guard.

2. LEADERSHIP. The CDICG shall be led by co-chairs from the


Intelligence Community and from the Federal law enforcement community.
The Intelligence Community co-chair will be the member designated by the
DCI. The law enforcement co-chair will be designated from among other
members of the CDICG by mutual agreement of the Attorney General, the
Secretary of the Treasury, and the Secretary of Transportation. Co-chair
designations will be made in consultation with the Director of ONDCP.

3. OTHER ATTENDEES. With the concurrence of the co-chairs, individual


members may invite other officials, representing the major counterdrug
intelligence centers and components of the participating departments and
agencies, to attend meetings or participate in CDICG deliberations as
appropriate to the issues under consideration. In particular, the Deputy
Director for State and Local Affairs/ONDCP may attend meetings of the
CDICG to discuss counterdrug intelligence issues that concern state and local
officials. With the concurrence of the co-chairs, said Deputy Director may
invite no more than two state and/or local law enforcement representatives to
attend appropriate CDICG deliberations.

C. FUNCTIONS. The CDICG, in support of the Council or its individual


members, will, among other things:

1. Ensure coordination among departments and agencies of the Federal


Government responsible for conducting intelligence programs that support the
National Drug Control Strategy;

2. Receive policy guidance and taskings from the Council; additional issues
for CDICG consideration may be received from other fora as described in
Section III or may be raised by individual members of the CDICG. The
CDICG will refer to the Council those issues that it cannot resolve;

22

OAG015-1050
'i 'Mr* i'tri-M" 'iff -frf"^i

General Counterdnig Intelligence Plan (GC1P) February 2000

3. Receive and recommend to appropriate CDICG members domestic and


foreign drug intelligence taskings and requirements in support of national
counterdrug policymakers;

4. Provide a forum to resolve or refer for adjudication those cross-


jurisdictional counterdrug intelligence issues that cannot be resolved at a
lower level;

5. Study and advocate enhancements to promote the effectiveness and


efficiency of both foreign and domestic counterdrug programs and activities,
including the adequacy of intelligence services;

6. Commission national and regional drug threat assessments and studies as


requested by senior policymakers;

7. Promote improvements to counterdrug intelligence centers and activities to


strengthen mission focus, reduce functional overlap, and promote joint
analytic products;

8. Assume the functions heretofore performed by the National Drug


Intelligence Center (NDIC) Executive Advisory Board, the ND1C Intelligence
Priorities Board; and the El Paso Intelligence Center (EPIC) Advisory Board;

9. Use the Counterdrug Intelligence Executive Secretariat (CDX) (described


in Section V, below) to carry out the functions of the CDICG under this
section, and other taskings, as appropriate; and,

10. Submit a semiannual written report concerning drug intelligence issues


and recommendations to the Council.

D. AUTHORITY. The CDICG derives its ability to resolve issues through the
authorities and prerogatives of its respective members.

V. COUNTERDRUG INTELLIGENCE EXECUTIVE SECRETARIAT.

A. ESTABLISHMENT. In order to improve the overall effectiveness of


counterdrug intelligence, there is established a full-time interagency staff known
as the Counterdrug Intelligence Executive Secretariat, or CDX, which shall
operate directly under the CDICG.

B. CDX DIRECTOR AND CDX DEPUTY DIRECTOR.

1. CDX DIRECTOR. There shall be a CDX Director, who will be ^«^. „.


responsible for carrying out the functions of the CDX. The CDX Director' .
shall be designated by mutual agreement among the

23

OAG015-1051
General Counlcrdrug Intelligence Plan (GCIP) February 2000

Secretary of the Treasury, and the Secretary of Transportation, in consultation


with the Director of ONDCP, for a renewable term of two years. The CDX
Director will fill an SES position.

2. CDX DEPUTY DIRECTOR. There shall be a CDX Deputy Director, who


will assist the CDX Director in carrying out the functions of the CDX. The
CDX Deputy Director shall be designated by the DCI, in consultation with the
Director of ONDCP, for a renewable term of two years. The CDX Deputy
Director will fill an SES or SIS position.
4

C. CDX STAFF. The CDX staff shall be initially composed of approximately 30


personnel—selected by the CDX Director from departmental nominees—on two-
to three-year details, and such additional detailees as needed to fill an executive
officer, legal advisor, and other administrative support positions. Within one
year, and annually thereafter, the CDICG will review CDX staffing to decide if
the CDX needs a mix of detailees and permanent appropriated staff positions. The
CDX staff shall be organized to address:

1. Foreign drug information and intelligence;


2. Domestic drug information and intelligence;
3. Information systems and technology; and,
4. Analyst career professionalization, education, and training.

D. FUNCTIONS. The CDX shall primarily provide staff support to the CDICG,
and shall act for the CDICG, as appropriate, in monitoring the implementation of
the GCIP; coordinating the implementation of multiagency, cross-jurisdictional
counterdrug intelligence taskings and requirements levied by or through the
CDICG; and promoting resolution of cross-jurisdictional counterdrug
intelligence-related issues. In so doing, the CDX shall, among other things:

1. Promote stronger information flow, information sharing, and fusion


relationships among Federal, state, and local agencies, between U.S. law
enforcement agencies and the Intelligence Community, and with foreign
nations or international organizations;

2. Promote development of technology standards and interoperable


information systems, and monitor implementation of and report on
information technology and communications plans;

3. Promote improved drug intelligence career professionalization, education,


and training throughout the intelligence and law enforcement communities;

4. Receive cross-jurisdictional counterdrug intelligence issues from multiple


sources, review and analyze the issues, and prepare appropriate staff studies
with recommendations for resolution;

24

OAG015-1052
General Countcrdrog Intelligence Plan (GCIP) February 2000

5. Promote improved mechanisms for counterdrug intelligence exchange


with foreign nations and international organizations;

6. Attempt to resolve issues and disputes at the lowest practical


organizational level; and,

7. Draft reports and recommendations, as appropriate, including a


semiannual, written report addressing issues raised and recommendations
made over the past six months, to the CDICG for review and submission to
the Council.

Recommendations by the CDX shall take care to protect and preserve the safeguards
between U.S. law enforcement and the Intelligence Community, shall be advisory and
non-binding, and may be formally and informally disputed by the applicable departments
or agencies.

E. ADMINISTRATION.
1. EVALUATIONS. The co-chairs of the CDICG shall evaluate the annual
performance of the CDX Director and CDX Deputy Director. Other CDX
personnel shall be evaluated within the CDX. Evaluations shall be provided
to the detailing agencies.

2. COOPERATION FROM OTHER AGENCIES. The CDX will receive


from each department and agency of the Executive Branch:
a. Access to the information it requires to fulfill its mission, with
applicable safeguards for protection of sources and methods;'
b. Cooperation in carrying- out the functions of the CDX; and,
c. Such assistance, information, and advice as the CDX may request, to
the extent permitted by law.

3. SUPPORT AND PLACEMENT. CDX will be administratively supported


by the Department of Justice, housed in Justice-owned or -leased non-
headquarters space in the Washington metropolitan area, and funded by
ONDCP, as prescribed below. ONDCP will, through the Office of
Management and-Budget (OMB) and the Office of Personnel Management
(OPM), assist parent agencies in obtaining and maintaining temporary SES
and SIS billets-for QDX.

F. FUNDING. The CDX shall be funded as a line item through the ONDCP
budget per fund availability. These funds shall be used to reimburse the Justice
Department for expenses associated with CDICG and CDX operating, travel,
administrative, supply, security, and support services, and those agencies that
provide administrative support detailees or services. Additionally, if any funds

'Disputes regarding CDX access to information should be referred 1o the head of the department or agency concerned
for resolution.

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General Counterdfug Intelligence Plan (CCIP) February 2000

remain after reimbursing the Justice Department, these funds will be used to
reimburse departments and agencies from which other detailees are assigned.

G. NOTE. The functions and responsibilities of the CDX will not derogate or
supersede the statutory roles, responsibilities, or authorities of participating
Executive Departments and Agencies.

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